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ISSUE 3/MAY 2013

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Editor-in-Chief: Tulika Sud Creative Director: Tulika Sud Editorial Design: Tulika Sud Photography: Krunal Palande, Prashun Thipaiah, Sia Krishna, Tulika Sud Illustration: Tulika Sud Writers: Ankit Wal, Satyen Rao, Tulika Sud Featured: Geeta Chaddha Fonts: Adobe Caslon Pro & Myriad Pro School of Art, Design & Media, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Š The authors and artists, 2013 No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written consent from the author. ISSN 2748534982

Thanks to Danne Ojeda for her untiring assistance in the development of this magazine. Enquiries can be sent to tulika.sud@gmail.com

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EDITORIAL Welcome back to passage. If you have been with us through our previous journeys you’re already aware of the significance and mission of our magazine. If not, keep reading and you’ll be sure to be back here with us next month too!

Ankit Wal as he discusses his experiences growing up with a working mother and now a working older sister. He’ll be sure to change your opinion about the role of women in Indian society today with his views and stories.

passage is about India, to put it simply. We take the untaken route of breaking existing stereotypes rather than simply adding on to them the way every form of media today seems to.

In the area of the arts, Geeta Chaddha shares her work as an Indian artist living abroad using various media. Take a look at some of her beautiful watercolours and her traditional Mysore paintings.

This month, as always, we have an exciting series of articles and images collected for you. The photoessay in this issue features wildlife with a special focus on snakes by photographer Prashun Thipaiah taken around India. More rich imagery follows in the visual collection, with a wide range of settings for you to absorb. Experience India through our pages with these photographs.

The spotlight this month is on geography, an often confused topic given the size of the Indian subcontinent. Use the infographic we created to gather the basics.

This issue features more interviews to give you the personal side of things. Hear from

The passage experience can be more than just reading. Try out the recipes that we have chosen for you this month. Serve them at a dinner party or just enjoy them with your family one weeknight and share the essence of passage and India itself. Be sure to find us again next month!

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Editor-in-Chief: Tulika Sud Creative Director: Tulika Sud Editorial Design: Tulika Sud Photography: Krunal Palande, Prashun Thipaiah, Sia Krishna, Tulika Sud Illustration: Tulika Sud Writers: Ankit Wal, Satyen Rao, Tulika Sud Featured: Geeta Chaddha Fonts: Adobe Caslon Pro & Myriad Pro School of Art, Design & Media, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. Š The authors and artists, 2013 No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written consent from the author. ISSN 2748534982

Thanks to Danne Ojeda for her untiring assistance in the development of this magazine. Enquiries can be sent to tulika.sud@gmail.com

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EDITORIAL Welcome back to passage. If you have been with us through our previous journeys you’re already aware of the significance and mission of our magazine. If not, keep reading and you’ll be sure to be back here with us next month too!

Ankit Wal as he discusses his experiences growing up with a working mother and now a working older sister. He’ll be sure to change your opinion about the role of women in Indian society today with his views and stories.

passage is about India, to put it simply. We take the untaken route of breaking existing stereotypes rather than simply adding on to them the way every form of media today seems to.

In the area of the arts, Geeta Chaddha shares her work as an Indian artist living abroad using various media. Take a look at some of her beautiful watercolours and her traditional Mysore paintings.

This month, as always, we have an exciting series of articles and images collected for you. The photoessay in this issue features wildlife with a special focus on snakes by photographer Prashun Thipaiah taken around India. More rich imagery follows in the visual collection, with a wide range of settings for you to absorb. Experience India through our pages with these photographs.

The spotlight this month is on geography, an often confused topic given the size of the Indian subcontinent. Use the infographic we created to gather the basics.

This issue features more interviews to give you the personal side of things. Hear from

The passage experience can be more than just reading. Try out the recipes that we have chosen for you this month. Serve them at a dinner party or just enjoy them with your family one weeknight and share the essence of passage and India itself. Be sure to find us again next month!

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CONTENTS 06 12 24 06

PERSONALLY SPEAKING With Ankit Wal as he describes his thoughts and experiences on growing up with a working mother and sister in contemporary India.

PHOTOESSAY Wildlife is the theme for this month’s photoessay, featuring breathtaking images of wildlife taken at various locations in India by Prashun Thipaiah.

OPINIONS Little India determines what it is that is so attractive about the concept of Little India that leads to its’ emergence in cities all around the world.


