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Vol Xi1i No 3

Jan 18 - Feb 18, 2017


Our hand painted porcelain dinnerware collection features over 125 pieces in 14 designs. It is fired at 1800 degrees, is dishwasher safe, ovenproof, and microwavable. All patterns are open stock. All items are lead free, and safe for food use. We are a licensed FDA facility, and all items have been inspected and approved.

JUST IN A LARGE SHIPMENT OF DINNERWARE - COMINGS SOON MORE TALAVERA POTTERY. BILL AND CHERYL JUST GOT BACK FROM A BUYING TRIP TO MEXICO AND LOTS OF GREAT FOLK ART AND TEXTILES ARE ON THE WAY!

GOOGLE US FOR A VIRTUAL TOUR OF THE STORE

5 STAR - TRIP ADVISOR RATED #1 BEST PLACE TO SHOP IN TUBAC AS ALWAYS: INCREDIBLE DISPLAYS - VAST SELECTION FRIENDLY AND HELPFUL STAFF


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

A Tubac Gallery's Selling Points

Cobalt Fine Arts Gallery

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On the cover

by Myrna York

R

ooted in Tubac for fourteen years, Cobalt Fine Arts Gallery defines sophistication and excellence through the artists it represents. The absence of kitsch makes me eager to look at the art more seriously, an experience that connects me right away to a kaleidoscope of paintings and the sculptures sensibly placed on plinths, inviting a circling navigation for careful study. The gallery reflects the tempo of our time and place filled with contemporary southwest art, familiar themes with a twist.

opportunity to talk to many directors at art organizations learning different ways of presenting and displaying art.

In an era of internet shopping and high resolution screens, nothing beats a face to face experience with a canvas or a sculpture. A photographic representation does not provide the experience we encounter when we are two to three feet away from an original work of art. Tactile experiences may be the next virtual challenge but here in our midst is the opportunity to actualize the texture of paint, metal, and clay.

As the brainchild of Mesia Hachadorian who opened the gallery along with her mother, Clay Hands' artist and gallery One that jumps out owner Diane Lisle, as a right away as you enter partnership and invited the gallery is Barbara a handful of artists they Meikle's paintings, Cobalt Fine Arts owner, Mesia Hachadorian. knew. Today, she is the definitely fauvist. Bold major owner and her and vibrant, A Pair of friendly, heart-warming approach beckons confidence Minis have ghostly tints around its' soft edges which and reliability in the language of art. Her emphasis appear to have been painted by loose flicking brush is on quality and innovation reflected in the artists strokes as if you had ran your hand against the hairs she currently represents - 40 artists from Arizona, and now begs grooming. Dense textural effects on Colorado, New Mexico, and California. one painting made by layers upon layers of paint Hachadorian has an amiable temperament, articulate and brainy, that comes from an assurance gained by being around art at such an early age. She received her Bachelor of Fine Arts from the University of Arizona and studied at Studio Art Centers International in Florence, Italy. She focused on art history, restoration, and museology. She learned Renaissance art first hand and while pursuing her studies she had an

contrasted by soft washes and drips of another tell us of Miekle's versatility. Wild as Matisse's fauves, her palette is reminiscent of John Nieto, the legendary Santa Fe Native American artist. Like Nieto, Meikle lives in the outskirts of Santa Fe and shares the charm of the southwest landscapes where colors appear to be more vibrant, a phenomenon only the desert's atmospheric effect can bestow.

Continued on page 5...

Burros, oil on canvass by Barbara Meikle at Cobalt Fine Arts Gallery 5 Camino Otero, Tubac This journal is made possible through the support of local advertisers, artists and writers... please visit their unique businesses and let them know where you saw their ad, art or article. The Tubac Villager is a locally owned and independently operated journal, published monthly to celebrate the art of living in Southern Arizona. Opinions and information herein do not necessarily reflect those of the advertisers or the publishers. Advertiser and contributor statements and qualifications are the responsibility of the advertiser or contributor named. All articles and images are the property of the Tubac Villager, and/or writer or artist named, and may not be reproduced without permission. Letters are welcome. 'The Villager is made available in racks and at businesses throughout the Santa Cruz Valley and also made available at public libraries in Arivaca, Green Valley, Nogales, Rio Rico and numerous Tucson Libraries and businesses. Jan-Feb 2017 Tubac Villager printed 6,000 copies. NEXT ISSUE PRINTS MID FEBRUARY


L o c ate d i n L A E N T R A DA DE T U BAC

For A Full Class Schedule Visit:

www.cookinga-z.com

FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD (AND WINE) $70 WITH JOHN BORD

SUNDAY: 2/5/2017 FROM 2:00PM - 5:00PM Taste food in all its glory as we approach Valentine's Day. Food can be creamy, sweet, spicy and made with love - and the perfect wines can complement those flavors.  Join Chef John Bord as he shows you how to prepare a meal that will leave you breathless. Creamy - Warm Piquillo Pepper and Crab Dip with a Sparkling Spanish Cava Sweet - Scallops with Cauliflower, Sherry Capers and Raisins with a Balsamic Reduction and Viognier Spicy - Mesquite Grilled Meatballs in a Chipotle Sauce with a California Red Zinfandel Lover's Knots - Chaicchiere o Crostoli, a warm Italian fritter served with a Moscato d' Asti and Cinnamon Powdered Sugar

CHARCUTERIE CHARETTE $55 WITH LAURENCE LEGOUGE

TUESDAY 2/14/2017 FROM 11:00AM - 1:30PM Presentation, Pairing and Creativity At the Ecole des Beaux Arts in France, students were given a finite amount of time to design a project. Quite often, the finishing touches were made en route to the school on the back of a cart (charette). This will be a fun, hands-on class focussed on presentation, the blending of flavors, and choosing complimentary wines.  We will taste as we go, and explore charcuterie - the creation of character.   In this charette we will break into groups and design charcuterie boards from cheese, bread, veggies and cooked or cured meats.  Wine will be tasted as part of the design and pairing options discussed. As the class falls on Valentine's Day, a french chocolate fondant will be made in class to celebrate the sensual side of food.

ENGLISH TEA $40 WITH ELAINE LEIGH

A HANDS-ON COOKING EXPERIENCE IN TUBAC...

where you learn & share & celebrate

TOGETHER!

THURSDAY: 2/16/2017 FROM 1:00PM - 3:30PM Join us for a classic Tea Party. We will make Elaine's wonderful menu of homemade Scottish scones with cream and jam, assorted finger sandwiches, Parmesan cheese straws and chocolate dipped strawberries. We will learn the proper way to brew and serve traditional English and herbal teas. Please bring your favorite bone china cup and saucer, if you don't have one we will make sure you have one for the tea party.

DIM SUM $50 WITH JERI HOYLE

SUNDAY: 2/19/2017 FROM 1:00PM - 3:30PM Literally meaning "to touch your heart," Dim Sum consists of a variety of dumplings, steamed dishes and other goodies. They are similar to hors d'oeuvres, and often enjoyed on a Sunday afternoon. We'll discuss the history and etiquette of dim sum as we focus on the technique of making some classic dim sum favorites, wonton, egg rolls, spring rolls and lettuce wraps. Traditional green tea will be served with our tastings. Join us in celebrating the Chinese New Year, the year of the Rooster.

BEAUTIFUL BALI $50 WITH MARION HOOK

TUESDAY: 2/21/2017 FROM 3:00PM - 5:30PM My first visit to Bali and Indonesia was in 1982, and I fell hopelessly, permanently in love with the fabulous food there. Fresh and healthy, it defied description as it was created with spices I’d never tasted before. Fall in love yourself when you create and enjoy feasting on Indonesian “comfort food.”- Marion Hook This class will focus on a few Easy to Make dishes that take the mystery out of the sometimes complicated cuisine.

SOUP AND SALAD BASICS $50 WITH JERI HOYLE

WEDNESDAY: 2/23/2017 FROM 11:00AM - 1:30 PM This is a much requested class for anyone interested in learning the basics skills of how to use a knife properly, how to sauté and cook vegetables to a consistent doneness, and season a dish to taste. Each student will work at their own station as Jeri teaches you the knife skills that make preparation easy and enjoyable. As you chop and slice, you will be creating the ingredients for a fresh Minestrone Soup. You will also learn how to prepare a fresh salad that looks great, is healthy and delicious. Learn tips, tricks and techniques to making simple and good food. Class size is limited to eight students to ensure individual attention. We will enjoy the food from class at a sit down lunch. Wine will accompany the meal.

FRIDA’S MOLE $60 WITH LAURA DUNCAN

Open 7 days 10 am- 5 pm - La Entrada de Tubac Tubac, AZ - 520.398.9497 - tumacookery.com

FRIDAY: 3/3/2017 FROM 3:00PM - 6:00PM Mole is perhaps the most unique dish in Mexico, Made with chocolate, nuts, chilis, sweet spices and dried fruit ground to a smooth sauce, mole has a very complex flavor unlike any other sauce anywhere. Our recipe comes from the kitchen of the famous Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. It is a relatively mild dish that can easily be made spicy if desired. Laura will guide us through the traditional methods of cooking and rehydrating dried spices to maximize flavor, as well as the modern use of a blender to make the process quick and easy. Locally grown pinto beans will be made Charro Style. A cilantro lime rice, a fresh green salad and the ultimate Mexican dessert - Flan - will make this an experience you won’t forget. Wine and Beer will accompany the meal.


(Above) A painting of the local Tumacacori Mountains, by Tubac artist, Fred Collins. (Right) Vibrant ceramics by Tucson artist, Randy O'Brien. Photos by Joseph Birkett Deep inside the gallery is Fred Collins' painting sampler. Delightful and entertaining, his tromp l'oeil piece literally means fool the eye, 'Steppin' Out is an original oil painting more accurate than the photographs he has worked with. Realism when taken to an extreme is called Super Realism, a style developed in the 1980's where colors are exaggerated and the image is sharper than its mega-pixel reference. Collins' play with dimensionality grows exponentially from inside out where the object as subject no longer becomes the focal point and the whole painting becomes the subject. To understand how Collins flirts with the mind is to refer to Belgian surrealist painter, Rene Margritte, who challenged our perception of reality. Tumacacori Winter, is an irony of the photographic process where the giclee is a digitized print of the original painting but the painting looks like the original photograph. Buy local! He lives in Tubac, our very own Super Surreal artist. It's hard to bypass a crackling red and black orb vessel and resist touching, a compulsion in anyone who has been around art who was taught to be respectful or risk setting off alarms that will rattle eardrums. But this is not a museum so with permission, one is able to satisfy the urge to stroke, satiate nerve impulses and delight in knowing that the sensitive-looking impasto glaze is hard and rough, not as fragile, and will not crumble as it may seem. Inspired by the natural world such as lichen, delicate but tough, this delightful experience is provided by Randy O'Brien, a Tucsonian ceramicist, whose innovation is evident in his 3D glazing on a 3D surface. His experiments paid off and over time he perfected his glaze concoctions.

Because these artists have proven that staying true to materials has boundaries that can be pushed beyond conventional practice, visiting Cobalt Fine Art Gallery has become a reservoir of immense energy to delight the senses. More paintings in a mix of realism and abstraction, some containing sculptural elements and blown glass and metal sculptures including jewelry of varied materials are offered to open our eyes to fresh new ideas and inspire us to acquire art for our own private enjoyment. As Hachadorian has envisioned from the gallery's inception as some kind of verisimilitude, it is indeed a place where quality and innovation elevate our cultural existence.

During Festival, February 11 & 12, 10 - 5, Saturday and Sunday. Painting demonstration by Barbara Miekle with two live miniature donkeys outside of the Cobalt Fine Art Gallery. 5 Camino Otero, Tubac, AZ 85646 More information: 520-398-1200


MATA ORTIZ POTTERY FEATURING JUAN QUEZADA, FAMILY & FRIENDS, COLLECTIBLE MASTER POTTERS

DESIGN ELEMENTS FOR YOUR HOME Wednesday-Sunday 12-4

Featuring

FAMOUS ARTISTS: Jon Lightfoot & Other Painters, Mark Rossi Bronzes, Designer Purses, Swarovski Crystal & Custom Jewelry 1950’s watch jewelry (STEAMPUNK)

PATZ’S 1950’s WATCH JEWELRY Desert Dreaming Photography

THE HIDDEN SECRET OF MORNING STAR RANCH: This 5000 acre gated community is a short drive to Tubac on paved roads w/ underground utilities & multi-million dollar homes. A 1,000 acre nature preserve w/ 15 miles of trails for hiking, biking & horseback riding. Top of the world views with 36-40 acre ranch sites @ 4000 ft. surrounded by gorgeous mountain peaks, like living in a national park. Special offerings in Morning Star:

FAMOUS AUTHOR’S RANCH RETREAT: 36 ACRES M/L WITH CUSTOM 3 BEDROOM, 3 BATH HOME & LARGE GUEST HOUSE. Everything is top of the line, totaling 5000 sq. ft. & being offered at 1/2 of building costs. Float in your

infinity edge pool looking out on your own private nature preserve. $1.1 million Call Howard Bach 520-360-0285 or Russell Palmer 520-275-5454

WINERY SPRINGS RANCH 38 ACRES M/L IN MORNING STAR RANCH. CUSTOM SANTA FE STYLE

2700 sq. ft., 4 bedroom 2 1/2 bath, tile floors tall ceilings, Kiva fireplace, unique architectural elements. Huge front & rear porches & walled yards with rock terraced organic garden. Incredible views of your own riparian area with live spring creek, tall trees, dramatic cliffs & mountain views. Mostly level, lush grassland, ideal for horses. Agent has loved living here for 10 years, will carry w/ good down. Reduced to $650,000. Call Howard Bach 520-360- 0285 INVESTORS/BUILDERS INCREDIBLE OPPORTUNITY: One of the best lots in MORNING STAR RANCH, 36 acres m/l , stunning top of the world views, offered at only $116,000 for quick sale! Call Howard Bach 520-360-0285

IDEAL ARTIST’S COMPOUND/PROFITABLE GALLERY This incredible 6200 sq ft. complex includes a really nice 2400 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath home with 18” tile floors, tongue & groove wood ceilings, and a private walled courtyard with a nice porch for entertaining. The retail space is 1400 sq. ft. with great displays. The huge workshop/studio plus office space has many skylights and 400 AMP power & gas for any production needs. New 30-year roof. Agent owned & Retiring after owning this incredible property for 10 years, will carry w/ good down. Reduced to $499,000 Call Howard Bach 520-360-0285 TUBAC COUNTRY CLUB ESTATES : Quiet, ideally located, level lot, terrific views in an area of fine homes. $49,000 agent owned. Call Howard Bach 520-360-0285

HOWARD BACH 520-360-0285 RUSSELL PALMER 520-275-5454 REALTY EXECUTIVES, TUBAC


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r D e c 1 6 - J a n 1 7

FEB 8 - FEB 12

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Santa Cruz County Update

By Kathleen Vandervoet

County leaders take oaths of office

Bruce Bracker, new Santa Cruz County Supervisor for District 3, joined nine other county elected officials on Jan. 3 when each took their oath of office. Bracker is the only newcomer and the other nine are individuals who were reelected to their offices. Bracker is likely the first county supervisor in the county’s history to be a Tubac resident. A county official asked to verify that said she couldn’t find information to contradict that.

Santa Cruz County Sheriff Tony Estrada spoke briefly and told the group that this begins his seventh four-year term as sheriff. He said he’s Arizona’s longest-serving sheriff.

(Left) County leaders are sworn into office by Superior Court Presiding Judge Thomas Fink, far left. From left are Supervisor Manuel Ruiz, Supervisor Rudy Molera, Supervisor Bruce Bracker, Superior Court Judge Div. 2 Anna Montoya-Paez and County Attorney George Silva. (Right) County Sheriff Tony Estrada, shown with his wife Blanca, is starting his 25th year in the elected office. Photos by Kathleen Vandervoet

Other elected officials include County Supervisors Manuel Ruiz and Rudy Molera, Treasurer Liz Gutfahr, Recorder Susie Sainz, School Superintendent Alfredo Velasquez, Superior Court Judge Division 2 Anna Montoya-Paez, Assessor Felipe Fuentes Jr. and Attorney George Silva.

Food code to be updated

The Santa Cruz County Sanitary Code will be updated in the coming months and restaurant owners and managers will be invited to a public meeting for discussion, although the date isn’t set.

Jeff Terrell, director of the county Health Department, has been working on the sanitary code and plans to bring the food code into alignment with the U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) 2013 code.

Family Practice

Your Your Family is Our Family Mon, Wed, Thurs, Fri

8:00am - 4:30pm Tues

9:00am - 4:30pm

He said he doesn’t expect the changes to cost restaurant owners and food service providers anything at first. When decisions are made to remodel or replace broken equipment, then items will be required to be in conformity with the new code, he said. Continued on next page...

