Page 20

tea chin g str ateg ies for the conte m porary cl assroom

So, to teach about syllables we need first to be sure that we understand what they are ourselves; then we need to put that information across in the best way to suit the age and stage of the students. This will require a full explanation of the definition, which can be done with practical demonstrations such as clapping, or feeling when the jaw drops for the utterance of the vowel. Rule 1: Know your definition or at least have a good dictionary handy so you can check. Rule 2: Remember to give your definition (as the dictionary does) in the same part of speech as the word being defined. Rule 3: Keep the definition as simple as possible while maintaining all aspects essential to accuracy. Rule 4: Discuss with examples to increase understanding and application. Rule 5: Take note of words with two or more meanings, but the same spelling (homonyms) such as chest, bulb. Rule 6: Practise! And use the words in both oral and written sentences.

Animating teaching strategies for all learning styles Often the mistake is made of assuming that what seems to be a purely academic subject such as grammar can be taught only in a dry unimaginative way. But this is far from true. Awareness of the need for more active involvement in learning has come about with the greater understanding of how the brain works, and the accompanying recognition that people vary considerably in their learning modes. In addition, the importance of teaching to the whole brain through multisensory activities cannot be over-emphasised. We know then that people learn in a variety of ways. Even within one family we often see that what works with one child may be useless for another. One may learn to read just by looking at letters or matching words and pictures; a more auditory child will absorb information principally by listening and repetition;



Grammar for Everyone  

Grammar for Everyone

Grammar for Everyone  

Grammar for Everyone

Advertisement