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KITCHEN EXPERIMENTS Aloo Gobi, Palak Mushroom Curry and Doodh Peda are on the menu as we bring you new recipes of authentic Indian cuisine to try out.

INDIAN ARTS Fine Art with Geeta Chaddha investigates her experiences and opinions on life as a fine artist both in India and abroad.

SPOTLIGHT Geography is a vast topic when it comes to a country as massive and diverse as India. Spotlight brings you the important facts.

VISUAL COLLECTION Every issue we bring you a few beautiful images from various places in India to appreciate. From rural to urban to untouched natural sights.

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PERSONALLY SPEAKING WITH ANKIT WAL Text Ankit Wal & Tulika Sud

He describes his thoughts and experiences on growing up with a working mother and sister in contemporary India and what he learns from them.

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I

’m from the state capital of one of the most populous states of India and the world, Uttar Pradesh. My favourite fact about Uttar Pradesh is that if it were a country, it would be the world’s seventh most populous country. Among this massive population I’m one of the lucky few to have a family that can provide for my education at university in Singapore. Like many others in my demographic and racial group I’m studying computer engineering. I’m 22 and fast approaching the daunting age of 23; equally daunting is the uphill task of finding my place in the professional world. My small family begins with my mother and father and continues with my sister and I. My father has now retired after a fruitful career with his own business. My mother is now unconventionally the breadwinner of our family. Our parents have been excellent to both my sister and I. They have always provided for all our needs and committed everything to our futures, much more so than to their own comfort. My mother works as a leading educationalist in Lucknow as the principal of one of the biggest high schools there. My sister has completed her master’s degree in English, based on a passion she shares with my mother and an incredible love for reading inherited from my father. She is currently working as a journalist covering the arts for a leading national magazine in New Delhi, where she lives with our maternal grandmother. As little as my parents talk about themselves, I gather that they met while working for a tech magazine in the early eighties. They promised themselves to each other with unusual haste and were married within a year in 1983. My mother used to work for an advertising firm, and then she entered the teaching world when I started school. She had taken a break from working for a few years until my sister and I were old enough to start school, at which point she realized that with both children out of the house staying at home was not for her. She started teaching grades 1 to 4 and fell in love

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with the profession. She fondly recounts stories of children she taught over twenty years ago. She remembers each of her students by face and name, having established a bond with most of them. Some of them are now starting college, others are married, but they often come to our home, especially on her birthday and teachers day. While her administrative job now takes up most of her time she ensures she has the opportunity to continue to teach English to the final year students to remain in touch with her love for teaching. I believe that my mother is one of the most steadfast and headstrong people that I know. She is my problem solver and goto person. She is passionate about her profession and the children that she teaches. She respects her students and detests preconceived notions about them. She has provided equal attention and opportunity to each and every one of her students over the years. She has always been attached to her children to the extent that all her career decisions, life choices and everything else are determined by what is best for us. She makes no excuses and never indulges in self-pity; she has always shielded her family and loved ones. The most admirable quality about my mother is her infinite ability to care. I wish I could be more like her. She works fourteen-hour days and still finds the time to keep the family together. Nothing is more important to her than the comfort and happiness of those at home. She works herself to death and this has brought her many grey hairs, which she gracefully conceals for the ones she loves. My sister and I have never wanted for anything. My mother has been the glue holding our family together and I doubt any of us would have made it without her. My father has been nothing but supportive of my mother’s career, taking delight in every promotion, offering counsel and advice on any issues that reign heavy on her mind and taking interest in all her stories about work. He’s sent me running out to get a card and flowers on every special occasion.


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Photograph by Tulika Sud 12


“She works fourteen-hour days and still finds the time to keep the family together. Nothing is more important to her than the comfort and happiness of those at home.”

My parents have always been religiously devoted to giving both my sister and I equal love, affection and attention. They take as keen an interest in her life as they do in mine. I believe that we are very lucky in their attitude towards us. My sister has always been a good student. While not at the top of her class, she has always been amongst the best few. She is as morally sound and convicted as any person and her self-doubt plagues her more than mine plagues me. It’s unfounded and she proves herself to be far more mature and level headed than I have ever been. More often than not, my sister is a great source of humility to me. She humbly does work that I wouldn’t manage without my feet leaving the ground. She was a student of the sciences but once in college, she pursued her passion for language and literature. She read the entire Agatha Christie collection when she was in the fifth grade and there is not a book in our well-equipped library at home that she hasn’t laid her hands on. I owe my limited experience with books and the joy I derive from my occasional reading to her. She followed in my mother’s footsteps and then went a step further with a master’s degree in English at the alma mater of my mother in Delhi. She works for Tehelka, a leading Indian magazine, and covers what appeals to her the most. She is an arts correspondent, interviewing people at the very forefront of New Delhi and India’s contemporary culture. She enjoys her job and seems to take a joy from it only a labour of love would yield. Like her, I’m not sure what she wants to do next, however, I have faith that she will do well in whatever she attempts in her life. She has my mother’s sense of passion as well as compassion and my father’s keen thirst for knowledge. My mother is my hero, and my sister is my foil. I have immense respect for these women in my family. This respect applies to all women. Something that I would hope is not too unusual. 13