Comprehensive preventative care

Hospital follow-up care

Chronic disease care management and coordination for diabetes, arthritis & heart disease

On Jan. 11, he said he had distributed his draft revisions to the County Attorney’s office and to county staff for review. The next step is to determine locations, dates and times for public sessions and that information will be in mailings to everyone who has food service licenses, he said. After public input, the final step is to have the changes submitted to the Santa Cruz County Board of Supervisors for adoption.

Emphasis on well child health maintenance Free immunizations Regular screenings for vision, hearing, anemia, lead, TB Care for chronic conditions such as diabetes, asthma & ADHD Hospital follow-up care

Prescription delivery available during clinic hours

Terry Colunga, F.N.P.

Tubac

MARIPOSA REGIONAL HEALTH CENTER 2239 E. Frontage Road, Tubac, AZ 85646

520-281-1550


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sit

Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r D e c 1 6 - J a n 1 7

DUNCAN, ARIZONA Vi

~ Fo u n d e d

1883

~

“Greenlee” by Duncan’s Hal Empie. 6 ft. x 30 ft. For tours call 928-215-9912 Tuesday-Saturday 9 to 5; all other times call 928-215-1641.

For information call 928-359-3590

Take I-10 East to 191 North to 70 East. Visit soon!

Eat/Drink: Humble Pie • Hilda’s Kitchen • Wanda’s Kitchen • The Bonnie Heather Stay: Simpson Hotel B&B • Chaparral Motel • Duncan Hotel • Nine Rail Ranch RV Camp Bob’s High Desert Park • Stephens RV Park Shop: Rock-A-Buy Rocks & Gifts • Germaine’s Emporium • Country Chic Art Gallery and Visitor Center • Town & Country Supply Stage Stop Mini-Mart and Gas • Chaparral Mini-Mart and Gas • The Outpost Mini-Mart Enjoy: Gila River Birding & Wildlife Trail • Rockhounding sites • Scenic back roads • Tours of Hal Empie’s paintings and his famous mural 928-215-1641 • Gila Lower Box Wilderness Study Area More information: Visitor Center 928-359-1955 For references/information in Tubac: Hal Empie Gallery 520-398-2811

Photos: Richard Billingsley, Ginger Pattison, Deborah Mendelsohn, Ardea Maddock, Norman Adams


HA L E M PI E continued...

Trees along I-19 being eliminated

Work began before Christmas on Interstate 19 to cut down trees. The project will create recovery zones to help drivers regain control of their vehicles if they’ve left the pavement, according to a press release from the Arizona Department of Transportation. The project will remove trees within 30 feet of the highways, but other vegetation will remain in place, as will trees and other plants beyond the 30-foot zone. On I-19, the average width of the median is 80 feet, which means some trees will remain in the center of the median. Trees that are removed will be mulched and used as a ground cover, the state news release said.

Mulch will be no more than two inches deep and cannot cover perennial vegetation or fill waterways. Any additional mulch will be hauled to a different site. Work on I-19 is expected to be completed by March.

I-19 checkpoint discussed

At a Dec. 19 meeting of the Santa Cruz Valley Citizens Council, Gary Brasher told community residents about a meeting he had in regard to the Border Patrol immigration checkpoint on northbound Interstate 19 in Tubac.

“The Waltons” 36x24 custom framed fine art quality giclee

HAL EMPIE GALLERY 520-398-2811

www.halempiestudio-gallery.com

Brasher said he was able to speak with U.S. Border Patrol Chief Mark Morgan at an October meeting held at the office of the Green Valley Chamber of Commerce. The meeting was set up by the office of U.S. Rep. Martha McSally.

Brasher, a Tubac realtor and developer for more than 20 years, and Nogales produce importer Jaime Chamberlain met with Morgan who was named national chief in October 2016.

“It was really actually pretty good because it gave us a little over an hour of almost one-on-one time to talk about our concerns and frustrations, specifically the checkpoint” on northbound Interstate 19 in Tubac, Brasher said. He said Chamberlain also spoke about commerce and trade issues faced at the U.S.-Mexico border in Nogales. Brasher was impressed that Morgan “listened for a solid 20 to 25 minutes he said anything. During that time we expressed the communities’ frustrations.”

Morgan told Brasher and Chamberlain that as more efforts are made at the border to halt illegal immigration and drug smuggling, he sees the Tubac checkpoint possibly not being used anymore. He said there is a checkpoint on Interstate 5 north of San Diego that isn’t staffed, although the buildings remain on the highway. Brasher said Morgan explained that he is still reviewing what technology and manpower are needed at and near Nogales to achieve what’s been achieved on the border south of San Diego.

“I asked him specifically what ranking our checkpoint has on his list of importance and he was very candid in saying ‘you’re No. 2.’ No. 1 is the lawsuit near the Canadian border,” Brasher said.

Continued on next page...

58TH ANNUAL TUBAC FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS FEB 8TH THRU THE 12TH

Daily demonstrations by Navajo Sandcast Artist, Alvin Thompson, from Winslow Arizona. Demonstrations by Glass Artist, Robert Sanders. One of Southern Arizona's largest selections of Reservation Pawn. Hopi Kachinas, American Indian Jewelry, Pottery, Baskets, Arts and Crafts. Honesty, Integrity and Selection for over 34years.

Open Daily 9-5 www.oldpresidiotraders.com 520-398-9333 27 Tubac Rd. Tubac, AZ


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Art center receives $10,000 grant

continued...

No entry fee at Tumacácori Park for 10 days

Combine great scenery and history with great savings and visit a national park for free on one of 10 fee free days in 2017. Tumacácori National Historical Park is participating. The 10 entrance-fee-free days for 2017 are:

• •

• Weekends

January 16: Martin Luther King Jr. Day February 20: Presidents Day

April 15-16 & April 22-23: National Park Week

August 25: National Park Service Birthday

November 11-12: Veterans Day Weekend

September 30: National Public Lands Day

“National parks are known for their priceless beauty,” said National Park Service Director Jonathan B. Jarvis. “They are a bargain anytime but on these ten days in 2017, they really will be priceless. We want everyone to visit their national parks and the fee free days provide extra incentive to experience these amazing places.”

The fee at the park is normally $5 for those 16 and older. Golden Age passes can be used, and annual passes can be purchased.

National Endowment for the Arts has approved more than $30 million in grants this year.

Included in this announcement is a Challenge America grant of $10,000 to The Tubac Center of the Arts for the Santa Cruz Valley Open Studio Tour. The Open Studio Tour represents artists from communities in southern Pima and Santa Cruz counties.

Beginning with a preview exhibition at the Tubac Center of the Arts on Jan. 20, 2017, the tour is planned for March 17-19 when artists in virtually all mediums share their studios and their work with locals and visitors to the region. As part of the 2017 expansion to the tour, the Center welcomes the city of Nogales in participation and the catalog for the event will include a gallery listing and be published in a bilingual edition.

The Challenge America category supports primarily small and midsized organizations for projects that extend the reach of the arts to underserved populations—those whose opportunities to experience the arts are limited by geography, ethnicity, economics, or disability. (For comments or questions, contact writer Kathleen Vandervoet at kathleenvandervoet@gmail.com)


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Birding in Tubac By John O'Neill

I

nternet posts in early January that a rosethroated becard was being seen daily at Tubac were good news to birders, like free tee times at Augusta National would be to bogey golfers.

was spotted with new arrivals to the hunt.

Bear with me while I chronicle this actionpacked, complex story, beginning with information about rose-throated becards and why they cause such excitement, the story of its discovery and subsequent birder traffic to Tubac, and scandalous rumors and denials about leadership of the prestigious but informal Tubac birding group.

The drive to add this Mexican beauty to their life lists caused about every birder in Arizona who had never seen one, and many who already had, hundreds of them, to scamper to the area of the kiosk along the Rose-throated becards are tropical birds, more Anza Trail, east of the Tubac Barrio. Most at home eating yummy insects and gulping who came eventually saw the bird, causing bites of fruit in Guatemala or Mexico than rapturous afterglows and eagerness to share the locations where the bird Arizona, where they are at the extreme edge of their range and very scarce. They once had a nesting site near Patagonia, but now years sometimes pass without a sighting.

4 Tubac Road 520.303.4707

The Bird  House;

a b i r d i n g   s t o r e

We're excited to announce

RICHARD CACHOR TAYLOR,

the author of our favorite birding book, Birds of Southeastern Arizona, Richard will be signing copies of his book at The Bird House

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9th

Come get your copy, supplies limited.

They are not the most fetching of tropical birds, with glossy crowns, dark backs and white on the abdomen. But pinkish patches on the throats of the males give them Latin panache. Combine that with extreme rarity, balmy January weather, and an easy, known locale to go birding and the price of Exxon-Mobile stock should uptick with all the gas burned on the roads to Tubac this winter. The excitement began the third day of the new year. In December, walks of the Tuesday-morning, everybody-welcome, Tubac birding group produced few unusual birds, perhaps explaining why only a dozen birders showed up on Jan. 3. As they headed south along the Anza Trail from the bridge, the becard was spotted in the open area past the second fence. News was posted on eBird and the internet birding listserv. The rush was on.

At 10:06 the next morning, Mike Judd sent a post to the listserv titled, “Becard present now.” The text read: “Just came out. Same place as yesterday.” Nobody in the bird world had to ask where.

On Thursday, Jan. 5, when I spotted the bird, my first rose-throated becard sighting since 1986, I estimated there were 60 birders in the area about 11 a.m. On Friday, Jan. 6, a reliable birder estimated there were 40+ present when the becard made its first dramatic daily appearance. Birders came and went all day, every day through at least Thursday, Jan. 12 and traffic will continue until the becard(s) vanish.

There’s a well-known phenomenon when many birders gather seeking a rare bird. So many talented people are scanning for the rarity that other uncommon birds are found. Having missed the becard Friday morning, Kay Carter and her group from Canby, Oregon walked north Continued on page 16...


GRAND OPENING PARTY February 4th, 4-7pm Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r D e c 1 6 - J a n 1 7

15

Live Music · Hors d'oeuvres · Libations

Treestump.co

Featuring Treestump Woodcrafts American Contemporary Crafts. Mesquite Furniture with Artful Accents created here in Southern Arizona by Local Artisans.

520-398-9009


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

of the Tubac bridge about 5 p.m. and found a SECOND rose-throated becard, either a female or first-year male without a throat patch.

Not to be outdone, Paul Suchanek of Tucson birded north of Tumacacori Saturday morning, Jan. 7, and reported two more becards, a female and a male on the Anza Trail, meaning -- be still my heart -there could have been at least THREE, possibly FOUR becards in the Tubac area, a veritable invasion, all of which might had gone unnoticed if the first hadn’t been seen by the Tubac group. Another uncommon bird, the rufous-backed robin was also be reported north of the bridge. Finding the becard, like finding most species, is not a chip shot. But with patience the becard can usually be spotted within an hour or two. It often feeds inside cottonwood canopies, sometimes high up, complicating the search. Other times it sallies forth to snare insects from lower branches.

Now food for inquiring minds who want poop on the internecine gossip about a potential coup d’etat [purple prose entry] in the Tubac birding group.

On Jan. 3, the day of the first sighting, Jim Karp, who I once wrote is the “genial godfather of Tubac birding,” and who has faithfully and generously led the Tuesday walks for years, was absent with a bum knee. Substitute leader was Rob Rutledge of Green Valley, a friendly former librarian who, like Karp, has an eagle eye for birds, and with his wife Reta, runs the volunteer organization, Friends of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge.

What set tongues wagging was that on the day of the discovery of the becard, three other uncommon birds for Tubac were sighted by the group: an eastern phoebe, a golden eagle and three white pelicans. Did Rutledge, based on such sterling leadership performance, want to overthrow the Karp regime with his own, like Caesar degraded the Senate after his war victories? Rutledge denied the power grab. Karp emailed the group that day: “After the great finds, I may not be invited back.”

It was all good natured, of course, since the Tubac bird leaders have to manage an unorganized group with no budget and have to buy their own coffee at the deli when walks end.

As always, the birding group meets near the deli, just east of the big “Tubac” sign at 8 a.m. every Tuesday until sometime in May. Birders of every skill level are welcome. Free. Bring binoculars. Esprit de corps is high after the becard sighting that has brought so much joy to hundreds [a thousand?] of our birder friends. ***

Mountain bluebirds, a species so glorious it hurts when you look at them through binoculars, are being seen at the Quail Creek Veterans Municipal Park in Sahuarita (really Green Valley) across the road from the main gate at the Quail Creek housing development. They are associating with a palm warbler, a bird plain in appearance but rare in Arizona.

GULLIVER & FRIENDS BOUTIQUE "A BOUTIQUE WITH A PURPOSE"

HELP ABUSED & ABANDONED HORSES GULLIVER & FRIENDS BOUTIQUE & THRIFT STORE NEEDS YOUR SUPPORT! LOCATED AT 1932 E FRONTAGE RD, TUMACACORI, AZ. Right across the street from Wisdom's Cafe. Hours: 10am-5pm Tuesday-Saturday

www.gulliverandfriends.org Ph: 520-398-2814

High quality second hand items for sale. All sales support the horses of Equine Voices Rescue & Sanctuary.

Donations are welcome. Volunteers needed. Shoppers wanted!


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

C I T I Z EN S CO U N C I L ACHIEVES MILESTONE “I remember when we hoped for 75 members,” local businessman Gary Brasher reminisced at a recent meeting of the Santa Cruz Valley Citizens Council. His story came after the president of the Citizens Council, Jim Patterson, announced to members that the Council had broken the 500-member mark in December. The SCVCC now has 503 members.

“I think people realize the importance of the Citizens Council in looking out for the interests of our community,” Patterson said later. “We monitor events and provide a forum for information and advocacy that has shaped our part of the Santa Cruz Valley for more than 30 years.”

Patterson added: “being able to say we have more than 500 members is important when we work with elected and appointed officials. It not only gets us in the door, it gets a lot more attention to our concerns.”

Over the years, the Council has fought issues like high-voltage power lines, runaway development proposals, and egregious utility rate increases. While Gary Brasher was president, from 1995 to 2007, the Council hired a lawyer and intervened in Tucson Electric Power Company’s plans to build massive transmission towers down the Valley to sell power to Mexico. In 2004, members of the Council shepherded the County’s Comprehensive Plan, which lays out a blueprint for the development and character of our communities. And from 2004 to 2006, the Council fought and ended plans for several thousand homes on land zoned for about 150. When Rich Bohman became president of the SCVCC in 2007, developers again attempted two massive projects. But members organized and won referendums blocking the developments after two of three county supervisors had voted approval. Issues like these are always lurking, and have the potential to change the landscapes and culture that attracted us. The Santa Cruz Valley Citizens Council remains the caretaker of our community’s values.

Members of the SCVCC live in the area south of the Pima County line and north of Rio Rico. The exact boundaries can be found on the Council’s website, scvccTubac.org. Non-voting Associate memberships are available to people interested in the Council’s activities, but who live outside the district boundaries. All members receive periodic news about important events affecting our community, as well as notices of meetings and meeting recaps.

Memberships are $15, or $25 for a two-person household, per calendar year. The Council also recently began offering multi-year memberships. 2017 membership forms are available at scvccTubac. org. Meetings are usually held the third Monday of each month, September through May, at 9:00 a.m. at the Tubac Community Center. Article courtesy Santa Cruz Citizens Council

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Drake has key role in Tubac’s future appearance By Kathleen Vandervoet

W

ho thinks about zoning? For most, it’s not until a surprise building pops up nearby or a tree-filled lot is bladed for development.

on the west side of the highway which has the zoning needed for commercial, retail and residential buildings. She’s also talked with a representative of the property, Todd Harrison.

Her philosophy is to try to gain as much information as possible on new issues. “I’ve been a planner for 27 years and I know having worked on both the public and private side that the most important thing is to not have surprises.

County law requires mailed notices to close neighbors about changes, but Drake is happy to hear from others, as well.

Jesse Drake thinks about zoning. She’s the Santa Cruz County Community Development Director and chief zoning official and has been on the job since late July.

But she noted she’s anxious to meet more locals. “Since I’ve been here I’ve been trying to interact in different areas of the community. Unless I know who the people are I need to contact, there’s no way for me to let them know” when zoning or development issues come up.

“This community is not my community, it’s your community. So, I like to involve neighbors early and continuously. That’s always my goal,” she said. Drake said the only Tubac issue she’s spent time on since starting work has been to look at vacant property at Exit 34 of Interstate 19

Jesse Drake, Community Development Director for the county, said she likes to involve neighbors early when zoning changes come up. Photo Kathleen Vandervoet.

“Lorin and her amazing crew helped move us from the conceptual stage through the finished construction of our whole home remodel. Ours was a complex project and her daily supervision and attention to detail resulted in a job that far exceeded our expectations.” - Erich & Christine Priester

The six-member Tubac Historic Zone Advisory Board has been set up for about 30 years and those members discuss planned projects in the retail area of the village of Tubac and give their recommendation to Drake. Their meetings are open to the public but they don’t have regular monthly meeting dates.

