Page 1

October 2016

Vol XII No 10


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

W alter W ilson P American Artist

ain ting s

on

3

Cover painting by Walter Wilson

vie w

at Tubac Center of the Arts

by Kathleen Vandervoet

A special one-man show of the art of Walter Blakelock Wilson is on view at the Tubac Center of the Arts until Nov. 13. His paintings, many of which focus on southwest landscapes or portraits, combine bold forms and strong color with softened and blurred edges to create impressive depictions of mood and beauty. Wilson, who died in Tubac in December 2011, was a lifelong artist, teacher and businessman. Born in 1929, he was raised in upstate New York, where as a young boy, he was strongly influenced by the paintings of his great grandfather, Ralph Albert Blakelock, one of the most unique of the 19th century Hudson River School painters. Wilson graduated with honors in fine arts from Colgate University in 1951. He and his family lived for many years in Colorado Springs. In 1988, Walter and his wife Patty, moved to Tubac where they opened Old

World Imports. That business is now operated by his son, Lincoln Wilson. The show at the Tubac Center of the Arts is in the Studio room and features 15 of his works. His children were the driving force in developing this special exhibit, said Mike Fenlason of the art center. “Elephant Head in Monsoon Season,” a huge painting measuring 60 by 56 inches, notably dominates the show, which includes a range of other work in either oil or acrylic, in sizes from small to large. “Moonrise of the Santa Cruz Valley” is another local work, while others depict, for example, “Twilight in the Salt River Canyon” and “Night Flight View of Albuquerque.” The Tubac Center of the Arts is open seven days a week. For information, call (520) 398-2371.

When you visit the Walter Wilson exhibit at the Tubac Center of the Arts showing through November 13, 2016 be sure to inquire about Wilson's book.

Available at the TCA, the book contains 224 pages, 316 illustrations, and 254 color plates, giving detailed insight on this important American artist. This journal is made possible through the support of local advertisers, artists and writers... please visit their unique businesses and let them know where you saw their ad, art or article. The Tubac Villager is a locally owned and independently operated journal, published monthly to celebrate the art of living in Southern Arizona. Opinions and information herein do not necessarily reflect those of the advertisers or the publishers. Advertiser and contributor statements and qualifications are the responsibility of the advertiser or contributor named. All articles and images are the property of the Tubac Villager, and/or writer or artist named, and may not be reproduced without permission. Letters are welcome. 'The Villager is made available in racks and at businesses throughout the Santa Cruz Valley and also made available at public libraries in Arivaca, Green Valley, Nogales, Rio Rico and numerous Tucson Libraries and businesses. October 2016 Tubac Villager printed 6,000 copies. NEXT ISSUE PRINTS EARLY NOVEMBER

Walter Wilson (1929-2011) at his easel at his Tubac studio. A collection of Wilson's paintings is currently on view at the Tubac Center of the Arts until November 13. Image courtesy of the Wilson family.


Wants to invite you to:

Saturday, November 12 At 5 O’ Clock in the evening

Gala Dinner and Entertainment Under The Stars! TICKETS $150 Cocktail attire Rock Corral Ranch in Tumacacori, Arizona

Catered by La Roca Restaurant Music by Domingo DeGrazia, Spanish Guitar Band

BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT ARSOBO.ORG For more information call: Bill Neubauer at (520) 444-9048

Let’s enjoy the night together and make changes in the life of those in need!! ABOUT US ARSOBO is a US/MEXICO Cross Border Non-Profit Organization Supporting Individuals with Disabilities. ARSOBO is a tax exempt non-profit organization (NGO) under section 501 (c) (3) of the Internal Revenue Code. Donations to ARSOBO are deductions under section 170 of the code. OUR MISSION “ARSOBO assists in alleviating the physical, psychological, and economic barriers faced by individuals with disabilities by providing appropriate, adaptive-technology, low-cost, assisted devices that improve access and participation in their communities.”

WWW.ARSOBO.ORG


in Tubac

6TH ANNUAL QUICK DRAW & ART AUCTION SATURDAY

NOVEMBER 19, 2016 1-8PM $ 1 & 5 CALLE BACA

Christmas Comes Early for Tubac Cowboys Schedule of Events 1–2:30 Quick Draw competition

20+ local artists have only 90 minutes to create a completed work of art for the charity auction to benefit the TCA’s Hi-Art Program, which encourages and supports area high school students interested in exploring fine art.

3–5 5–8

Charity Auction of Quick Draw Art

A live auction by famed professional auctioneer Gary Corbett.

Cowboy cuisine catered by Tubac Jacks with music to follow TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR $$25.00 Benefit for TCA HI-ART program

Available for purchase at: Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise, Tubac Territory and Tubac Center for the Arts. Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery 5 Calle Baca Rd.; Tubac, AZ 85646 rogowaygalleries.com • 520-398-2041 Tubac Territory Furniture & Interiors 1 Calle Baca Rd.; Tubac, AZ 85646 ttfurniture.com • 520-398-2913

Last Year’s Participants were… Roberta Rogers Manny Valenzuela Leigh Morrison Roy Purcell Karon Leigh David Simons Nicholas Wilson Lyle Collister

Jim Petty John Marbury Lou Maestas Hugh Beykirch Wolfgang Vaatz Annie Santa Maria Lisa Larrabee Fred Collins

Hoste

d by


8 JUST IN FROM GUATEMALA TABLE RUNNERS PILLOW COVERS HUNDREDS OF BAGS AND PURSES CARVED SANTOS AND ANGELS

JUST IN FROM ECUADOR MACHINE WASHABLE TABLE CLOTHS AND RUNNERS PANAMA HATS

5 STAR - TRIP ADVISOR RATED #1 BEST PLACE TO SHOP IN TUBAC AS ALWAYS: INCREDIBLE DISPLAYS - VAST SELECTION - FRIENDLY AND HELPFUL STAFF

HUNDREDS OF COLORFUL SCARVES

JUST IN FROM PERU HAND KNIT COTTON SWEATERS CARVED GOURDS PISAC POTTERY RETABLOS FINE SILVER JEWELRY MILAGROS AND MORE!

JUST IN FROM MEXICO PEWTER SERVING PIECES SEMI LOAD OF DINNERWARE BLOWN GLASS PITCHERS AND GLASSES ZAPOTEC RUGS FROM OAXACA BLOWN GLASS HUMMINGBIRDS ANOTHER SEMI LOAD OF TECATE POTS SILVER FROM TAXCO

COMING SOON SEMI LOAD OF TALAVERA POTS MORE DINNERWARE! SEMI LOAD OF OXIDADO POTS HATCH CHILES!

WE HAVE BEEN IMPORTING FOLK ART FROM THE CRAFT CENTERS OF LATIN AMERICA FOR 40 YEARS. WE WORK WITH HUNDREDS OF ARTISANS, IN VILLAGES FROM MEXICO TO ARGENTINA. THE QUALITY OF ART WE DISPLAY REFLECTS DECADES OF TREATING ARTISANS FAIRLY AND BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS THAT SPAN GENERATIONS. WE INVITE YOU TO EXPERIENCE ONE OF THE BEST LATIN AMERICAN FOLK ART COLLECTIONS ANYWHERE. - Bill & Cheryl Green

Our hand painted porcelain dinnerware collection features over 125 pieces in 14 designs. It is fired at 1800 degrees, is dishwasher safe, ovenproof, and microwavable. All patterns are open stock. All items are lead free, and safe for food use. We are a licensed FDA facility, and all items have been inspected and approved.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

7

Santa Cruz County Update

By Kathleen Vandervoet

DOME HOUSE GONE FROM VILLAGE

CONGRESS COMMITTEE HEARS ABOUT CHECKPOINT

A geodesic dome building that was a part of downtown Tubac for decades was demolished in August after the roof caved in.

Tubac Realtor and developer Gary Brasher testified before the House Subcommittee on Border and Maritime Security in late September.

The dome at 25 Calle Baca was built in the mid-1970s when there were few shops in the village. It served as the workshop of Origins Press and lithographs by numerous artists were created there.

It had been vacant in recent years and now the property is owned by Windward Partners. The prior owner didn’t maintain the roof, said Todd Harrison who is part of a team with Windward. Harrison said the group has aggregated four vacant land parcels, including the dome parcel, with the intent to develop a boutique hotel north of the La Entrada de Tubac shopping plaza.

The newsletter of Tubac’s Santa Cruz Valley Citizens Council reported: Congresswoman Martha McSally, the chairperson of the committee, called the hearing (titled “Moving the Line of Scrimmage: Re-Examining the Defense-in-Depth Strategy”) to question Border Patrol’s “in-depth” strategy, including the use of checkpoints like the one on I-19.

Gary Brasher told the subcommittee that residents believe inland checkpoint operations have opened up miles of U.S. rural land to trespassers, giving them what Brasher called “free run” of the 25-mile “no-man’s land” that the Border Patrol does not staff. He said that although the community supports Border Patrol and understands the need for enforcement, that “this isn’t the Gaza Strip.” 

Shown in 2015, this dome was part of Tubac for more than 40 years. It was demolished recently.

LICENSE PLATE READERS ADDED ON I-19

Driving north or south - you’re being watched!

Cameras that photograph license plates of every vehicle were added in September to the east side of northbound Interstate 19 at the Tubac Border Patrol immigration and smuggling checkpoint. They are very similar to the license plate readers installed on the west side of southbound I-19 at the checkpoint in 2012.

“The license plate readers scan license plates of passing vehicles and compare the numbers to lists of stolen cars and those used in the commission of a crime,” said a comment issued by the public affairs office of the Tucson Sector Border Patrol.

Metal guard rails were also installed on the east and west edges of the roadway in the location of the license plate readers. There was no response to two requests for the budgeted cost of the project. CANDIDATE FORUM SET OCT. 13

The public is invited to a candidate forum organized by the Santa Cruz Valley Citizens Council on Thursday, Oct.13, at Rio Rico High School starting at 5:30 p.m.

Invited are candidates running to be this area’s state senator, state representatives, county supervisor, Dist. 35 school board and Tubac fire board members. Early voting for the Nov. 8 election begins Oct. 12. Rio Rico High School is located at 590 Camino Lito Galindo, west of the Peck Canyon interchange on I-19. BREAKFAST WITH HISTORY IS NOV. 7

The Tubac Historical Society resumes its winter time Breakfast with History programs and the next one is Monday, Nov. 7, at 8:30 a.m. at Wisdom’s restaurant in Tumacacori. The speaker is Steve Gastellum.

The topic will be the complex and lengthy Baca Float decisions and the effect on property owners. The controversial placement of a “floating” land grant by the King of Spain in the Santa Cruz Valley in 1863 brought disappointment and heartache to the families who lived in the valley prior to that time and to settlers who homesteaded the area.

It encompassed land in what's now Tubac, Tumacácori and Rio Rico and the Santa Rita mountain range. People who had settled there in the 19th century lost their property in 1917 when the Supreme Court reversed numerous decisions by the Department of the Interior and, in effect, evicted families from their homes. To reserve a seat, call (520) 398-2020. Tickets are $20 for historical society members and $25 for others.

Brasher said in his testimony that the Border Patrol checkpoint on Interstate 19 has resulted in illegal immigrants and others coming into the surrounding communities not for minutes or hours, but sometimes days. Brasher said the checkpoint affects business because people are hesitant to hold events in Tubac because they aren’t used to that level of “militarization.”

He said he has heard from local business owners about people who wouldn’t travel down I-19 because they thought they needed a passport to get back into “the United States.” Also at the hearing was newly installed Border Patrol Chief Mark Morgan. Brasher said Morgan has only been at the job for several months, but nevertheless maintained that checkpoints are an effective use of scarce resources when there is a low ratio of agents to miles of border. Brasher said that Morgan testified for about five or eight minutes and then left the hearing room. He was not present to hear Mr. Brasher and the three other witnesses testify.

PROTECT YOURSELF AND THOSE AROUND YOU

GET THE SHOT, NOT THE FLU! Your

Your family is our family

• Nogales • Rio Rico • Patagonia • Tubac

www.mariposachc.net

TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT, CALL 520-281-1550


8

Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Santa Cruz County Update continued...

DRONES A FOREST CONCERN

Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), or drones, are becoming increasingly popular among outdoor recreationists. Much of the land surrounding Tubac, Rio Rico and Green Valley is part of the Coronado National Forest.

While Coronado National Forest has authority to manage the lands upon the Forest, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is the sole controller of the National Airspace System.

The landing of aircraft (which the FAA considers UAS) is prohibited on lands administered by the US Forest Service. Exceptions include when the craft is forced to land due to an emergency, in officially designated landing sites or on approved official business of the Federal Government. “It comes down to being a responsible drone operator and realizing that you are essentially a pilot in the eyes of the FAA,” said Coronado National Forest Aviation Officer Sean Cox.

“We provide multiple-use land management and a variety of recreation experiences on Forest lands. Those uses should be accompanied by responsibility and common sense.” FULL MOON NIGHTS AT TUMACÁCORI

The skies of southern Arizona are famous for clear, dark nights, perfectly suited to the study of the heavens. Whether by the glow of a full moon or the sparkle of stars, Tumacácori National Historic Park is a beautiful place to enjoy the night.

Once each month from September through February, the park stays open until 8:30 p.m. to celebrate the full moon. At 6:30 p.m. each night, a ranger will also offer a free, candle-lit tour of the mission grounds.

Visitors are encouraged to bring layered clothing, flashlights, binoculars and cameras. Admission to the park is $5 per adult, free for federal pass holders and children under age 16. For more information, call the visitor center at (520) 377-5060, or visit the park website at nps.gov/tuma. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED FOR FREE TAX PREP

More volunteers are needed to assure that free tax preparation assistance in Tubac and Rio Rico continues. Training starts in December for leaders and in January for volunteers. Through the AARP Tax-Aide program, the opportunity has been available in recent years. David Jernigan said that because of health issues, he’s retiring as local coordinator.

The group needs a volunteer coordinator to handle publicity and schedule locations, times and dates. The electronic returns originator volunteer checks returns to make sure all of the necessary papers have been signs, and electronically transmit returns to the IRS. Also needed are counselors who actually prepare the returns and release them for review and submittal. Jernigan said there are six computers available at each tax session but they seldom have that many counselors.

For more information or to sign up, call Dave Jernigan at (520) 470-9435 or send an email to revdwj@me.com. Find more details at http://www.aarp.org/money/taxes/ aarp_taxaide/ For comments or questions, contact Kathleen Vandervoet at kathleenvandervoet@gmail.com


Come enjoy our updated menu and cooler weather on the patio at Shelby’s Bistro.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

10

S

Birding in Tubac by John O'Neill

ept. 7 was a dark and stormy day in the Tubac area. At the risk of blatant anthropomorphizing (six syllables; top that), even the lesser goldfinches at the thistle feeder were sopping, quarrelsome and clinically depressed. The remnants of Hurricane Newton churned up the I-19 corridor, whipping the seed pods off our mesquite trees and compelling local birds and humans to seek snug places to wait out the deluge.

Lisowski said the Tubac bird was a Leach’s storm-petrel type, a bird recently divided into three species by ornithologists. He didn’t see it well enough to document it as a Leach’s or Townsend’s storm petrel, so it was merely reported as a storm petrel species, making it no less rare, just unnamed.

No one could have predicted at about 2 p.m., as the eye of the storm passed, that the next four hours would develop into an adrenaline-pumping, record-breaking, sure-to-be-legendary day in Arizona birding history. Dozens, maybe hundreds of seabirds were pushed north from the Pacific Ocean and Gulf of California by the storm, bringing THREE species new to Arizona, one of them a North American record. And one little deep-ocean, web-footed bird visited the Tubac Golf Resort. Birders, knowing hurricanes propel oceanic birds inland from deep salt-water habitats, from which they would never leave unless forced by a natural anomaly, were out peering through rain-splattered binoculars and spotting scopes. Soon their posts lighted up the Arizona/New Mexico internet birding listserv like the Las Vegas strip on a moonless night (world’s worst analogy entry): Tucson birder Chris McCreedy alerted the listserv that storm petrels were at Patagonia Lake, though IDs were dubious because of torrential rains. Green Valley-based birding guide Laurens Halsey found storm petrels at the Amado sewage treatment pond, “two with white rumps and one with a dark rump.” Then, to his astonishment, “a shearwater just flew by.” Tubac birder Bill Lisowsky was driving north on I-19 past the Chavez Siding exit when he saw a storm petrel to the east. He had to go through the Border Patrol station and return south in quest of the bird. He was rewarded with a storm petrel with a white rump near a pond at the Tubac Golf Resort, but it vanished before he could take a photograph. There was also an American avocet at the resort, a most unusual bird here. Brian Patrick Gibbons returned to his Tucson home after watching storm petrels at local venues to see and photograph a Juan Fernandez petrel cruising by his yard, an Arizona and North American record and surely one of the best yard birds ever spotted. Seabird postings were coming from so many directions birders were perplexed. McCreedy, at the Patagonia Lake hotspot, pleaded for updates from Amado birders because he didn’t know

shearwater at Amado; and two storm petrels species seen in past years in Arizona after hurricanes, least storm petrel at Amado and Patagonia, and one black storm petrel.

