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TUCKER DOUGLAS GRADUATE PORTFOLIO 2008-2012

{ SELECTED WORKS }

M.Arch Candidate Rice University 2014


READY. STEADY. GO.

ABOUT: I am an architecture student and inspired designer. I have chosen to continue my education at Rice University where I am pursuing my M.Arch. These first studio semesters at Rice have focused my studies on the importance of articulating arguments and understanding the architect’s agency at both the urban and architectural scales and the gray zone between.

Additionally, I am recently interested in the capacity of architecture experience to enhance and provide less typical services and delve into other areas of deign – especially in humanitarian efforts.


CONTENTS

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Accordion Clinic (Graduate) Speedy Publics (Graduate) Pin-Up (Graduate) SPL (Graduate) Seattle - Food (undergraduate) X.Change (undergraduate) Books Abroad (internship) Pavilion {arboretum project}

{reverse chronology}


ACCORDION CLINC

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| SPRING 2012 | DURATION: 2 DAYS | LOCATION: MALAWIAN, AFRICA | FIRST PLACE | SPRING 2012 CHARRETTE, PACKED IN: SAVING LIVES THROUGH DESIGN | THIS PROJECT IT CURRENTLY IN THE PROCESS OF BEING PROTOTYPED BY BTB AND WILL PUBLISH IN PLAT 3.0. | TEAM MEMBERS: SAM BIROSCAK, VY DROUIN-LE, AND MICHAEL MATTHEWS |

ACCORDION CLINIC

The portable clinic is an ambassador for Beyond Traditional Borders (BTB), conveying a private, welcoming, and secure gesture to rural Malawians. It allows HSA to treat and advise patients safely and with dignity, even in adverse conditions. Since BTB medics face the challenge of having to provide care on the go, our scheme seeks to be as portable and as quickly deployable as possible. The tent and furniture designs

{10min 44lbs $250}

use an accordion-like formal logic that enables them to be both tightly packed and folded down in almost a single, broad gesture. A sealable, covered structure provides a private environment for examinations, as well as keeping dust out of the treatment area. At the same time, nets provide natural light and ventilation without allowing outside observation. A net placed below the examiACCORDION CLINC

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nation table opens for cross-ventilation during warmer months, and can be sealed during the rainy season or for greater privacy. The entrance is a welcoming gesture, a hand extending from the clinic providing a shaded entrance and directionality. This directionality places agency in the hands of the volunteers, allowing them to decide the most appropriate orientation without sacrificing the privacy of the patients.

The hinge system imbedded within the structure and furniture folds like an accordion, increasing setup speed and ease of packing. The interior is sealed during setup and take-down, preventing dust and dirt from entering the clinic during transitions. The nonporous rubber exam surface is supported by ž�hollow metal tubing, a cheap and effective way to support anyone from a child to a 200 pound adult.

ACCORDION CLINC

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privacy + dust protection

natural light

cross-ventilation

inviting entrance

ACCORDION CLINC

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SPEEDY PUBLICS

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| ARCH503 | FALL 2011 | DURATION: 1.5 MONTHS | LOCATION: HOUSTON, TEXAS | PROJECT: REGIONAL LIBRARY |

SPEEDY PUBLICS

The present typology of the library is a hybrid; the library must contain within it program relating to old and new technologies; it must house social functions; and it should serve as a foundation for democracy and act as an enabler of local and global communities. These different variables of the library allow for a partitioning of spaces into fast to slow. This library is a speculation of the library’s future

{fast & slow}

both in terms of technology and how is holds information and its role in the social sphere. The position of this project is to highlight the play between the fast and slow functions within the library and utilize their differences in the given context and then subsequently focus on the situations created from this refocusing for slow and fast program. In the refocusing of fast and slow, the slow-bar, reSPEEDY PUBLICS

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PROGRMATIC SPLIT

ENLARGING PUBLICS

CONNECTION

01 CALIBRATING MASSING

02 CALIBRATING MASSING

SPEEDY PUBLICS

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presenting the primary houser of information, is elevated to a symbolic level, releasing the tension that exists within the community, allowing circulation to flood the site underneath, and respond to the fast pace environment of the surrounding area. Through the interdependence of these bars of slow and fast circulation an overlap between spaces oc-

curs – a third space is then created. At this point the connection between these elements is understood. Through transparency and audio connection the contrast between the communal and knowledge based space is understood, and can then one can operate between the two.