Otherwise, she’s been busy in the eastern part of the county in Elgin and Sonoita, working with property owners related to winery issues and answering calls about construction that started on what’s expected to be a Dollar General store. Another project is to remove the so-called “high-rise district” that’s a section of the county’s Comprehensive Plan. “This county doesn’t need high rise, not at this time. And we have no land zoned for it.” That recommendation will be submitted to the Board of Supervisors.

Drake graduated with a degree in urban planning with a design emphasis from Arizona State University in 1994, but had already started her career at a private planning firm in Phoenix in 1990, she said. Before coming to Santa Cruz County this July, she was the planning manager in Cochise County, where she started in 2014. She also worked as director of community development for three years for the town of Fountain Hills near Phoenix. Drake filled a vacancy created when her predecessor, Mary Dahl, retired in June 2016 after 14 years in the position.

She views her position as a way to help assure balance growth. “I don’t generate plans. But


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

I can assist their direction. I can make sure they’re done in a manner that won’t disturb the neighbors in any way.

“On the other hand, I’m a firm believer in private property rights and I think that it’s very important that we don’t step on those and over regulate.

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“I’m here to help people. They’re the ones with the vision and goals. I can help direct it, maybe make a clearer path for them.” Drake said there’s more potential for this area. “What I’d like to see in this county is a broader economic focus. Now we have tourism, the wineries, and the produce industry. I think there’s a lot more to this county. I’m enthusiastic that (county and city leaders are) looking to get an economic development person.

“When I go to Phoenix, which I do frequently, people ask me where I work and I say beautiful and historic Santa Cruz County, and they go ‘what state is that in?’ Therein lies our problem.” In her private planning practice she said she worked “for the wireless industry in site acquisition, so I know quite a bit about that.” She feels that the Santa Cruz County Code doesn’t have sufficient “protection for the neighbors” in relation to wireless towers so she would like to work on that.

Drake said she wants to get to know area residents and business owners and encourages people to contact her. Her phone is (520) 375-7675 and her email is jdrake@santacruzcountyaz.gov. The office is in Rio Rico at 275 Rio Rico Drive.

Art & Business Donations Sought by Local Teacher Three young children, Ian (9), Olivia (6), and Eli (5) Mascarenas were tragically taken in a murder-suicide in on December 5, 2016 in Albuquerque, NM. All three Mascarenas children attended Manzano Mesa Elementary School in Albuquerque. Allison Lemons, a teacher at Rio Rico High School, is a Mascarenas family member. “I can’t imagine what hurts my uncle worse, losing his grandkids or watching his son go through this. And as an educator, I can’t imagine what’s worse for their teachers, losing a student or seeing the pain of their surviving classmates.” The ALMA Institute of Albuquerque has been commissioned to build three memorial benches, one for each child, to be installed at the Manzano Mesa Elementary Campus. The lead artist, Cassandra Reid (lotustileworks.com), is committed to working with the classmates of each child; they will get to help build the tiles that the benches will be made of. This project is asking for your generosity. Allison Lemons is asking for donations of art from artists and businesses to be auctioned online. The website, IOE Healing Through Art Memorial Fund, also accepts direct donations. Please feel free to contact Allison at ioeangels@gmail.com

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

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A Farewell I

to

By Carol Egmont St. John

t was four years ago that the Tubac Center of the Arts celebrated Trudi Fletcher’s 100th birthday with an abundance of friends and family to view a retrospective of her work. Hundreds of people came and her paintings were virtually sold out. Four years later, I thought it was time to celebrate Trudi again; this time not with a grand event but more quietly, paying attention to the spirit of a woman who has lived and loved for so long. She was still fascinated with the life within and without and dealing with the constellation that was she. It is a special event to speak with anyone who has seen so much and learned as much as she had during her rare, and wonderful life. That morning, two days before her passing, she said, “I want to see it through to the end.” And she did. She had managed to stay in her Spanish hacienda on Bernabe Circuelo, in Tubac, surrounded with her memorabilia and creature comforts, all of which proved a life well spent. Her shelves held remarkably

Trudi Fle tch er illustrated and notated travel albums, and troves of family photos. The plaster walls were covered with her colorful folk art and the rooms filled with big comfortable furniture in the Old-World style. She prided herself in being adept on the computer and made a point to cut and save articles from the newspapers that spoke to her, including mine, which she was able to recall and discuss.

She didn’t spend a lot of time remembering, however. “I want to look forward. You can’t go back, really. Things change and we have to stay open. We have to accept and stay open.” Her studio was still set up for her next burst of energy when she would pick up the brush one more time to discover where it took her. She was ready for the next surprise the next delight of pigments running into one another and pulling up images to entertain herself and others.


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I found Trudi upbeat and ready to talk, looking glamorous in gold jewelry and clothed in the vibrant colors she loved so well. She spoke with conviction, on the subjects that mattered most to her, art, life today and the spiritual life she was experiencing.

Like most people, Trudi suffered losses and pain, self-doubt and frustration, but through the world of art she discovered a gift that kept her going for over a century. She was emboldened by the desire to create and to experiment and find her own truth. Art gave her more than just the act of doing, it took her to many places, introduced her to marvelous people and gave her life purpose.

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Trudi absolutely believed that with art as a guide, all things are possible. “We can create and recreate the world.”

She watched the world create and recreate itself over so many years. From her early years of rather strict parenting, she emerged from the twenties loving the Charleston and the fun, but protected from the excesses of those times by her family’s belief in common sense. She said she was not affected when the bottom fell out of the economy.

Nor did World War II rain on her parade. It was a distant war for her. No family members were lost and her only sense of reality came from volunteering for the war effort. The “We all have the potential for a creative life. forties and fifties were about learning about No two people will find the same truth, but motherhood, self-reliance and her ability to the possibilities are there for each of us to explore and ultimately find. take charge of her own life. The sixties and seventies brought her to Art is spiritual,” she said. “It’s an unending source for living a satisfying high art; the nineties and onward to further confidence and expansion. life. Of course you must lay yourself open and accept what comes out “I wouldn’t have survived if my creativity had been taken from me. I of you. I have never painted for anyone but myself.” might never have found the confidence that emerged if I had been Her unwillingness to conform is of course why her visions remained unique, despite her many years of instructions under some of the most outstanding instructors of the last century. She knew how to take what they offered and maintain her own vision and style.

On that last day that we were together, perhaps her last fully conscious day, she spoke of her worries about the future. Her concern was about modern materialism and young people’s focus on things. She feared for their loss of sensitivity and lack of spiritual resources. “As the world goes forward, gentleness, kindness and generosity must not be left behind.”

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kept from expressing myself. It is very exciting to be an artist, the most precious quality I have. But remember. Love is at the root. The love of nature, of others, of creation itself. All this moves through you and keeps you going, if you accept change and remain open. Embrace the spirit that loves you and gives you answers.” What glorious words these were from a woman about to face her last adventure. I felt honored to hear and record them, and glad to have shared a small piece of the life of Trudi Fletcher.

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

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Array of activities at Tubac Community Center By Kathleen Vandervoet

An enthusiastic board of directors is supporting new and ongoing activities at the Tubac Community Center. The center, originally built as a grades 1-8 public school in 1964, was purchased by Santa Cruz County in 1998 and has been the headquarters for many programs since then.

On what was once the playground for youngsters, the fenced Community Garden of Tubac opened a year ago. It has 35 neatly separated plots with water and there are several available.

One of the most recent additions is a pickleball court for outdoor play. Pickleball is a sport played using paddles and a small ball that combines aspects of tennis, badminton and ping pong. It can be played as doubles or singles. Chuck Gruneisen, president of the board of directors of the Tubac Community Center Foundation, said he’s happy to help the center expand. “It’s important to have a place for people to gather for social events. People know they can come and meet others.” “The garden is a real good example. People who would normally not meet” find common interests there, he said.

Activities are free of charge but donations are accepted.

• Senior lunch every Thursday at noon funded by contributions and by members of the Tubac Rotary Club.

• Free transportation (donations accepted) in a van for senior citizens to doctor’s appointments. Call 398-1800.

• Slow flow yoga/balance class Thursdays from 11 a.m. to noon.

• Distribution of loans of free home medical equipment such as walkers, canes, crutches, wheelchairs, raised toilet seats, shower chairs. Call 398-1800.

• Dance – line dance, ballet, tap - instruction, days and time to be determined. Argentine tango, Fridays at noon. Call Cheryl at (719) 237-7364. • TRX classes (TRX is a suspension trainer which uses hundreds of exercises to strengthen parts of the body). Wednesdays and Saturdays, 9 a.m., Thursdays, 5 p.m. Call Jim at (719) 2377364. • Food bank distribution Thursdays from noon to 1 p.m. • Branch of the Nogales-Santa Cruz County public library open Monday through Friday from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. There are two free computers for public use and Wi-Fi. Phone 3989814. • Story hour at the library every Friday at 11 a.m. • Alcoholics Anonymous, open meetings Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, 7 p.m. Men’s meeting Saturdays at noon. • Narcotics Anonymous meetings Tuesdays and Thursdays, 6 p.m. Hotline phone is (520) 8818381. • Tubac Consciousness discussion group meets Thursdays, 9-11 a.m. Call 398-2747.

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• Research library of the Tubac Historical Society open Wednesdays and Thursdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 398-2020. • Official polling place for elections. • Large meeting room for homeowners’ associations and for the Santa Cruz Valley Citizens Council. • Pickleball questions, call Ron at (602) 5240067. An email list and a phone app provide ways for people to set up games with other interested players. • Community garden questions, call Pamela at (425) 785-8600. Work parties from 9 a.m. to noon are held on the third Saturday of each month. • Income tax preparation help seasonally. Call 398-1800. • Blood drives twice a year. • A long-term study of Santa Cruz River water quality is based in one of the community center rooms.


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Above, the Tubac Community Center invites you to participate in activities. (Center) Some of the pickleball enthusiasts include, from left, Carlos Palomares, Bill Stephenson, Pamela Ridgway, Lynn Baker and Milan Gregory. (Right) The Community Garden of Tubac, shown in early January, will be bursting with growth in the spring. Photos Kathleen Vandervoet An upcoming event is a Book Sale by FANS (Friends of the Library) on Friday, Feb. 17, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The public is invited. Santa Cruz County maintains the Tubac Community Center and provides landscaping, cleaning and care of mechanical equipment.

The board of the Tubac Community Center works cooperatively with the county and meets monthly. Gruneisen said they write grant applications and are able to offer programs at no charge. During 2016, revenue from grants and donations was about $5,500, he said. One of the main grant providers has been the Tubac Health Care Foundation, he added.

The cost to the county for the community center isn’t

separated out of a larger budget, County Manager Jennifer St. John said. She said the county pays for a weekly custodian, landscape work, for utilities and an alarm system.

officers are Rochelle Ulrich, vice president; Mark Wieging, secretary; Kate Penland, treasurer. Members are Willie Armijo, Brenda Camou, Kim Etherington, Lil Hunsacker, Dana Long and Claire McJunkin.

“I think the theory behind that statute is that the citizens have paid taxes for general government type services already and therefore the building and those general services have already been paid by the citizens in the form of property taxes and should be available free of charge as a result.”

He realizes that’s a success story. “And I’ve got a great board. Everyone jumps in and does what they can. A lot of them are really well-connected.”

Fees aren’t charged for classes and activities. Because it’s a county-owned building, St. John said the policy is to have it available at little or no cost:

The board of directors meets on the first Tuesday of each month at 9 a.m. at the community center. Board

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Gruneisen has been president of the board for three years and was a board member before that. “My job is more than it was when I first started.”

Volunteers staff the reception desk at the community center and additional volunteers are being sought. Call the center at 398-1800 to speak with someone or to leave a message.

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D os C orazones I nterior D esign C enter “ We put the heart in ever y home we touch.” By Sarah Sheen

Being welcomed inside Dos Corazones in Tubac provides a treat for the eyes and warmth for the soul. Lori Kirkpatrick’s shop is built on love, her passion for interior design, and her unique skill of bringing the comforting feeling of home to any space. She offers a full custom design center, with virtual layout online and nationwide shipping. Her selections and designs are widely accessible to homes across the country.

Ever since opening on October 1, 2013, Lori has worked with determination to inspire personality in every home she touches. Her mission to scout out the most unique and gorgeous designs has led her throughout Mexico, Texas, North Carolina, Georgia and New York City. The look of her store is constantly evolving, with an endless array of novelty pieces. Design with a Unique Twist

Once inside Lori’s shop, customers will want to move in. It is rare for anyone to leave without choosing from her selection of unique glass lighting, custom lamps and lampshades. The walls of the shop are painted in bold red, calming teal, Flaming Tomato orange, and a fabulous chartreuse hue in the expanded wing. Thymes Frasier Fir fragrances subtly envelop the space. Luxurious textures and hues are layered in cozy arrangements. Any plush sofa or handsome chair can be upholstered in a wide selection of leather, animal print, and colorful textile patterns. Options for

mixing and matching abound. Lori is an expert at easing clients into the joy of incorporating vibrant pops of personality. Versatile accents are found throughout her shop, such as acid washed animal hides lending a surprising splash of color. Vintage Vinyls floor

coverings are available in an assortment of sizes and fun patterns—UV treated for indoor or outdoor enjoyment. Sassy sayings in reclaimed frames, bejeweled bottles, and a heart-shaped metate are all playful and romantic pieces. When asked what her favorite interior design projects have been, Lori is truly passionate about putting her skills to work in homes that begin as a clean canvas. When given the opportunity to start fresh, Dos Corazones design lends a uniquely elegant twist to any space. Contemporary and Traditional Art

Canvasses depicting darling animals and native plants are rendered by local artist Pam Corbett. It is easy to get attached to Corbett’s animals, as even the smallest travel-size canvas features a delightful “Happy Fatties” personality. Animals which have graced the walls are often affectionately named by Lori, such as: Lovechild the Donkey, Candy the Pig, Samson and Wilbur the Cows. What at first appears as oil on canvas is actually intricately layered handmade paper in vibrant colors, outlined delicately with ink. Corbett’s process adds a special dimension. A delightful array of Southwestern woven baskets by Betty Kaufmann evoke the colors of a desert sunrise and add to the shop’s nesting aesthetic. Jewelry by Jamie Dietrich makes a wonderful gift. Handmade sterling silver and turquoise keepsake boxes come in many varieties.


Images: (Facing page) The Tubac showrooms at Dos Corazones are filled with artfully staged settings with bright accents and many interesting candles. (Facing page, inset) Lori Kirkpatrick. (Above, left) Assorted Vintage Vinyl floor coverings are placed around the store's settings. (Above, right) One of artist, Pam Corbett's cows in its natural setting. (Below) The vibrant furniture arrangements invite visitors to step in and get a feel for the pieces with design elements for inspiration. Photos by Joseph Birkett A teal chandelier that was originally intended for adding drama to the entryway of the shop has become a surprisingly popular seller—it has shipped all over the country, in red, purple and lime green varieties.

In contrast to the airy chandeliers are massive, solid, wooden and leather pieces. Hacienda style consoles and credenzas provide an earthy, rich, comfy counterpart to the vibrant and whimsical styles. Handmade plush sofas and armchairs come from classic lines like King Hickory and Paul Robert. Massive buffets and armoires are available from Jason Scott.

From Two Hearts to Many Hearts

The name Dos Corazones was suggested by Lori’s husband, Terry Kirkpatrick, of Grumpy Gringo Fine Cigars in Tubac. Lori speaks sweetly from her soul when she reflects on how her vision has expanded to envelop many hearts. She expresses gratitude to her family, her community and customers, as well as the angels and good energies surrounding her shop.

As with the marriage of two hearts in her logo, Lori artfully pairs elegance with rustic appeal, angels with whimsical devils, contemporary design with vintage flair.

Continuing to Expand and Evolve

Lori explains that she will continue to build the Dos Corazones website, as well as an upcoming e-commerce site. With her determined spirit and enthusiasm for hunting out the most gorgeous pieces around, she promises to inspire each visitor to her shop with exhilarating home designs from the heart. Visit Dos Corazones in the Mercado de Baca shopping plaza, 19 Tubac Road.

More information at DosCorazonesDesign.com 520-398-3110.