Still confused? So am I trying to ‘splain this stuff. Just think of the seabird invaders as rare; rare; rarer; rarest; and you-gotta-be-kiddin’. Below is some generic information about storm petrels and a bit of specific data about the three first-time Arizona birds, wedge-rumped storm petrels, Juan Fernandez petrels, and wedge-tailed shearwaters.

whether to stay put or zoom around the Santa Rita Mountains. The listserv postings set my heart thumping and wheels splashing to the Amado sewage pond where so many birders had gathered there was no good place to park along the frontage road. Scopes were focused on several of what proved, after careful study, to be at least four wedge-rumped storm petrels, the first ever seen in the Grand Canyon state, and one least storm petrel. Another seabird, a red phalarope, was bobbing on the pond. While storm-petrel watching, Halsey noticed and photographed a fly-by wedge-tailed shearwater, another first for Arizona. By the time the feathers had settled, some 25 storm petrels of three species (plus one different but unidentified) were recorded -- at Tucson ponds, in Amado, at Patagonia Lake, in Benson, in Mesa, at the Tubac Golf Resort, the I-19 rest stop, and one found in Rio Rico. Doubtless many more storm petrels passed unseen by birders. Confused by all this storm petrel/petrel/shearwater stuff ? Here in a paragraph, as terse as possible, is Seabirding 101. Seabirds (order Procellariiformes) have a fossil record dating 60 million years. There are 117 species of diverse sizes and ranges. All have tubular noses on their upper bills and web feet. Oops; not terse enough. Five species of the deep-sea marine birds were verified in Arizona resulting from the storm: the aforementioned state record wedge-rumped storm petrels, seen at Patagonia Lake and Amado, Juan Fernandez petrel in Tucson, and a wedge-tailed

Storm petrels are the smallest of sea birds, about 5.5 to 7 inches in length, with wing spans of about 15 inches. They are strictly pelagic (birder word for oceanic), coming ashore only to breed. They feed on plankton crustaceans and small fish picked from the ocean surfaces, often while hovering, and other times by patting and moving their feet on the water’s surface while letting the breeze hold them in place. This feeding behavior led some people to dub storm petrels “walk-on-water” birds. The wedge-rumped storm petrels seen here bred on Ecuador’s Galapagos Islands. The Juan Fernandez petrel is a large species of gadfly petrel, 17 inches long with a 38 inch wing span. They nest only on Isla Alejandro Selkirk and forage there and around Isla Robinson Crusoe, about 400 miles offshore from Chile. Chicks are fed a diet of regurgitated fish and squid (yum, yum). Wedge-tailed shearwaters are a widespread tubenose seabird with a wingspan of about 40 inches. Sometimes called muttonbirds (let’s hope not for obvious reasons), they breed on tropical islands. They dine on fish, squid and crustaceans. Their young live totally at sea for four years before returning to land to build a burrow and raise a single chick. Wind-blown sea bird invasions are usually one-day wonders for birders lucky enough to be in the area and to be alerted in time. Arizona birders to our north were too far away to participate on day one. So the next day, Sept. 8, Glendale (Maricopa County) birder Tommy DeBardeleben and a

continued on page 13...


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J u n e / J u ly 2 0 1 6

L o c ate d i n L A E N T R A DA DE T U BAC

Featured classes for Full Schedule visit

www.cookinga-z.com

ELAINE'S INDIA $45 WITH ELAINE LEIGH WEDNESDAY 10/12/2016 FROM 11:00 am - 1:30 pm Elaine Leigh brings her Bombay upbringing to Tubac!   She shares her favorite vegetarian recipes from one of the tastiest and healthiest world cuisines. In this hands on class, we will cook three entrees including (1) lentils with tomato, onion garlic and spices, (2) potatoes with garam masala in a tomato sauce and (3) green beans with mustard seeds and almonds. A quick and easy tomato chutney as well as a fantastic cooling peach and cardamom lassi beverage will round out the rich and spicy flavors of India.  White wine will be provided with the meal.

COOKING Z-A FROM ZUCCHINIALMONDS $50 WITH LAURENCE LEGOUGE THURSDAY 10/20/2016 FROM 11:00 am - 1:30 pm French instructor Laurence Legouge teaches three classic dishes of everyday french cuisine. Start with a Zucchini soup and end with an Almond fruit salad. Eggs, ham and cheese complement this perfect meal and keep it light, yet filling. First course: Douceur de courgettes a la Vache qui rit®. For years, people have been wondering why the Laughing Cow laughs. Nobody knows. But this zucchini and VQR soup will definitely put a smile on your face. Second course: Quiche - salade. Quiche is a tradition in France, and when one does not know what to prepare for dinner, the answer is often a ham and cheese quiche served with salad. Make a white pie crust, a whole wheat one, or use puff pastry. Each one will come out tasting differently. Third course: Salade de fruits aux amandes. Almonds in the fruit salad give it a sweet and crunchy taste. Add orange blossom water, mint and lemon juice and you have a delicate dessert that lets you finish on a lighter note. Served with cookies. Wine served with the meal.

PIZZA ON THE PATIO $45 WITH RANDY WADE

"I go to the classes because I love to chop and touch and smell the food and be a part of the process, but, I've also noticed that there are plenty of people who just love the real-life experience of watching someone else do the cooking, and then to enjoy the food together." - Madeline A.

We will also have a fresh chopped salad with local organic greens form Tubac's Double Z farm. Beer and wine will accompany.

TAMALES TO GO $45 WITH LAURA DUNCAN

HANDS-ON

MONDAY 10/24/2016 FROM 10:00 am - 1:00 pm This will be our very first tamale workshop and we are so excited to teach the age-old tradition of tamale making. This class will be all "hands on", creating two delicious tamale recipes . We will make a red chili beef tamale and a sweet and savory vegetable tamale. You will have the opportunity to taste each of these tamales in class and you will be taking home a half dozen of the tamales we make to share with family or friends. Arbuckle's Mexicali Coffee will be served.

Classes • Demonstrations • Private Events • www.cookinga-z.com

SATURDAY 10/22/2016 FROM 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM This is a Pizza skills class for all levels of cooks. We will work with dough, make sauce, and cook pizza in a portable pizza oven. Each student will have the opportunity to make a pizza with toppings of their choice. Recipes for an excellent and easy pizza dough as well as two sauce types will be provided to each student.

DINNER IN A PUMPKIN $55 WITH JERI HOYLE FRIDAY 10/28/2016 FROM 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm

Above: Jack M. with Fresh Apple Blossoms in a Pastry Class

This is a beautiful harvest dish bursting with all the autumn flavors we love. A mixture of turkey, wild rice and mushrooms are seasoned with savory herbs and spices and roasted in a whole sugar pumpkin. We'll even roast the seeds! We will also prepare a Baby Spinach Salad with Cranberries, Roasted Pumpkin Seeds and Dijon vinaigrette. Our dessert to accompany this meal will be Sea Salt Chocolate Cheesecake , a light and easy no bake cheesecake that will become a favorite. Wine pairings and Oktoberfest beer will be served with the meal.

FURTHER FUN WITH FILO $45 WITH ERICA SWADLEY FRIDAY 11/1/2016 FROM 11:00 am - 1:30 pm In this hands on class, we're offering an opportunity to expand your filo skills. For first time filo folk, we'll go over the simple techniques for conquering fear of filo. For old hands there will be some sumptuous recipes that would be good to try for the upcoming holiday season. We'll make an Elegant Orzo and Veggie Torte. We'll make a savory roulade, either from mushrooms or autumnal vegetables, which can be served in small portions as an appetizer or in hearty slabs for an entree. We'll finish with a Maple Bourbon Pecan Baklava, not your Greek auntie's recipe.

TORTILLA SOUP $45 WITH JERI HOYLE WEDNESDAY 11/2/2016 FROM 11:00 am - 1:30 pm

Open 7 days 10 am- 5 pm - La Entrada de Tubac Tubac, AZ - 520.398.9497 - tumacookery.com

Tortilla soup is a party favorite, perfect to make for a crowd. It's delicious year round but has become a "Fall Gathering" tradition. This is a recipe was developed by Jeri over the years and is always a repeat request. It's fun to serve with crisp fried tortilla strips and tasty condiments. The perfect accompaniment is a salad of farm fresh tender greens, jicama and seasonal pomegranate dressing. It's not a party without a show-stopping desert. So we will make a Tequila Spiked Arizona Pecan Pie "Boo"zy Jamaica Punch will also add to the festivities!


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

13

Birding in Tubac continued from page 10...

birding friend rose well before sunup with hopes of seeing some lingering seabirds at Amado and Patagonia Lake, hotspots from the day before. Finding all the pelagic birds gone, they rushed to Benson to chase a storm petrel somebody found there that day, but it had flown to parts unknown. Then they burned rubber north to Mesa, near Phoenix, to see a storm petrel found there that day. “It showed up right by where our long trip began at 4 a.m. this morning,” he said. As the excitement waned on Sept. 8, birders realized that survival prospects for seabirds in the desert were dismal because of their exhausting journeys and lack of marine food, the only nourishment they knew how to locate. Several suggested anybody finding a live bird take it to wildlife rehab. Dead birds could be put in home freezers for ornithologists to study later. There was one more opportunity for empathy and aid to a stranded bird, when, to birders’ surprise, a black storm petrel showed up at the Benson sewage treatment pond Sept. 10, three days after the great Sept. 7 oceanic bird fallout. Kurt Radamaker suggested birders going to look for the storm petrel first mix up an odiferous brew called chum by blending fish or shrimp with fish oil to toss into the sewage pond. “If we can get the “stormy” to eat it may be enough to strengthen it and get it back to the gulf [of California] fat and happy,” he wrote. I began to wonder if the three new state bird records in a single day could be, in itself, a record, the most new birds seen in a day in Arizona since Asians crossed the

land bridge from Siberia to Alaska about 13,000 years ago, roamed down the West Coast eating saber-toothed and woolymammoth sandwiches and headed east along the I-8 corridor. Not so, said Andrew Core, who compiles the Southeast Arizona Rare Bird Alert. Tropical storm Nora, in 1997, also brought three species to Arizona that were state records – black storm petrel, Leach’s storm petrel and black-vented shearwater. Birds added as North American records are extremely rare, usually one or two a year. Yet the Juan Fernandez petrel was the second North American record from the Santa Cruz/Pima county area in four months. A pine flycatcher was found in the Santa Cruz Mountains in May. Unlike the seabirds, it was decent enough to linger for weeks until hundreds of birders in four-wheel, high clearance vehicles could view it, 9.9 miles up a steep, rutted road west of Highway 83 from Sonoita. Keep your binoculars polished. Who knows what’s next. *** Moonless nights in the fall are good times to bird the sky. In early evening Cygnus, the swan, looks magnificent flying through the Milky Way, and Aquila, the eagle, which doesn’t really look like a bird, is nearby. Other times of year we can view Corvus, the crow/raven. For those into plant-eating, hoofed, domesticated mammals that fly like birds, Pegasus, the great winged horse, dominates a big section of sky in the fall.

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MARCH 1 - 8, 2017

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Experience the exotic Baja Peninsula from Mexicali to Santa Rosalia

Visit the Lagoons where the gray whales return every year to have their calves. In early March, the mothers are friendly often bring the babies to the boat to get to know us. We can’t guarantee it, but it is the best chance to get to pet a baby whale! No words can describe the experience! It will forever change your view of how we relate to other species. * Fly across the Sea of Cortez * Visit a botique winery in the famed Guadalupe Valley * Learn about colonial history, prehistoric and natural history of this unique and incredible world. ** We offer 30 years of experiences and personal friendships to make your tour unforgettable!


14

Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

The Magic of a Tubac Garden & Orchard

Words and photos by Paula Beemer

I

grew up in Chile, a country that is blessed with rich soil and the conditions that allow us to grow fruits and vegetables right in our backyards, with no major effort.

at the end of Piedra Dr., right next to Tubac Creek. Their backyard shook my conformist soul.

I have great childhood memories of biting into apricots and peaches within seconds of harvest, as well as tossing the rotten fruit at my siblings during our playful battles. I also remember the smell of my mother’s marmalade simmering on the stove as a result of a very productive season.

They not only have an incredible garden with eggplants, chiles, corn, tomatoes and more, but also a beautiful, productive orchard! Over 60 fruit trees grace their property, to include pomegranates, figs, quince and other varieties. To my amazement they even have blackberries. I started to wonder if there was magic involved!

When the sweet thoughts of a garden with fruit trees come to my mind, and through all of my senses, it always makes me wish I had one. I had wrongly come to the conclusion that living in the desert would deprive me of such a pleasure.

And just like I remember my mother’s satisfaction, Cassey expresses the same in her words, smiles and in the brightness of her eyes as she describes the recipes she puts together with her own production of ingredients.

After making peace with the “you can’t” thought, I was recently invited to the home of Tubac residents Cassey and Gary Pundt

Cassey and Gary are very humble in their accomplishments as gardeners, but I managed to unveil the magic I had suspected


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

15

(Above) Cassey and Gary Pundt standing proud with the results of their dedication at Tubac Creek Heritage Orchard & Garden. (Below) A good crop deserves a good celebration!

(Facing page, top) The inspiring varieties of colors in the peppers. (Facing page, below) The pomegranates are ready to be picked.

was there. The secret that is no secret. It is a mixture of perseverance, passion and vision. In 2009 they began to develop a two-acre area, installed a well and established an irrigation system. There are four key aspects to a successful garden: water, good soil, irrigation and mulch. With all these elements in place, it became a matter of trial an error, Gary explained. We like to start everything from seeds and in the case of the trees, it only took five plants to produce all the trees we have now, Gary explained. Most of the hard work was done in the beginning, now the process is for the most part automated, except for the picking. It is sometimes hard to keep up with the speed of production, they explained. Their crop is also much more than they can personally consume and that is when the community sees the one of the many benefits of having great neighbors like the Pundts.

Some of their produce reaches Tubac residents through the Tubac Market, and also through the local farm stand outside The Goods. Some has even been used in the cooking classes at Tumacookery. Although it is not a business at the moment, and they prefer to call it a “jobby,” half job, half hobby, they have given their operation a name. “Tubac Creek Heritage Orchard & Garden.” Today they are able to enjoy the “fruits” of their labors, sitting at a patio table in the middle of the garden, sipping a glass of red wine and listening to the romantic tunes of the movie “French Kiss.” As the last rays of the sun filter through the trees, the “Tubac Creek Heritage Orchard & Garden” glows in radiant glory as a payback for their efforts and dedication to the land.

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General Election 2016 November 08, 2016 Schedule of Events

Request for Early Ballots now being accepted through October 28, 2016 Request may be made in writing or verbally by contacting the Recorder’s Office at (520) 375-7924.

Permanent Early Voting List (PEVL): To automatically receive an Early Ballot for each election for which you are eligible. Please call the Recorder’s Office at (520) 375-7924 or visit our website at servicearizona.com or co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder under “Permanent Early Voting List Request”. Last day to apply for Permanent Early Voting is October 28, 2016. Monday – October 10, 2016: Voter Registration Deadline To register to vote, please visit the Santa Cruz County Recorder’s Office or call to request a voter registration form. You may also register to vote online at servicearizona.com or co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder. Qualifications to vote in Santa Cruz County: Be a United States citizen; a resident of Santa Cruz County at least 29 days prior to the Election; will be 18 years of age or more on or before Election Day; not convicted of a felony or treason, or your rights have been restored-for more information, please contact the Recorder’s Office at (520)375-7924 or visit our website at co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder under “Voter Information”; not adjudicated to be an incapacitated person (A.R.S. 14-5101) Wednesday – October 12, 2016 through Friday – November 04, 2016: Early Voting Available Santa Cruz County Recorder, 2150 N. Congress Dr., Suite 101, Nogales, Arizona (Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.) Early Ballots may be delivered to the Recorder’s Office and any polling place until 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. Last Day to Register for November Election: October 10, 2016 First Day of Early Voting: October 12, 2016 Last Day to Request an Early Ballot: October 28, 2016

ASSISTANCE TO VOTERS: A Special Election Board may be sent to the voter’s residence if you are ill or disabled. Please contact our office at (520) 375-7924 for further information.

MILITARY /U.S. CITIZENS LIVING OUTSIDE UNITED STATES: Complete Federal Post Card Registration and Absentee Request Form which are available at all United States Embassy and Consulate offices around the world. The form may be returned to our office by mail, fax, or email. For further information, contact the Recorder’s Office or visit our website at co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder.

Elección General 2016 08 de noviembre del 2016 Calendario de Eventos

Solicitud de Boleta Anticipada disponible hoy hasta el día 28 de octubre del 2016 Las solicitudes deberán ser por escrito o verbalmente llamando a la Oficina del Registro Público al (520) 375-7924. Registro Permanente de Voto Anticipado (PEVL): Para automáticamente recibir una boleta anticipada para cada elección a la cual sea elegible. Favor de marcar a la Oficina Del Registro Público al (520) 375-7924 o visitar el sitio web servicearizona.com o co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder debajo de “Permanent Early Voting List Request”. Ultimo día para aplicar para el Registro Permanente de Voto Anticipado es 28 de octubre del 2016 Lunes, 10 de octubre del 2016: Último día para Registro de Votante Para registrarse para votar favor de pasar a la Oficina del Registro Público o llamar para pedir la forma de registro de votante. Puede también registrarse por medio de internet en: servicearizona.com o co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder. Para tener derecho al registro en el Condado de Santa Cruz se necesita: Ser ciudadano de los Estados Unidos; residente del Condado de Santa Cruz por lo menos 29 días antes de la Elección; si usted va a cumplir 18 años de edad el día de o antes del día de la Elección; no haber sido convicto(a) de felonía o delito mayor o de traición, o que se la hayan reintegrado sus derechos-para más información, favor de comunicarse a nuestra oficina al (520) 375-7924 o puede visitar nuestro sitio web a co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder; y que no se le haya declarado ser persona discapacitada (Estatuto 14-5101 de Arizona) Miércoles, 12 de octubre del 2016 hasta el Viernes, 04 de noviembre del 2016: Votación Anticipada Estará Disponible Oficina del Registro Público, 2150 N. Congress Dr., Suite 101, Nogales, Arizona (lunes a viernes, 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.) Votos anticipados pueden entregarse en la Oficina del Registro Público y en cualquier de las casillas de votación hasta las 7:00 p.m. el día de la Elección. Último día para registrarse para la elección de noviembre: 10 de octubre del 2016 ASISTENCIA PARA VOTANTES: Una junta electoral especial puede ser Votación anticipada estará disponible: 12 de octubre del 2016 enviada a la residencia del elector si están enfermo o discapacitado Último día para solicitar una boleta anticipada por correo: 28 de octubre del 2016 comunicándose a nuestra oficina para más información MILITAR Y CIUDADANOS ESTADOUNIDENSES QUE VIVEN FUERA DE LOS ESTADOS UNIDOS: Debe completar un formulario de inscripción y en ausencia Solicitud de Tarjeta Postal Federal (FPCA) que están disponibles en todos las embajadas y consulados de los Estados Unidos en todo el mundo. La forma puede ser devuelta a nuestra oficina por correo, fax, y correo electrónico. Para más información, hable a la Oficina Del Registro Público o viste nuestro sitio web co.santa-cruz.az.us/287/Recorder. Suzanne “Suzie” Sainz Santa Cruz County Recorder 2150 N. Congress Drive Nogales, Arizona 85621 (520) 375-7924 voter@santacruzcountyaz.gov


VOTE FOR YOUR LEGISLATIVE DISTRICT 2 DEMOCRATIC TEAM VOTA POR TU EQUIPO DEMÓCRATA EN EL DISTRITO LEGISLATIVO 2

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Senator Dalessandro has been supporting public education, economic development and Santa Cruz and Pima County seniors, children and families.

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Driven by passion for social justice and public service, he has worked on many issues at the state, local and federal level including: gun violence prevention, comprehensive immigration reform, and educational equity. Daniel is committed to fight for the prosperity of our families and community.

