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John William Hausladen Design and Preservation Portfolio


Resume: https://issuu.com/tulane34/docs/20190202_hausladen_resume hausladenjw@aol.com 484-459-4667 7726 S. Claiborne Ave., Apt. A New Orleans, LA 70125


1.

Almost Nothing: Lakeshore Field House

6.

Waterfront Museum Campus on the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain

2.

A Village for the Elderly

7.

Children’s Chair

3.

PROFILE OF

Tulane University Archives RECONSTRUCTED GALLERIES

8.

22’ 7”

829 Canal St. Circa 1900 comme building with c. 193 Deco/Egyptian Re alterations that h attained historic significance.

Writing Sample: National Register Nomination

45’ 3”

4.

Pocket Park

9.

Writing Sample: Selected Book Contribution

RESTORE CASEMENT-T WINDO

REVI OPENINGS A RESTOR ART-DECO DET

5.

Façade “Renew” on Canal Street

PROPOSED

10.

Observation Through Illustration EXISTING


1.

Almost Nothing: Lakeshore Field House Integrated Design Studio, Prof. Judith Kinnard, Spring 2019 (In Progress)

These process drawings and models describe a scheme in development for a field house in Streeterville, Chicago, containing a gymnasium, fitness rooms, artists’ studios, classrooms, formal event space, and an art gallery. During his tenure at IIT, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe lived across East Pearson Avenue from the site, which is on the view corridor between the Museum of Contemporary Art and Lake Michigan. I have thus conceived my project as an exploration in the Miesian poetics of minimalism, grids, and the pavilion typology, while establishing a set of rules to achieve rational and efficient relationships between disparate programs. In contrast to the high-rise context, the result is in effect, as Mies once described his Crown Hall, “beinahe nichts� -- almost nothing.


LA

IVE

R ED

OR

SH

KE

E. PEARSON ST.

E. CHICAGO AVE.

LA

AN

HIG

MIC

KE

N

DOWN

FITNESS 551 SF

GYMNASIUM OPEN TO BELOW

STRETCHING 551 SF

EVENT VERANDA

STUDIOS’ VERANDA DOWN

STUDIO 350 SF

STUDIO 350 SF

STUDIO 350 SF

STUDIO 741 SF

STUDIO 550 SF

STUDIO 550 SF

STUDIO 550 SF

STUDIO 1,131 S

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

GALLERY 780 SF

LOBBY 760 SF

COURTYARD

KITCHEN 171 SF

ADMIN. 460 SF

EVENT SPACE 1,1711 SF

VESIBULE

CROSS SECTION

RAMP 1:36 RISE-RUN RATIO

N

TOTAL SF THIS FLOOR: 15,310 SF


A

B

C

D

1

A

B

E

2

C

F

3

D

1

E

G

2

3

F

H

4

G

H


PROCESS PERSPECTIVE VIEWS


2.

A Village for the Elderly Housing Design Studio, Prof. Irene Keil, Fall 2018

A site in Central City, New Orleans, with paradoxical qualities – a corner lot adjacent to vacant lots; nearly orthogonal, but not; situated in a context with a dense pattern-language that is nevertheless decidedly low-rise – was selected by me for its surrounding fabric’s rich characteristics, which offered both design inspirations and imposed limitations.


From a choice of several potential user groups, I elected to design a residential building for senior citizens, a program that implied the consideration of an additional layer of requirements such as the need to achieve predictable, controlled, and compliant means of circulation.

51% of Elderly in Central City Live Alone Compared to 34% in Orleans Parish and 27.3% nationwide

31% of people in Central City are living on Social Security Income Compared to 25% in Orleans Parish Source: The Data Center (www.datacenterresearch.org), compilation of U.S. Census Bureau

Immobility

Aging in Place

All one level, yet sectional interest (shaped) ; ADA bath

Isolation

Activities of Daily Living (ADLS)

Shared auxiliary and leisure spaces

Fixed Income

Affordability

Senior Depression Dementia

Reminisce Therapy Universal Design

=

Max-Out Density Bonus (25 units/site) Historic Urban Neighborhood Communal Courtyard orientation

The resulting negotiation with the detached typologies of the surrounding buildings was a necessary challenge. As a recurring interest in my design education, I sought to achieve accord with – but not duplication of – the historic context. Additionally, I imbued a poetic quality to the design’s massing, the underlying formal logic of which can be demonstrated by a clear diagram.