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

S even G ood R easons

Insomnia

and

to

S tay S leepless :

Secondary Gain

By Rubin Naiman, PhD

M

aybe you’ve heard this one: A woman goes to see a psychologist and tells him her husband thinks he’s a chicken. “Well,” says the psychologist, “we have effective treatments for that. Why don’t you bring him in?” “I don’t know,” responds the woman. “We really need the eggs.” Like many sleep specialists, I wondered why our effective treatments for insomnia didn’t seem to be significantly impacting the epidemic of sleeplessness. I wondered why so many of my patients struggled with following through on recommended treatments. And I wondered why so many people with insomnia didn’t even seek treatment and instead opted for drugs, substances, or just muscling through. The answer to these questions is secondary gain—the indirect, potential benefits of not treating a health concern. Secondary gain is not a conscious or manipulative attempt to leverage illness. It is, rather, a kind of behavioral trap that snares and keeps us stuck against our will. Secondary gain does not mean we are in any way enjoying our sleep struggles. Like the golden handcuffs of an unsatisfying job or the emotional security of a dysfunctional relationship, the challenges of secondary gains around sleeplessness are both common and tricky to navigate. The first step in addressing secondary gain is to identify the specific ways in which it affects us. Here are seven of the most common patterns of insomnia-related secondary gain I have observed:

1) Most obvious, spending less time asleep means more time awake. Being awake can allow us to feel more productive, can provide more time for ourselves, or can help us feel less pressured, less rushed. Independent of insomnia, restricting sleep has long been seen as a badge of honor. 2) Chronic sleep loss fogs our mind and blunts our emotions. As uncomfortable as the resulting daytime sleepiness might be, it can take the edge off waking life by rendering us desensitized or numb. In some ways, being chronically sleepy is similar to being somewhat inebriated. 3) Excessive daytime sleepiness provides legitimate excuses for avoiding personal, social, and professional obligations. Our unmanageable sleepiness can get us out of attending social events, can explain poor performance at work or school, can justify inattentiveness to family and friends, and can explain our failure to follow through on an exercise or weight management program. 4) Untreated insomnia can have a powerful impact on our primary relationships. For some, it may offer protection from intimacy by reinforcing the need to sleep apart or by otherwise limiting their availability to their partner. For others, it may encourage support, concern, kindness, or even pity from a partner. Research suggests that untreated insomnia eventually has a deleterious effect on relationships.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r D e c 1 6 - J a n 1 7

Enhancing your jewelry collection with Venetian glass.

5) Chronic sleep difficulties can become a rationale for dependence on alcohol, marijuana, or food to make it through the night—or day. In fact, many adult alcoholics began their heavy drinking patterns in adolescence in an attempt to manage their sleeplessness. Although alcohol, substances, and food may appear to help in the short-term, they ultimately exacerbate sleep struggles. 6) Chronic insomnia provides justification for remaining dependent on sleep medications, both prescription and overthe-counter varieties. Despite common knowledge that sleeping pills are of limited effectiveness and questionable safety, their use has continued to rise in recent years. 7) Probably the most subtle and least acknowledged form of secondary gain around insomnia is the avoidance of dreams. Because most sleeplessness occurs in the latter part of the night, when we are in our most protracted periods of REM sleep, it deprives us of our dreams. Shakespeare eloquently called our attention to this issue in Hamlet’s famous soliloquy: “To sleep perchance to dream. . .” Many of us would rather evade the challenging emotions dreams can elicit and so we avoid, often unconsciously, dreaming. Addressing insomnia-related secondary gain begins with the willingness to carefully consider how our symptoms might be serving us, even if indirectly. Give this some serious thought and obtain input from people who are close to you. Identify the specific benefits you might be deriving from staying sleepless, and then find alternative ways to obtain those benefits. In other words, plan to get your eggs elsewhere. More often than not, treating insomnia calls for examining and changing lifestyle patterns. You’ll find that what you need for better sleep is exactly what you need for a happier and healthier waking life. Consider getting help from a knowledgeable sleep therapist or coach, if needed. Rubin Naiman, PhD, is a psychologist, sleep and dream specialist, and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Arizona Center for Integrative Medicine. He recently moved to Tubac where he will begin offering sleep health consultations as well as healing sleep retreats at the Golf Resort. His website is www.DrNaiman.com.

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Ongoing WEEKDAYS: Branch of the Nogales-Santa Cruz County public library open at the Tubac Community Center from 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. There are two free computers for public use and Wi-Fi. Phone 398-9814. MONDAYS THROUGH SATURDAYS: Yoga at Tubac Healing Arts Center. 8:30am. 6 Camino Otero. www.tubachealingarts.com. 520-275-2689. MONDAYS: Tubac Art Academy - Fine Art Classes featuring Lou Maestas – Painting – any medium – all levels. 9am -12noon. Ongoing classes. $45 per class. (505) 3212918. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7pm at the Tubac Community Center. 50 Bridge Rd. TUESDAYS: Tubac Art Academy - Fine Art Classes featuring Lou Maestas – Painting – any medium – all levels. 9am -12noon. Ongoing classes. $45 per class. (505) 3212918. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. Tubac Community Forum. Join this weekly conversational group for a deep dive into politics. We will explore the cultural and social roots of many of our current issues such as climate change and income inequality from our many points of view. We will use a conversational form based on the work of David Bohm, a quantum-physicist. Please email Linda Ellinor at lellinor25@gmail.com or Melissa Murray at manifestingme@gmail.com for details and to RSVP.

Yoga at Tubac Healing Arts Center. 5:30pm. 6 Camino Otero. www.tubachealingarts.com. 520-275-2689.

Yoga at Tubac Healing Arts Center. 5:30pm. 6 Camino Otero. www.tubachealingarts.com. 520-275-2689.

IF YOU HAVE A DRUG PROBLEM WE CAN HELP Narcotics Anonymous meets at 6PM at the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd.

IF YOU HAVE A DRUG PROBLEM WE CAN HELP Narcotics Anonymous meets at 6PM at the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd.

WEDNESDAYS:

FRIDAYS:

TRX (Stretching) 9am at the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. Call 520-398-1800.

Tubac Rotary Club meets at 8am at the Tubac Golf Resort & Spa.

Access to Brownell Research Center & Library, Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. 10am-2pm, and by appointment. www.ths-tubac.org. 520-398-2020.

Children’s Story Hour at 11 am; & Dance - line dance, ballet, tap - instruction, days and time to be determined. Argentine tango, Fridays at noon. Call Cheryl at (719) 237-7364. At the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. Call 520-398-1800.

Class in Expressive Arts, with Peggy Delgadillo starting January 25, 1pm-4pm. $50 per class, at the Tubac Art Academy. Call 520-398-3242 for more information. Jam Nights at The Goods. 4pm-6pm. BYO Instruments. 26A Tubac Rd. Awanas - 6:30-8, at The Church at Tubac. 2204 West Frontage Road. Info: 398-2325. www. churchattubac. com. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7pm at the Tubac Community Center. 50 Bridge Rd. THURSDAYS:

Live Music at Stables Ranch Grille at the Tubac Golf Resort and Spa. For more information call 520-3982678. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7pm at the Tubac Community Center. 50 Bridge Rd. SATURDAYS: Tucson Audubon hosts Weekly Walks at the Arivaca Cienega. Explore the upland desert, grasslands, and wetlands of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge with Bob Rolfson or another expert birder at 8am every Saturday through April.

Tubac Quantum Consciousness Group at 9am-11am (392-2747); Slow flow yoga/balance at 11am; Senior Lunch 12noon; Food bank distribution at 12; TRX (Stretching) at 5pm at the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. Call 520-398-1800.

TRX (Stretching) 9am at the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. Call 520-398-1800.

Access to Brownell Research Center & Library, Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. 10am-2pm, and by appointment. www.ths-tubac.org. 520-398-2020.

Live Piano Music at the Cow Palace Restaurant and Bar. Amado, I-19 Exit 48. 398-8000.

Local's Art Salon at The Goods 4pm-6pm. Join us for Happy Hour and express yourself! Bring something for "Show & Tell" 26A Tubac Rd.

Try

our new Menu!

New Breakfast • Mexican • Italian Entrees Cowpuncher Stew & Chili to warm you this season! New! Gold Canyon Top Sirloin and Porterhouse Steaks on the Charbroiler

Alcoholics Anonymous - MEN'S meeting, noon at the Tubac Community Center. 50 Bridge Rd.

Live Music at Stables Ranch Grille at the Tubac Golf Resort and Spa. For more information call 520-3982678. 3rd Saturday of every month, 9am-12noon - Tubac Community Garden Work Party at the Tubac Community Center, 50 Bridge Rd. All ages welcome! No need to register, just show up. We will have lunch provided by Tubac Market for a $3-$5 donation. Make sure you bring a hat, sunblock, gloves, and a water bottle. See you on Saturday!!!! Contact our Garden Manager, Pamela if you have questions, 425-7858600. SUNDAYS: The Church at Tubac - Bible Study at 10 am. Worship Service at 11 am. 2204 West Frontage Road. Info: 3982325. www.churchattubac.com. The Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Green Valley/Amado holds services at 10 am at the Amado Territory Ranch off Interstate 19 Exit 48. Please submit Ongoing events monthly, or indicate relevant issues which you would like your event to run. * * * * *

NOW THROUGH THE END OF THE SCHOOL YEAR TUMACÁCORI LAUNCHES SECOND YEAR OF EVERY KID IN A PARK PASS. Tumacácori encourages all fourth graders to visit the park for free this year as part of the Every Kid in a Park program. The program gives fourth grade students, and those accompanying them, free access to more than 2,000 federally managed lands and waters. Visit www.EveryKidinaPark.gov to download the pass and obtain more information. Fourth grade teachers in Santa Cruz and Pima Counties can apply for these funds to cover transportation costs supporting a field trip to Tumacácori. Field trips come packaged with curriculum-based pre- and post-visit lessons, and include options including river programs, My Life at Tumacácori, Padre Kino’s Quest, and the ever-popular Mission Mystery. To learn more about curriculum-based experiences at Tumacácori, visit www.nps.gov/tuma/ learn/education/index.htm. The Every Kid in a Park pass – which features a new design for this year’s students – is valid for a full calendar year starting September 1. The pass grants free entry for fourth graders and up to three accompanying adults (or an entire car for drivein parks) to most federally managed lands and waters, including national parks, forests, wildlife refuges and marine sanctuaries. For more information, please visit www.everykidinapark.gov and follow the program on Twitter @everykidinapark, Facebook, Instagram and YouTube. For additional information about Tumacácori, please visit www.nps.gov/tuma or call 520-377-5060. NOW - ONGOING SPECIAL EXHIBIT - TUBAC’S PIONEER FAMILIES AND THE CATASTROPHE OF BACA FLOAT NO. 3. This ground breaking exhibit tells the story of how local homesteaders lost their lands to real estate speculators and political actions beyond their control. Included with park admission, $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. * * * * * JANUARY 18, 20, 25 & 27 - 9AM-12NOON - LESLIE MILLER - EVERNOTE FOR THE EMERGING/ ENTERPRISING ARTIST. How to manage your art affairs - Branding, Marketing, Setting Goals, Customer Retention. $200. (865) 389-7664. lesliemiller@icloud. com. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 18, 9:30AM-11AM - BORDER COMMUNITY ALLIANCE PRESENTS "MEXICO: HISTORY, CULTURE & CONTEXT" This short course provides a basic introduction to Mexico with lecture, multi-media presentations & guest presenters. The course is FREE with a suggested donation of $20 per session payable when you arrive. In Green Valley. To register visit http:// bordercommunityalliance.org/cross-border-tours-2/ cross-border-tours/ JANUARY 19, & 26, 9AM-12NOON - BASICS OF DRAWING WITH RICK WHEELER. Learning some of the basic tools and techniques of drawing. At the Tubac Center of the Arts, 9 Plaza Rd. Call 520-398-2371 to reserve your space. JANUARY 19, & 26, 1PM-4PM - TUBAC ART ACADEMY - FINE ART CLASSES FEATURING MYRNA YORK DRAWING/SUMI-E. $300. Materials included. (720) 220-9307. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia.


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Tour Eco-friendly Homes & Sites Speakers, Exhibits & Demonstrations

Farmers’ Market, Seed-swap, Music, Food & more!

Saturday, January 28th • 10am - 4pm • Arivaca, AZ Exhibits, Vendors & Demonstrations Sky Island Alliance The Solar Store Desert Tortoise Botanicals Watershed Management Group Native Seeds/SEARCH Ecogro Aquaponics Borderlands Restoration Ravens Way Wild Journeys Originate Natural Building Materials EarthUprising Compressed Adobe Block Pima County Dept of Environmental Quality Byrd Baylor - books & posters Altar Valley Conservation Alliance Ken Buchanan This House is Made of Mud Friends of Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge Tierra Sagrada Massage Master Gardeners

Tickets $10

• Available online. Visit our website. • In advance at Green Valley Chamber of Commerce, Arivaca Library & Arivaca Artists’ Coop • At the door at Arivaca Action Center on Universal Ranch Rd. Follow tour signs.

Studio construction at Bart Santello’s Desert Homestead

John Slattery

Un ‘Pueblo Mágico’ de los Belloteros: Emory Oak and its Acorns

Lincoln Perino

Cob House at ErdaKroft

Rainwater Harvesting for your Home & Yard

Emily Bishton

Wildlife-friendly Garden Design

SPEAKERS Native Seeds/SEARCH

How to Save Seeds and Why You Should

Borderlands Restoration • David Seibert

Engaging Community in Economic, Social and Ecosystem Restoration

For inspiration, information & tickets

ArivacaEcoFest2017.wordpress.com


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

JANUARY 19, 11AM - TUBAC HISTORICAL SOCIETY'S ANNUAL MEETING at the Tubac Golf Resort & Spa. www.ths-tubac.org. 398-2020.

humorous play boasts numerous successful Broadway runs with such as stars Coward himself, Laurence Olivier, Tallulah Bankhead, Gertrude Lawrence, Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor. This production is directed by Susan Voorhees. Tickets: $20 in advance - $25 at door. At the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19.

JANUARY 19, 12NOON - MARSHALL TRIMBLE PRESENTATION AND LUNCHEON at the Tubac Golf Resort & Spa. 65 Avenida de Otero. Come help the Tubac Historical Society celebrates its 50th Anniversary by listening to Arizona's "leading historian" and entertainer, Marshall Trimble. Marshall is considered a contemporary version of Will Rogers. $30 for THS members; $35 for non-members. Send in your check along with luncheon preference (chicken or vegetarian) to: Tubac Historical Society P.O. Box 3261 Tubac, AZ 85646 or call 398-2020 for more information.

JANUARY 20-22 - THE SPA IS EXCITED TO ANNOUNCE SLEEP RETREAT, FACILITATED BY RUBIN NAIMAN, PHD. The Healing Sleep and Dream Retreat Two Night Package, Single Occupancy is $579 and includes a luxurious Hacienda Suite, the weekend workshop and 20% off regularly priced Spa treatments. The Two Night Package, Double Occupancy is $389.50 per person and includes a luxurious Posada Double Queen Guest room, the weekend workshop and 20% off regularly priced Spa treatments. The retreat is limited to 20 people. For reservations and more information please contact Debra Henrickson, Spa Director at 520. 398.3546. www.TubacGolfResort.com/blog.

JANUARY 19, 4PM-5PM - INTRO TO YOGA. Always wanted to do yoga? Public classes are not the place for you? Take our entry course January 12, 19 and 26, 2017 – Thursday afternoons 4 – 5 pm. Only $35 for 3 sessions to get you safely into yoga poses! 6 Camino Otero. 520-275.2689. www. tubachealingarts.com. JANUARY 20, 25 & 27 - 9AM-12NOON - LESLIE MILLER - EVERNOTE FOR THE EMERGING/ENTERPRISING ARTIST. How to manage your art affairs - Branding, Marketing, Setting Goals, Customer Retention. $200. (865) 3897664. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 20, 9AM-12NOON - WATERCOLOR/ABSTRACT WORKSHOP WITH JIM PETTY. $45. Fridays. (719) 838-1102. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 20 & 27, 10AM-1PM - “THE CREATIVE PROCESS” WORKSHOP WITH CAROLYN WAYLAND. Moving past fears, learn how to use the basic building blocks of art to create acrylic paint compositions. At the Tubac Center of the Arts, 9 Plaza Rd. $200 Members / $240 Non-Members. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. JANUARY 20 & 21, 1PM-5PM - CK WEARDEN - BEGINNER 2 DAY "HAPPY DAY PUEBLO PAINTING WORKSHOP" All supplies included. $350. Limit 6 per class. Classes continuing through April. (520) 612-4141. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 20, 2-3PM - WILDLIFE OF THE SONORAN DESERT. Wildlife that inhabit the Sonoran Desert have specialized adaptations that allow them to thrive. From roadrunners to regal horned lizards and round-tailed ground squirrels, we explore how animals are adapted to life in the Sonoran Desert. All ages welcome. Joyner-Green Valley Library, 601 N. La Cañada Dr., Green Valley. Cost: Free. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@ pima.gov or 520-615-7855. JANUARY 20, 5PM-7PM - OPENING RECEPTION FOR THE TCA'S ARIZONA AQUEOUS XXXI EXHIBIT. For over 30 years the Tubac Center of the Arts has presented this national juried annual exhibit of water media on paper. The exhibit has evolved over the years and continues to push the boundaries of combining water based paints and inks with paper. Awards include Best of Show, Juror’s Award, Award of Excellence and the Ursula Seuss Abstract Award. The exhibit continues through Sunday, February 26. ALSO OPENING JANUARY 20, 5PM-7PM - OPEN STUDIO TOUR PREVIEW EXHIBIT. Tubac Center of the Arts presents an exhibit of the work of participating Open Studio Tour artists. Please join us for the Opening reception on Friday, January 20th, 5-7pm. Meet the artists, preview their work and plan your studio tour visits. Studio Tour is Friday, Saturday and Sunday, March 17, 18, & 19, 2017. AND AT THE TCA - OPENING RECEPTION - JANUARY 20, 5PM - MONICA WARHOL – WILDE WEST WHAT EXHIBIT. An invitational exhibit of the contemporary paintings of artist, Monica Warhol. Exhibit runs through February 19. 9 Plaza Rd. 520-398-2371.