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Paid for by Dalessandro for AZ 2016

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

6 vie for 3 Tubac fire board seats

By Kathleen Vandervoet

Interest is high this year in board positions for the Tubac Fire District. There are six candidates for the three open slots for this unpaid position.

The fire board oversees the annual budget for fire and emergency medical response in the district which includes Tubac, Amado areas south of the county line, and the north half of Rio Rico. The board supervises the fire chief, and is responsible for hiring that individual. Board members attend monthly meetings that are open to the public.

There are two board members who have two years left on their terms, Herb Wisdom and Mike Connelly. Candidates for the four-year terms for three open positions include incumbents Randy Williams and Bill Kirkpatrick. Other candidates are Candy Clancy, Mary Dahl, Dennis Eshleman and Gene Schafer. Each was asked several questions, including one improvement he or she sees as needed in the fire district.

RANDY WILLIAMS:

The Rio Rico resident is the director of maintenance at the Nogales International Airport and said his main job there is keeping the current fleet of aircraft flying and assisting aircraft owners in keeping their aircraft in top shape. He’s is currently finishing his first four-year term on the fire board. He’s not been a member of other boards.

An improvement he would like to see relates to the 911 emergency system which “has some issues with getting calls dispatched in a timely manner. However, this has

General Election November 08, 2016 October 12 thru November 04, 2016: Santa Cruz County Recorder’s Office, 2150 N. Congress Dr., Nogales, AZ - From 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, October 22, 2016: Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd., Tubac, AZ - From 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Saturday, October 22, 2016: Santa Cruz County Public Works Department, 275 Rio Rico Dr., Rio Rico, AZ - From 2:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Saturday, October 29, 2016: Patagonia Town Hall, 310 McKeown Avenue, Patagonia, AZ - From 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Early ballot drop off at any Early Voting Site listed or at our office until November 08, 2016 or at any polling place on Election Day before 7:00 p.m. ASSISTANCE TO VOTERS: A SPECIAL ELECTION BOARD MAY BE SENT TO THE VOTER’S RESIDENCE IF YOU ARE ILL OR DISABLED. PLEASE CONTACT OUR OFFICE AT (520) 375-7924 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION.

Elección General 08 De Noviembre Del 2016 Sitios De Votación Anticipada

12 de octubre hasta el 04 de noviembre del 2016: La Oficina del Registro Público, 2150 N. Congress Dr., Nogales, AZ - de 8:00 a.m. a 5:00 p.m. Sábado, 22 de octubre del 2016: Centro Comunitario de Tubac, 50 Bridge Rd., Tubac, AZ - de 9:00 a.m. a 12:00 p.m. Sábado, 22 de octubre del 2016: Obras Publicas de Santa Cruz, 275 Rio Rico Dr., Rio Rico, AZ - de 2:00 p.m. a 5:00 p.m. Sábado, 29 de octubre del 2016: Edificio Municipal de Patagonia, 310 McKeown Avenue, Patagonia, AZ - de 9:00 a.m. a 12:00 p.m. Sábado, 29 de octubre del 2016: Estación de Bombero Sonoita, 3173 AZ-83, Sonoita, AZ - de 2:00 p.m. a 5:00 p.m. Entregué su boleta de votación anticipada en cualquier de los sitios de votación anticipada enumerados; o en nuestra oficina hasta el 08 de noviembre del 2016 o en cualquier casilla de votación el día de la elección antes de las 7:00 p.m. ASISTENCIA PARA VOTANTES: UNA JUNTA ELECTORAL ESPECIAL PUEDE SER ENVIADA A LA RESIDENCIA DEL ELECTOR SI ESTÁN ENFERMO O DESCAPACITADO CONTACTANDO A NUESTRA OFICINA PARA MÁS

been improving over the years,” he said.

BILL KIRKPATRICK:

Kirkpatrick of Tubac has already served 4 ½ years on the fire board since he was appointed to fill a vacancy, and then elected to a term.

He retired in 2003 after 23 years as production coordinator for the Arizona Film Commission (also known as the Arizona Motion Picture Development Office, Arizona Department of Commerce.) He has served on the board of the Santa Cruz Regional Council of First Things First since July 2011 with two terms as board chairman and he is currently vice chairman. One improvement he sees as needed is to upgrade the ambulance fleet, he said.

CANDY CLANCY:

She is an advisor in the area of business development for Glenmede Trust Company.

She received her Master’s degree in education, and was a teacher in Cleveland. Other work experience includes employment at banks and working in finance for a pipe producer. Clancy has served on boards in Ohio related to mental health and school alumni. A Tubac resident, she said the most important improvement that can be implemented in the fire district is financial restraint.

MARY DAHL:

Dahl was Santa Cruz County Community Services director for 14 years until she retired in June 2016. A Rio Rico resident, she is a member of the board of directors of Friends of the Tubac Presidio and will be joining the board of Friends of Las Lagunas. She said she would like to see the fire district have more fiscal discipline, more community outreach and develop programming and partnering with the Rio Rico Fire District on grant writing and other programs.

DENNIS ESHLEMAN:

A Tubac resident, Eshleman is a consultant to small businesses and not-forprofit organizations in strategic planning after spending 26 years working for Fortune 100 companies in marketing, general management and strategic planning.

He is a board member of both the Tubac Center of the Arts and the Friends of the Presidio. He is an officer on the Tubac Center of the Arts board and on the Management Committee of the Friends of the Presidio along with Earl Wilson and Shaw Kinsley

The Tubac Fire Board needs more fiscal discipline, he said. “We are routinely spending several hundred thousand dollars a year more than our revenue intake. The mismatch between spending and revenue needs to be resolved. There are also opportunities to bring innovation to the emergency medical services offered by the Tubac Fire district which must be explored to provide the district with the services we deserve. Finally, we need more community outreach between the Fire Board and the community.”

GENE SCHAFER:

He worked for the Rio Rico Fire District from 1994 to 2006 and was a firefighter, EMT and held several administrative positions. He worked for the Tubac Fire District from 2008 to 2015 when he retired. He has not previously been a board member for any group. A Rio Rico resident, Schafer would like to see a new main fire station built to replace the current Station 1 in Tubac which was built about 40 years ago and is small. A new station would also provide training facilities and better overnight facilities for employees, he said.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Dist. 3 Supervisor candidates explain goals By Kathleen Vandervoet

There are four candidates for the Nov. 8 election for a spot on the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors. The position pays $63,800 per year, plus benefits. The Board of Supervisors has three seats representing roughly equal (by population) sections of Santa Cruz County.

The District 3 supervisor represents Tubac, Tumacácori, half of Amado and half of Rio Rico, along with Patagonia, Sonoita and Elgin. Supervisors each have an office at the county building in Nogales and have secretarial assistance. They employ a County Manager for daily operations. The Board of Supervisors usually holds meetings twice a month which are open to the public. The Tubac Villager invited the candidates to respond to several questions and to submit their photograph. Here, in alphabetical order, are responses. BRUCE BRACKER, DEMOCRAT

What is one goal you believe you can accomplish in 2017 if elected?

“Between January and December 2017 I will work with the other supervisors to increase the amount of HURF (Highway User Revenue Funds) that we are receiving from the State of Arizona and use that money to pave or repair roads and extend the walking paths in our community. In addition I will be continuing my in conversations with constituents in both the eastern and western parts of the county to make certain that their needs are met.” What is your experience in overseeing a budget such as the county’s $70 million budget? “I have experience working on and developing budgets in my own business for the past 22 years and in the capacity as executive board member for several local nonprofit organizations of which some deal with public funding.” What is one concrete step the supervisors can take to increase employment in the county?

“Job creation is a long term constant effort. I will work with the other supervisors and county leadership to immediately support the business community and organizations throughout the county that are working on this effort. It is critical that we take advantage of our local assets to maximize job growth.” Will this be a full-time job for you or will you also have other employment?

“The supervisor position will be a full-time commitment for me. I will continue to be involved in my small family business where I have a partner and a full-time manager to manage day to day operations.” (Note: Bracker is a Tubac resident.)

DEAN DAVIS, INDEPENDENT

Davis said one key point to improve our economy would be to improve our identity through promoting what Santa Cruz County offers through tourism advertising. “I am optimistic that I can make a difference but I am realistic enough to realize that change will not come instantly.” As a general contractor, he’s had work experience overseeing budgets. He said, “I have assembled and

15

managed budgets of up to $6 million. As a Rio Rico Fire District Board Member, I oversee annual budget s of approximately $5 million, and as Chair of that Board, I review and sign off on our monthly expenditures per state reporting. “On a smaller scale, as former President of the Rio Rico Chamber of Commerce, I assembled and controlled annual budgets and fund raising of approximately $5,000.”

To increase employment, the Rio Rico resident said, “My first step would be to increase tourism in the county by promoting what we have in the charm of Tubac, Patagonia, Sonoita and Elgin (and) establish a definitive trail head for Sonoita Creek in Rio Rico. “Secondly, I would promote retail development in Rio Rico to capture both local dollars and Mexican dollars that are passing us by every day.

“In conjunction with the above goals, we need to ultimately remove the Border Patrol check points at the interior locations, or at the least close them on weekends to make accessibility to the county more desirable.” Regarding other employment, Davis said, “This by all means would be a full time commitment to the job.” JOSÉ "MUCHO" MARTINEZ, REPUBLICAN If elected, Martinez will immediately go over the county budget in great detail with the County Manager. “We must audit every expenditure, every penny, the county has.” He said four county buildings are not being used “but we are still paying utilities on them.” He’s been told the county spends $44,000 a month on vacant buildings. If the money is saved, he said, it could equal “what we’re wasting on the jail.”

Saved money can then be used, he believes, to supplement the budget in the sheriff ’s office. “We need more sheriffs.” He believes that economic deficiencies can be resolved locally. “We must stop blaming our problems on the state and federal governments,” he said.

A Rio Rico resident, his budget experience is only based on balancing his own household budget, he said.

A concrete step the board of supervisors can take to increase employment in the county, Martinez said, is that the county “has to focus on education and not giving so much red tape to companies that want to come in and build here. Companies want to see a workforce that is ready.” If elected this will be his full time job and he will resign from his job at a Nogales radio station, he said. CHARLIE MONTOY, INDEPENDENT He believes that one goal he can accomplish in 2017 is to “improve economic development by growing businesses.” He said he would look to create tax breaks for new companies coming into the county.

He has had daily experience with a budget, operating his own small business in Patagonia. Overseeing a $70 million county budget doesn’t worry him. “It’s all in the way you look at it,” he said.

One concrete step county supervisors can take to increase employment would be to improve infrastructure, he said. He pointed to better roads and improved Internet access. If elected, Montoy said he won’t have other employment, and the supervisor job will be full time.


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r Au g - S e p t 2 0 1 6


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

22

Family Practice

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Butterfly Cover

I was so excited to see the butterfly on the cover of the Aug-Sept 2016 edition. I have photographed that butterfly myself at my home in Green Valley.  Its range is tropical and subtropical but does extend into the Southern U.S.  But I was disappointed then reading On the cover to see it was not identified.  I think you should identify subjects in print and publications, so here is what it is:  Battus philenor.  I also included its main food source around these parts, an interesting plant in itself.  Battus philenor:    www.learnaboutbutterflies.com/North%20America%20-%20Battus%20philenor.htm and its food plant Aristolochia watsonii:  www.fireflyforest.com/flowers/173/aristolochia-watsonii-watsons-dutchmans-pipe/ and www.desertmuseum.org/books/nhsd_aristolochiaceae.php Name withheld by request Green Valley, AZ


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

VOTE YES FOR THE SCVUSD35

BUDGET OVERRIDE Letter submitted by Rich Bohman, Lil Hunsaker Members, Citizens Supporting SCVUSD35 Override

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Tubac Fire Local 4125 Supports WILLIAM KIRKPATRICK GENE SCHAFER RANDY WILLIAMS for Tubac Fire Board

The success of our children and our community depends on our ability to provide the best possible education. This is why we must vote “YES” on November 8 for our school district’s proposed override -- Santa Cruz Valley Unified School District No. 35 (SCVUSD35) M&O Budget Override. SCVUSD35’s 7 percent budget override is absolutely needed, and will fund the following programs:

Full-day kindergarten, 9th – 12th grade library/media centers, Art classes, Technical education classes to better provide career choices, K-12 counseling, Online education for select programs, Information technology, and Athletics (not to exceed 5 percent). Full-day kindergarten is essential for our students’ success. Arizona only pays for half-day kindergarten. SCVUSD35, committed to providing the best possible early education program, is the only district in Santa Cruz County to provide pre-kindergarten, and for many years has provided full-day kindergarten. Why? SCVUSD35 has a proven successful early education program. Ninety percent of SCVUSD35 kindergarten students are identified as English Language Learners, entering kindergarten 1-2 years behind in their kinderreadiness skills. With PreK and full-day kinder, SCVUSD35 has been successful in all students achieving English proficiency, reading at grade level by grade 3 as required by law for promotion to the fourth grade. Arizona school districts now depend on Overrides. For many years, Arizona has been reducing educational dollars to local districts, placing Arizona 48th in the nation in per pupil spending. As originally designed by lawmakers, overrides were mechanisms to provide additional local funding for “wish list” programs. Today, they are used by districts to pay for basic programs, filling gaps in lost funding from the State. SCVUSD35 currently has a 5% override in place, which expires at the end of fiscal year 2018. Beginning July 1, 2017, if passed, the proposed 7% override will replace the existing override, generating $1.2 million annually for seven years. The cost to residential property owners will be less than $8.00 a month for a home valued at $100,000. SCVUSD35 continues to be fiscally responsible. Arizona allows for a maximum 15% override. SCVUSD35, recipient of ASBO’s Certificate of Excellence in Financial Reporting for the last 16 years, is asking for less than half the override amount allowed. Furthermore, SCVUSD35 has worked diligently over time to lessen the taxpayer’s burden by reducing its combined primary and secondary tax rate from 8.01 percent (2002) to the current rate of 3.86 percent (2017) – a decrease of 4.15 percent over 15 years. In summation, good schools benefit everyone. Families with school-age children are drawn to communities that have schools with excellent ratings, offering programs for excelling students. Quality schools produce educated people, attract good neighbors and good businesses, keeping our area prosperous. We need to insure the success of our youth, so please vote YES for the SCVUSD35 M&O Budget Override.

Letter submitted by Charlie Alvarez President, Tubac Fire Local 4125 International Association of Firefighters The entire Tubac Fire District is important, not just certain areas of the district. When we are asked to respond to an emergency call we suit up and do not think twice about which area of the district we are responding to. There are residents throughout our district that have special medical needs. There are children with special medical needs that live between stations 3 and 4. Without these 2 stations what happens to these children? What will happen to the remaining residents that live along Pendleton Drive? There are many instances in which the medic units from stations 3 and 4 respond to the Tubac area. Closing stations will increase response times to the entire district. The residents never know what stations we are responding from because our job is to provide emergency services to all of our residents. We are currently severely under staffed. If you or someone you love were to have a medical emergency, and had to wait because the station closest to you is now closed or lacking personnel because eliminating positions is thought to save money, how would you feel? Currently if there is a Fire at your residence, only 2 firefighters respond. When the 2 firefighter arrive on scene, they are tasked with making sure everyone on scene is safe. By this time we hope that the nearest station is arriving to help with the fire. What would be the outcome if the nearest station is now in Green Valley because we no longer have the man power or stations to help? We greatly fear this for our residents. In the Fire service we refer to one another as brothers and sisters. We have families that we come home to after every long shift. This election season we are in strong support of William Kirkpatrick, Gene Schafer and Randy Williams. They share our sentiment regarding the closing of the stations and elimination of personnel. They have worked hard to listen to our thoughts and concerns. We ask that you show your support for these individuals on November 8th. In closing we would like to state that we have an incredible amount of love and respect for the entire Tubac Fire District. We invite you to come to any of our stations to meet our staff and discuss any thoughts or concerns that you may have. Thank You, Tubac Fire Local 4125


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Letters c o n t i n u e d . . .

Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Rotary Dictionary Project Letter submitted by Byron Thompson, president Tubac Rotary

Back in 1956, when Art Linkletter coined the phrase, “Kids say the darndest things,” he certainly knew what he was talking about. Kids these days are still saying “the darndest things,” but they are also extremely bright and anxious to learn, as a few Rotarians found out recently when we visited the Montessori de Santa Cruz school to distribute free dictionaries to the third and fourth grade students. You could feel the energy as we walked into the room--anxious students sitting crosslegged in a circle waiting. When I explained that the book we were about to give them would make their world larger because they would learn more words and be able to communicate better their eyes got large with excitement. When I asked them, “How do you use a dictionary?” their responses were so sincere and thoughtful that the grown-ups in the room had a hard time holding back a smile. “You use a dictionary with respect.” “You should use a dictionary carefully and keep it safe.” “A dictionary can help you get a better job.” For some students these dictionaries may the first book they can call their own. We encouraged them to write their names in them and take them home. They gave us the “Really?” look. We told them that the books were their personal property and were written to serve them through elementary school and into middle school. Heads nodded. Since implemented in the early 1990s, the Rotary Dictionary Project has distributed more than 17 million books to children in the United States. Although we have only one elementary school in Tubac and the number of copies we distribute is small compared to some clubs, the response from the students was overwhelmingly positive. Within minutes after being handed their personal copy the students were sharing strange words and practicing sign language with each other, spelling out their names with nimble fingers. The 540 page Student Dictionary is also a Gazetteer. It includes 150 pages of supplemental information including the Constitution, biographies of the presidents,

Above: Rotary member Jackie Peterson shared the excitement with third graders Christopher, Joshua and Roman as they explored the pages of their new dictionary. Photo courtesy Tubac Rotary maps of the continents, countries, states and even the solar system. Always fascinating to the students is a page which contains the longest word in the English language –1,909 letters describing a type of protein. And, of course, the pages which show how to form letters used in sign language. Educators see third grade as the dividing line between learning to read and reading to learn. Montessori teacher/administrator Mary Gilbert said that many of the students use their new dictionaries daily at home. She said that in the classroom, lessons are coordinated around the use of the dictionary as a reference book. One of the Rotary purposes is to help make this a better world for everyone. The Dictionary Project assists students in becoming good writers, active readers, creative thinkers and resourceful learners. The kids feel good about meeting community members who care enough to purchase these dictionaries and come to the school and present them personally. We love the idea of opening a new world to them and just being able to spend time with them each year. They give us good feelings about the future, reaffirm our belief in the education system and they are just fun to talk to. And yes, even today, “Kids do say the darndest things!” Any students from the area who are being Home-Schooled who would like a dictionary are encourage to contact one of our members.