Vernacular w/ gablet roof (FORM)

Abstraction (MODULE)

Agglomeration (VILLAGE)

Mash and Encircle (ACTION)

MASSING


S. Rampart St. Section “B”

LOBBY

St. Andrew St.

MAIL

dwgmodels.com

LOUNGE

Section “A”

dwgmodels.com

dwgmodels.com

dwgmodels.com

dwgmodels.com

dwgmodels.com

dwgmodels.com

dwgmodels.com

FIRST FLOOR 1:8


CIRCULATION

10 TYPE C STUDIO UNITS WITHIN GABLES

2 “TYPE D” DOUBLE UNITS 8 TYPE A UNITS 8 TYPE B UNITS

A.

One-Bedroom (626 sf) 1:4 Gallery kitchen, large living

Wheelchair path


B.

One-Bedroom (626 sf) 1:4 Walk-in closet, large bedroom

C.

Studio (419 sf) 1:4 Sloped ceiling under gable

D. Double.

Two living bedrooms with separate entries allow two friends to live together independently Shared kitchen, porch, and main living Generous circulation accomodates scooters and walkers.


3.

Tulane University Archives Design Studio, Prof. Benjamin Smith, Spring 2018

Associative meanings communicated by form were embraced in this project for the archive of HowardTilton Memorial Library’s Special Collections. An abstraction of the iconic gables, dormers, and pinnacles of the University’s historic Richardsonian Romanesque vernacular found fidelity with the bold pyramidal geometry of Étienne-Louis Boullée’s Cénotaphe de Turenne. Diverse precedents throughout history, including proto-modern works by Louis Sullivan and the Viennese Secessionists, Aldo Rossi, and Venturi and other Postmodernists, served as additional inspiration. Additionally, one particular intent of the design was for its geometry to be “felt” in sectionally-dynamic spaces such as in the Archive’s top floor reading room and in the first floor exhibition space.

Gibson Hall, Tulane’s “Old Main.”


Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom Processing

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Archive Displays

Processing

Stacks

South Elevation

ZIMPEL ST.

ZIMPEL ST.

North Elevation

Section C

Section D

Section E

ZIMPEL ST.

North Elevation

Section C

Section-Perspective B

Section D

North Elevation

Section E

Section C

Section-Perspective B

B Section D Section-Perspective Section ESection C

North Elevation

Section D

Section E

Map Room

Auditorium

Map Room

Auditorium Section-Perspective A

Up

Section-Perspective A

Up

Section-Perspective A

Up

Up

Up

Section A

Section B

Section B

Gallery

Up

Lobby Connection to Library

Connection to Library

Section A

Gallery Up

Section A

Lobby

Up

Up

Connection to Library

Down

Connection to Up

Archive Public Reading Room

Up

Up

Up

Up

Connection to Library

Archive Public Reading Room

Section B

Walled Garden

West Elevation

West Elevation

Map Room Auditorium

Archive Public Reading Room

Lobby

Section B

Office Suite Walled Garden

Up

Gallery

Lobby

Section A

Auditorium

Map Room

Auditorium

Up Gallery

Down

Up

Section-Perspective A

Auditorium Up

West Elevation

Stacks

Stacks

Stacks

South Elevation

ZIMPEL ST.

Section-Perspective B

Stacks

Walled Garden

East Elevation

West Elevation

East Elevation

Office Suite

East Elevation

Office Suite

Walled Garden

Office Suite

East Elevation

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom Classroom

Classroom

Classroom Processing

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Processing

Classroom Classroom

Processing

Processing

Stacks

Classroom

Archive Displays Stacks

Stacks

ZIMPEL ST.