Dancer is a sweet Chihuahua mix. He's 3 years old and loves people!! He gets along great with other animals and enjoys the company of people and kids. He was rescued from Animal Control and is now ready for his forever home!!

Santa Cruz Humane Society 232 E. Patagonia Highway Nogales, AZ 85621 (520) 287-5654 JANUARY 20, 5PM-8PM - A NIGHT UNDER THE STARS. Sonora Astronomical Society volunteers set up telescopes for celestial viewing and provide an introduction to the night sky. Come before dark to take a self-guided tour of the Canoa Ranch Headquarters. Bring your flashlight and lawn chair. Weather permitting. All ages welcome. Tour 5:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m., Star Gazing 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Where: Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Registration not required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima. gov or 520-724-5220. JANUARY 20, 6:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - RETRO ROCKETS at the De Anza RV Resort. E Frontage Rd between Tubac and Amado. 520-398-8628. JANUARY 20 & 21, 7PM - SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRODUCTION OF PRIVATE LIVES, BY NOEL COWARD. Private Lives is one of the most sophisticated, entertaining plays ever written. Elyot and Amanda, once married and now honeymooning with new spouses at the same hotel, meet by chance, reignite the old spark and impulsively elope. After days of being reunited, they again find their fiery romance alternating between passions of love and anger. When discovered by their jilted lovers, all four individuals find themselves in the midst of the most compromising of situations. Brilliant and witty, Noel Coward's comedy of manners is a delightful romp. Since its premiere at the Kings Theatre in Edinburgh in 1930, this uniquely

JANUARY 21, 8AM-11AM - SONORAN DESERT WEEDWACKERS - BEAT BACK BUFFELGRASS DAY. Join your friends and neighbors to remove invasive buffelgrass. There are multiple locations throughout Pima County including Tucson Mountain Park. Register online www. pagregion.com/buffelgrass. Ages 12 and up. Pima County Tucson Mountain Park. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information and to register: www.pagregion.com/ buffelgrass. JANUARY 21, 10AM-12NOON - WALKING TOURS OF OLD TUBAC. Come explore colorful Old Tubac that even some of the locals don’t know about! Guided by Connie Stevens, you’ll discover fascinating facts about the town’s early adobe buildings and learn about Arizona’s first European settlement. Topics from early Native American inhabitants, Spanish explorers, American pioneers, Apache attacks, kidnappings, and other exciting episodes are discussed. Meet at the Park’s Visitor Center. Allow 2 hours for the tour and wear walking shoes, sunscreen and a hat. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 20; reservations requested, 520398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 21, 10AM-1PM - MONICA WARHOL WORKSHOP. Monica Warhol, scion of the Warhol family and artist, actress, raconteur, provocateur, invites you to learn printmaking, release tour creativity and get your art to Pop. At the Tubac Center of the Arts. Cost: $157 Members / $177 Non-Members. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. JANUARY 21, 24, 28 & 31, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. JANUARY 21, 10AM-2PM - LIVING WITH URBAN WILDLIFE SHOWCASE. Wildlife interactions are a part of everyday life. Drop in through the day to meet live animals and take part in family-friendly activities to learn about the amazing wildlife that thrive in our neighborhoods. Homeowners will want to stop by the mobile exhibit to learn practical tips for excluding wildlife from your living spaces. All ages welcome. Pima County Feliz Paseos Park, 1600 N. Camino de Oeste. Cost: Free. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. JANUARY 21, 2PM - THE CHIRICAHUA APACHES: A COMPREHENSIVE STORY OF A FAMOUS PEOPLE - SPECIAL PRESENTATION BY JACK LASSETER. This is Jack’s fresh comprehensive story of the Chiricahua Apaches, famous warriors of the Southwest and their leaders Victorio, Lozen, Geronimo, Chatto, Loco, Mangas Coloradas, Cochise and his blood brother

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN ART

Home-style Dog Boarding Pet Sitting in your home Dog Walking & more Transportation available Over 10 years of loving your pets like our own.

Great Selection of Mexican Chimineas

Serving Nogales to Sahuarita

520-988-0994

www.paws-a-moment.com


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Tom Jeffords. He’ll discuss the lives, culture, and tactics of these brave people. Wine and hors d'oeuvres will be served. $15 per lecture. A portion of the proceeds supports our education and preservation programs. Please call for reservations and future dates, 520-398-2252 or e-mail info@tubacpresidio. org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 22, 2PM - TEODORO ‘TED’ RAMIREZ ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE CONCERT SERIES: RUN BOY RUN. They brought the house down last season with beautiful harmony and musicianship. Here’s your opportunity to see them again or for the first time! Matt and Grace Roland, Bekah and Jen Sandoval, and Jesse Allen make up this family band. If you love virtuoso fiddle, cello, mandolin, guitar and bass with classic Blue Ridge Mountain style harmony you won’t want to miss this concert. Admission is $20 for adults, free admission for children 14 and under. Seating is limited and reservations are recommended. Please call 520-398-2252 or email info@ tubacpresidio.org today! Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 22, 3PM - SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRODUCTION OF PRIVATE LIVES, BY NOEL COWARD. This production is directed by Susan Voorhees. Tickets: $20 in advance - $25 at door. At the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. JANUARY 23, 8AM-9:30AM - BIRDS AND PLANTS OF FELIZ PASEOS PARK. Join a Pima County naturalist to learn about common desert birds and plants. We are likely to see verdins, cactus wrens, and curve-billed thrashers among the cacti, palo verde, and ironwood. All ages welcome. Pima County Feliz Paseos Park, 1600 N. Camino de Oeste. Cost: Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www. pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. JANUARY 23, 8:30AM-10:30AM - WHAT'S HAPPENING AT THE BORDER? A BREAKFAST GATHERING... After breakfast, three panelists will share perspectives on the border, followed by a question/answer period: Alma Cota de Yanez, Director of FESAC, a Mexican non-profit; Peg Bowden, author and activist; Tony Sedgwick, rancher and lawyer. Jerry Haas, Director of the Border Community Alliance will serve as moderator. $25, BCA members $20. Location: Abrego Grill, Torres Blancas Golf Course, 3233 S. Abrego Dr., GV. Visit bca.z2systems.com/np/clients/bca/eventList.jsp for more info. JANUARY 23, 1PM-3PM - TUBAC ART ACADEMY - FINE ART CLASSES FEATURING JOHN MARBURY - THE "GRID" METHOD OF DRAWING. Mondays. $35. (505) 870-7766. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 23, 6-7:30PM - A LOVE AFFAIR WITH HUMMINGBIRDS! WITH KAREN KREBBS. Conservation Biologist Karen Krebbs will entertain you with hummingbird facts and fun! Karen has been studying hummingbirds for 30 years and will share her knowledge on hummingbird identification, entertaining behavior, nesting biology, and ways to attract these tiny jewels to your garden and home. Arizona is home to an exciting diversity of hummingbird species and these small energetic pollinators will make you smile and laugh! At the Pima Community College Downtown Campus in the Amethyst Room, 1255 N. Stone Ave. For more information visit tucsonaudubon.org/news-events/lwn.html JANUARY 24, 9AM-11:30AM - HIKE BROWN MOUNTAIN TRAIL. Enjoy the scenic and rugged beauty of the Tucson Mountains on this 2-mile guided hike with a Pima County naturalist. Ages 12 and up. Tucson Mountain Park, Brown Mountain Trailhead 8451 W. McCain Loop Road Cost: Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. JANUARY 24, 28 & 31, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220.

F O R

R E N T

CALL - MT. VIEW RV RANCH

520-398-9401

• 2 Mobile Home Lots - $300/mo each for your mobile home Must fill out application for background check

JANUARY 25, 9AM-10:30AM - HERITAGE AREA STRUCTURES REHABILITATION TOUR. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. JANUARY 25 & 27 - 9AM-12NOON - LESLIE MILLER - EVERNOTE FOR THE EMERGING/ENTERPRISING ARTIST. How to manage your art affairs - Branding, Marketing, Setting Goals, Customer Retention. $200. (865) 3897664. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 25, 9:30AM-11AM - BORDER COMMUNITY ALLIANCE PRESENTS "MEXICO: HISTORY, CULTURE & CONTEXT" This short course provides a basic introduction to Mexico with lecture, multi-media presentations & guest presenters. The course is FREE with a suggested donation of $20 per session payable when you arrive. In Green Valley. To register visit http:// bordercommunityalliance.org/cross-border-tours-2/cross-border-tours/ JANUARY 25, 11AM-1PM - GUIDED TOUR OF THE BARRIO DE TUBAC ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE. Special tour by Phil Halpenny and Gwen Griffin of the Spanish colonial archaeological site just south of the Park which preserves the remains of the original Tubac town site, including residence foundations, plaza area, refuse area and partial irrigation ditch. Meet at the Park’s Visitor Center. Tour involves a walk of about 1-1/4 miles. The Archaeological Conservancy protects this site and participants are asked to sign 'An Acknowledgement of Risk Factors' before entering. Wear walking shoes, sunscreen and hat. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 15; reservations encouraged, 520-398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. WEDNESDAYS STARTING JANUARY 25, 1PM-4PM - CLASS IN EXPRESSIVE ARTS, WITH PEGGY DELGADILLO. Inspired by The Artist's Way by Julia Cameron. A spiritual path to higher creativity. Includes discussion & delightful art experiences. No experience necessary. Art supplies included. $50 per class. WEDNESDAYS at the Tubac Art Academy. Call 520-398-3242 for more information. JANUARY 25 THROUGH 30 ALAMOS MUSIC FESTIVAL. The Dr. Alfonso Tirado Classical Music Festival, held annually in Alamos, Sonora, is much more than a world class musical experience. It is a unique opportunity to experience the rich heritage of colonial Mexico. The finest of musical, historical, and cultural heritage that Mexico has to offer. Fiesta Tours International, benefits the tubac Center of the Arts. firstatoursint@gmail.com, or 520-398-9705. JANUARY 26, 9AM-12NOON - BASICS OF DRAWING WITH RICK WHEELER. Learning some of the basic tools and techniques of drawing. At the Tubac Center of the Arts, 9 Plaza Rd. Call 520-398-2371 to reserve your space. JANUARY 26, 10AM-1PM - PRINTMAKING, CREATIVITY & POP WITH MONICA WARHOL. Join Monica Warhol, scion of the Warhol family and artist, actress, raconteur, and provocateur to learn printmaking, release your creativity and get your art to “pop”. Call TCA at 520.398.2371. JANUARY 26, 1PM-4PM - TUBAC ART ACADEMY - FINE ART CLASSES FEATURING MYRNA YORK - DRAWING/SUMI-E. $300. Materials included. (720) 220-9307. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 26, 4PM-5PM - INTRO TO YOGA. Always wanted to do yoga? Public classes are not the place for you? Take our entry course January 12, 19 and 26, 2017 – Thursday afternoons 4 – 5 pm. Only $35 for 3 sessions to get you safely into yoga poses! 6 Camino Otero. 520-275.2689. www.tubachealingarts.com.

JANUARY 26, 5PM-7PM - ARTS SPEAK: A CONVERSATION WITH MONICA WARHOL. Join us for a conversation & live podcast recording with artist, Monica Warhol. Monica will discuss art, Andy & more in this electric & eclectic hour discussion. “Professional artist Monica Warhol is fiercely loyal, agreeably stimulating and attractive. Originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Warhol moved to Tucson 13 years ago. Although she is distantly related to the famous artist Andy Warhol, (his father and her grandfather were brothers), she downplays that connection, preferring to become successful on her own merit. She emphasizes, “It’s not about my name; it’s about a lot more than that.”” (Agrillo, 2015). Join the conversation! Reserve your seat. Call TCA at 520.398.2371. TCA members, Free. Guests and nonmembers, $8. JANUARY 27 - 9AM-12NOON - LESLIE MILLER - EVERNOTE FOR THE EMERGING/ENTERPRISING ARTIST. How to manage your art affairs Branding, Marketing, Setting Goals, Customer Retention. $200. (865) 3897664. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 27, 9AM-12NOON - WATERCOLOR/ABSTRACT WORKSHOP WITH JIM PETTY. $45. Fridays. (719) 838-1102. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 27, 10AM-1PM - “THE CREATIVE PROCESS” WORKSHOP WITH CAROLYN WAYLAND. Moving past fears, learn how to use the basic building blocks of art to create acrylic paint compositions. At the Tubac Center of the Arts, 9 Plaza Rd. $200 Members / $240 Non-Members. Contact: Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. JANUARY 27, 10AM-1PM - LIVING HISTORY: SPINNING. Spinning is one of the oldest surviving crafts in the world. The tradition of weaving traces back to Neolithic times – approximately 12,000 years ago. Watch and learn how fiber and spinning impacted human activity from ancient to modern times. A knowledgeable volunteer will demonstrate how the spinning wheel produces thread from fiber, and you are welcome to experience spinning with a drop spindle. Included with park admission, $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 27 & 28, 1PM-5PM - CK WEARDEN - BEGINNER 2 DAY "HAPPY DAY PUEBLO PAINTING WORKSHOP" All supplies included. $350. Limit 6 per class. Classes continuing through April. (520) 612-4141. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 27, 2:30PM-8:30PM - KITCHENS OF NOGALES: LA ZONA GASTRONOMICA. This tour begins with a visit to the landmark symbol of Nogales - the statues known as Monument to Benito Juarez and the Mono Bichi, followed by a short craft beer orientation and tasting at Nogales Brewing Company. The tour fee includes transportation by rental van, guide, and a four course meal at a modern central Mexican cuisine dining venue, La Llorona. We'll also visit the new La Granja food truck plaza. Great opportunity for craft beer enthusiasts and those passionate for Latin American cooking. $60 BCA Member, $80-Non-member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ JANUARY 27, 6:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - MIDLIFE CRISIS at the De Anza RV Resort. E Frontage Rd between Tubac and Amado. 520-398-8628. JANUARY 27 & 28, 7PM - SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRODUCTION OF PRIVATE LIVES, BY NOEL COWARD. This production is directed by Susan Voorhees. Tickets: $20 in advance - $25 at door. At the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. JANUARY 28, 9AM-1PM - TUMACÁCORI NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK IS OFFERING TOURS TO THE HISTORIC MISSION SITES OF GUEVAVI AND CALABAZAS. These fragile ruins, protected within the national park, are normally closed to the public and can be visited only as part of these special,

ATTENTION: SERIOUS VISUAL ARTISTS Our apprenticeship program will begin this month. Call for appointment to discuss program.

Lou Maestas Artist/Painter Look for Peggy Delgadillo’s class on “Expressive Art” in her ad in this issue.