Trinket Snake Coelognathus helenus Prashun Thipaiah. Khasi Hills.

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PHOTOESSAY WILDLIFE Images Prashun Thipaiah

Featuring breathtaking images of wildlife taken at various locations in India by Prashun Thipaiah with a focus on various snakes.

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FALSE COBRA

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TRINKET SNAKE

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MEDO PIT VIPER

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MEDO PIT VIPER 22


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KING COBRA

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OPINIONS LITTLE INDIA Text Satyen Rao Image Tulika Sud

Determines what it is that is so attractive about the concept of Little India that leads to its’ emergence in cities all around the world.

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ndia – apart from its name, there isn’t very much that’s little about this magical country. With a 1.2 billion strong population, India is the largest democracy in the world and spectacularly boasts of having 17 main languages along with 844 dialects. With its geographical variety, cultural diversity, traditionalism and modernity, gastronomic multiplicity and innumerable art forms, it is almost impossible to not be slightly amused at the inexplicable irony upon hearing the words ‘Little’ and ‘India’ coined together. Indian culture itself is an amalgam and the country as a whole is a composite. And yet, in much the same way as some chemical reactions – in addition to the elements – require nothing more than a little catalyst to yield a complex compound, it is the little elements, ideologies and traits of India within the socio-cultural and entertainment spheres that help form a holistic image of complex India across the world. Today, every major metropolis across the world needs a mall, as it acts as a space that is representative of globalisation, westernisation, and modernisation and a space where brands promote identity and belonging. As the tidal wave of western culture soaks the people across the world, there is a dearth of fresh air and oxygen for everyone drowning in the sea of capitalism. I say drowning because these very malls also act as a space where people feel isolated, objectified, excluded and artificial by way of huge numbers on the price tags and lack of numbers on the advertisement of the size zero models wearing bikinis. Little India is the oxygen. It is the refreshing gust of breeze on a hot and still day that gently blows over your exposed skin, cools you and puts a smile on your face. Little India neighbourhoods certainly exist everywhere – from Singapore to Kuala Lumpur to Toronto and Artesia in Southern California – and all of them are extremely popular and have a fantastic repu-

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tation for being vibrant, entertaining and always refreshing. So, what is so special about these neighbourhoods? I have taken the liberty to highlight what I believe are a few elements that create the experience of Little India and make this so popular and easy to embrace in all parts of the world. I am of the opinion that the five senses, touch, sight, smell, taste and hearing are all catered to sumptuously as one walks through Little India and this is the secret of the unbridled satisfaction that each individual receives from his or her experience there. COMMUNITY: SIGHT Little India anywhere in the world gives you the feeling of being in a compact space with people milling about and exudes an air of homeliness. It is the familiar feeling of friendliness, togetherness and the personal touch that is often lost or even discouraged in today’s fast paced world of cut-throat competition. Little India takes you in and makes you feel like you are a part of a wonderful community. The delightful sight of the crowded street, marketplace and traditional Indian stores, men and women dressed in spectacularly colourful traditional attire, the artifacts, the restaurants that are all welcome to the modern eyes that are usually tuned in to sepia. There are no status barriers, absolutely no herds of men in suits with briefcases and blank faces and no women with artificial expressions. You walk in and you enjoy yourself, you indulge in the sights and sounds, and you can see smiles and even sport a smile of your own. It’s like having a vacation home right in the middle of Manhattan. It is as natural and friendly as a neighbourhood can get. Friendly faces, friendly voices and a comfortable environment immediately grip you and refuse to let go – you are spoilt before your journey has even begun.