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What a Newcomer Likes about Southern Arizona Letter submitted by Bill Stephenson

You’re expecting me to rehearse, alliteratively: spectacular sunsets, nifty night skies, beautiful birds, crazy cactus blossoms, and moving monsoons. And all that’s true. I will eventually get to the area’s character, but first need to ramble a bit.

I’m new. Most everyone asks why I moved here; the same question when I moved to western North Carolina. I’m sure it’s a standard opener. Don’t worry, I’m not going to answer it.

“The place has a lot of energy” is the term my son and his age group universally use to describe towns they like–places like Aspen, Asheville, Austin, to use a lot of A’s. They tend to be small to medium-sized places; it’s throwing away words to say Boston or San Francisco have energy.

We all know you have to look hard to find energy in Tubac in summer. What about its high season? Again, I just moved here, so you can’t believe anything I say. But last February or March, after a difficult September, I was willing to bet my son would use this energy term on his next visit.

My son needs to escape Steamboat Spring’s snow come November or December, let alone February, March, or even April, as everyone here knows since everyone in Tubac moved from Colorado. Even people who don’t know what this energy term means, would agree Steamboat Springs (if not Alamosa or Brush) has a superabundance of it in both winter and summer. Plus a superabundance of snow in winter.

So he’s been coming somewhere south for the past fifteen years, when he found Tubac a sleepy place. That’s one reason I moved here, by the way, since I’m as nuts about golf as he. Anyway, after last February or March, when I fell in love with the place, I predicted he would change his mind; agree that Tubac has a lot of energy in winter, if not summer.

He came, in November, February, and March, and saw Tubac in its winter glory. Played the Resort’s Rancho several times, fell in love with Mexican food at four different places. So what was his verdict? Lots of energy or just a medium amount?

So Tubac is my kind of small town. True, it is more expensive. Once way up in Wisconsin I bought a ten acre farm a mile south of Lake Superior for only $12,000. The old farmhouse was scheduled to be torched for fire department practice, but we managed to gut it and get it restored to something resembling former glory. It’s hard to find a $12,000 house in Tubac. Otherwise, the area isn’t totally impossible for a financially-deprived ex-teacher. But people are what make a town, and the people here I like.

So what about its energy? There is a lot to do, if you keep your ears open, and you certainly see healthy people walking all over the place. What about its character? Few Tubacans I’ve met would dispute the fact that it has a lot of that. I think it may, for many, be their determining reason for staying. Maybe that’s hard to say, however: people who have the luxury of living in two or more places might not be overly worried about one place’s energy or character. But I am. I hope the town stays the same. More of the same, less of change. Ok, maybe a few more people--interesting people. I personally don’t care all that much about energy; care more for those beautiful birds, moving monsoons, and crazy characters. I’m here to stay.

Bill Stephenson, a new writer-in-residence at Tubac’s Lowe House Project, invites all area writers to an October 12 4:00 meeting at the Lowe House to discuss reviving a monthly writers’ gathering. He will also be offering workshops on memoir and poetry for emerging writers this winter; for more information on both, see his website, livewritewords.com

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   

I suppose I should stop to define the term. I surmise a place’s energy is determined by four things: good food and drink (usually in upscale places that have good vibes); good music and some kind of entertainment or interesting activity (not bowling or bingo); good physical appearance (meaning well kept and probably wealthy looking, not down in the dumps); good people (especially younger ones, wandering around late into the night). Obviously the town to our north, to make a simple contrast, suffers on the energy scale. It indisputably has more to offer, but those offerings aren’t all that glamorous, and trying to find a restaurant or bar open there after 8:00 at night, when my son and his buddies think about going out to eat, is impossible. Be that as it may, my son wasn’t disappointed when I told him I might be considering bidding for a golf course house in that nearby northern town. “It’s right for you, Dad, there’s more for you to do there.” That gave me a hint of what his verdict was going to be about Tubac, and it also told me something about me. Anyway, I didn’t bid, and he did come, and I finally got his unspoken verdict: not enough energy.

I still dispute the verdict. I guess I’m biased, Tubac being the kind of small town I’ve always chosen to live in–no big box stores, no need to carry around a heavy keychain for all those locks. Two places under 10,000 population that I lived in stubbornly resisted the invasion of McDonald’s until the end of the twentieth century (Idaho Springs, CO) or the beginning of the twentyfirst (Hayesville, N.C.), and a third still holds out (Washburn, WI). Being stubborn about everything, however, too often prevents necessary change, and I think most of the old geezers who resisted in the first two towns now approve the cheap but good coffee and place to hang out in the mornings... not that I’m advocating that kind of change here; we already have great coffee hangouts and certainly don’t need to look up at those arches every day.

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 

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  

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 


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6 * * * * *

Ongoing MONDAYS THROUGH SATURDAYS: Yoga at Tubac Healing Arts Center. 8:30am. 6 Camino Otero. www.tubachealingarts.com. 520275-2689. TUESDAYS & THURSDAYS: Yoga at Tubac Healing Arts Center. 5:30pm. 6 Camino Otero. www.tubachealingarts.com. 520275-2689. FRIDAYS: Tubac Rotary Club meets at 8am at the Tubac Golf Resort & Spa. SATURDAYS IN OCTOBER: Bird Walks at Tumacácori National Historical Park. Meets at the Tumacácori Visitor Center, 8:30 a.m. and continuing throughout the morning as long as birds are active. Admission to the park $5.00, free for federal pass holders and children under 16. (520) 377-5060, extension 0. nps.gov/tuma. SUNDAYS: The Church at Tubac - Sunday School at 10 am. Worship Service at 11 am. 2242 West Frontage Road. Info: 398-2325. www.churchattubac.com Please submit Ongoing events monthly, or indicate relevant issues which you would like your event to run.

NOW THROUGH OCTOBER 28 - REQUEST FOR EARLY BALLOT ACCEPTED FOR THE NOVEMBER 8 GENERAL ELECTION. Also last day to apply for Permanent Early Voting List Request. Contact the Recorder's Office at 520-375-7924. NOW THROUGH NOVEMBER 8 - ELIGIBLE VOTERS RESIDING IN SANTA CRUZ VALLEY UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 35 MAY RUN FOR THE DISTRICT 4 SEAT ON THE PIMA COUNTY JTED GOVERNING BOARD. The election will be held November 8, 2016. The seat is currently held by Wayne Peate. In 2010, SCVUSD voters approved entering into partnership with Pima County JTED (Joint Technical Education District) to expand career training opportunities for local students. As a result, JTED Member District 4 extended into Santa Cruz County encompassing the SCVUSD No. 35 district area. Other JTED Governing Board members eligible for re-election in November are Mary Jondrow (District 1) and Robert Schlanger (District 5). Those wishing to run for the District 4 seat must conduct all filings in Pima County, as this is the county of jurisdiction for the JTED. All pertinent information and required forms are available at the Office of the Pima County School Superintendent, and can be found on the School Elections page of their website: http://www. schools.pima.gov/elections. Prospective candidates can click on the “November 2016 Governing Board Elections Candidate Information” tab to access all the necessary forms to download and print. Also provided is a “Handbook for School Board Candidates – Nov 2016 General Election” providing details on the candidacy process, and a “Timeline for November 2016 Governing Board Candidates,” which is a summary of important due dates/deadlines throughout the upcoming 2016 General Election cycle.

NOW THROUGH NOVEMBER 13 - "WALTER BLAKELOCK WILSON" EXHIBIT AT THE TUBAC CENTER OF THE ARTS. 9 Plaza Road. 520-398-2371. NOW THROUGH THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR TUMACÁCORI LAUNCHES SECOND YEAR OF EVERY KID IN A PARK PASS. Tumacácori encourages all fourth graders to visit the park for free this year as part of the Every Kid in a Park program. The program gives fourth grade students, and those accompanying them, free access to more than 2,000 federally managed lands and waters. Visit www.EveryKidinaPark.gov to download the pass and obtain more information. Fourth grade teachers in Santa Cruz and Pima Counties can apply for these funds to cover transportation costs supporting a field trip to Tumacácori. Field trips come packaged with curriculum-based pre- and post-visit lessons, and include options including river programs, My Life at Tumacácori, Padre Kino’s Quest, and the ever-popular Mission Mystery. To learn more about curriculum-based experiences at Tumacácori, visit www.nps.gov/tuma/ learn/education/index.htm. The Every Kid in a Park pass – which features a new design for this year’s students – is valid for a full calendar year starting September 1. The pass grants free entry for fourth graders and up to three accompanying adults (or an entire car for drivein parks) to most federally managed lands and waters, including national parks, forests, wildlife refuges and marine sanctuaries. For more information, please visit www.everykidinapark.gov and follow the program on Twitter @everykidinapark, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. For additional information about Tumacácori, please visit www.nps.gov/tuma or call 520-377-5060. NOW - ART EXHIBIT: THE ARIZONA CAVALCADE OF HISTORY – The Alan B. Davis Gallery is open with 16 paintings by renowned Western artist William Ahrendt, each depicting a significant event in Arizona’s colorful

history. The paintings and their historical narratives were featured as a special 16-part “Cavalcade of History” series in Arizona Highways magazine from 1987 through 1990. Arizona Highways remembers this series as “among the magazine’s most remembered illustrations.” The giclées reproductions on canvas were donated to the Tubac Historical Society in memory of longtime Tubac resident and businessman Alan B. Davis. The collection is on permanent display at the Tubac Presidio’s Otero Hall. Also on display: A RARE ORIGINAL 1800’S PERIOD CARRIAGE CALLED AN AMBULANCE. It has been restored and modified to replicate the ambulance that Phocion R. Way, an engraver from Cincinnati, Ohio, rode on from Mesilla on the Rio Grande River to Tucson in June of 1858. Included with park admission: $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. * * * * * OCTOBER 8, 11, 15, 18, 25 & 29, 9AM-10:30AM TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Join a walking tour of the Canoa Ranch headquarters to gain insights into the fascinating stories of the people that lived and worked on the ranch. Visit the historic ranch buildings and corrals, and enjoy scenic views of the Santa Cruz River Valley. All ages welcome. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Free. Online registration required. www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov, or 520-724-5520. OCTOBER 8, 2-4PM - OPENING RECEPTION FOR A NEW EXHIBIT AT THE PRESIDIO - TUBAC'S PIONEER FAMILIES AND THE CATASTROPHE OF BACA FLOAT NO. 3. The controversial placement of a "floating" land grant in the Santa Cruz Valley in 1863 brought disappointment and heartache to the families who


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6 lived in the valley prior to that time and to settlers who homesteaded the area. These folks built houses, outbuildings, fences, wells and irrigation systems in an effort to provide for their own livelihood and to improve their communities. They lost it all in 1917 when the Supreme Court reversed numerous decisions by the Department of the Interior and, in effect, evicted families from their homes. This exhibit explains the origin of the Baca Float land grants and examines the histories of some of families that were affected by the Supreme Court decision. With an interactive component, the exhibit also invites other families from Southern Arizona and beyond to add their stories to the ones told here. Dr. Tom Sheridan will be with us and have copies of his book Landscapes of Fraud for sale. Regular admission to the Tubac Presidio Park is $5 adults, $2 youth 7-13, Kids 6 and under FREE. 520-398-2252. OCTOBER 8 - FAMILY SLEEPOVER: A NIGHT AT THE MISSION IN 1916. The year is 1916 and a group of “ranger recruits” gather in Tumacácori’s picnic area to receive instruction. The agenda includes checking on reports of a cow loose in the mission grounds, locating and documenting archaeological artifacts, conducting a night patrol by candle light, and consuming the allimportant evening meal. The evening winds down with live music and campfire treats before the recruits curl up on their bedrolls to spend the night under the stars or sheltered by adobe ruins. Tumacácori once again offers its popular Family Sleepover program, this year including a living history twist. “Camping out with family is a beloved tradition in national parks,” says Superintendent Bob Love, “We are excited to offer visitors the chance not just to camp here at Tumacácori, but to experience this place the way travelers and early park rangers did.” The first sleepover of the year begins Saturday, October 8th, with subsequent events on March 18th and April 1st. The immersive Family Sleepover experience includes period costuming, equipment, and story-telling. Participants sign on to protect the ruined mission church overnight, just like rangers of the nascent National Park Service 100 years ago. Unlike their historic predecessors, however, these campers will depart by 8:30 a.m. having left no evidence of their overnight stay. Registration first-come, first-served and accessible via www. recreation.gov. A $20 charge applies to each adult participation ($10 for children under the age of 16)

and includes entrance to the park, dinner, breakfast, and all activities. To learn more about this unique opportunity, call 520-377-5060 or visit www.nps.gov/ tuma. OCTOBER 9, 9AM-3:30PM- TUBAC TEA AND RUN/ WALK FOR TATAS. The run/walk will meander through the neighbor hoods of Barrio de Tubac. It will take place from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. The run will be 10k and the walk will be 5k. There will a costume contest for the run/walk participants and prizes for the top finishers. The tea will be from 12:30p.m.to 3:30 p.m. and will involve a full tea type luncheon. We will also have a music program, two guest speakers; a Doctor of Oncology and a Survivor of Breast Cancer. We would also like to have a silent auction with items provided by the art community of Tubac. The waiters will be men who volunteer their time for this event. There will be a tea hat contest at each table with the winner receiving the table centerpiece. You can also bring your own teacup and saucer to honor a loved one. email:tubac4tatas@gmail.com. Web-site: www. tubac4tatas.org. Like us on Facebook. OCTOBER 10 - VOTER REGISTRATION DEADLINE FOR THE NOVEMBER 8TH ELECTION. OCTOBER 10 THROUGH 14 - FALL BREAK - No classes for SCVUSD #35. OCTOBER 10, 17, 24, 31, 9:30AM-12NOON - CRAFTING YOUR SPIRITUAL STORY LINE— DEBORAH KNOX. Jumpstart or deepen your personal creativity, spiritual journey and writing. Tucson author and Life Work Transitions facilitator Deborah Knox, author of Put your Spirit to Work –Making a Living Being Yourself—is offering this popular class for the first time in Tubac during four sessions of discovery of your life story and the power of your words and wisdom. For more information and to register contact Deborah at lifeworktransitions.com. OCTOBER 11, 10AM-1PM - TUESDAYS IN OCTOBER: “WATERCOLOR PAINTING TECHNIQUES” – ROBERTA ROGERS. Roberta has put together an exiting array of 3-hour workshops to explore in watercolor techniques. Each session will highlight a specific topic. Students can either work on the lesson planned for the day or

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TOO LOUD A SOLITUDE Feature Film Launches Kickstarter Campaign Audiences will soon be able to see Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal’s novella Too Loud a Solitude (1977) as a feature film that will utilize live action puppets, animation, stock photographs and footage, digital technologies, and a cast featuring Paul Giamatti. Director Genevieve Anderson and a team of renowned filmmakers completed a 17-minute version of the film in 2007, funded by the Rockefeller Media Artist Foundation, Heather Henson, and the Jane Henson Foundation, and now the team is making the entire feature film. Hrabal fans worldwide are invited to support the project via the film’s Kickstarter campaign. www.tooloudasolitude.com Hrabal, a Czech, is considered to be one of the greatest writers of the 20th century, and has had two novels adapted to film by Czech director Jirí Menzel, including the Oscar-winning Closely Watched Trains (1967), and six other film adaptations. Too Loud a Solitude is considered by some critics to be his finest work, and the first of his works ever to be adapted by an American director. Hrabal’s poignant visual writing style has had wide-ranging influence on writers, including Philip Roth and Louise Erdich, and artists such as the Australian singer/songwriter Nick Cave, among many others. “The outpouring of support for this film has been amazing over the years,” said Anderson. “We have been working on this film in one form or another since 2004, and between the fans of the book and our committed production team, we are poised to launch a successful campaign and begin production on an incredibly moving and unique film.” “Watching Genevieve’s films, and the worlds they evoke, give me the distinct impression that I am seeing right into someone’s private inner world, a place where the characters and situations were the direct embodiments of the feelings for the events and not simply their visual, dramatic representations. This indicates to me that her impressive technical skill is in service to something else.” - Bill Viola http://www.genevieveanderson.com 30-Second Too Loud A Solitude Trailer: https://vimeo.com/138690915/d8266b608a

$4,900 $4,900 30 30


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bring in another project that they would like Roberta to assist them with. Additional sessions Tuesdays – October 18th and 25th. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Full Course Cost: $200 Members / $240 NonMembers. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. OCTOBER 12 - FIRST DAY OF EARLY VOTING FOR THE NOVEMBER 8TH ELECTION. EARLY VOTING AVAILABLE THROUGH NOVEMBER 4TH. OCTOBER 12, 8AM-9:30AM - BIRDING ALONG THE SANTA CRUZ RIVER. Take a guided birding walk to see the riparian birds and other wildlife that are attracted to the mature willows and continuous river flow along the Santa Cruz River in Marana. All ages welcome. Wheeler Taft Abbett Sr. Branch Library, 7800 N. Schisler Drive. Cost: Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information contact: www. pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. OCTOBER 12, 10AM-4PM - OPEN HOUSE AT SANTA CRUZ CHILI & SPICE IN TUMACACORI. Sample great Mexican Food, mini margaritas and join in a tour of our work facility. 1868 E Frontage Rd. just south of the Mission. 520-398-2591. santacruzchili.com. OCTOBER 12, 11AM-1:30PM - COOKING A-Z ELAINE'S INDIA, WITH ELAINE LEIGH. $45. Elaine Leigh brings her Bombay upbringing to Tubac! She shares her favorite vegetarian recipes from one of the tastiest and healthiest world cuisines. In this hands on class, we will cook three entrees including (1) lentils with tomato, onion garlic and spices, (2) potatoes with garam masala in a tomato sauce and (3) green beans with mustard seeds and almonds. A quick and easy tomato chutney as well as a fantastic cooling peach and cardamom lassi beverage will round out the rich and spicy flavors of India.  White wine will be provided with the meal. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. OCTOBER 12, 4PM-6PM - TUBAC WRITER’S GROUP ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING. Come one, come all to meet and greet at the Lowe House Project in Old Town Tubac and take it from there. For more information contact Bill Stephenson at livewritewords.com. OCTOBER 13, 8:30AM - NANCY MONTOYA, WINNER OF THE PULITZER PRIZE IN BROADCAST JOURNALISM, WILL SPEAK AT A BREAKFAST GATHERING IN GREEN VALLEY. Now a part of the Arizona Public Media news team (KUAT Channel 6), Ms. Montoya’s area of expertise is Immigration and US/Mexico Border Issues. Her topic is “Reporting on the Border: What It Is Like.” The public is invited. The event will be at Grill on the Green at Canoa Ranch starting at 8:30; for ticket information, visit BorderCommunityAlliance.org.

