Page 40

Nicole Peltier Hall is the owner of the Yoga Room, where she hosts Raven Yoga, a class designed to address the needs of people in recovery.

IT TAKES PRACTICE INCORPORATING YOGA INTO TRADITIONAL ADDICTION RECOVERY HAS SEEN LOCAL SUCCESS. BY KIM BROWN

F

or those working to overcome addiction, yoga can be a refreshing and powerful way to reconnect and focus. Yoga for Recovery classes are available at some Tulsa-area nonprofits, a few treatment centers and even traditional yoga studios. Many treatment centers and social service providers have embraced this practice by including yoga and mindfulness classes alongside traditional substance abuse treatment programs. Specialized training for yoga instructors — which can range from $1,000 to $1,200 per session per instructor — is supported by local philanthropic agencies such as the Hardesty Family Foundation, which has grant-funded these programs for nearly three years. “I’ve been practicing yoga for 20 years, and there is empirical evidence that it lowers stress and anxiety, helps with depression and gives people an overall sense of well-being, which are major drivers when dealing with recovery, domestic abuse or post-traumatic stress disorder,” says Michelle Hardesty, executive director of the Hardesty Family Foundation. “What yoga teaches you is that when you’re on your mat, what happens and how you react is the same way you can approach situations when you’re off the mat. You can learn those behaviors and take them out into the real world.”

38

TulsaPeople APRIL 2018

TulsaPeople April 2018  
TulsaPeople April 2018