Tubac, AZ

520-398-3242


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8 reserved tours. The cost for the tour is $25 per person. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, visit the National Park Service reservation website, www.recreation.gov. The tours meet at the Tumacácori National Historical Park Visitor Center. Participants ride in a 15-passenger van to the Guevavi and Calabazas sites. At each location, participants walk on unshaded, moderately improved trails to reach the mission ruins, including one short section of steep, uphill trail at the Calabazas Mission. Please note that these tours are not wheelchair accessible and require walking on uneven terrain. Participants need to bring water, and to wear clothing appropriate for the weather with comfortable walking shoes. Restroom facilities are available only at the beginning and end of the tour, at Tumacácori. After the tour returns to Tumacácori, participants are invited to visit the Tumacácori Mission church and grounds, visitor center, and museum on their own, at no additional charge. A self-guided tour booklet is available. Guided tours of Tumacácori are scheduled each day at 2:00 p.m. and may also be available at 1:00; inquire at the visitor center. For more information, call the Tumacácori visitor center at 520-377-5060 or visit our website at nps.gov/tuma. JANUARY 28, 10AM - HELL BENT FOR RESURRECTION: A HIKE THROUGH TUBAC’S MANY LAYERS. Join us for a new program of History Hikes to take advantage of the great outdoors and our amazingly rich cultural heritage. Join Rick Collins, our Interpretive Specialist, for an insightful walk on the Anza Trail. We'll start at the original Plaza de Armas from which the expedition to Alta California departed before walking along the Rio de Tubac (as it then was!) and discussing the native peoples and later arrivals who lived in Tubac and the area along the River. Bring sturdy walking shoes, sunscreen, and water. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. The 1 and 1/4 mile hike begins from the Tubac Presidio Visitors Center, rain or shine. Hike limited to 15 people. Call (520) 398-2252 or e-mail to info@tubacpresidio.org to reserve your place. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 28, 10AM-1PM - CHOCOLATE! 1000 YEARS AND COUNTING. Come discover the rich history of chocolate in the Southwest. Taste a cacao bean, learn how the Mayans and pre-Columbian Native Americans prepared their chocolate, and sample the energy drink that fueled the 1774 and 1775 Anza expeditions from Tubac to Alta California. Included with park admission $5 adult, $2 youth, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 28 & 31, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. JANUARY 28, 10AM-4PM - ARIVACA ECOFEST AND GREEN HOME TOUR. Tickets $10 available at Arivaca Action Center 15925 W. Universal Ranch Rd. or online at www.ArivacaEcoFest2017.wordpress.com. Self guide home tour of properties using alternative building techniques from straw bale to cob, solar and water harvesting adaptations, and food cultivation from fish farming to aquaponics to alpacas. In addition, presentations by experts on rainwater harvesting, earthworks, plant foraging and food security. Exhibits, vendors and demonstrations on eco friendly technologies and products. Farmer's Market, Seed-Swap, Music, Food & More! www.ArivacaEcoFest2017. wordpress.com. Tickets $10. JANUARY 28, 3-5PM - BIRDING SWEETWATER WETLANDS. Explore this urban birding hotspot with a naturalist to look for wetland and desert birds as well as other wildlife. All ages welcome. Sweetwater Wetlands, 2667 W. Sweetwater Drive. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-6157855.

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JANUARY 28, 5PM-8PM - HISTORY ON TAP. Levin's Park presents Beer, food & history at the Arizona History Museum, 949 E 2nd St, Tucson. Must be 21 to attend. Featuring 7 local brewers, multiple food vendors and music by the 4th Cavalry Regimental Band. Tickets $40, AHS Members $30, Designated Drivers $20. Visit www.azhs.gov for more info and tickets.

presentations & guest presenters. The course is FREE with a suggested donation of $20 per session payable when you arrive. In Nogales. To register visit http://bordercommunityalliance.org/cross-border-tours-2/crossborder-tours/

JANUARY 28, 6:30PM-8:30PM - A NIGHT UNDER THE STARS. Explore the wonder and unfold the mysteries of the night sky. Tucson Amateur Astronomy Association volunteers provide an introduction to the night sky and set up telescopes for celestial viewing. Feel free to bring your lawn chair. All ages welcome. Weather permitting. Tucson Mountain Park, Ironwood Picnic Area, 1500 S. Kinney Road at Hal Gras Road. Cost: Free. Registration not required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855.

FEBRUARY 2, 9AM-12NOON - TUBAC ART ACADEMY - FINE ART CLASSES FEATURING ROBERTA ROGERS - TRADITIONAL WATERCOLOR. $50. (520) 979-4122. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia.

JANUARY 29, 11:30AM - BAGELS AND PRRHULOXIA Jazz, folk and rock songs with bagels and coffee. Vocalist-Karen Kluge, Pianist - Janie Pogan, Bass- Leslie Carter. $10 at the door. UU Church, interstate 19 Exit 48 East to the Territory Lane. JANUARY 29, 2PM - SCHOOL DAYS, SCHOOL DAYS - A MUSICAL CELEBRATION OF TUBAC’S TERRITORIAL TEACHERS AND TIMES. Join music and drama students of the Montessori de Santa Cruz School and Lowe House Project artist- in-residence Sharman Nittoli in the 1885 schoolhouse as they perform original songs based on the school days of Tubac’s early teachers and their students. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. For reservations, call 520-398-2252 or info@tubacpresidio. org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. JANUARY 29, 3PM - SHOESTRING PLAYERS PRODUCTION OF PRIVATE LIVES, BY NOEL COWARD. This production is directed by Susan Voorhees. Tickets: $20 in advance - $25 at door. At the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. JANUARY 30, 1PM-3PM - TUBAC ART ACADEMY - FINE ART CLASSES FEATURING JOHN MARBURY - THE "GRID" METHOD OF DRAWING. Mondays. $35. (505) 870-7766. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. JANUARY 30, 6PM - AUDITIONS FOR THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS PERFORMANCE OF SEE HOW THEY RUN, BY PHILIP KING, DIRECTED BY SUSAN FORD. Characters gallop in and out of the four doors of an English vicarage in this fast-paced farce which was originally produced in England and made its American debut in 1949. There are roles for three women and six men. Ages vary from twenties to sixties. Dialect is Cockney, British and American. Cold readings from the play will be heard. Those interested in doing backstage work should also attend. Performances will be March 31 April 2 and April 7 - 9. For information, e-mail the director: golfkittylady@ gmail.com. “See How They Run” is produced by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Santa Cruz Shoestring Players is a community theater and proud member of AACT. At the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. JANUARY 31, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 1 THROUGH SUPERBOWL SUNDAY - THE GLORY OF BEADS VENETIAN BEAD & JEWELRY SHOW at The Wyndham Canoa Ranch Resort, 5775 S Camino del Sol, Green Valley. Daily 9 to 6pm, Superbowl Sunday 11am to 6pm - we'll have the TV on all day! Call 248-470-9359 for more information. FEBRUARY 1, 9:30AM-11AM - BORDER COMMUNITY ALLIANCE PRESENTS "MEXICO: HISTORY, CULTURE & CONTEXT" This short course provides a basic introduction to Mexico with lecture, multi-media

FEBRUARY 2 & 3, 9:30AM-3:30PM - CRAFTING YOUR SPIRITUAL STORY LINE—DEBORAH KNOX. Jumpstart or deepen your personal creativity, spiritual journey and writing. Tucson author and Life Work Transitions facilitator Deborah Knox, author of Put your Spirit to Work –Making a Living Being Yourself—is offering this popular class for the first time in Tubac. Discover your life story from a spiritual perspective and the power of your words and wisdom. A Lowe House Project Workshop. For information, fees and registration contact Deborah at lifeworktransitions.com , dlkcoach@ gmail.com or 520 780 3834. FEBRUARY 2, 11AM-2PM - FRONTIER PRINTING PRESS DEMONSTRATIONS. A knowledgeable volunteer demonstrates the Washington Hand Press used to print Arizona’s first newspaper in 1859 and answers questions about hand press printing, type setting, and other aspects of this marvel of industrial engineering. You will get to set type and print small samples to take with you. Included with park admission: $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. FEBRUARY 2, 3 & 4 - BEGINNERS' OIL PAINTING WORKSHOP : A LOOSE AND BOLD APPROACH, 3 DAY WORKSHOP. Hours: Feb. 2 - 1:00pm5:00pm. Feb. 3 - 8:00am-12:00pm and 1:00pm-5:00pm. Feb. 4 - 8:00am12:00pm. Cost: $225 - Location: Tubac Art Academy. Contact Leslie Miller. lesliemillerfineart@icloud.com. 865-389-7664. FEBRUARY 2 & 4, 5:30PM-8:30PM - SPARROWS SPECIALTY WORKSHOP AT THE TUCSON AUDUBON NATURE SHOP. Often skulky and elusive, these “little brown jobs” are often overlooked in the field. As part of this workshop, you will learn how to find and observe sparrows in their preferred habitat. Useful foraging behaviors and flight characteristics are

B C

BEEMER CONSTRUCTION INC. Commercial & Residential

Matthew Beemer General Contractor Lic# ROC198858

(520)245-7548 Building in Tubac and surrounding areas for over 15 yrs. Over 30 years of hands-on experience.

The Brasher Team Tubac Village Office: #2 Tubac Road 520.398.2506 Tubac Golf Resort Office: #1 Ave. Otero, Ste F 520.398.0200 P.O.Box 4241. Tubac, Arizona 85646 Email: tubac@russlyon.com

REMODELINGS- ADDITIONS NEW CONSTRUCTION


34 presented by general and vocalizations for breeding species are reviewed. The significance of bill shape and size, wing length and tail length are all discussed in relation to identification. This workshop covers 34 species of sparrows, towhees, and longspurs that may be found in the southwest. Taught by Homer Hansen. Cost: $110/member; $145/non-members. For more information visit tucsonaudubon.org/what-we-do/education/lifelongbirdng.html FEBRUARY 2, 6PM - AUDITIONS FOR THE SHOESTRING PLAYERS PERFORMANCE OF SEE HOW THEY RUN, BY PHILIP KING, DIRECTED BY SUSAN FORD. Characters gallop in and out of the four doors of an English vicarage in this fast-paced farce which was originally produced in England and made its American debut in 1949. There are roles for three women and six men. Ages vary from twenties to sixties. Dialect is Cockney, British and American. Cold readings from the play will be heard. Those interested in doing backstage work should also attend. Performances will be March 31 April 2 and April 7 - 9. For information, e-mail the director: golfkittylady@ gmail.com. At the Community Performance and Art Center on Continental Road in Green Valley, one mile west of I-19. FEBRUARY 3 THROUGH 5 - CHRISTIAN YOUTH THEATER PRESENTS “YOU’RE A GOOD MAN CHARLIE BROWN” at the Pima Community College Center for the Arts Proscenium Theatre. Come and spend “an average day in the life of Charlie Brown” in this fresh musical that pays homage to the classic Charles Schultz’s characters we all know and love. Sing along with unforgettable classics like “Suppertime” and “My Blanket and Me”, as well as new standards including “Beethoven Day” and “My New Philosophy”. Tickets are just $15 and are available at cyttucson.org. Showtimes are the following: Friday, February 3rd – 7pm, Saturday, February 4th – 2 pm & 7pm, Sunday, February 5th – 2pm. For more information on Christian Youth Theater and “You’re a Good Man Charlie Brown” contact Carolyn Anderson at (520) 440-1654. FEBRUARY 3 THROUGH 5 - BALLET TUCSON’S WINTER CONCERT - “LOVE SONGS & OTHER DANCES.” Company Ballet Master Daniel Precup choreographs the world premiere of Love Songs to some of opera’s most famous arias including La Traviata, La Boheme, The Pearl Fishers, Rigoletto, and Tosca to name just a few. Bernardo Bermudez (back by popular demand) and Victoria Robertson are the featured vocal guest artists and live piano accompaniment add to the romance and passion of this memorable concert to share with your favorite valentine! Performance Dates/Times: Friday, February 3 – 7:30 pm; Saturday, February 4 – 2:00 pm & 7:30 pm; Sunday, February 5 – 1:00 pm & 5:00 pm. Stevie Eller Dance Theatre (1737 E University Blvd, Tucson). Ticket Information: General $45; Seniors/Students/ Military $40. Phone: 800.838.3006. Online: www.brownpapertickets.com.

Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

FEBRUARY 4, 8AM-10AM - BIRDING TUCSON MOUNTAIN PARK. Join a local birding expert for a guided walk in Tucson Mountain Park to see rufous-winged sparrows, gilded flickers, phainopeplas, and many other desert birds. Ages 12 and up. Tucson Mountain Park, Ironwood Picnic Area, 1500 S. Kinney Road at Hal Gras Road. Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@ pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 4 & 5, 9AM-4PM - DAVID SIMONS: SEE DIFFERENTLY, PAINT DIFFERENTLY WORKSHOP. Workshop Fee: $250/TCA Members, $270/ Nonmembers. 5 student minimum. Call TCA at 520-398-2371 to register. Two day oil painting workshop to learn how to see with the painter’s eye. FEBRUARY 4, 9:30AM-12NOON - MEDICINAL AND PRACTICAL USES OF DESERT PLANTS. Join us at the Desert Discovery Center in Tucson Mountain Park for an in depth look at the medicinal and practical uses of desert plants. Workshop includes a short hike and make-andtake session to process a variety of desert herbs for use at home. Ages 12 and up. Tucson Mountain Park, Desert Discovery Center, 7798 W. Gates Pass Road. $10 with Membership, Non-Member $15 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/ nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 4, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 4, 10AM-12NOON - WALKING TOURS OF OLD TUBAC. Come explore colorful Old Tubac that even some of the locals don’t know about! Guided by Connie Stevens, you’ll discover fascinating facts about the town’s early adobe buildings and learn about Arizona’s first European settlement. Topics from early Native American inhabitants, Spanish explorers, American pioneers, Apache attacks, kidnappings, and other exciting episodes are discussed. Meet at the Park’s Visitor Center. Allow 2 hours for the tour and wear walking shoes, sunscreen and a hat. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 20; reservations requested, 520398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. SATURDAYS FEBRUARY 4, 11, 18, 25, & MARCH 11, 10AM-12NOON - BACKYARD BIRDING AND BEYOND AT THE TUCSON AUDUBON NATURE SHOP. Learn why southeastern Arizona is such a great place for birds and why bird watching is so much fun! Taught by Lynn Hassler, this course is designed for beginners and will address how to separate birds by habitat, seasonal occurrence, and behavior. Learn about field marks and vocalizations and get the lowdown on binoculars and field guides, birding vocabulary, and etiquette in the field. Course includes two 2-hour classroom sessions and three field trips.Cost: $150 members, $185 non-members. For more information visit tucsonaudubon.org/what-we-do/education/ lifelongbirdng.html FEBRUARY 4, 11AM-3PM - SAVOR SOUTHERN ARIZONA FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL AT THE TUCSON BOTANICAL GARDENS. Tucson’s culinary prestige and slow food movement has been growing each year, and now is the time to SAVOR. Indulge in the flavors of Southern Arizona’s culinary arts at the 4th Annual Southern Arizona Food and Wine Festival surrounded by the colorful floral blooms of the Tucson Botanical Gardens. Featuring over 75 of the region’s finest chefs, wineries, breweries, local foods and restaurants highlighting exceptional menu tastings. This foodie festival will showcase the diversity of the heritage foods and ingredients throughout the Southwest region. Tickets $65 Each. Tickets include libation, and menu samplings from over 75 local wineries, breweries, distilleries, restaurant chefs, and food purveyors in Southern Arizona. 21 and up event. 2150 N Alvernon Way, Tucson. For tickets and information https://saaca.thundertix.com/events. FEBRUARY 4, 1:30-4PM - LUNAFEST, A NATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL FEATURING NINE SHORT AWARD-WINNING FILMS BY, FOR AND ABOUT WOMEN, will be hosted by the Green Valley branch of the American

Association of University Women at the Center for Performance and Art, 1250 Continental Rd. in Green Valley. Refreshments will be served and a raffle held from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. Films will be shown from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Tickets are $25 and available at the Green Valley/Sahuarita Chamber of Commerce and Community Connect next to CVS Drug Store in the Continental Shopping Plaza. 85% percent of the proceeds will go to the philanthropies of AAUW, including scholarships to Pima College; 15% to the Breast Cancer Fund. The 9 films range from animation to fictional drama and cover topics of importance to women although men are invited too. They are selected by LUNA, makers of the Whole Nutrition Bar for Women, to promote women filmmakers and support worthy women’s nonprofits. AAUW’s mission is to improve the lives of women and girls. AAUW members and the public are invited to become sponsors of LUNAFEST by donating $100 for a Blue Moon, $50 for a Full Moon and $25 for a Half Moon. Their names will appear in the program. FEBRUARY 4, 2PM - TALK: THE HISTORICAL INFLUENCES OF THE RAILROADS ON THE BORDERLANDS. Rio Rico historian Dwight Thibodeaux will speak about how the arrival of the railroads in Arizona Territory affected the borderlands. Today, we don’t think about railroads unless the traffic arms come down at a railroad crossing and block our way.  This is especially true since there is no passenger service (only freight) from Nogales to Tucson. Dwight will explain how the Gadsden Purchase of 1854, which resulted in the purchase of southern Arizona from Mexico, was motivated primarily by the railroads.  Beginning in the 1880s, the railroads had an enormous impact on southern Arizona, including an impact on marriages!  He will also explain how Rio Rico could have become a major metropolitan area with over a million residents, if only the many proposed railroads had been completed to Calabasas! Call (520) 398-2252 to make your reservation. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Park. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 4, 2PM-4PM - THE DUST DEVILS, Blue grass and new grass with emphasis on vocal harmonies with great vocalists. UU Church in Amado Territory, Interstate 19, Exit 48 Turn east Tickets at the door for $15. FEBRUARY 5, 2PM - TEODORO ‘TED’ RAMIREZ ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE CONCERT SERIES: EARL EDMONSON. Earl Edmonson is a master of the flat-top guitar, steel guitar, mandolin, harmonica, and vocals! His work is found on countless Arizona recordings, and he has appeared in live performance with many legendary performers: Alison Krauss and Union Station, the Subdudes, Travis Edmonson, Katie Lee, and Tom Paxton to name just a few. We’re thrilled Earl will perform in a solo format, and Ted might just join him and share a few tunes and stories about the early Tucson music scene. Tickets $18 adults, free for children 14 and younger. Seating is limited, please call now for reservations, 520-398-2252. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 5, 2PM-5PM - COOKING A-Z - FOR THE LOVE OF FOOD (AND WINE) WITH JOHN BORD. $70. Taste food in all its glory as we approach Valentine's Day.  Food can be creamy, sweet, spicy and made with love - and the perfect wines can complement those flavors.  Join Chef John Bord as he instructs you how to prepare a meal that will leave you breathless. Creamy - Warm Piquillo Pepper and Crab Dip with a Sparkling Spanish Cava. Sweet - Scallops with Cauliflower, Sherry Capers and Raisins with a Balsamic Reduction and Viognier. Spicy - Mesquite Grilled Meatballs in a Chipotle Sauce with a California Red Zinfadel. Lover's Knots - Chaicchiere o Crostoli, a warm Italian fritter served with a Moscato d' Asti and Cinnamon Powdered Sugar. Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. FEBRUARY 6 THROUGH 22, 9AM-12NOON - LEARN AUTHENTIC MEXICAN SPANISH. Structured for adults, extrememely effective system, high retention, interactive and fun. Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays.