Section-Perspective B

South Elevation

Section C

Section D

North Elevation

Section E

Section-Perspective B

Section C

Stacks

Section D

Stacks Stacks

Stacks

ZIMPEL ST. North Elevation

Stacks

SITE PLAN

Archive Displays

Classroom

Archive Displays South Elevation

Stacks

Section E

South Elevation

South Elevation

FIRST FLOOR

Stacks

Section-Perspective A

Section-Perspective A

THIRD FLOOR

Stacks

Up

Auditorium

Gallery

Lobby

Gallery

Section A

Section A

Section B

Section B

Stacks

Up

Map Room

Auditorium

Lobby

Up

Up

Connection to Library

Up

Connection to Library

Office Suite West Elevation

Walled Garden

Walled Garden

West Elevation

East Elevation

East Elevation

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Classroom

Processing

Processing

Stacks

South Elevation

Stacks

South Elevation

ZIMPEL ST.

ZIMPEL ST. North Elevation

Section-Perspective B

Section C

B Section D Section-Perspective Section ESection C

Section D

North Elevation

Section E

Up

Section-Perspective A

Up

Section-Perspective A

Gallery Section A

Section A

Gallery

Lobby

Lobby

Connection to L

Section B

Connection to Library

Section B

Walled Garden

West Elevation

West Elevation

Walled Garden

Eas

Classroom

PROCESS DRAWINGS

Classroom

Classroom Processing

Classroom Processing

South Elevation

South Elevation


4.

Pocket Park for the Rear of Richardson Memorial Hall, Tulane University Design Studio, Prof. Tom Holloman, Summer 2017

A flexible outdoor space, incorporating areas for both intimate gathering and the congregation of large groups, was conceived in a manner as to be respectful of practicality and context.

LOWER LEVEL

UPPER LEVEL


PANORAMA OF EXISTING SITE


5.

Façade “Renew” Preservation Studio, Prof’s John Stubbs and Beth Jacob, Spring 2017

Based on historic photographs and extant contemporaneous vernacular, restorations of the façades of several historic commercial buildings on the 800 block of Canal Street, New Orleans, were proposed.

23’

RECONSTRUCT DORMER AND REPLACE ROOFING MATERIAL RECONSTRUCT CORNICE, ARCHES, AND PILASTERS

827 Canal St. Circa 1890 commercial building with slipcover.

58’ 9”

REMOVE SLIPCOVER

REVISED STOREFRONT

PROPOSED

EXISTING

PROPOSED


ROPOSED

21’ 7”

22’ 7”

RECONSTRUCT PARAPET AND CORNICE

837 Canal St. Circa 1880 commercial building with mid-20th century slipcover.

829 Canal St. Circa 1900 commercial building with c. 1930 Art Deco/Egyptian Revival alterations that have attained historical significance.

PROFILE OF RECONSTRUCTED GALLERIES

44’ 6”

45’ 3”

RESTORE TO CASEMENT-TYPE WINDOWS

REMOVE SLIPCOVER AND AWNING RECONSTRUCT GALLERIES REVISED STOREFRONT AND OPENINGS PER CONTEMPORANEOUS VERNACULAR

REVISED OPENINGS AND RESTORED ART-DECO DETAIL

23’

EXISTING

PROPOSED

EXISTING RECONSTRUCT DORMER AND REPLACE ROOFING MATERIAL

22’ 7”

RECONSTRUCT CORNICE, ARCHES, AND PILASTERS

829 Canal St. Circa 1900 commercial building with c. 1930 Art Deco/Egyptian Revival alterations that have attained historical significance.

PROFILE OF RECONSTRUCTED GALLERIES

827 Canal St. Circa 1890 commercial building with slipcover.

45’ 3”

58’ 9”

RESTORE TO CASEMENT-TYPE WINDOWS

REMOVE SLIPCOVER

REVISED OPENINGS AND RESTORED ART-DECO DETAIL

EXISTING

REVISED STOREFRONT

PROPOSED

EXISTING


6.