FOOD: TASTE AND SMELL There aren’t many things in the world as irresistible as Indian food. There are so many kinds of Indian foods that almost every avenue in New York could have an Indian restaurant offering a different variety. The smell of curries and kebabs pervade the streets as their aromas waft through the air and reel you in.To the nose dulled by the smell of Chanel and the tongue that’s grown indifferent to pizzas and noodles, Little India is quite literally an explosion. The restaurants are a treat as they serve up their brand of authentic Indian cuisine, and foodies can find it takes a while before they can even get through the experimenting phase! The joy of treating your palette to the taste of something different and exhilarating is unparalleled. Indian food has definitely positioned itself as an important brand across the world and it is only going to get more prominent in the future. Indian food has a reputation for being healthy and the tastes have a universal appeal, as the brave challenge its spice and the rest enjoy its subtleties. MATERIALS: TOUCH Everything suddenly operates on touch – from mobile phones to computers and even the screens on the airplanes. Our hands are numbed by the rhythmic drumming of the keyboard, the clicks on our mouse, the buttons on the TV remote and the familiar shapes of cutlery. We touch but we don’t feel anything. India offers a different experience of touch – a world of new materials, fabrics, and different compositions in various shapes. Even the common action of holding a spoon to eat the food is eliminated as the naan breads, rice and curry may all be eaten by hand. After all, every infant instinctively reaches out for food with their hands, wanting to touch it, feel it and understand the composition of the food before attempting to transfer it to the mouth. Then there are the clothing stores that offer various dresses and outfits in host of different

materials that range from common cottons to exquisite silk and woollens. Some stores even offer linens for the beds and curtains and they are carefully embroidered using the best materials as the base. The artifact stores also allow you to touch, hold and even own antique pieces made of brass and even silver and gold while the pottery has a unique feel on its own. Figuratively speaking, touch also refers to the element of personal contact and emotional touch. Whoever one may interact with – be it the shop owner or the steward at the restaurant – there is a relationship that is built which ensures you take away more with you than something you just bought or experienced. Relationship building and personalization are what modern companies stress on implementing and they spend billions of dollars in doing so. In a neighbourhood such as Little India, it happens for free. MUSIC: HEARING The word used to describe the aural atmosphere in cities is ‘bustling’. It might be the noise of traffic, cars honking or the rattling train racing through the underground tunnel. Perhaps the only way to hear some form of music and melody in a city is by wearing a pair of headphones and selecting a song on your device. The bustle in Little India is something different and even melodious at times. Sure, there is the sound of traffic and cars honking, but it is dwarfed by the sounds of people talking over each other, the cling-clang of pots and pans, and most importantly the music – Bollywood music bursting out of the stores and restaurants that cast a beautiful aura of being in a local street in India itself. There is also the sound of prayer and songs from the temples and mosques. It is more man and less machine. It is more communication and less noise. There is a meaning to the sounds heard and one can in fact enjoy it. These sounds are more than that of just another engine or a siren. The sounds of Little India will only lift your mood and spirits. 29


Photograph by Tulika Sud 30


KITCHEN EXPERIMENTS ALOO GOBI, MUSHROOM CURRY & DOODH PEDA Text Sia Krishna Images Sia Krishna and Tulika Sud

We bring you new recipes of authentic Indian cuisine to try out for yourself and share with friends and family. Photograph and try them at home!

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Photo courtesy Sia Krishna. 32


ALOO GOBI Stir fry of potatoes and cauliflower with aromatic Indian spices Preparation Time: 5 minutes Cooking Time: 15-20 minutes Serves: 4-6 people INGREDIENTS 2 large potatoes 1 medium cauliflower 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 tsp ginger-garlic paste 2-3 green chilies 2-3 tbsp coriander leaves Freshly squeezed lemon juice Salt to taste For tadka (tempering): 1½-2 tbsp oil 1 tsp jeera (cumin seeds) A pinch of hing (asafetida) Spices: ½ tsp haldi (turmeric powder) ¾ tsp red chili powder ½ tbsp dhania (coriander powder) ½ tsp garam masala ½ tbsp kasuri methi (dried fenugreek leaves)

METHOD Heat oil in a pan and add cumin seeds and hing. When cumin seeds crackle and change colour, after about 30 seconds, add finely chopped onions. Sauté the onions till they turn translucent and then add gingergarlic paste, green chilies and crushed kasuri methi leaves. Give it a good stir till the raw smell of ginger-garlic paste disappears, which takes about 1 minute. Add all the spice powders and stir for 30 seconds. Mix in cubed potatoes and stir for 3 to 4 minutes. Add cauliflower florets and salt to taste and then stir for about 2 to 3 minutes, making sure all individual cauliflower florets are coated with spice mix.