SPEEDY PUBLICS

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PIN-UP

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| ARCH367| FALL 2011 | DURATION: 1 WEEK | LOCATION: RICE UNIVERISTY | PROJECT: SITE SPECIFIC ART |

PIN-UP

{site specific art}

This project is a commentary on criticism within the academic architecture community. A student is constantly producing and testing work. Work is tested, analyzed and criticized. When the later, the producer of work is asked to “pin-up” their work. The work is then viewed by an “objective reviewer.” In the discourse between presenter and critic it is understood that it is the work being critiqued.

However, it is impossible to detach the creator from their work. The work is the creator. The work inherently represents the mode of thinking of the creator. Thus, in actuality it is the creator who is being critiqued and not the work. Site: The jury room (formatted at a pin-up or gallery space ) was chosen because it represents an area where the entire student body regularly pins-up work PIN-UP

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and it has personal significance for all architecture students because it is where their efforts and ideas are judged. Project: The actual body of work is a mosaic or paneling of a self-portrait. The eyes are framed in the image. The eyes are cho-

sen as significant because they are the facial feature which represents a person and their visual identity. The dimensions of the installation our 10’x25’ and was attached through the use of 187 11”x17” sheets of paper.

PIN-UP

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PIN-UP

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SPL

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| ARCH503 | FALL 2011 | DURATION: 3 WEEKS | LOCATION: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON | PROJECT: CASE STUDY RESEARCH |

SPL

{case study research}

An in depth analysis of the Seattle Public Library, this case study research delves into the various way a library functions; programmatically, socially, and functionally. This analysis seeks to unpack the difference between knowledge and information within the constructs of the library as well as examine the physical architectural components utilized in the housing of information. SPL

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SPL

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SPL

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SEATTLE FOOD

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| ARCH453 | FALL 2010 | DURATION: ONE SEMESTER | LOCATION: SEATTLE, WASHINGTON | PROJECT: SPECULATIVE FOR A CITY | GROUP PARTNERS: MATT EDWARDS, GREG UHRICH, AND DON GRAY |

SEATTLE - FOOD

This project does not presuppose solvency of all problems, rather it creates a framework that can radiate from the city’s core. Treating the improvement of Seattle as an evolutionary process, this project can be used as the initial step towards a more efficient and self-sufficient city. Seattle 2035 begins to embrace the idea of the city center as the organ to sustain life. This project was developed under the outlined Li-

{a speculative design}

ving City Design Competition 2035 brief. Our team chose to diverge from the prescriptive methods delineated within the brief, and rather refocused on a more ecological response within the city’s urban framework, aimed at positively enhancing the given social mindset.

SEATTLE FOOD

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SEATTLE FOOD

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work sustaining population

efficient farming

water management

FOOD

This project attacks the notion of the city as an all consuming, dependent entity. In today’s current model, we produce food unsustainably and beyond the core of the city. Current reliance on oil and transportation to move food makes our cities heavily dependent upon large monocultural regions. Conversely, the proposed living city provides viability for creating an efficient infrastructure embedded within the city’s core. The project intends on providing framework to reverse the role of the city as a consumer and model the city into a system yielding the nutrients needed to sustain life within the downtown core of Seattle. The focus for a self-sufficient future is food. The way we treat our food is a major contributing factor in the city’s tendency to be a massive consumer. In our current production model, fruits and vegetables regularly travel between 500 and 2500 miles to reach to Seattle, accounting for nearly 20% of the energy consumed in the U.S. This large agricultural radius creates immense carbon footprints for the food Seattle consumes. Traditional monoculture farming methods are highly unsustainable and damaging to the land on which it is produced. Today’s system takes nearly 6.41 Barrels

SEATTLE FOOD

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of oil to produce food from one hectare of traditional row farming. These methods lean heavily upon oil from the equipment used and the pesticides and fertilizers required to yield food. Traditional farming methods devour the nation’s continually depleting natural resources. By 2015, the CDC projects 61% of Americans to be overweight or obese, expressing a major flaw in

how we nourish our bodies. We go out to eat three to four times per week, usually consuming foods high in artificial ingredients and calories. As a result, many people cannot describe where their food comes from, let alone understand how to grow it. In opposition to fast frozen produce, urban agriculture embodies food grown within a walking radius. We consume linearly, growing crops in mono-

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culture fields, using gasoline to generate food, harvest food, and transport food. The linear consumption model is both unsustainable and removed from the consumer. In a cyclic model, citizens of Seattle can grow and harvest their own food. By remodeling our impactful relationship with food, we intend to shape a more culturally self-sufficient Seattle. Urban agriculture infused into the heart of Seat-

tle, brings together the city’s iconic waterfront, cultural marketplace, and the need for an efficient, connective system. Utilizing urban agriculture, combined with community green space and mass transit, enhances the existing attributes of Seattle while creating a culture based upon the education and societal reliance of closely harvested foods.