Waterfront Museum Campus on the Northshore of Lake Pontchartrain Site Strategies, Prof. Aron Chang, Fall 2017

During a one-week “charrette” group project, these process ink-on-vellum drawings were the foundation of my team’s proposal.


7.

Children’s Chair Franklin & Marshall College, Studio Art, Prof. Carol Hickey, Spring 2011

As a project to design a cardboard chair for children, I conceived a take on the classic “tête-à-tête.” Consisting of slotted cardboard sheets, the chair was built with great material efficiency and without - except for the seat bottom - a need for glue. As the pictures attest, the clients were pleased! (The accompanying axonometric was modeled in Rhinoceros in 2017.)


8.

Writing Sample: Miller Memorial Library National Register Nomination

Presented to the state committee in April 2017, the history of this diminutive but delightfully sophisticated mid-century modern library in Hammond, LA, by architect John Desmond was researched and documented for a successful National Register nomination on its architectural merits. Permalink: https://www.crt.state.la.us/dataprojects/hp/nhl/view.asp?ID=1422

Constructed from 1956-1957, Miller Memorial Library is a prime example of post-war American modern architecture, popularly referred to as “Mid-century Modern.” More specifically however, Miller Memorial is as an early expression of the New Formalism subtype of Modernism, which proved highly adaptable to public and civic buildings such as schools, municipal buildings, and public libraries. Perhaps the most well known building in the United States designed in the New Formalist style is Edward Durrell Stone’s John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC, which opened in 1971. ... Embracing “traditionally rich materials” and classical precedents such as symmetry, New Formalism is present in the design of Miller Memorial, a building that utilizes the warm, traditional building material of brick. The influence of classical precedent is evident in the symmetry of the building’s front elevation and in the colonnades of steel columns directly in front of the inset curtain walls of fixed windows and panels. While eschewing decorative detail, the symmetry and steel colonnades are a subtle nod to the classical tradition, executed in the modern material of steel, and achieve for Miller Memorial’s design a substantial level of monumentality and decorum. Despite the apparent horizontality of the façade, the moderately high ceilings of the interior (approximately 12’), carried to the exterior through the equally high portico and windows, elicit the sublime. In overall effect, New Formalist architecture seeks a “delicacy of details,” which Desmond attained through the use of narrow window moldings and thin steel columns. Highly functional and thoroughly contemporary, Miller Memorial is nevertheless a warm space with an elegantly simple, light aesthetic that evokes a measured, intimate monumentality.


9.

Writing Sample: Selected Contribution to New Orleans Architecture Vol. IX: Carrollton

During my practicum with Koch & Wilson Architects, I assisted author Robert Cangelosi with his drafts of the latest installment of the New Orleans Architecture series of books published by the Friends’ of the Cabildo. Among my contributions, I identified an authentic George Barber house and drafted this excerpt from my research.

This imposing Colonial Revival residence was built to a mail-order catalog design of the prolific architect George Barber of Knoxville, Tennessee, who published house plans built throughout the United States from the 1880s through the first decade of the twentieth century. Appearing as Design No. 205 in Barber’s Modern Dwellings: Practical Designs and Plans for Those Who Wish to Build or Beautify Their Homes of 1905, it is a later Barber design that reflects the transition away from the Queen Anne style – both in Barber’s work and in the earlier iterations of the Colonial Revival style generally – toward a massing, symmetry, and detail that were more faithful to original colonial Georgian and Federal precedents but still far from replicative. On April 30, 1909, Ernest T. Churchill contracted with builder Jules W. Markel before notary F.T. Daunis to construct this two-story frame residence, which is set back from the street in a grand manner. Attorney James R. Logan, the present owner, purchased the house in 2000. The inventive balustrade with diagonal crosses on the second floor -- a highly vernacular interpretation of a “Union Jack” motif -- is likely original but deviates from the Barber design as rendered in the published catalog, as do the house’s side dormers, main entablature, and interesting roofless portion of the porch that wraps around the front left side of the house. While the intact stucco exterior surface is reportedly original, the porch’s column capitals and first floor balustrade have been lost.


10.

Observation Through Illustration Always ongoing.


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