Snap a picture with your smartphone so that you can try this recipe at home, or view it at www.monsoonspice.com

Cover the lid and let it cook for 7 to 10 minutes, stirring in between to make sure that vegetables don’t stick the bottom of the pan. The vegetables should get cooked thoroughly but still retain their shape. If not, cover and let them cook for another 3to 5 minutes. Turn off the flame and add freshly squeezed lemon juice to taste. Garnish with finely chopped coriander leaves and mix well before serving with any Indian flat breads or plain/ flavoured Basmati rice. 33


Photo courtesy Sia Krishna. 34


PALAK MUSHROOM CURRY Button mushrooms in creamy spinach gravy Preparation Time: 5-10 minutes Cooking Time: 15-20 minutes Serves: 5-6 People INGREDIENTS 15-20 button mushrooms 1 large onion, finely chopped 1 tsp jeera (cumin seeds) 1 tsp dhania (coriander powder) ½ tsp garam masala 1 tbsp lemon juice 1 tbsp oil Salt to taste For spinach puree: 1 large bunch spinach 1 inch ginger, peeled 1-2 green chilies 1 inch cinnamon 4 green cardamoms 4 cloves ¼ cup coriander leaves

METHOD Grind all the ingredients listed under spinach puree to a smooth paste without adding any water. Keep it aside till needed. Heat oil in a pan and add cumin seeds to it. When it starts to sizzle and change colour, add finely chopped onions. Cook till onions turn golden brown, for about 2 minutes. Next add the button mushrooms and stir fry them till water starts to drain, for about 3 minutes.

Snap a picture with your smartphone so that you can try this recipe at home, or view it at www.monsoonspice.com

Mix in spinach puree and give it a good mix. Add ½ cup water, garam masala, coriander powder and salt to taste. Mix well. Cover and let it cook for 7 to 10 minutes. Add a little more water if you find the gravy too thick and adjust the seasoning. Turn off the flame and add lemon juice to taste and serve with any Indian flat breads or plain/flavoured Basmati rice. 35


Photo courtesy Sia Krishna. 36


DOODH PEDA Milk sweetmeat Preparation Time: 2 minutes Cooking Time: 4-5 minutes Makes: Around 20-24 Pedas INGREDIENTS 1他 cups milk powder 1 can condensed milk 2 tbsp butter 6 green cardamoms A small pinch of saffron A small pinch of salt Few dry nuts of your choice

METHOD Take a microwave safe deep bowl and melt the butter by microwaving it for 20 to 30 seconds. Once the butter is melted, add milk powder and condensed milk and whisk them well. Make sure that they are combined well without any lumps. Place the bowl back in the microwave and cook on high power for a minute. Remove the bowl and mix well with a help of a sturdy spoon. Place the bowl back in the microwave and cook on high power for another minute. Take it out of the microwave and mix in cardamom, a pinch of salt and saffron dissolved in 2 tbsp warm water or milk. Mix well and place back in a microwave for another minute on high. By now you should be able to form small balls of the mixture. Mix well and microwave again for 30 seconds to a minute. Let it cool for a minute so that it becomes easy to handle without burning your hands.

Snap a picture with your smartphone so that you can try this recipe at home, or view it at www.monsoonspice.com

Grease the surface as well as the rolling pin generously with ghee. Lightly knead the mixture with hands or using a spoon, to make a large ball and place it on the greased surface. With the help of a rolling pin, roll it into a circle with 1 cm thickness by applying gentle pressure. Cut using cookie cutters or a knife. Press a piece of your chosen nuts in the centre and place in a greased plate until they cool down completely. 37


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INDIAN ARTS FINE ART WITH GEETA CHADDHA Text & Images Tulika Sud

Geeta Chaddha describes her experiences and opinions on life as a fine artist both in India and abroad, highlighting the Indian advantage.

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“I would encourage everyone to try their hand at painting, everyone can. Young artists should follow their heart and enjoy painting. They should just paint with their feelings and develop their own styles.”

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eeta is an Indian artist from Delhi who has spent the last twenty years living in Dubai. How and when did your interest in art first come about? I started sketching from comic books when I was around six or seven years old. Did your parents support this interest?

It has become bolder. I’m a very impatient artist, I like to finish a painting fast, and so my brushstrokes are quick. Sometimes a watercolour takes just a few minutes. It has to be very effective. How frequently do you work on your art at present if you manage to work so quickly?

They really did, especially my father. He understood that I would never enjoy doing a Bachelors Degree in English or History the way I would an art course.