OCTOBER 13, 5:30PM - SANTA CRUZ VALLEY CITIZENS COUNCIL WILL HOLD A CANDIDATE FORUM FOR THE PUBLIC TO ATTEND at Rio Rico High School. OCTOBER 13, 7:30PM - TRUE CONCORD'S 13TH SEASON OPENS WITH MUSIC OF THE FOUR ELEMENTS. The program is built around the four elements of ancient philosophy - earth, fire, water and air. A pre-concert talk with Music Director Eric Holtan will occur 45 minutes prior to each performance. For Tucson performances, premium tickets are $40 and general admission is $25. Students $5. Tickets may be ordered online at http://www. trueconcord.org/buy-tickets/, or by telephone at (520) 401-2651. At the Scottish Rite Temple, downtown Tucson. OCTOBER 14 THROUGH DECEMBER 4 - “ANSEL ADAMS & THE AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPH”. OPENING RECEPTION: FRI. OCTOBER 14TH 5-7PM. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Admission: Free. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371. OCTOBER 14, 7PM - TRUE CONCORD'S 13TH SEASON OPENS WITH MUSIC OF THE FOUR ELEMENTS. The program is built around the four elements of ancient philosophy - earth, fire, water and air. The earth is embodied in Carson Cooman's A Cosmic Prayer, in which theoretical physicist Howard Georgi's words celebrate the material universe, from the astronomical to the subatomic; and Johannes Brahms's O Schöne Nacht, capturing Georg Friederich Daumer's romantic evocation of the marvels of the stars, nightingales and love. For fire, the young American composer Daniel Elder adapts and expands text from Shakespeare's Henry V in The Brightest Heaven. Water is everywhere - in contemporary choral superstar Eric Whitacre's Water Night, with text by Nobel Prize winning poet Octavio Paz; in Stephen Paulus's setting of the folk song The Water is Wide; and in the Henry Mancini/Johnny Mercer pop classic Moon River. And no song goes higher in the air than the James Van Heusen/Sammy Cahn standard, Come Fly with Me. A pre-concert talk with Music Director Eric Holtan will occur 45 minutes prior to each performance. All seats in Green Valley are $30. Students $5. Tickets may be ordered online at http:// www.trueconcord.org/buy-tickets/, or by telephone at (520) 401-2651. At the Desert Hills Lutheran Church, Green Valley. OCTOBER 15, 7AM-11AM - SONORAN DESERT WEEDWACKERS. Join the Sonoran Desert Weedwackers to eradicate buffelgrass and fountain grass in Tucson Mountain Park. Work requires hiking and pulling buffelgrass on steep slopes. Location: Pima County Tucson Mountain Park - Meeting location provided with reservation. Email eeducation@pima.gov. Ages 18 and up. Free. www.pima. gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov, or 520-615-7855.

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OCTOBER 15, 8AM-12NOON - ANZA DAYS. This year’s Anza Days celebration has been re-envisioned to reflect more historical accuracy and provide for the educational engagement of youngsters in this most significant event in Tubac’s history, when Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza made the 1775 overland expedition from Tubac to the Pacific. It begins in the cool of the morning at the Tubac Presidio at 8 am with period costumed riders executing cavalry drills. On the command of, “Vayan subiendo”, the Anza riders will assemble along with a host of imaginary settlers and livestock, and proceed to the steps of St. Ann's Church (the site of Tubac’s original church, Santa Gertrudis). There they will receive a blessing for the journey and head north with the first day objective of La Canoa. Subsequently, from 10 am to noon at the Presidio we will unveil our children’s Anza Discovery Program with costumes, activities, props, ponies and superb photo ops. This is a totally FREE EVENT and a wonderful opportunity to engage your children and grandchildren in Tubac’s colorful history. For more information call the Presidio, 520-398-2252. OCTOBER 15, 8AM-2PM - PASSPORT DAY at Western Passport Center, 7373 E Rosewood Center, Tucson. Apply during the slow season and avoid the rush! Renew your possport or apply fo rhte first time. No appointment necessary. Online at Travel.State.Gov. OCTOBER 15, 10AM-2PM - UFOS: URBAN FEATHERED OBJECTS. Bring your neighbors, friends and the whole family to explore the haunts and habits of birds at Sam Lena Park and the Kino Ecosystem Restoration Project. Guided birding walks, nature crafts, and bird brain activities throughout the day. Drop by any time! All ages welcome. Sam Lena Park/KERP, 3400 S. Country Club Road. Cost: Free. For more information contact: www.pima. gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. OCTOBER 15, 2PM - TRUE CONCORD'S 13TH SEASON OPENS WITH MUSIC OF THE FOUR ELEMENTS. The program is built around the four elements of ancient philosophy - earth, fire, water and air. A pre-concert talk with Music Director Eric Holtan will occur 45 minutes prior to each performance. For Tucson performances, premium tickets are $40 and general admission is $25. Students $5. Tickets may be ordered online at http://www.trueconcord.org/ buy-tickets/, or by telephone at (520) 401-2651. At the Tohono Chul Alice Y Holsclaw Performance Garden, northwest Tucson. A $10 park entrance fee on top of the ticket price admits patrons to the Tohono Chul gardens and museums before and after the show. OCTOBER 15, 6-9PM - PAWS PATROL 10TH ANNIVERSARY & NATIONAL FERAL CAT DAY DINNER AND SILENT AUCTION. At the St. Francis of the Valley Episcopal Church, 600 S La Canada Dr. Green Valley. Tickets $40 each, 2 for $75. For more info 520-207-4024. OCTOBER 15 - DEADLINE EXTENDED FOR CALL TO TUBAC ARTISTS. See Nov. 12. Old Town Tubac Historic Adobe Build Tour. Works for exhibit and sale of any medium featuring Tubac’s adobes and elements of its cultural heritage. Preferably small. A Lowe House Project Artist in Residency Program. If interested, want info, and to submit, send image with medium, dimensions and your contact information to tubacval@ msn.com. OCTOBER 16, 11AM-2PM - FRONTIER PRINTING PRESS DEMONSTRATION. A knowledgeable volunteer demonstrates the Washington Hand Press used to print Arizona’s first newspaper in 1859 and answers questions about hand press printing, type setting, and other aspects of this marvel of industrial engineering. You will get to set type and print small samples to take with you. Included with Tubac Presidio park admission: $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. 520-398-2252. OCTOBER 16, 2PM - BOOK EVENT: IT’S A (PRAIRIE) DOG’S LIFE BY THEODORE G. MANNO. A prairie dog town is a busy place. As author and field researcher Theodore Manno explains a prairie dog's life is full of mischief, romantic trysts, antipredator behavior, fighting, kissing, and infanticide. He vividly recounts the daily ups and downs of prairie dogs as well as his own trials and triumphs while observing these rare rodents in Bryce Canyon National Park with other "Dog Squad" researchers from the vantage point of a nine-foot-tall tower. Over time, they came to know

the personalities and social structure of the town's inhabitants. His presentation provides a full overview of what is currently known about prairie dogs, a species that you may be surprised to learn is threatened with extinction. His book, The Utah Prairie Dog: Life Among the Red Rocks will be available for signing and sale. Call 520-398-2252 to make your reservation today. $7.50 fee includes admission to tour the Tubac Presidio Park. OCTOBER 16, 3PM - TRUE CONCORD'S 13TH SEASON OPENS WITH MUSIC OF THE FOUR ELEMENTS. The program is built around the four elements of ancient philosophy - earth, fire, water and air. A pre-concert talk with Music Director Eric Holtan will occur 45 minutes prior to each performance. For Tucson performances, premium tickets are $40 and general admission is $25. Students $5. Tickets may be ordered online at http://www. trueconcord.org/buy-tickets/, or by telephone at (520) 401-2651. At Grace St. Paul's Episcopal Church, Tucson. OCTOBER 18, 10AM-1PM - TUESDAYS IN OCTOBER: “WATERCOLOR PAINTING TECHNIQUES” – ROBERTA ROGERS. 3rd session of 4. Each session will highlight a specific topic. Students can either work on the lesson planned for the day or bring in another project that they would like Roberta to assist them with. Final session – October 25th. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Full Course Cost: $200 Members / $240 NonMembers. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. OCTOBER 18, 5PM - SCVUSD NO. 35 GOVERNING BOARD MEETING, District Office, Board Room, 570 Camino Lito Galindo, Rio Rico. The public is invited to attend the regular bimonthly meeting of the district governing board. OCTOBER 20 & 21, 9AM-12NOON - DECORATIVE PAPERS AND HANDMADE ARTISTS BOOKS PLAYSHOP WITH SUSAN CORL. Oct 21 from 1pm4pm. Have fun like a kid making a mess playing with paints, glue, crayons and make beautiful decorative papers to be included in handmade books and book covers. Experiment with different techniques such as Orizomegami, a fold and dye technique and wax resist papers using batik methods and common materials found around the house to create one-of-a-kind works. Learn different bookmaking models that include your decorative papers. All materials included. A Lowe House Project “playshop” in Old Town Tubac. For more information, fees and registration email susancorl@ hotmail.com. OCTOBER 20, 11AM-1:30PM - COOKING Z-A FROM ZUCCHINI-ALMONDS, WITH LAURENCE LEGOUGE. $50. French instructor Laurence Legouge teaches three classic dishes of everyday french cuisine. Start with a Zucchini soup and end with an Almond fruit salad. Eggs, ham and cheese complement this perfect meal and keep it light, yet filling. First course: Douceur de courgettes a la Vache qui rit®. For years, people have been wondering why the Laughing Cow laughs. Nobody knows. But this zucchini and VQR soup will definitely put a smile on your face. Second course: Quiche - salade. Quiche is a tradition in France, and when one does not know what to prepare for dinner, the answer is often a ham and cheese quiche served with salad. Make a white pie crust, a whole wheat one, or use puff pastry. Each one will come out tasting differently. Third course: Salade de fruits aux amandes. Almonds in the fruit salad give it a sweet and crunchy taste. Add orange blossom water, mint and lemon juice and you have a delicate dessert that lets you finish on a lighter note. Served with cookies. Wine served with the meal. www. cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. OCTOBER 20, 1PM-3PM - GREEN VALLEY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY IS CELEBRATING OUR 40TH YEAR! Starting our year with a Party! Join us for the festivities: Presentation of GVGS Meritorious Service Award to: Betty Malesky, CG, Past President, Newspaper columnist, by Bob Vint, Librarian and Web Master; A unique version of "GVGS History" by Edie Sly and "GVGS's Future" by Sumner Walters; Honors and Awards - Reed Sanderson, Long-term members - John Rychener, Officers and directors - Reed Sanderson. Party, with refreshments and surprises by JoAnn Herbst & Committee. Coffee, punch and more, featuring


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Anniversary Cake. Reservations (requested) would be helpful to us and you. Email Mo Ferdie; tucsongoalie@ gmail.com. You can find more information on our web site: azgvgs.org. (it's new and easier, but the old one still works). Valley Presbyterian Church, 2800 S. Camino del Sol, Green Valley. OCTOBER 20, 5PM - ARTS SPEAK PRESENTATION WITH DR. BECKY SENF – “ANSEL ADAMS AND THE AMERICAN PHOTOGRAPH”. The Director of The Center for Creative Photography, an expert on Ansel Adams, will speak about the life and work of the man who many say legitimized photography as an art form. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Admission: Free for TCA Members, $10/Nonmembers and guests. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371. OCTOBER 20, 6:30PM - SANTA CRUZ SHOESTRING PLAYERS WILL HOLD AUDITIONS FOR the second show of their 2016-2017 season, “PRIVATE LIVES” by Noel Coward which will be directed by Susan Voorhees. Brilliant and witty, Coward’s comedy of manners is a delightful romp and has entertained audiences worldwide since its 1930 premiere in Edinburgh. Auditions are Thursday, October 20 at 6:30pm and Sunday, OCTOBER 23 AT 3PM in the theater at the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. There are roles for two younger women and men plus a woman any age. Dialect is British. Cold readings from the play will be heard. Those interested in doing backstage work should also attend. For information, e-mail the director: smvaz@aol.com. Performances will be Jan 20 - 22 and Jan 27 - 29. Santa Cruz Shoestring Players is a community theater and proud member of AACT.

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OCTOBER 20, 7:30PM - THE CREE PROJECT IS HOSTING A SCREENING OF A VERY IMPORTANT DOCUMENTARY CALLED "GENERATION FOUND" at Harkins Theater, Tucson. This is an important educational film for us to bring to Southern AZ. It is not only about the ongoing heroin/opioid epidemic, it is also about how communities can come together to solve the problem. We will also be inviting a group of panelists to speak and have a Q&A post screening. This is a great opportunity to learn more, get involved, and ... bring along your teens and preteens (and your adults!). They will learn a lot. In order for this screening to take place - The Cree Project needs to sell 54 more tickets. Purchase your ticket/s here: http:// gathr.us/screening/17226. Please, purchase your ticket NOW, or, if you cannot attend, please consider purchasing a couple of tickets that The Cree Project can offer to someone who cannot easily afford the entry fee. If you decide to go this route - please just shoot me an email and I will make sure they go to someone who needs them. Here is the invitation on the Cree Project website: http://www.thecreeproject. com/new-events-1/

OCTOBER 22, 7AM-1PM - MEET YOUR BIRDS AT SWEETWATER WETLANDS! Tucson Water and the Tucson Audubon Society present Tucson Meet Your Birds, a free, fun and family-friendly event at the Sweetwater Wetlands. We will make it easy for you--NO BINOCULARS NEEDED TO PARTICIPATE! Stroll 20 acres of treelined paths and ponds with experts pointing out the birds for you. All new members who join at this event (and current members who recruit) will be entered to win a pair of Swarovski binoculars! See tucsonaudubon.org/TucsonMeetYourBirds or our Facebook event for more info.

OCTOBER 21, 7:30PM - “PERFORMING ARTS SERIES” – DANNY O’KEEFE. Singer songwriter whose songs has been recorder by Who’s Who of artists including Elvis Presley, Cab Calloway, Willie Nelson and Waylon Jennings. O’Keefe is a legend, see him here! Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Admission: $30.00 for TCA Members, $35.00 Nonmembers. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371.

OCTOBER 22, 9AM-3PM - 4TH ANNUAL ANZA DAY AT CANOA RANCH. Visit the historic ranch buildings and corrals and enjoy an appearance by the Anza Trail Color Guard, vendors, special exhibits, historical presentations, and family fun activities. Tour Canoa Ranch headquarters to gain insights into the fascinating stories of the people that lived and worked on the ranch. All ages welcome. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. For more information contact: www.pima.gov/ nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220.

OCTOBER 21 THROUGH 23 - ARIZONA FIELD ORNITHOLOGISTS 10TH ANNUAL MEETING in Yuma, AZ. AZFO is going to the “coast” – Arizona’s “West Coast” along the lower Colorado River. Plan to join your fellow birders and ornithologists near the water in Yuma for the 10th Annual AZFO state meeting. The weekend will start with minifield expeditions to area birding spots on Friday afternoon. Saturday, you’ll hear interesting presentations and try your eyes and ears at our photo and audio bird ID quizzes and peruse our used publication sale. Go to www.azfo.org for more information and to register.

OCTOBER 22, 9AM-12NOON - KIDS IN THE CANYON. Experience a Fall Day in the Sky Islands at Madera Canyon. USFS Fee Waiver "Free Day" in the Canyon with guided nature walks on Proctor Trail. Kids' art activities & nature displays at Proctor Ramada. Plus Smokey the Bear. Canyon trails & picnic/recreation areas open all day. For more info visit friendsofmaderacanyon.org.

OCTOBER 22, 9:30AM-2:30PM - SPECIAL TOURS OF TWO RARELY AVAILABLE ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES. In celebration of International Archaeology Month, Tubac Presidio State Historic Park will collaborate with Tumacácori National Historical Park to provide special tours of two unique archaeological sites. Join Philip Halpenny at the Tubac Presidio for a tour of the Spanish

colonial archaeological site that preserves the remains of the original 1752 Tubac town site. The Archaeological Conservancy protects this site and participants are asked to sign 'An Acknowledgement of Risk Factors' before entering. Meet at the Presidio at 9:30 am. After the first tour, bring your own picnic lunch to enjoy in either Parks’ picnic area. Next, we will meet in the Tumacácori parking lot at NOON and car pool with a National Park Service ranger for a tour of the Los Santos Ángeles de Guevavi mission. Established by Father Kino in 1691 where the Pima Revolt began, excavations have revealed evidence of extensive prehistoric habitation on the mission site, along with evidence of mission era corrals and other structures. This site is only available for special guided tours. Fee is $15 per person and includes both tours and admission to both Parks. Tour limited to 15. For reservations call the Presidio at 520-398-2252 or info@ TubacPresidio.org. OCTOBER 22, 4PM-6PM - COOKING A-Z - PIZZA ON THE PATIO, WITH RANDY WADE. $45. This is a Pizza skills class for all levels of cooks. We will work with dough, make sauce, and cook pizza in a portable pizza oven. Each student will have the opportunity to make a pizza with toppings of their choice. Recipes for an excellent and easy pizza dough as well as two sauce types will be provided to each student. We will also have a fresh chopped salad with local organic greens form Tubac's Double Z farm. Beer and wine will accompany. www. cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. OCTOBER 22, 6:30PM-8:30PM - A NIGHT UNDER THE STARS. Explore the wonder and unfold the mysteries of the night sky. Tucson Amateur Astronomy Association volunteers provide an introduction to the night sky and set up telescopes for celestial viewing. Bring your lawn chair. All ages welcome. Weather permitting. Tucson Mountain Park, Ironwood Picnic Area, 1548 S. Kinney Road. Free.www.pima. gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855.