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

FEBRUARY 7, 9AM-11:30AM - HIKE BROWN MOUNTAIN TRAIL. Enjoy the scenic and rugged beauty of the Tucson Mountains on this 2-mile guided hike with a Pima County naturalist. Ages 12 and up. Tucson Mountain Park, Brown Mountain Trailhead 8451 W. McCain Loop Road. Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 7, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 8, 8:30AM-6PM - MAGDALENA THEN AND NOW TOUR. Located just 60 miles south of Nogales, Magdalena has been designated a "Magical Pueblo" because of its historic and colonial charm. This tour includes both a look back to the past and a glance at the contemporary challenges of a small Mexican city. $75 BCA Member, $95 Non Member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ FEBRUARY 8, 9AM-10:30AM - HERITAGE AREA STRUCTURES REHABILITATION TOUR. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-7245220.

FEBRUARY 8 THROUGH 12 - 10AM-5PM 58TH ANNUAL TUBAC FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS. Free Admission, parking $8. Meet juried artists from around the country. Food & Fun! Horse Drawn Trolleys and more. DAILY DURING THE TUBAC FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: -DAILY DEMONSTRATIONS BY NAVAJO SANDCAST ARTIST, ALVIN THOMPSON & GLASS ARTIST, ROBERT SANDERS AT THE OLD PRESIDIO TRADERS, 27 Tubac Rd. 520-398-9333. -DEMONSTRATION PAINTING WITH ARTIST BARBARA MEIKLE AND A SPECIAL SHOW FEATURING CYNTHIA DUFF & TERRANCE SLONAKER. At the Cobalt Gallery, 3 Camino Otero. 520-398-1200. -WOOF, WOOF - WE'RE BACK! THE SANTA CRUZ HUMANE SOCIETY WILL HAVE DOGGIES FOR VIEWING AND ADOPTION daily during the Tubac Festival of the Arts. Visit our booth on Otero Street from about 10-2. -PARK AT THE TUBAC PRESIDIO STATE HISTORIC PARK, 1 Burruel St. Ours is the best lot: it's paved and the closest lot to the Festival. You'll get a free pass to see the Presidio, too! FEBRURARY 9 - RICHARD CACHOR TAYLOR, AUTHOR OF BIRDS OF SOUTHEASTERN ARIZONA WILL BE SIGNING HIS BOOK at The Bird House, 4 Tubac Rd. FEBRUARY 9, 10 & 11 - LESLIE MILLER - BEGINNING OIL PAINTING: LOOSE, BOLD APPROACH. 3-Day workshop. 8 student limit. $45 per class, plus $25 materials. (865) 389-7664. lesliemiller@icloud.com. At El Presidito #4 Calle Iglesia. FEBRUARY 9, 2:30PM-8:30PM - KITCHENS OF NOGALES: LA ZONA GASTRONOMICA. This tour begins with a visit to the landmark symbol of Nogales - the statues known as Monument to Benito Juarez and the Mono Bichi, followed by a short craft beer orientation and tasting at Nogales Brewing Company. The tour fee includes transportation by rental van, guide, and a four course meal at a modern central Mexican cuisine dining venue, La Llorona. We'll also visit the new La Granja food truck plaza. Great opportunity for craft beer enthusiasts and those passionate for Latin American cooking. $60 BCA Member, $80-Non-member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ FEBRUARY 10, 9AM-2PM - TOUR PIMA COUNTY’S RANCHO SECO. Tour the historic Rancho Seco with Rangeland Manager Vanessa Prileson and a local rancher, to learn about life on a ranch and Pima County’s Open Space program. We will meet at the Cow Palace Restaurant in Amado and will carpool from there in county vehicles. Bring a lunch and water. Ages 12 and up. Meet at 28802 S. Nogales Hwy, Amado. $10 with Membership, NonMember $15 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www. pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 10, 6:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - RETRO ROCKETS at the De Anza RV Resort. E Frontage Rd between Tubac and Amado. 520-398-8628. FEBRUARY 10, 7:30-9:30PM - TCA'S PERFORMING ARTS SERIES - ELLIS & PLATT. Two of Seattle’s best come together for a one-time music event designed specifically for our Tubac audience! Acclaimed singer / songwriter Dave Ellis and Book-it Theatre’s renowned actor / director /composer Myra Platt perform some of the classic old-time songs you know so well & can sing along with, and some new songs by Ellis. Call TCA for tickets at 520.398.2371. Individual tickets: TCA Member $30, Nonmember $35. 9 Plaza Rd.

FEBRUARY 11, 9AM-1PM - TUMACÁCORI NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK IS OFFERING TOURS TO THE HISTORIC MISSION SITES OF GUEVAVI AND CALABAZAS. These fragile ruins, protected within the national park, are normally closed to the public and can be visited only as part of these special, reserved tours. The cost for the tour is $25 per person. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, visit the National Park Service reservation website, www.recreation.gov. The tours meet at the Tumacácori National Historical Park Visitor Center. For more information, call the Tumacácori visitor center at 520-377-5060 or visit our website at nps.gov/tuma.

cured meats. Wine will be tasted as part of the design and pairing options discussed. As the class falls on Valentine's Day, a French chocolate fondant will be made in class to celebrate the sensual side of food. Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. FEBRUARY 14, 21 & 28, 12NOON-1:30PM - ORNITHOLOGY 102 AT THE GREEN VALLEY RECREATION CENTER. Many of our local birds are only here in the summer to breed, and others are only here in the winter and away

FEBRUARY 11, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 11, 3PM-5PM - LET’S TALK NATURE! Pima County Naturalists give a short talk “Lost Mammals of the Tucson Mountains” followed by a Q and A session on any nature subject that crosses your mind. Please bring a lawn chair. All ages welcome. Tucson Mountain Park, Desert Discovery Center 7798 W. Gates Pass Road. Children free. Adults free with Membership, Non-Member Adult $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima. gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 12 - ARTIST DEMONSTRATION WITH TUCSON WATERCOLOR ARTIST OWEN ROSE. Please stop by Big Horn Galleries during the Tubac Festival Of The Arts and see Tucson artist Owen Rose demonstrating on Sunday, February 12th. Come by and meet this talented and personable artist at Big Horn Galleries, 37 Tubac Rd., Tubac (located at the end of Tubac Road, across from the Presidio). 520-398-9209. FEBRUARY 12-17 - FABULOUS TRIP TO ALAMO, SONORA SPONSORED BY THE TUBAC HISTORICAL SOCIETY. Join us for a five night trip to the splendid Spanish Colonial mining town of Alamos including three nights at the luxurious Hacienda de los Santos. $1,325 per person for standard double; $1,425 per person for deluxe double. Single supplements available. Contact John Cloninger at johnmarkcloninger@gmail.com or call 398-2020 for more information and a reservation form. FEBRUARY 13, 8AM-10AM - BIRDING SWEETWATER PRESERVE. Join expert birder Jeff Babson for a walk through Sweetwater Preserve, located in the eastern foothills of the Tucson Mountains, where we expect to see an abundance of desert birds such as gilded flicker, phainopepla, pyrrhuloxia, black-tailed gnatcatcher, and many more. All ages welcome. Pima County Sweetwater Preserve, 4000 N. Tortolita Road, south of El Camino Del Cerro. Free with Membership. Non-member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www. pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 13 & 14, 9AM-4PM - CHINESE SEWING BOX BOOK MAKING WITH SUSAN CORL. Come away with a multi-compartment “Amaze Your Friends!” book made with ancient traditions. Make as many unfolding compartments and origami accents as you want. Most materials included. A Lowe House Project workshop in Old Town Tubac. For more information, fees, suggestions of additional tools and registration, email susancorl@hotmail. com. FEBRUARY 14, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 14, 10AM-4PM - OPEN HOUSE AT THE SANTA CRUZ CHILE & SPICE COMPANY. Sample great Mexican food, mini margaritas and join in a tour of our work facility. 1868 E Frontage Rd, Tumacacori. 520-398-2591. FEBRUARY 14, 11AM - STATEHOOD CELEBRATION AT THE TUBAC PRESIDIO. Join us to celebrate the 105th anniversary of Arizona’s statehood at Arizona’s first state park! The Presidio cannon will be fired at 11am and we will join in a group birthday song. To honor the occasion we will have a special Arizona birthday cake and soft drinks will be served. Visitors are encouraged to bring a picnic lunch to enjoy on the park grounds. Included with regular Park admission: $5 adults, $2 youth (7-13), children FREE. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St., Tubac, AZ (520) 398–2252. FEBRUARY 14, 11AM-12NOON - MUSEUM TOUR: SPANISH TUBAC – A CURATOR’S LOOK AT THE PRESIDIO THAT TRANSFORMED THE SANTA CRUZ VALLEY. Join us for a guided tour where you’ll explore Spanish Tubac and take a closer look at several museum artifacts and discuss their impact on history. Allow 1 hour for the tour. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 12; reservations requested, 520-398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 14, 11AM-1:30PM - COOKING A-Z - CHARCUTERIE CHARETTE WITH LAURENCE LEGOUGE. $55. Presentation, Pairing and Creativity. At the Ecole des Beaux Arts in France, students were given a finite amount of time to design a project. Quite often, the finishing touches were made en route to the school on the back of a cart (charette.) This will be a fun, handson class focused on presentation, the blending of flavors, and choosing complimentary wines.   We will taste as we go, and explore charcuterie - the creation of character.  In this charette we will break into groups and design charcuterie boards from cheese, bread, veggies and cooked or

LIVE MUSIC 6:30 PM Jan 6th Jan13th Jan 20th Jan 27th

CROSSFIRE Chuck Wagon & Wheels Retro Rockets Midlife Crisis

DINNER SPECIALS Thursday

Broasted Chicken / Baby Back Ribs

Friday

Beer Battered Cod/ Pot Roast

Saturday

New York Steak/ Seafood Pasta

Reservations for parties of 8 or more. Dinner served 4:30 PM-7:30 PM Bar Menu Served 7:30 till 9:30 PM House Wines ............................. $4.00 Btld. Beer .................................. $3.00 Well Drinks ................................ $5.00 BREAKFAST Served Saturday & Sunday Try our Omelettes Starting French Toast at 7:30 AM Eggs Benedict 520-398-8628 www.deanzarvresort.com I-19 Arivaca Rd. (2 Miles S. Along E. Frontage Rd.)

XNLV308824

At Dos Silos, at the Tubac Golf Resort and Spa. Rick Gehweiler, certified Instructor for Warren Hardy Spanish, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. www. warrenhardy.com. For more information contact rickgehweiler@gmail. com.


36 from their nesting grounds. What cues do birds use to recognize the seasons and navigate during migration? Parental care of eggs and hatchlings varies from none to extensive, and can involve just female parents, just males, both or neither. How did all this diversity in social and parental behavior evolve? Ornithology 102 will cover: bird orientation and navigation, breeding biology and mating systems, and the many connections between the study of bird and human biology. Taught by Carol Vleck. Cost - $125 for the threeclass series. For more information visit tucsonaudubon.org/what-we-do/ education/lifelongbirdng.html FEBRUARY 15, 11AM-1PM - GUIDED TOUR OF THE BARRIO DE TUBAC ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE. Special tour by Phil Halpenny and Gwen Griffin of the Spanish colonial archaeological site just south of the Park which preserves the remains of the original Tubac town site, including residence foundations, plaza area, refuse area and partial irrigation ditch. Meet at the Park’s Visitor Center. Tour involves a walk of about 1-1/4 miles. The Archaeological Conservancy protects this site and participants are asked to sign 'An Acknowledgement of Risk Factors' before entering. Wear walking shoes, sunscreen and hat. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 15; reservations encouraged, 520-398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 16, 11AM-2PM - FRONTIER PRINTING PRESS DEMONSTRATIONS. A knowledgeable volunteer demonstrates the Washington Hand Press used to print Arizona’s first newspaper in 1859 and answers questions about hand press printing, type setting, and other aspects of this marvel of industrial engineering. You will get to set type and print small samples to take with you. Included with park admission: $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. FEBRUARY 16, 1PM-3:30PM - COOKING A-Z - ENGLISH TEA WITH ELAINE LEIGH. $40. Join us for a classic Tea Party. We will make Elaine's wonderful menu of homemade Scottish scones with cream and jam, assorted finger sandwiches, parmesan cheese straws and chocolate dipped strawberries. We will learn the proper way to brew and serve traditional English and herbal teas. Please bring your favorite bone china cup and saucer, if you don't have one we will make sure you have one for the tea party. Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. FEBRUARY 16, 5PM-7PM - ARTS SPEAK: “INSULTS RAIN DOWN ON ME LIKE HAIL,” THE REBELLIOUS ART OF EDOUARD MANET. Now regarded as one of the arts masters, Manet’s art provoked scandal, laughter and puzzlement when it first appeared. Bill Boslego will discuss why the public was so hostile towards Manet’s work. Bill Boslego has been a docent at the Tucson Museum of Art since 2014 when he and his wife moved to Green Valley from Virginia. In addition to his volunteer work with the Museum, he is also a volunteer guide at the San Xavier Mission. Join the conversation! Reserve your seat. Call TCA at 520.398.2371. TCA members, Free. Guests and nonmembers, $8. FEBRUARY 16 & 18, 5:30PM-8:30PM - RAPTORS SPECIALTY WORKSHOP AT THE TUCSON AUDUBON NATURE SHOP. A favorite among birdwatchers, raptors impress us with their size and speed. Though there are not many species of raptors, identification challenges arise from variations in their plumages due to age, sub-species or color morphs. In this workshop, you will learn to recognize species apart from their plumages and learn behaviors that aid in their identification. The importance of a raptor’s wing shape and its influence on flight and behavior and other physiological features will be presented. This workshop covers 28 species of raptors that can be found in the southwest. Taught by Homer Hansen. Cost: $145 non-member, $110 member. For more information visit tucsonaudubon.org/what-we-do/education/ lifelongbirdng.html

Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

FEBRUARY 17, 10AM-2PM - BOOK SALE by FANS (Friends of the Library) at the Tubac Community Center. 50 Bridge Rd. 520-398-1800. FEBRUARY 17, TOUR 5PM-6PM, STAR GAZING TILL 8PM - A NIGHT UNDER THE STARS. Sonora Astronomical Society volunteers set up telescopes for celestial viewing and provide an introduction to the night sky. Come before dark to take a self-guided tour of the Canoa Ranch Headquarters. Bring your flashlight and lawn chair. Weather permitting. All ages welcome. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Free. Registration not required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520724-5220. FEBRUARY 17, 6:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - MIDLIFE CRISIS at the De Anza RV Resort. E Frontage Rd between Tubac and Amado. 520-398-8628. FEBRUARY 17, 7:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - THE DANNY GREEN TRIO. Ages 18 & up = $12 advance / $17 day of show (reduced rates for youth) Multiple award-winning jazz pianist from San Diego backed by bass and percussion combine elements of jazz, Brazilian, and classical music create gorgeous, engaging music. Sea of Glass Center for the Arts, 330 E. 7th Street, Tucson, AZ. For info & directions – http://theseaofglass.org or (520) 398-2542. FEBRUARY 18, 7AM-1PM - COME AND MEET YOUR BIRDS AT SWEETWATER WETLANDS WHERE 303 BIRD SPECIES HAVE BEEN SEEN! This is a FREE event, presented by Tucson Audubon and Tucson Water. We’ll make it easy for you! Stroll 20 acres of tree-lined paths and ponds with experts pointing out the birds for you. Come learn what Tucson Audubon can do for you and the birds! No binoculars needed to participate! Guided walks from 8--11 AM. Kids and family birding activities. Live birds and reptiles. Food trucks. Fun partner vendors. For more information visit tucsonaudubon.org/TucsonMeetYourBirds. Sweetwater Wetlands Park 2511 W Sweetwater Dr, Tucson. FEBRUARY 18, 8AM-11AM - SONORAN DESERT WEEDWACKERS. Join the Sonoran Desert Weedwackers to eradicate buffelgrass and fountain grass in Tucson Mountain Park. Work requires hiking and pulling buffelgrass on steep slopes. Meeting locations change frequently. Email eeducation@pima.gov for meeting location. Ages 18 and up. Pima County Tucson Mountain Park Cost: Free. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 18, 9AM-3PM - COLOR THEORY. Artist & educator, Myrna York will instruct this one day exercise with watercolor or acrylic to demonstrate the importance of color theory in painting. Workshop Fee: $105/TCA Members, $125/Nonmembers. 5 student minimum, Call TCA at 520-3982371 to register. Understand hue, chroma, value, saturation, intensity, temperature and the importance of color theory in painting. One day exercise with watercolor or acrylic. FEBRUARY 18, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 18, 10AM-12NOON - HELL BENT FOR RESURRECTION: A HIKE THROUGH TUBAC’S MANY LAYERS. Join us for a new program of History Hikes to take advantage of the great outdoors and our amazingly rich cultural heritage. Join our docent for an insightful walk on the Anza Trail starting at the original Plaza de Armas from which the expedition to Alta California departed. The hike will follow along a short portion of the Rio de Tubac (as it then was!) while discussing the native peoples and later arrivals who lived in the area. Wear sturdy walking shoes, sunscreen, and bring water. $10 fee includes all day admission to the Park. The 1 and 1/4 mile hike begins from the Tubac Presidio visitors center at 10 am, rain or shine. Hike limited to 15 people. Call (520) 398-2252 to reserve your place today. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St.