I try to paint for a few hours in the morning sun because it is the best light for watercolour painting.

Did you formally study art?

Free, loose style painting, the faster the better. That’s where watercolours help, because less is always more when you’re painting with watercolours.

Yes, after school I enrolled in a polytechnic college to do a three-year course in textile designing. It was there that I formally started painting and experimenting with different mediums. What media do you work with? I started out with pencil sketching, then moved on to oils and watercolours. Glass painting is my current favourite. How would you describe your style? My style is realistic, leaning towards larger than life themes. 40

How has your style evolved over time?

What is it that inspires you?

How about people? Which Indian artists have had a major impact on your work and how? I like the works of Manjit Bawa and Anjolie Ele Menon. They have very different styles in oils, with simplicity of figuration, the subjects and the real details in their painting; combined with perfect drawing and colour coordination. I admire such qualities in an artist. They are the masters!


Mysore Painting Geeta Chaddha.

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Watercolours Geeta Chaddha.

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“You can’t even compare the Indian and Dubai art scenes. The Dubai art scene is still trying to make a mark for itself; the architecture is currently the main feature of Arab art.”

Where have you exhibited your work? I was doing a lot of work for an interiors shop. I had to paint on ceramic vases and lamp bases to match the upholstery of the rooms. It was really challenging! My paintings have also been displayed at the Dubai art centre. I’m also commissionedto paint by my clients. My daughter has taken all my watercolours! How does your family influence you? They are very encouraging. At the same time, they’re my best critics. What are your plans for the future? At present, I’m building an art studio cum home in Bangalore, India, where I plan to really dive into my art aspirations without any disturbance! You’re moving back to India. How would you say India as a country and culture has impacted your art? Art in India is not all of one kind. Every state in India has a different style, which is amazing. Every style is great in its own way. I learnt a lot about these different styles while I was in college. We had to make designs from these places. You can do so much by just following some of these patterns! How would you describe the art scene in India? How does it compare to Dubai? You can’t even compare the two. Indian art is an institution by itself. It is complex and

very appealing. The uniqueness of Indian art lies in its rich cultural heritage. There are so many styles in Indian art, from realistic to modern. Dubai art is very limited, as they really don’t have a long history. The Dubai art scene is still trying to make a mark for itself; architecture is currently the main feature of Arab art. What do you think the future of the Indian art scene is? The future looks extremely positive. Indian artists are respected all over the world and are able to compete with the best. What can artists from other countries learn from India? Often, artists from other countries do not fully understand Indian art because they have no knowledge of their religion and symbols. For one, they can give thought to details in their paintings in the manner that Indian artists often do. Colour is another aspect. A painting can tell a story too, such as Rajasthani paintings and Tanjores in the South. What advice would you give young artists in India today? I would encourage everyone to try their hand at painting, everyone can. Young artists should follow their heart and enjoy painting. They should just paint with their feelings and develop their own styles over time, to be unique. 43


SPOTLIGHT:

GEOGRAPHY LARGEST COUNTRIES IN THE WORLD RUSSIA CANADA UNITED STATES CHINA BRAZIL AUSTRALIA INDIA

TOTAL LAND AREA 44


Y LONGEST RIVER: GANGES HIGHEST PEAK: MT. KANCHENJUNGA

CAPITAL: DELHI HEAVIEST RAINFALL: CHERRAPUNJI

28 STATES 7 UNION TERRITORIES

NEIGHBOURS

India shares land borders with Pakistan, Afghanistan, Myanmar, China, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. India’s neighbours in the sea are Sri Lanka and the Maldives. Pakistan was originally a part of India, until Partition took place in 1947. Pakistan consisted of East and West Pakistan. In 1971, East Pakistan attained independence and was named Bangladesh. 45


Untitled Krunal Palande. Canon 3000N. Currey Road, Mumbai. 46


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Untitled Krunal Palande. Canon 1000D. Ladakh.

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Untitled Tulika Sud. Bangalore. 50


Untitled Tulika Sud. Bangalore. 51


Untitled Tulika Sud. Bangalore. 52


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MASTHEAD

The passage masthead incorporates the line which is always used in Hindi typography above words, as you can see here “भारत”. This element of the line is the basis of the design for the pages of this magazine itself.

COVER: LITTLE INDIA, SINGAPORE

passage takes you on the route to understanding the inside of India, experiencing colours, diversity and beauty at every step along the way. This month’s cover conveys these features of India.

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Passage Issue 3  

Passage Issue 3