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6 OCTOBER 23 THROUGH OCTOBER 31 - SPECIAL EXHIBIT: COMMON GROUND: TUBAC CEMETERY AND OTHER WORKS. A special art exhibition by local artist/printmaker Joyce M. Jackson will be displayed in the 1885 Schoolhouse between 9am and 5pm. From October 23rd to 31st. The exhibition features images inspired by the hand hewn grave markers and memorial tributes found in the historic burial ground at the corner of Burruel Street and Bridge Road, and explores human events and emotions familiar to us all. Included with regular Tubac Presidio Park admission, $5 adults, $2 youth 7-13, Kids 6 and under FREE. OCTOBER 23, 3PM - SANTA CRUZ SHOESTRING PLAYERS WILL HOLD AUDITIONS FOR “PRIVATE LIVES” by Noel Coward which will be directed by Susan Voorhees. Brilliant and witty, Coward’s comedy of manners is a delightful romp and has entertained audiences worldwide since its 1930 premiere in Edinburgh. Auditions at the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. There are roles for two younger women and men plus a woman any age. Dialect is British. Cold readings from the play will be heard. Those interested in doing backstage work should also attend. For information, e-mail the director: smvaz@ aol.com. Performances will be Jan 20 - 22 and Jan 27 - 29. Santa Cruz Shoestring Players is a community theater and proud member of AACT. OCTOBER 23, 6PM - THE AUTISM SOCIETY OF SOUTHERN ARIZONA PRESENTS - 2ND ANNUAL “JEANS AND JEWELS GALA”. The gala will help raise awareness and much needed funding for the vital programs and services we offer throughout Southern Arizona. Enjoy a spectacular desert sunset, gourmet dining, silent auction, gourmet S’mores bar, old fashioned photos and even a mechanical bull. 100% of the proceeds from our Gala will stay local. To set-up an interview, or to obtain photos, please contact Nicole Glasner, Executive Director at Autism Society of Southern Arizona, at 520-237-5075. At the Oasis Wild Horse Ranch, 6801 N. Camino Verde, Tucson. Individual tickets are $75 and VIP tickets are $100 and are available at as-az.org or by calling 770-1541. OCTOBER 24, 10AM-1PM - COOKING A-Z - TAMALES TO GO, WITH LAURA DUNCAN. $45. This will be our very first tamale workshop and we are so excited to teach the age-old tradition of tamale making. This class will be all "hands on", creating two delicious tamale recipes. We will make a red chili beef tamale and a sweet and savory vegetable tamale . You will have the opportunity to taste each of these tamales in class and you will be taking home a half dozen of the tamales we make to share with family or friends. Arbuckle's Mexicali Coffee will be served. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. OCTOBER 25, 8-9:30AM - BIRD10AMING AT KERP. Take a stroll with birding expert Jeff Babson to spot wetland and desert birds in the urban habitats of Kino Ecosystem Restoration Project (KERP) at Sam Lena Park. All ages welcome. Sam

Lena Park/KERP, 3400 S. Country Club Road. Cost: Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. OCTOBER 25, 10AM-1PM - TUESDAYS IN OCTOBER: “WATERCOLOR PAINTING TECHNIQUES” – ROBERTA ROGERS. Final session. Location:Tubac Center of the Arts. Full Course Cost: $200 Members / $240 Non-Members. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. OCTOBER 25, 6PM-7:15PM - “KEEPING YOUR HEART IN SYNC: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION” part of the UA Sarver Heart Center’s 30th Anniversary, lecture by Dr. Hutchinson. In DuVal Auditorium at Banner – University Medical Center Tucson, 1501 N. Campbell Ave., Tucson. To register online, please visit heart.arizona.edu or click on “Attend Events.” If you are unable to register online, please email heart@u.arizona.edu or call 520-626-2901. Free event parking is available in the Banner – University Medical Center Visitor/Patient Parking Garage or in UA Zone 1 lots after 5 p.m. OCTOBER 26, 9AM-10:30AM - HERITAGE AREA STRUCTURES REHABILITATION TOUR. Architectural preservationist Simon Herbert discusses the processes and materials used for the rehabilitation of the structures at Historic Hacienda de la Canoa as he leads this behind-thescenes tour. Learn about the work that has transformed the structures from deteriorating ruins to functional buildings. All ages welcome. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov, or 520-724-5520. OCTOBER 26-28, 11AM-6PM - 17TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY MENTAL HEALTH ARTS SHOW. At Plaza Arboleda Conference Center located at 2502 North Dodge Boulevard in Tucson. The art exhibit is open to the public and free of charge. There will be a public RECEPTION CELEBRATION HELD ON OCTOBER 25TH FROM 5:00 P.M. - 6:30 P.M. If you are interested in submitting artwork, you may obtain the entry forms now by visiting the Community Partners website at www.CommunityPartnersInc.org/arts-show. (520) 784-5378. OCTOBER 26, 1PM-3PM - WHERE IDEAS ARE BORN—CAROL ST. JOHN. Awaken the senses and creativity with local columnist for the “Tubac Villager” accomplished oil painter, watercolorist, poet, activist and author of the 5-Star Rated book “Taproots...Where Ideas Are Born” A Lowe House Project Free Talk in Old Town Tubac. For more information and reservations email tubacval@msn.com. OCTOBER 27, 4PM-6PM - ROYAL CARIBBEAN CRUISE PRESENTATION & RUBY JANE APPAREL TRAVEL WARDROBE FASHION SHOW. Door Prizes!. If you can attend this exciting event, all 520-841-8305 or emailjerrie.villagetravelarts@gmx.com no later than October 20. At the Sonoran Center, 2050 Territory Land, I-19 exit 48, Amado. Hosted by Royal Caribbean International, Village TravelArts & Ruby Jane Apparel. OCTOBER 28 THROUGH 30 - CYT TUCSON PRESENTS - “BYE BYE BIRDIE” at Pima Community College Center for the Arts Proscenium Theatre. Tickets are just $15 and are available at cyttucson.org. Showtimes are the following: Friday October 28th – 7:00pm, Saturday, October 29th – 2:00pm, Saturday, October 29th – 7:00pm, Sunday, October 30th – 2pm. CYT Tucson is a local non-profit theater arts organization providing instructional classes and live musical performance opportunities for Tucson youth ages 5 - 21. For more information on Christian Youth Theater and “Bye Bye Birdie” contact Ray Frieders at 370-4000. OCTOBER 28 - FRESH MAINE LOBSTER AT THE COW PALACE RESTAURANT. Reserve by Oct. 26 and book your Holiday Parties with us. 520-398-8000. I-19 Exit 48 Amado.

OFFICE

OCTOBER 28, 3PM-6PM - COOKING A-Z - DINNER IN A PUMPKIN, WITH JERI HOYLE. $55. This is a beautiful harvest dish bursting with all the autumn flavors we love. A mixture of turkey, wild rice and mushrooms are seasoned with savory herbs and spices and roasted in a whole sugar pumpkin. We'll even roast the seeds! We will also prepare a Baby Spinach Salad with Cranberries, Roasted Pumpkin Seeds and Dijon vinaigrette. Our dessert to accompany this meal will be Sea Salt Chocolate Cheesecake, a light and easy no bake cheesecake that will become a favorite. Wine pairings and Oktoberfest beer will be served with the meal. www. cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. OCTOBER 29, 8AM-11AM - HIKE COLOSSAL CAVE MOUNTAIN PARK. Discover the rich natural and cultural history of Colossal Cave Mountain Park during a 2 to 3 mile, easy to moderate level interpretive hike along the Arizona Trail. Ages 12 and up. Colossal Cave Mountain Park, 16721 E Old Spanish Trail. Cost: Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855.

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OCTOBER 29, 6:30PM-8:30PM - NATURE NIGHT: LET’S TALK NATURE! Naturalist Jeff Babson shares “The Wonders of Bird Migration” in a short talk followed by a Q and A session on any nature subject that crosses your mind. Please bring a head lamp or flashlight and a lawn chair. All ages welcome. Sam Lena Park/KERP, 3400 S. Country Club Road. Cost: Free. Registration not required. For more information contact: www.pima. gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. OCTOBER 30, 12NOON-4PM - TUBAC ALL SOULS DAY DÍA DE LOS MUERTOS FESTIVAL & PROCESSION. The Tubac celebration of Día de los Muertos is a glorious event, exuberantly honoring our ancestors and our community. Everyone is welcome to create an ofrenda or altar and these will be displayed throughout the community. At Tubac Presidio State Historic Park beginning at noon and running until 4 pm, we’ll have face


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Snickers

NOVEMBER 2, 11AM-1:30PM - COOKING A-Z - TORTILLA SOUP, WITH JERI HOYLE. $45. Tortilla soup is a party favorite, perfect to make for a crowd. It's delicious year round but has become a "Fall Gathering" tradition. This is a recipe was developed by Jeri over the years and is always a repeat request. It's fun to serve with crisp fried tortilla strips and tasty condiments. The perfect accompaniment is a salad of farm fresh tender greens, jicama and seasonal pomegranate dressing. It's not a party without a show-stopping desert. So we will make a Tequila Spiked Arizona Pecan Pie "Boo"zy Jamaica Punch will also add to the festivities! www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. NOVEMBER 4, 5 & 6, 10AM-5PM - TUBAC FALL ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL. More than 100 juried exhibitors. Unique Holiday Shopping. One of a Kind handmade items. For more information visit the Tubac Chamber of Commerce's website www.tubacaz.com. 520-398-2704.

Snickers is a very affectionate dog, he was rescued from Animal Control. He gets along great with other animals and loves to play!

painting, live music, food vendors with a wonderful variety of offerings, ofrenda exhibits, intention writing, and a special bilingual presentation of the History of Dia de los Muertos by Zandra Pardi. Then a splendid procession will march through the streets to the Tubac Cemetery and end at a symbolic bonfire in the Sculpture Garden at the K. Newby Gallery. There will also be music, dancing, food and drink in the Sculpture Garden. Participants are encouraged to come in costume, have their faces painted and bring mementos of loved ones to memorialize in the parade and at the bonfire. Purchase your tickets at the Presidio by October 29 and receive a discount: Adults $5, children (7-13), $1.50, children (younger than 7) are free. Day of event ticket prices $7.50 adults, $2.50 children (7-13), children (younger than 7) are free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. OCTOBER 30, 4-5:30PM - OUTDOOR CONCERT WITH THE GREEN VALLEY CONCERT BAND. Enjoy the music of the Wild, Wild West performed by the Green Valley Concert Band. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: $10 per person at the door. For more information contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520724-5220. OCTOBER 30, 4-8PM - ALL SOULS DAY - THE DAY BEFORE HALLOWEEN PARTY. Everyone is welcome to celebrate at Tubac Art & Gifts. Take costume selfies, make an All Soul’s Day offering, enjoy refreshments, and see creative Halloween gifts and treats. 31 Tubac Road. NOVEMBER 1, 8, 15, 22, 10AM-1PM - TUESDAYS IN NOVEMBER: "DRAWING FUNDAMENTALS" - RICK WHEELER. Full course cost $200 members/$240 non. Contact the Tubac Center of the Arts to register at 520398-2371. NOVEMBER 1, 11AM-1:30PM - COOKING A-Z - FURTHER FUN WITH FILO, WITH ERICA SWADLEY. $45. In this hands on class, we're offering an opportunity to expand your filo skills. For first time filo folk, we'll go over the simple techniques for conquering fear of filo. For old hands there will be some sumptuous recipes that would be good to try for the upcoming holiday season. We'll make an Elegant Orzo and Veggie Torte. We'll make a savory roulade, either from mushrooms or autumnal vegetables, which can be served in small portions as an appetizer or in hearty slabs for an entree. We'll finish with a Maple Bourbon Pecan Baklava, not your Greek auntie's recipe. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. NOVEMBER 1, 8, 15, 2PM-5PM - LIVEWRITE - POETRY WITH BILL STEPHENSON. "What ‘oft was thought but ne’er so well expressed." Three weekly workshops that include recitation, discussion, and learning exercises for turning casual poems into well crafted poems. A Lowe House Project Workshop in Old Town Tubac. For more information and registration contact Bill at livewritewords.com

NOVEMBER 4 & 5, 7PM - THE SANTA CRUZ SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRESENT: SOMEONE WHO’LL WATCH OVER ME BY FRANK MCGUINNESS. This powerful and moving play, set in Beirut, Lebanon in the 1980s, is based on a true story. In the perma-darkness of a windowless room, with one ankle shackled, English academic Michael, Irish journalist Edward, and American doctor Adam wonder what they have done to deserve captivity and when, if ever, they might see their loved ones again. Having little contact with their unseen captors, and none whatsoever with the outside world, the men use dark humor and their vivid imaginations to forge their own reality within the walls of their cell. As victims of political action, powerless to initiate change, what can they do? How do they live and survive? Filled with humor and pathos, Someone Who'll Watch Over Me is ultimately a remarkable celebration of the human spirit. This play was first staged in July 1992 at the Hampstead Theater in London. It was later produced on Broadway at the Booth Theater and ran for almost 300 performances. This production is directed by Amanda Urbaniak. Additional showings: November 11-12 at 7pm and November 13 at 3pm. At the Community Performance & Art Center, 1250 W. Continental Road, Green Valley. www.santacruzshoestringplayers. com. NOVEMBER 5, 8AM - 5K RUN/WALK FOR SALAD BARS IN SCHOOLS IN TUBAC. The Fresh Produce Association of the Americas would like to invite the community to participate in our first 5K Run/Walk for Salad Bars in Schools on Nov. 5, 2016 at the Tubac Golf Resort and Spa. The event will take participants through the beautiful paths of the Tubac Golf Resort and SPA, under the cotton trees and around the lily ponds proceeding through the Historic Anza Trail and a few streets in the Tubac Village. This will be a fun event that also raises money to fund salad bar equipment for schools in the area, a cause near and dear to our hearts because it helps instill healthy eating habits for area school children. The registration is open through www.active.com at the following link: http://www.active.com/tubac-az/running/distance-running-races/5krun-walk-for-salad-bars-in-schools2016?int= or by searching for "Tubac". General registration is only $25 and children $10 for a 1-mile run! Packet pickup starts at 7 a.m., Run starts at 8 a.m. Only the first 100 participants will receive a shirt, but they are all invited to enjoy a light breakfast after the event and enjoy some other gifts. We look forward to seeing you all there! For more information visit www. Over the freshfrommexico.com or call (520) 287-2707.

31 NOVEMBER 7, 8:30AM -TUBAC HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS BREAKFAST WITH HISTORY. The speaker is Steve Gastellum. The topic will be the complex and lengthy Baca Float decisions and the effect on property owners. The controversial placement of a “floating” land grant by the King of Spain in the Santa Cruz Valley in 1863 brought disappointment and heartache to the families who lived in the valley prior to that time and to settlers who homesteaded the area. It encompassed land in what's now Tubac, Tumacácori and Rio Rico and the Santa Rita mountain range. People who had settled there in the 19th century lost their property in 1917 when the Supreme Court reversed numerous decisions by the Department of the Interior and, in effect, evicted families from their homes. To reserve a seat, call (520) 398-2020. Tickets are $20 for historical society members and $25 for others. Wisdom’s restaurant in Tumacacori. NOVEMBER 8 - ELECTION DAY. NOVEMBER 10, 5PM - ARTS SPEAK PRESENTATION WITH SUSIE HEINZ – “PABLO PICASSO: WOMEN ARE GODDESSES & DOORMATS”. Whether you love Picasso’s art or not, this talk with Susie Heinz will help you understand why he is considered by many to be the greatest artist of the 20th century. The influence of women in his art will be explored. Free for Tubac Center of the Arts Members, $10/Nonmembers and guests. Call TCA at 520-398-2371. NOVEMBER 11& 12, 7PM - THE SANTA CRUZ SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRESENT: SOMEONE WHO’LL WATCH OVER ME BY FRANK MCGUINNESS. This powerful and moving play, set in Beirut, Lebanon in the 1980s, is based on a true story. Filled with humor and pathos, Someone Who'll Watch Over Me is ultimately a remarkable celebration of the human spirit. This production is directed by Amanda Urbaniak. Additional showing: November 13 at 3pm. At the Community Performance & Art Center, 1250 W. Continental Road, Green Valley. www.santacruzshoestringplayers.com. NOVEMBER 12, 10AM-3PM - OLD TOWN TUBAC HISTORIC ADOBE BUILDING WALKING TOUR. The tour includes buildings believed to have garrisoned Spanish Colonial Soldiers in the mid-1700s, housed some of Arizona's earliest 19th century settlers, homes built on existing foundations by Tubac's Hispanic Heritage Families and where Tubac's artist colony had its beginnings and continues to this day. A rare opportunity to tour inside these historical treasures and learn about the people living and working here for hundreds of years. $40 per person, children with adults and students with ID - Free. $35 per person for Tubac Historical Society Members. Registration is recommended. Tickets are limited. Proceeds support this missions of the Tubac Historical Society and Lowe House Project Artist in Residency Program. For more information and registration 520-398-2020 and info@ths-tubac.org.

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NOVEMBER 5, 10AM - ANNUAL MEETING OF THE ARIZONA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 949 E 2nd St, Tucson. 520-628-5774. ArizonaHistoricalSociety.org. NOVEMBER 6 - TCA ANNUAL MEETING. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Admission: Free. Southwestern theme, prizes for best Western dress. (Cost of dinner extra, $25 members, $30 non). Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371. NOVEMBER 6, 3PM-6PM - COOKING A-Z - SOUTHWEST THANKSGIVING DINNER, WITH JOHN BORD. $70. Experience the flavors of the southwest with this special Thanksgiving Dinner menu that will inspire you and delight your family and friends. Paired with dry Riesling and Pinot Noir wine. Cream of Chayote Soup with Corn, Roasted Brussel Sprouts with Pepitas, Pistachios, Dried Cranberries and Walnuts, Fresh Cranberry Sauce with Cinnamon, Oranges and Grand Marnier, Buttermilk Mashed Potatoes with Bacon and Ancho Crema, Chorizo Cornbread Stuffing, Mesquite Grilled Turkey served with a Pomegranate Ginger Chutney, Pumpkin and Gorgonzola Flan. . www.cookinga-z. com. 520-398-9497.