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X.CHANGE TOWER

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| ARCH454 | SUMMER 2010 | URATION: 5 WEEKS | LOCATION: NEW YORK, NY | PROJECT: MID-RISE HOUSING

X.CHANGE

{mid-rise tower}

This project attempts to act as a social condenser within the confines of skinny site located in the Lower Bowery in New York City. Three types of living are dispersed vertically throughout the building, zoned in elevation according to activity levels within the site; POD units positioned at the front edge, with couple units at the middle, and family units at the back side. The programmatic elements involved in this

project were left to be defined as the project progressed. Progression of diagrams illustrates the response to New York building code requirements and the development and specification of affordable housing elements.

X.CHANGE TOWER

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PODS CO M M U N A L FAM I LY T H R E E ( 3 ) G R E AT J O N E S C A F É M I D D L E S I Z E D U N I TS O U T D O O R S S PAC E C I R C U L AT I O N & EGRESS

PODs 80 – 100 sqft Th i s re s i d e n t i a l u n i t i s fo c u s e d o n t h e yo u n g wo r k i n g p ro fe s sional

M i d d l e s i ze d units 300 – 400 sqft Th i s re s i d e n t i a l u n i t c re a te d to s e r ve a f a m i l y o f t wo o r fo r t wo yo u n g p ro fe s sionals that want to s h a re a cco m m o d a t i o n s.

Fa m i l y t h re e 600 – 800 sqft Th e f a m i l y o f t h re e re s i d e n t i a l u n i t s a re a i m e d a t a cco m m o d a t i n g o n e co u p l e a n d o n e c h i l d.

X.CHANGE TOWER

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X.CHANGE TOWER

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BOOKS ABROAD

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| INTERNSHIP | SUMMER 2010 | DURATION: 6 WEEKS | LOCATION: GAMBIA, NIGERIA, KENYA, & GHANA | PROJECT: LIBRARY |

BOOKS ABROAD

Wings of the Dawn is a nonprofit organization based in Texas. It specializes in setting up these centers in communities without libraries and upgrades existing educational facilities to serve as central locations where children, youth and adults can have access to education, employment and business resources. Literacy is the gateway to freedom and equality. The lack of materials, staff and facilities can be sol-

{library project}

ved with a targeted program of delivering books and a space for local readers to remote locations. One answer - sturdy, depreciated and decommissioned shipping container filled with books and computers. These hardy structures are designed to travel by ship, plane, rail and truck and to withstand the most brutal environments.

BOOKS ABROAD

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Books abroad is a project currently evolving, sponsored by wings of the dawn – international institute for children and created by firm817. Wings of the Dawn is a nonprofit organization based in Texas that instills Lifelong Learning Centers in Africa as an intergenerational model where adults and youth own, tailor and manage education and community revitalization services. It specializes in setting up these centers in communities without libraries and upgrades existing educational facilities to serve as central locations where children, youth and adults can have access to education, employment and business resources. Literacy is the gateway to freedom and equality. The lack of materials, staff and facilities can be solved with a targeted program of delivering books and a space for local readers to remote locations. One answer - sturdy, depreciated and decommissioned shipping container filled with books and computers. These hardy structures are designed to travel by ship, plane, rail and truck and to withstand the most brutal environments.

BOOKS ABROAD

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BOOKS ABROAD

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PAVILION

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| ARCH353 | FALL 2009 | DURATION: 2 WEEKS | LOCATION: MOSCOW, IDAHO | PROJECT: PAVILION |

PAVILION

{arboretum project}

This pavilion serves as a refuge in nature. Positioned in the pond located in the University’s arboretum, the pavilion is placed out of the way of constant traffic. Formally, the proportions are derived from the dimensions of a Tanami mat, implicitly reinforcing the notion of meditation. In plan, the space is partitioned in several units, within each unit is a Tanami mat sized seating place.

Traditional Japanese and vernacular architecture inspire the formal architectural aesthetic of the pavilion. The variation of the contour of the roofline allows an array of different sun exposures, providing different options for the inhibiter of the pavilion to select from.

PAVILION

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PAVILION

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PAVILION

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architecture portfolio 2012  

this is a document comulation of my architectural work at present

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