OPEN EVERY DAY

Mercado de Baca 19 Tubac Road Mercado de Baca 19 Tubac Road Next Shelby’sBistro Bistro Next to to Shelby's 520-398-2805 520-398-2805 www.sweetpoppy.webs.com www.sweetpoppy.webs.com


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NOVEMBER 12, 5PM - STARRY, STARRY NIGHT - GALA DINNER AND ENTERTAINMENT UNDER THE STARS. Tickets $150, Cocktail Attire. Catered by La Roca Restaurant, Music by Domingo DeGrazia Spanish Guitar Band. At the Rock Corral Ranch, Tumacacori. Buy tickets online at ARSOBO.ORG. ARSOBO is a US/MEXICO Cross Border Non-Profit Organization supporting individuals with disabilities. For more information call Bill Neubauer at 520-444-9048. NOVEMBER 13, 3PM - THE SANTA CRUZ SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRESENT: SOMEONE WHO’LL WATCH OVER ME BY FRANK MCGUINNESS. This powerful and moving play, set in Beirut, Lebanon in the 1980s, is based on a true story. Filled with humor and pathos, Someone Who'll Watch Over Me is ultimately a remarkable celebration of the human spirit. This production is directed by Amanda Urbaniak. At the Community Performance & Art Center, 1250 W. Continental Road, Green Valley. www. santacruzshoestringplayers.com. NOVEMBER 15, 6:30PM - HISTORY TALK – “RIO RICO’S RAILROAD HISTORY” BY RAILROAD ENTHUSIAST ED BIEBEL. The railroad first arrived in Calabasas in 1882 when it was the port-of-entry into Mexico. The New Mexico and Arizona Railroad was the first railroad built from the Arizona Territory into Mexico. Ed Biebel, railroad enthusiast, will speak about: What happened in Calabasas when the railroad arrived? Contact RioRicoHistorian@hotmail.com. www.RioRicoHistoricalSociety.org/talks. html. This event is free and open to the public, at the Rio Rico Community Center. NOVEMBER 16, 17, 18 - LIVEWRITE POETRY INTENSIVE WITH BILL STEPHENSON. “What ‘oft was thought but ne’er so well expressed." Three day intensive workshop that includes recitation, discussion, and learning exercises for turning casual poems into well crafted poems. A Lowe House Project Workshop in Old Town Tubac. For more information and registration contact Bill at livewritewords.com. NOVEMBER 17, 1-3PM - GREEN VALLEY GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY MEETING. Program: Suzanne Young Brayer, B.A. and M.A., Arizona State University, "Timelines." Plotting an individual on a timeline is a valuable tool to help in genealogy research. By summarizing a life, it can point out areas for further research, errors and inconsistencies, interconnections between persons, and relationships to historical events. This discussion will demonstrate the types of timelines, how they can be created and how to use them in analysis. Meetings feature helpful genealogical items for Silent Auctions and Raffles. Refreshments will be served. Visitors are welcome. For more information, contact JoAnn Herbst (520-396-4630 or joannherbst29@gmail.com), or go to our web site at www.azgvgs.org (new and easier). At the Valley Presbyterian Church, 2800 S. Camino del Sol, Green Valley. NOVEMBER 17, 5PM - ARTS SPEAK PRESENTATION WITH THE TUBAC HEALTHCARE FOUNDATION. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Admission: Free. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371. NOVEMBER 18 THROUGH DECEMBER 30 - HOLIDAY ARTISAN MARKET AT THE TUBAC CENTER OF THE ARTS. Our annual holiday arts and crafts exhibit provides unique and made items from regional artists. Great holiday gift items. Visit with Santa during Luminaria Nights, Friday December 2nd & Saturday December 3rd from 5:00 – 8:30pm. Free for TCA Members, $10/ Nonmembers and guests. 9 Plaza Road. 520-398-2371. NOVEMBER 18, 6:30PM - OPENING NIGHT GALA FOR TUCSON BALLET'S SPIRIT GARDEN, AN ORIGINAL BALLET COMMEMORATING DIA DE LOS MUERTOS (DAY OF THE DEAD). Ballerinas, Catrinas, skulls, and other iconic images will be included in the performance in an inventive manner. The music of Tucson’s own internationally renowned troubadours Calexico has also served as an inspiration for the creation of Spirit Garden, Calexico

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specially adapted their music for the ballet. Also included on the program is Perseus & Andromeda, the 2nd installment of Daniel Precup’s “Greek Heroes” series. The program concludes with the encore presentation of Red, White & Blue!, the company’s signature patriotic work. Performance Dates/Times: Opening Night Gala Friday, November 18 – 6:30 pm. Opening Night Gala includes pre-performance wine and buffet reception, silent auction, live musical entertainment by Mariachi Valenzuela, and a post-performance champagne and dessert reception with company artists. Other Performances: Saturday, November 19 – 7:30 pm, Sunday, November 20 – 2:00 pm, Temple of Music and Art (330 S. Scott Ave.) Ticket Information: Opening Night Gala - $100, General - $45, Seniors/Students/Military - $40. Phone: 800.838.3006. Online: www.brownpapertickets.com. NOVEMBER 19, 12NOON-4PM - RIO RICO HISTORICAL SOCIETY PRESENTS BUS TOUR OF HISTORIC RIO RICO. The bus departs the Rio Rico Community Center, 391 Avenida Coatimundi in Rio Rico at 12 p.m. The bus tour includes the Calabasas Mission accompanied by a National Park Service Ranger, Anita Badertscher, plus these seven additional site tours by Rio Rico historian, Dwight Thibodeaux: 1. Calabasas Town Site, 2. Toacuquita Indian Village/Rancheria, 3. The Stud Barn, 4. Baca Float Ranch House, 5. Palo Parado Railroad Siding/Otero Town, 6. Baca Float Ranch/Palo Parado Barn, 7. Rancho Santa Cruz. Reservations required. Suggested donation $20 for members, $25 for non. Wear good hiking shoes, a hat, bring water, sunscreen and a portable chair. Contact Information: Rio Rico Historical Society, RioRicoHistorian@hotmail.com, 520-281-8293, www.RioRicoHistoricalSociety.org/tours.html. NOVEMBER 19, 1-8PM - COWBOY CHRISTMAS 6TH ANNUAL QUICK DRAW AND ART AUCTION. Join Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery, Tubac Territory Gallery, TCA staff & board members and community artists for this Quick Paint event and barbecue. 1-2:30pm Quick Draw Competition - 20+ local artists have only 90 minutes to create a completed work of art for the charity auction. 3-5pm Charity Auction of Quick Draw Art. 5-8pm Cowboy Cuisine catered by Tubac Jacks with music to follow. All funds raised directly support Tubac Center of the Arts High School Arts programing. Location: Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery, 5 Calle Baca, Tubac. Admission: Event Free / Dinner $25. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 or Rogoway Turquoise Tortoise Gallery at (520) 398-2041. NOVEMBER 19, 4PM - EQUINE VOICES RESCUE & SANCTUARY FALL FUNDRAISER held at the Madera Clubhouse in Quail Creek, 2055 E. Quail Crossing Blvd, Green Valley. The Fall Fundraiser will include silent and live auctions, hors d’oeuvres, complimentary wine tasting, three course meal, and cash bar. All the money raised at this event will go directly to benefit the equines that have made the sanctuary their home. To make your reservation to attend go online at equinevoices.org/events or contact our office at 520-398-2814. The cost is $65 per person, or you can purchase a table of 10 for $650. This can be a table for you and your friends, clientele, or donated to groups such as the Elephant Head Volunteer Fire Department, Pima County Sheriffs, Border Patrol, Equine Voices volunteers, or an organization of your choice.

will be joined by Gloria Hernandeez and her family along with Adrian Corona Trillo. Meet the artists and see demonstrations of pottery painting as well as a mid-afternoon firing of a pot in the traditional manner.  The pottery for sale will be in a variety of price ranges.  Collectors and interested visitors will want to take home a beautiful piece of pottery. Location: Tubac Center of the Arts. Admission: Free. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371. DECEMBER 2 & 3, 9AM-4PM - 8TH ANNUAL GREEN VALLEY GOURD ART FESTIVAL. This festival sponsored by the Valley Gourd Patch of Green Valley features original gourd art and gourd art supplies. Gourd festival will run from 9am to 4pm both days in the Green Valley Village Mall, Suite 35, at I-19 and Esperanza. 520-648-9808; ajzaloz@gmail.com or www.azbaskets.net. DECEMBER 7, 6PM - SAVE THE DATE - BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND, AN EVENING OF WINE APPRECIATION & FINE FOOD PRESENTED BY PETER C. HANDLER. For reservations and more information please call 520-3982678. At the Tubac Golf Resort & Spa. DECEMBER 9, 9AM-12NOON & 1PM-4PM - HOLIDAY GIFT PLAYSHOPS WITH SUSAN CORL. Come play for one or both sessions! A morning session of making cut paper lanterns from envelopes with translucent paper and clever hinges. An afternoon session on origami paper projects as gifts and cards including a poinsettia flower book, a star ornament, picture frame ornaments and pop-up boxes. All materials included. A Lowe House Project “playshop” in Old Town Tubac. For more information, fees and registration email susancorl@hotmail.com.

Calendar listings are welcome from advertisers , government agencies and non-profit, public events.

Please format: Date, Time, Event, Details, Contact Info Repeat contact info on repeat entries and renew event listing each month. Send to editor@tubacvillager.com

NOVEMBER 24, 12NOON-7PM - MAKE YOUR RESERVATIONS FOR OUR THANKSGIVING FEAST! $45 per person. At the Tubac Golf Resort & Spa. 520-398-2211.

or mail to PO Box 4018, Tubac, AZ 85646

NOVEMBER 26 & 27 - “MATA ORTIZ WEEKEND”. See beautiful pottery from Mata Ortiz and meet the artists and families who create these amazing works of art at Tubac Center of the Arts. Two of the nephews of Juan Quezada, Samuel and his wife Estella and Mauro and his wife Martha

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NOVEMBER 19, 4PM - EQUINE VOICES RESCUE & SANCTUARY FALL FUNDRAISER at the Madera Clubhouse in Quail Creek, 2055 E. Quail Crossing Blvd, Green Valley.

To make your reservation to attend go online at equinevoices.org/ events or contact our office at 520-398-2814.

Tubac, Arizona

EQUINE VOICES OPENS NEW BOUTIQUE & THRIFT STORE Equine Voices Rescue & Sanctuary in Amado recently opened their long-awaited “Gulliver’s Boutique & Thrift Store”. For those of you who don’t know Gulliver, he is a very large and handsome Clydesdale-cross who has been the mascot of Equine Voices since its opening in 2004. Over the past twelve years, Equine Voices has saved over 800 equines, most of whom would have ended up being slaughtered in Canada or Mexico for human consumption. Currently, the Sanctuary is home to 47 horses, 5 burros, and 1 goat. Karen Pomroy, Founder and President of Equine Voices, states that it takes $35,000 to $40,000 per month to meet the needs of these animals. The boutique’s mission is to assist in making Equine Voices more sustainable for years to come. It is located at 1932 E. Frontage Rd. in Tumacacori, directly across from Wisdom’s Café, a favorite spot for many locals and out of town visitors. The boutique features an ever-changing variety of items including furniture, home décor, kitchenware, jewelry, artwork, Western-themed items, and much, much more. All proceeds from store sales will benefit the equines of Equine Voices. Donations of items for the store are always needed and are tax-deductible. Please contact Angie Wilson at angie@equinevoices.org or 520-398-2814 to arrange for pick-up or drop-off of your donations. So, come visit the boutique and know that you are helping support an important cause! Hours are Tuesday through Thursday from 11:00 to 4:00 and Friday and Saturday from 11:00 to 6:00.

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A lamos , M exico

Fiesta Tours International Journey Fundraiser for the Tubac Center of the Arts

Words and images by Cathy Giesy

A

lamos is a small town of about 25,000 people hidden away at the base of the Sierra Madre Mountains in the southern part of the neighboring state of Sonora. An extremely successful silver mining town from the late 1600’s until the early 1900’s replete with all the fascinating stories and legends of ghostly visages and wealthy eccentrics

Alamos boasted that it exported more silver than any other silver-mining city of Mexico (a claim also made by every silver-mining city from Batopilas to Guanajuato!). Many of the old silver barons built huge mansions based on the architectural style of Andalusia, Spain. Most were built in neighborhoods surrounding the church and central Plaza de Armas. These homes housed large families, great numbers of servants, horses and carriages, farm animals, and beautiful gardens. Pathways were paved with silver from homes to the church for the

young brides to walk on for their marriage ceremonies. The ladies became so tired of using their silver plates every day for meals that they longed for porcelain china plates from Europe.

In 1894, Alfonso Ortiz Tirado was born in Alamos. He was always interested in music and loved to perform. His father encouraged him to go into a career that would allow him a good living, and so Alfonso studied medicine. He became a successful physician, but his passion was singing, and eventually he became famous as the “Tenor of the Americas”. When he passed away, he left funds to the city of Alamos to encourage young people to pursue music. In a wise decision, the city fathers established an annual festival of music. After 32 years of wonderful events and fabulous performances, the festival has evolved into a world class event. The festival continues today and is always held in late January on


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Americans discovered the charm of Alamos, and began a process of restoration of the wonderful colonial buildings. Over the next few decades, more Americans and Canadians arrived to claim an old “ruin” and restore it to its historical splendor. Even a few residents of Tubac have found their way to Alamos to enjoy the relaxed way of life that blankets the village today. Many famous people have discovered the charm of Alamos - Alvaro Obregon, former president of Mexico, Maria Felix, actress, Hal Findlay - musical director for Warner Brothers, Carol O’Connor (Archie Bunker fame), Forest Mars of Mars Candy, and Joaquin Murrieta – well known California bandit! A few of the old homes, convents, mints, etc were converted to hotels, restaurants, and bed and breakfasts. The most wonderful story today is the Hacienda de los Santos, a project having reclaimed and rebuilt of several homes of an entire block to create the lovely spa and resort. Alamos was declared a “Pueblo Magico” in 2005, a designation of a “magical town” by the Secretary of Tourism – a designation of a town known for its natural beauty, touristic comfort, and historical importance.

dates surrounding the birthdate of Dr. Ortiz. http://festivalortiztirado.gob.mx/programa/

A visit to the small museum located at the corner of the Plaza de Armas is a wonderful way to learn about the mining history of the area, as well as to learn about Dr Ortiz Tirado, by perusing a room totally dedicated to his life and times. After a series of wars and depressions, Alamos was left to crumble by the early part of the 20th century. In the 1940’s a handful of wealthy

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Next January, Fiesta Tours International will be taking a tour group to the annual Festival of Dr Ortiz Tirado as a fund raiser for the Tubac Center of the Arts. Enjoy a night in the beachside resort town of San Carlos on the way down, and a night in the capital city of Hermosillo upon returning to Arizona. Stay three wonderful nights in Alamos at the luxurious Hacienda de los Santos. Attend a stunning performance every night in the Municipal Palace, and others daily in the historic church on the plaza de Armas, peruse the artisan booths that

pop up every year, a book mart, an Art Walk – and much more. Truly a wonderful way to experience Alamos. Contact Fiesta Tours International at 520-398-9705 or fiestatoursint@gmail.com for a detailed itinerary and more information.

B

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Hawks, Eagles, & Vultures:

By Vincent Pinto

photo: Ghostrider by Joseph Birkett

Autumn’s Annual Assault - Part I

W

eather or not you have, do, or have ever considered yourself a birdwatcher, chances are that diurnal raptors hold a special place in your thoughts and memories. Given our relative glut of avian species - upwards of 500 have been recorded in the Sky Islands region of southeast Arizona - many types of birds seem to vanish into the proverbial feathered crowd. Not so our Hawks, Eagles & Vultures. The sheer size of some may arrest our attention, while the decidedly predatory nature of most species makes for dramatic ecological observations. No wonder that throughout human history many species of diurnal raptors have been revered and why today they still compel us to watch and wonder.

Condor is also in this group, but is only hypothetical in southeast Arizona. Turkey Vultures ply our skies year-round, though their numbers do diminish noticeably in winter. They are rather unique among birds in that they possess a keen olfactory sense which has evolved to locate pungent carrion. Along with their ability to easily ride air thermals and their acute vision this allows them to locate even small carcasses before most other avian scavengers. This is just as well, as TV’s can be dominated by other species at a feeding site.

New World Vultures

While Turkey Vultures can be found throughout southeast Arizona, Blacks are more confined in range. Look for them especially near Nogales and Patagonia Lake and more marginally near Tucson and Douglas..

Here, then, is a short introduction to some of the species in our region. Autumn is a prime time to observe our diurnal raptors, as a combination of breeders, migrants, and wintering species artfully converge as monsoon season ends.

We begin our journey with 2 species of local Vultures - the familiar Turkey Vulture and the somewhat less known Black Vulture. Both are within the family Cathartidae. The California

In fact, their cousins, Black Vultures, generally soar even higher than TV’s and seem to “use” them to locate some off their meals. In this bit of avian one-upmanship when the two species actually meet at the carcass Black Vultures tend to feed rather frenetically, tending to keep the TV’s at bay! Should a Crested Caracara, a rather weird relative of Falcons, or a Golden Eagle show up, then both species of Vultures may well be out of a meal, as they both are dominated by these species.

Interestingly, DNA studies have linked our New World Vultures at least distantly to some species of Storks. It seems that the large Old World Vultures that we often associate with Africa and our own Vulture species independently developed the carrion-feeding habit. Convergent evolution can be fascinating!

Osprey

The Osprey is the only species within the family Pandionidae. What it lacks in diversity it more than makes up for in its rather cosmopolitan distribution. This fish-eating species is an uncommon migrant through our parts, making any sighting notable. Given that we live on the verge of Patagonia Lake I most often see them there. Osprey effortlessly soar over the water, searching for fish, which comprise the vast majority of their diet. They generally hover a la a Kingfisher over their intended target, finally plunging partly into the water to snatch a meal. The still living fish is then manipulated in the Osprey’s talons until it flies away with it head first and with minimal wind resistance. Overall Ospreys have made a decent comeback after their number plummeted due to the use of DDT and other heinous pesticides.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Fish Eagles

Bald Eagles are part of a group of related Fish Eagle species found in many parts of the temperate and tropical realms. They, along with the remainder of our diurnal raptor species, belong to the family Accipitridae. The stronghold of this species in Arizona is in the Mogollon Rim and lower Colorado Plateau regions, where numerous manmade impoundments help support a small breeding population. Here at home Bald Eagles are a rare migrant and wintering species. Look for them around our local lakes and in Sky Island Valleys. I will never forget the haunting vision of a lone adult Bald Eagle flying through a dense snow squall amidst the solitude of Parker Canyon Lake. Wintering Balds feed upon a combination of fish, waterfowl, lagomorphs, and carrion where they too will dominate Vultures. This species will also not hesitate to separate an Osprey from its hard-won piscine repast.

Kites

Species that share the name Kite are not always very closely related and thus form a somewhat artificial, yet convenient group of diurnal raptors. Both our White-tailed and Mississippi Kites are slender, rather small, point-winged, Falcon-like raptors. The latter species - a local breeder - often adeptly preys upon insects while in flight. The ghostly White-tailed Kite is rare and irregular permanent resident here, fluctuating in numbers from year to year. I feel lucky if a spy 1 or 2 of these svelte predators each year. Small rodents form the mainstay of their diet, which they may catch by first hovering over a likely site.

Northern Harrier

We end part one with the Northern Harrier, a species found within the genus Circus, which includes 10 species - most in the Old World. The generic name derives from the species proclivity

to circle in the air while hunting. As a write, I have just seen my first Harrier of the year in mid-September - an early migrant, as this species typically only winters here. As with several other diurnal raptors, the Northern Harrier has evolved to fly using a dihedral wing pattern. This shallow “V” arrangement of the wings allows for highly efficient flight as this species quarters near to the ground. There it indeed attempts to harry its would-be prey into vulnerable positions. In common with its counterpart, the partly diurnal Short-eared Owl, Harriers sport a distinct facial disk that likely help to collect sound from the rustlings of their prey - primarily small birds and rodents.

Sexual dimorphism is evident in the plumage of this graceful raptor. The adult males are ghostly gray, while the larger females are a rich brown hue. Such size differences between diurnal raptors is the norm, with the females almost always topping the males in both size and weight. Perhaps this has evolved so that the genders minimize competition for prey while in a nesting pair as well as to provide a broader range of food items for their young.

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Next time we’ll hone in on the Accipiters and the Buteos - stay tuned for more riveting raptors!

3 Naturalist, Wildlife Biologist, & Bird Guide Vincent Pinto and his wife, Claudia, run RAVENS-WAY WILD JOURNEYS their Nature Adventure & Conservation organization devoted to protecting the unique Biodiversity of the Sky Islands Region. RWWJ offers a wide variety of custom Bird Guiding, Nature tours, & Educational programs. They also own & operate a luxury Safari Eco-Lodge on their 42acre Nature preserve by Patagonia Lake. The Safari Tented Camp caters to birders, Nature-lovers, hikers, and anyone who enjoys the peace and solitude of the great outdoors. Visit: www.ravensnatureschool.org

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

THE A R T

OF HEALTH By Jennifer Bek, R.N., CHHC

A

ccording to Dr. Michael Greger, author of the New York Times best seller, How Not to Die, only 3% of Americans consume even the minimum recommended daily intake of fiber. The government’s USDA Dietary Guidelines refer to fiber as one of the “shortfall nutrients,” defined as a nutrient that at least a quarter of the population is not getting enough of. A lack of fiber can cause digestive and elimination problems, accounting for the shelves full of fiber supplements and laxatives in super markets and drug stores. But guess what? Instead of buying fiber in a jar, we can simply increase our fiber intake by increasing the amount of fruits, vegetables, beans, peas, lentils, whole grains and nuts in our diet. Fiber is part of the cellular wall in fruits, vegetables and grains that helps food move through the digestive tract, keeping it functioning optimally. Fiber draws fluids from the body to add bulk to the stool. High fiber diets have been shown to lower the risk of some cancers, diverticulosis, irritable bowel syndrome and obesity. High fiber also helps maintain an optimum balance of bacteria in the digestive tract, increasing healthy bacteria while decreasing the unhealthy bacteria that can cause digestive problems. How much fiber do we need? Here is Mayo Clinic’s recommended daily fiber intake : Women under 50 – 25 grams

BRING ONTHE FIBER!

QUINOA-CORN HIGH FIBER CHILI (CROCK POT) Ingredients: 4 cloves minced garlic 1 chopped onion

Olive oil or avocado oil

2 15 oz. jars or cans Fire Roasted Tomatoes

1 cup organic corn (if frozen, thaw under warm running water) 1 14 oz. can organic diced tomatoes 1 can pinto beans (drain & rinse) 4 cups organic vegetable broth 1 cup chopped celery 2 teaspoons cumin

2-3 teaspoons chili powder Salt & pepper to taste

1 cup uncooked quinoa (rinsed)

Women 50 and over – 21 grams Men under 50 – 38 grams

Men 50 and over – 30 grams

In addition to regular fruits and vegetables, here are other foods containing fiber that are easy to work into everyday soups, salads and snacks: Avocados – 10.5 grams of fiber per cup

Instructions 1. Put small amount of oil in slow-cooker with onion and garlic.

2. Turn on high and cover while preparing other ingredients.

Artichokes – 10.3 grams of fiber per medium artichoke

3. Add remaining ingredients, stirring quinoa in last.

Coconut (shredded) – 7.2 grams of fiber per cup

5. Serve with avocado slices and lime wedges.

Berries (all kinds) – 7- 8 grams of fiber per cup

4. Cook 4-6 hours on low.

Black Beans – 12.2 grams of fiber per cup

6. If desired, add pre-cooked ground beef or shredded chicken last ½ hour of cooking.

Garbanzo Beans – 8 grams fiber per cup

Split Peas (cooked) – 16.3 grams of fiber per cup Lentils (cooked)– 10.4 grams of fiber per cup Brussels Sprouts – 7.6 grams of fiber pr cup

Acorn Squash (baked) – 9 grams of fiber per cup Quinoa (cooked) – 5 grams fiber per cup

Flax Seeds (whole) – 3 grams of fiber per tablespoon Chic Seeds – 5.5 grams per tablespoon

HIGH FIBER CHIPS ‘N’ DIP

1 can black beans (drain & rinse)

7. Add more vegetable broth for thinner soup.

THE SALAD-IS-THE-MEAL Ingredients: Mixture of fresh organic greens (kale, arugula, Swiss chard)

Some dishes you probably already make can be “fiber enriched” by adding a few different ingredients. The chili recipe uses quinoa and extra beans instead of ground beef (there is no fiber in meat, dairy or eggs.) I love to make a big batch of this chili and freeze it in glass jars. (Be sure to get soup cold in the refrigerator before freezing – then keep lid loose in freezer until frozen to prevent jar cracking.) I purchased a large 7-quart Crock Pot so I can double all my soup recipes and keep my freezer stocked with “fast food” soup meals.

Radicchio, chopped

The next recipe is our daily “Salad-Is-The-Meal” lunch entree that has lots more fiber added. The “Chips and Dip” idea just skips the sour cream and potato chips by using fiberrich hummus (garbanzo beans) with cucumbers and Mary’s Crackers (lots of seeds and no gluten.) My go-to snack every day is hummus and celery. Keeps my hand out of the cookie jar and my fiber count up!

Black olives

Jicama, chopped

Celery or bok choy, chopped Sliced red and/or yellow peppers Artichoke hearts

Chopped red or green onion Sliced tomatoes

Pumpkin seeds or sunflower seeds Crumbled feta or goat cheese Dressing of choice

(Hummus with cucumber & cracker-chips) Ingredients: 2 cans chick peas, rinsed and drained 3 cloves chopped garlic Juice of 1 lemon

2 teaspoons ground cumin

2 teaspoons Bragg’s Liquid Aminos ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil Water as needed

Instructions: Blend all ingredients in food processor. Serve with veggies or Mary’s crackers. For those of you just returning from summer travels, here is a reminder of where to buy great fresh organic vegetables in Tubac. 1. The Shorey Family Farmer’s Market is open on Wednesdays and Saturdays from 11:15 a.m. until 3:00 p.m. at the plaza by Mirage & Bird, across from the Tubac Center of the Arts. In addition to a large selection of fresh organic produce, they offer homebaked goods such as pot-pies and fruit pies, their raw honey and free-range eggs among their many home-made items. 2. The Tubac Market now has an organic section with many choices including a full selection of non-organic produce. 3. The Double Z Farmer’s Market, in front of The Goods Sandwich & Smoothie Bar on Tubac Road, is open every Sunday from 8:30 a.m. until noon with their grand array of organic home-grown items.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

Mission: Educational and Spiritual - Remember our departed loved ones Cultural - Eat, Dance, and Tell Stories

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The Brasher Team Tubac Village Office: #2 Tubac Road 520.398.2506 Tubac Golf Resort Office: #1 Ave. Otero, Ste F 520.398.0200 P.O.Box 4241. Tubac, Arizona 85646 Email: tubac@russlyon.com

Civic - Gather family and friends for a Tubac-wide celebration History - Preserve a cultural tradition Artistic - Nourish our creative spirits

Sunday October 30, 2016 • 12 PM - 4 PM Tubac Presidio State Historic Park and K Newby Gallery (bonfire at end of procession) Tickets: Adults $7.50

Children 7-13 $2.50

Purchase Tickets at the Presidio by Oct. 29 Adults $5.00 Children 7-13 $1.50 6 and under Free

Food

c!

Musi

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• Arts and Crafts Booths • Ofrendas (Altar Installations)

• Art Exhibit:

Common Ground: The Tubac Cemetery Series

• Zandra Pardi - bilingual presentation of the History of Dia de los Muertos

• Children’s Crafts • Face Painting

• 4 PM - Parade/Procession to Cemetery ending with bonfire at K Newby Gallery

For more information - 520-398-2252 Tubacpresidio.org

OPPORTUNITY The opportunity is available for someone to become a business partner in a flourishing Gallery, rated A+ by BBB, located in Tubac, AZ. The Gallery has exclusive two dimensional art, museum quality sculpture and award winning creations of jewelry. For more information, please email thesilverhatgallery@earthlink.net Please, no walk-in inquiries.

Authentic Mexican Art


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

M ontessori M oment

“M ontessori S chool C elebrates I nternational D ay of P eace ” Article & photo by Madeline Akcorta

On a beautiful Friday morning in late September, the Montessori de Santa Cruz school celebrated the International Day of Peace. Students, faculty, parents and community members gathered in front of the school for the ceremony, which happens every year around the world. The United Nations established the International Day of Peace in 1981. On this day, the United Nations devotes itself to worldwide peace and encourages all mankind to work in cooperation with this goal. MdSC joined in this tradition after 9/11 as a way of honoring the First Responders. Celebrating the International Day of Peace was also incorporated as a way to teach children about the concept of Peace and Peacemaking. “Peacefulness” is one of the virtues taught at the school every year during the month of September. Throughout the month, the children talk about what Peace means, what makes them feel Peaceful, and how they can be Peacemakers in their community. Maria Montessori, the founder of Montessori education, firmly believed that the education of children was the key to the future of peace. Her vision and goal was to establish world peace through education. For her efforts in teaching children the importance of creating Peace, Maria Montessori was nominated three times for the Nobel Peace Prize. Every year, MdSC invites representatives from civic groups to join in the ceremony. This year we had several School Board members,

together brought smiles to our faces and warmed our hearts. Observing their innocence and charm is a great reminder of why we must continue to work toward peace in the world for everyone on Earth, especially the children.

“Avoiding war

is the work of politics, establishing peace is the work of education.”

- Maria Montessori as well as representatives from the Tubac Fire Department, Green Valley Animal League, Tumacacori National Historic Park, Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, Cochise College, Church of Tubac, and Santa Cruz County Sheriff Tony Estrada, who participates nearly every year. For the ceremony, we all gathered in a large circle in front of the school and were greeted by MdSC’s School Director, Mary Gilbert. Then we turned toward the United States flag to say the Pledge of Allegiance together, followed by a moment of silence. The preschool and kindergarten children performed an adorable song called “Peace Is the Way.” Hearing the little children sing

The Lower Elementary children (grades 1-3) performed a song by Ben Harper called “With My Own Two Hands,” accompanied by the school’s music teacher, Mr. John White. The song is about changing the world and making it a better, kinder place with “my own two hands.” Upper Elementary students (grades 4-6) came forward individually to tell us what makes them feel peaceful. Many spoke of friends, family, pets and music. One funny student said that eating cheese makes him feel peaceful, and I have to agree with him on that one. After all the students contributed to the ceremony, our circle widened so we could all hold hands in honor of celebrating and acknowledging that there is always a need for more peace in the world. Handmade gifts were handed out by the students to all who participated, as a token of thanks from the school to the community. Montessori de Santa Cruz is a non-profit 501c3 free public charter school and tuition-based preschool serving the Santa Cruz Valley area. For 16 years MdSC has served our children with continuous and generous community support from fundraisers, events, donations and grant awards. For more information on how to enroll your child, participate in events or opportunities to give or volunteer, please contact the office at 520-3980536 or mdsc3@montessoridesantacruz.org.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r O c t o b e r 2 0 1 6

W

hen I was considering what I wanted to write about this last month, I was without a single idea. I said to myself, “I am a blank slate.” Then I thought, what a wonderful place to start from. Coming to the mat without concepts or “beginner’s mind” is perfect. Even the most accomplished practitioners benefit from and understand the mind free of “knowing” creates an environment of receptiveness. When ears, eyes and heart are open, the ability to gather in the teachings is vast. The old adage about not being able to pour anything more into a full cup applies. I know I often get full of myself and think I have the answers to my practice and all my students too. Then I am lucky enough to be with a teacher who gives me more, more information, facts, ideas and the realization that my cup is pretty empty. Approaching asana practice with wonder and complete attention is how to learn about personal and particular needs. When every action into the position I strive for is mysterious and new, realizing what holds me back from getting deep becomes clear. I am always amazed when I look down at my big toe and can make it move in a particular way. Awed by the complex connections of mind and body is not only a concise and methodic learning experience, but a beautiful example of “beginners mind.” I like to start with a basic pose. Asanas like Tādāsana (Mountain Pose), Uttānāsana (Standing Forward Bend), or Bhujangāsana (Cobra) seem and look simple, but can be improved on infinitely. I

try to notice what is makes me want to fidget or get out of the position. Sometimes it is a shoulder or my hand. Then I have to ask all the questions: am I aligned properly, am I using too much or too little energy, is my breath full and complete, where is my focus? Maybe I cannot get one heel lower than the other. The question is why? What inhibits my full expression of the asana? All these instants of physical and mental awareness give me lots of new information. So I learn about myself. I begin to understand a different way to approach the practice. The pose becomes a bit more fluid, the aches and pains begin to abate, it may even be better than the last time. One of the things I love about Yoga is its continuous spaciousness. Every asana has its charms and

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confrontations. I endeavor to practice the positions that make me work hard even though some days become a practice of favorites. Vīrabhadrāsana II (Warrior II) works my mind and body quite well. Getting it right and staying in the pose is a personal challenge. Occasionally it makes me happy but most of the time, it requires a lot of effort. It is a difficult hip opener. I have to be attentive to breath and to my feet. This is foundational work, solid and balanced; here I use the breath to create more length and stability. Knees and thighs must be active and engaged as well. The actions also include orientation of my pelvis, torso and arms. Where they are in relationship to my body and to space. Next the drishti, the focus of my eyes, my mind and body. I discover something about Warrior II than can be done more fully, better, or with greater ease. If I continue to keep my senses and my heart open, there is a never-ending learning that occurs. This is a favorite thing that happens: I study with a teacher who fills me up with amazing insights and new information. I absorb it into my practice and teachings and improve it all. Then I begin again with an empty slate. Kathy Edds, Yoga Instructor (ERYT 500), Ayurvedic Lifestyle Coach, www.kathyedds.com Kathy teaches yoga at The Tubac Healing Arts Center in Tubac. www.tubachealingarts.com

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by Claire McJunkin

Above: "Sisyphus" photo by Joseph Birkett

To feel and speak the astonishing beauty of thingsearth, stone and water, Beast, man, woman, sun, moon and stars-Robinson Jeffers

We who live in Southern Arizona are so fortunate for a variety of reasons. Just look around and you can see the beauty of our land. The green on the land is still visible after a long, hot, somewhat dry summer. The rain in Tubac did not seem to be as abundant this year. We still have fall flowers though. The huge Arizona Sunflowers are just getting started. You can see them on the drive to Nogales along side the interstate. Great bushes of sunflowers reaching to the sun. Fall is such a special season here. It is spectacular. We will still have really warm days for another couple of weeks, but our mornings and evenings are wonderful. Chilly, sweater weather-- my scarves and light jackets are back

out by the door. I tire of summer clothes by now and I'm ready for the season to change. Sweet little Tubac is ready too. So many activities are gearing up in the village. Our sleepy days are coming to an end. Welcome back friends and neighbors. Tubac will be active and busy and oh, so popular. I think we have the best of both worlds-slow-paced and quiet, then busy and hectic. Our shop owners are ready for busy and hectic, I'm sure. We who live in Tubac year round do our very best to support the shops and restaurants and markets during the summer. It can be a long summer. We just had a beautiful harvest moon. Now we wait for the hunter's moon in October, the beaver moon in November and the cold moon or long night's moon in December. These names were given by Native Americans and are a common part of our culture. There are many names given to full moons--full moons are so bright and such an important part of the night sky. Aren't we lucky to live in this amazing area-we have an endless vista of the night sky. I never tire of looking at our wonderful dark skies full of twinkling lights. This is another reason that we are fortunate to live here. We are part of a Dark Sky Initiative Community. The International headquarters for the International Dark Sky Association is located in Tucson. Our need to preserve the night sky from light pollution is integral to living here, not only for the astronomers but for the wildlife and human life. If you go online you will find this brilliant pledge that we all can live by.

THE DARK SKY PLEDGE I pledge devotion to the stars of the majestic Milky Way Galaxy, and to a dark night sky in which they shine; one cosmos, overhead, clearly visible, with liberty from bright light for all. I still remember my cousin visiting from Detroit. "What is that?" he said looking up on a dark moonless night. "It's the Milky Way!" He was in his late 40's before he ever saw it. We take it for granted. We just need to look up "to feel and speak the astonishing beauty of things-" The lovely swallows are packing up for their move. Willie, our very own keeper of Las Golondrinas at the Tubac Community Center, keeps the dates of arrival and departure for these sweet birds. We wish them Godspeed. One last note. Sweet Ruthie, my mother, passed away 2 years ago on October 24. Many readers have expressed to me how they enjoyed her column, her zest for life and her unending love for this exquisite, amazing desert. Before she moved to Tubac, I would write her letters trying to explain how this place can change you, how you can come to love everything that is foreign to you... and not miss (as much) what you left behind. She embraced Tubac and Santa Cruz County and Nogales, Sonora to it fullest. Oh, the adventures we had! Never a dull moment. I miss you Mom, love you.

Z


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Visit our gift shop with a wide selection of herbs, seasonings and spices, as well as a variety of southwestern jellies, mustards, sauces and dry soup mixes. Check out our Western museum and go through the wide selection of cookbooks, childrens’ books and books on local history. And pick up some Santa Cruz Chili Paste, Chili Powder and Salsa for all your favorite recipes.

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Tubac villager oct 2016  

Tubac, Arizona - October 2016 Tubac Villager

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