FEBRUARY 18, 10AM-2PM - DESERT DISCOVERY DAY. Explore the diversity of the beautiful Sonoran Desert with a variety of family-friendly, hands-on activities. Travel through time on a geology hike; discover blooms, butterflies, and birds on a guided nature walk; taste food from the desert; meet native wildlife. All ages welcome. Tucson Mountain Park, Desert Discovery Center, 7798 W. Gates Pass Road. Free. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 18, 10AM-3PM - CRUISE, BBQ & BLUES FESTIVAL & CAR SHOW. Blending science, mechanics and design is an innovative art form in its own right. Car design is a ubiquitous but often overlooked art form which SAACA brings to light through our annual Classic Car Show. The event invites thousands of people out to rev up the weekend with live oldies music, kids’ activities and great food. With 20 different classes of auto awards given in Best of Show, Best Interior, Best Paint, Best Engine and People’s Choice, as well as a first place award given in each vehicle category. $5 admission, 10 and under Free. $1 discount for all Veterans and Active Duty Military with your Military ID. No pre-purchase tickets are available. Cash Only. Tickets available at the door. The one day event will feature live Blues music on the main stage, classic BBQ on the grill, and an endless supply of everything we have come to love about fast cars and classic auto! 12155 N Oracle Rd, Oro Valley. FEBRUARY 18 & 19, 11AM-5PM - THE YOGA OF GANESH - AWAY, AROUND AND THROUGH WITH TANYA WITMAN. Expolre ways to work with your own obstacles, from the physical to the spiritual, the mundane and the cosmic, the everyday to the eternal. Call 520-275-2689 for futher inquires. At the Tubac Healing Arts Center, 6 Camino Otero. FEBRUARY 18, 1PM - MUSIC ON THE FARM! Music starts at 1PM. 5 rockand-roll/blues style bands. Western cantina sales benefit Boys & Girls Club of Santa Cruz County. Good food, optional camping. $15 advance tickets; $20 at the gate. Details and tickets: AguaLindaFarm.com. FEBRUARY 19, 1PM-3:30PM - COOKING A-Z - DIM SUM WITH JERI HOYLE. $50. Literally meaning "to touch your heart," Dim Sum consists of a variety of dumplings, steamed dishes and other goodies. They are similar to hors d'oeuvres, and often enjoyed on a Sunday afternoon. We'll discuss the history and etiquette of dim sum as we focus on the technique of making some classic dim sum favorites, wonton, egg rolls, spring rolls and lettuce wraps. Traditional green tea will be served with our tastings. Join us in celebrating the Chinese New Year, the year of the Rooster. Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. FEBRUARY 19, 2PM - TEODORO ‘TED’ RAMIREZ ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE CONCERT SERIES: THE REMUDA TRIANGLE WITH SUE HARRIS. "Remuda" is the Spanish word describing the herd of horses vaquerros use to pick their daily riding mounts. This herd includes Stewart MacDougall, Ed Brown, and Sue Harris. Sue is the latest member of the New Christy Minstrels. The group’s poems are laced with raw humor, irony, and commentary on the state of just about everything, blended seamlessly with songs that range from poignant reflections on days gone by to uplifting celebrations of modern cowboy life. Tickets $20 adults, free for children 14 and younger. Seating is limited, please call now for reservations, 520-398-2252. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 20 - TUMACÁCORI NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ENTRANCE-FEE-FREE DAY. FEBRUARY 21, 8:15AM-5:30PM - "COWBOYS TO VAQUEROS" TOUR. This tour includes a visit to the amazing Sante Fe Ranch on the US side, followed by an incredibly scenic 60 km van ride over rough roads on the Mexican side. Travel by rental van in MX. Great trip for outdoor enthusiast, but not for the faint-of-heart. $75 BCA Member, $95 Non Member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/

FEBRUARY 25TH, 8 A.M. TO 3 P.M.

Estate wide Garage Sale

PALO PARADO ESTATES

is having a multi-family one-day garage sale. West side of Tubac, AZ between exits 34 and 40.

Find furniture, tools, art, household items, hardware and much more. Follow the garage sale arrows.


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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

FEBRUARY 21, 9AM-11:30AM - HIKE BROWN MOUNTAIN TRAIL. Enjoy the scenic and rugged beauty of the Tucson Mountains on this 2-mile guided hike with a Pima County naturalist. Ages 12 and up. Tucson Mountain Park, Brown Mountain Trailhead 8451 W. McCain Loop Road. Free with Membership, Non-Member $5 fee. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. FEBRUARY 21, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 21, 3PM-5:30PM - COOKING A-Z - BEAUTIFUL BALI WITH MARION HOOK. $50. My first visit to Bali and Indonesia was in 1982, and I fell hopelessly, permanently in love with the fabulous food there. Fresh and healthy, it defied description as it was created with spices I’d never tasted before. Fall in love yourself when you create and enjoy feasting on Indonesian “comfort food.” - Marion Hook. This class will focus on a few Easy to Make dishes that take the mystery out of the sometimes complicated cuisine. Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. FEBRUARY 22, 9AM-10:30AM - HERITAGE AREA STRUCTURES REHABILITATION TOUR. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more contact: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-7245220. FEBRUARY 22, 2PM - TALK: WASHINGTON'S MEDICINE: BLOOD AND GUTS IN THE 18TH CENTURY. Join us on Washington’s birthday for a sometimes humorous and interactive look at the crude and frequently innovative medical treatments of 18th century medicine. Dr. Abraham Byrd, a Tucson family physician and Surgeon General for the Sons of the American Revolution, will discuss medical practice on the frontiers of New Spain and in the eastern colonies. Dr. Byrd will look at the early days of health care when the cure could be as bad as the disease. Call (520) 398-2252 now to make your reservation. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Park. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 23, 9AM-5:30PM - CROSS BORDER TOUR - NOGALES. Educational and inspirational, these tours provide an orientation to the rising economic and civil sector of Nogales, MX led by Mexican & US guides & a member of the US Consulate staff. Lunch & snack included. Transportation in Mexico is by van; only minimal walking is required. $60 BCA Member, $80 Non Member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ FEBRUARY 23, 11AM-1:30PM - COOKING A-Z - SOUP AND SALAD BASICS WITH JERI HOYLE. $50. This is a much requested class for anyone interested in learning the basics skills of how to use a knife properly, how to saute and cook vegetables to a consistent doneness, and season a dish to taste. Each student will work at their own station as Jeri teaches you the knife skills that make preparation easy and enjoyable. As you chop and slice, you will be creating the ingredients for a fresh Minestrone Soup. You will also learn how to prepare a fresh salad that looks great, is healthy and delicious. Learn tips, tricks and techniques to making simple and good food. Class size is limited to eight students to ensure individual attention. We will enjoy the food from class at a sit down lunch. Wine will accompany the meal. Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520-398-9497. FEBRUARY 23, 11AM-2PM - FRONTIER PRINTING PRESS DEMONSTRATIONS. A knowledgeable volunteer demonstrates the Washington Hand Press used to print Arizona’s first newspaper in 1859 and answers questions about hand press printing, type setting, and other aspects of this marvel of industrial engineering. You will get to set type and print small samples to take with you. Included with park admission: $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. FEBRUARY 24, 10AM-1PM - LIVING HISTORY: SPINNING. Spinning is one of the oldest surviving crafts in the world. The tradition of weaving traces back to Neolithic times – approximately 12,000 years ago. Watch and learn how fiber and spinning impacted human activity from ancient to modern times. A knowledgeable volunteer will demonstrate how the spinning wheel produces thread from fiber, and you are welcome to experience spinning with a drop spindle. Included with park admission, $5 adult, $2 youth 7-13, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. FEBRUARY 24, 11AM-1PM - GUIDED TOUR OF THE BARRIO DE TUBAC ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE. Special tour by Phil Halpenny and Gwen Griffin of the Spanish colonial archaeological site just south of the Park which preserves the remains of the original Tubac town site, including residence foundations, plaza area, refuse area and partial irrigation ditch. Meet at the Park’s Visitor Center. Tour involves a walk of about 1-1/4 miles. The Archaeological Conservancy protects this site and participants are asked to sign 'An Acknowledgement of Risk Factors' before entering. Wear walking shoes, sunscreen and hat. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 15; reservations encouraged, 520-398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St.

FEBRUARY 24, 2:30PM-8:30PM - KITCHENS OF NOGALES: LA ZONA GASTRONOMICA. This tour begins with a visit to the landmark symbol of Nogales - the statues known as Monument to Benito Juarez and the Mono Bichi, followed by a short craft beer orientation and tasting at Nogales Brewing Company. The tour fee includes transportation by rental van, guide, and a four course meal at a modern central Mexican cuisine dining venue, La Llorona. We'll also visit the new La Granja food truck plaza. Great opportunity for craft beer enthusiasts and those passionate for Latin American cooking. $60 BCA Member, $80-Non-member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ FEBRUARY 25, 8AM-3PM - PALO PARADO ESTATES - ESTATE WIDE GARAGE SALE. Palo Parado Estates is having a multi-family one-day garage sale. West side of Tubac, AZ between exits 34 and 40. Find furniture, tools, art, household items, hardware and much more. Follow the garage sale arrows.

FEBRUARY 25, 6:30PM-8:30PM - A NIGHT UNDER THE STARS. Explore the wonder and unfold the mysteries of the night sky. Tucson Amateur Astronomy Association volunteers provide an introduction to the night sky and set up telescopes for celestial viewing. Feel free to bring your lawn chair. All ages welcome. Weather permitting. Tucson Mountain Park, Ironwood Picnic Area, 1500 S. Kinney Road at Hal Gras Road. Free. Registration not required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-615-7855. DEADLINE TO ENTER FEBRUARY 26 - 18TH ANNUAL ARIZONA YOUNG ARTISTS’ COMPETITION, a scholarship competition that showcases the talents of artists (ages 15-19). Applicants may enter in the disciplines of Acting, Dance and Voice for a chance to compete in The Finals at the Herberger Theater on Saturday, March 11, 2017, 7pm in front of a live audience. The winner of each discipline will receive a $1,000 scholarship to help further

FEBRUARY 25, 9AM-1PM - TUMACÁCORI NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK IS OFFERING TOURS TO THE HISTORIC MISSION SITES OF GUEVAVI AND CALABAZAS. These fragile ruins, protected within the national park, are normally closed to the public and can be visited only as part of these special, reserved tours. The cost for the tour is $25 per person. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, visit the National Park Service reservation website, www.recreation.gov. The tours meet at the Tumacácori National Historical Park Visitor Center. For more information, call the Tumacácori visitor center at 520-377-5060 or visit our website at nps.gov/tuma. FEBRUARY 25, 9:30AM TEE TIME - SANTA CRUZ HUMANE SOCIETY'S 8TH ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT AT THE KINO SPRINGS GOLF CLUB, NOGALES. $90 Entry includes fees/cart/lunch. Prizes! For more information email tubacsue@aol.com. FEBRUARY 25, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. FEBRUARY 25, 10AM-12NOON - WALKING TOURS OF OLD TUBAC. Come explore colorful Old Tubac that even some of the locals don’t know about! Guided by Connie Stevens, you’ll discover fascinating facts about the town’s early adobe buildings and learn about Arizona’s first European settlement. Topics from early Native American inhabitants, Spanish explorers, American pioneers, Apache attacks, kidnappings, and other exciting episodes are discussed. Meet at the Park’s Visitor Center. Allow 2 hours for the tour and wear walking shoes, sunscreen and a hat. $10 fee includes all day admission to tour the Presidio Park. Tour limited to 20; reservations requested, 520398-2252 or info@TubacPresidio.org. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 25, 10AM-1PM - LIVING HISTORY: CHOCOLATE! 1000 YEARS AND COUNTING. Come discover the rich history of chocolate in the Southwest. Taste a cacao bean, learn how the Mayans and pre-Columbian Native Americans prepared their chocolate, and sample the energy drink that fueled the 1774 and 1775 Anza expeditions from Tubac to Alta California. Included with park admission, $5 adult, $2 youth, children free. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. (520) 398–2252. FEBRUARY 25, 2PM - THE ARCHEOLOGY OF ARIZONA - SPECIAL PRESENTATION BY JACK LASSETER. Have you ever wondered why there seems to be so many more archeological sites here in the Southwest than in other parts of the country? It’s the dry climate. Wherever you travel in Arizona you see archeological sites. This talk tells us about the six major pre-historic peoples in Arizona: the Ancient Puebloan People (Anasazi), the Mogollon, the Hohokam, the Sinagua, the Salado and the Patayan. Jack will also discuss the earlier Paleo-Indians, the archeological techniques used by the professionals, and some details about the archeologists who have made this field so famous in Arizona.  A great addition to our Arizona knowledge, this field of study makes us well aware that we are not the only people to have lived here. Wine and hors d'oeuvres will be served.  $15 per lecture. A portion of the proceeds supports our education and preservation programs. Please call for reservations and future dates, 520-398-2252. Tubac Presidio State Historic Park, 1 Burruel St. FEBRUARY 25, 3PM-5PM - BIRDING SWEETWATER WETLANDS. Explore this urban birding hotspot with a naturalist to look for wetland and desert birds as well as other wildlife. All ages welcome. Sweetwater Wetlands, 2667 W. Sweetwater Drive. Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, eeducation@pima.gov or 520-6157855. FEBRUARY 25 - ARTIST DEMONSTRATION AND OPEN HOUSE. Please join us for an open house and artist demonstration by FEATURED ARTIST PHIL STARKE on Saturday, February 25th. Phil is a well-known and respected artist and paints scenes from the west and southwest. Phil’s work will be featured from February 20th – March 6th and can be seen at Big Horn Galleries, 37 Tubac Rd., Tubac (located at the end of Tubac Road, across from the Presidio). 520-398-9209.

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Tumacácori Begins Conservation Project Inside Historic Mission Church

Tumacácori National Historical Park is launching a five-year project to conserve original plasters and painted finishes inside the San José de Tumacácori Mission church. The work will be carried out through a Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit (CESU), a national consortium of federal agencies, academic institutions, nonprofit groups, and other agencies who work together to accomplish preservation and conservation projects.

In order to conserve the fragile interior finishes, Tumacácori is partnering with the Architectural Conservation Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania, specialists in research on and field treatment of earthen architecture. The University of Pennsylvania team has previously worked on Franciscan Missions in Texas and California, and Dominican missions in Puerto Rico. Their first project at Tumacácori, in 2014, involved conservation of the church façade. The current project builds on a detailed photographic survey of the church’s interior finishes completed by students from the University of Arizona between 2014 and 2016. Beginning this year with the east side of the nave, conservators from Tumacácori NHP and the University of Pennsylvania will work their way toward the domed sanctuary. During their recent, initial visit, the team tested a new method to strengthen the lime plaster which coats the adobe walls. Future visits will explore improved methods of reinforcing the attachment of the lime coating to the mud brick of the walls. Through this project, Tumacácori and the University of Pennsylvania see huge potential in engaging related professionals in both the U.S. and Mexico, and in training conservation students in the delicate work of heritage conservation. Tumacácori is seeking additional funding to host conservators and students from both the U.S. and Mexico to foster collaboration and education. For more information or comments, contact Alex Lim, Architectural Conservator, at 520-377-5091, or alex_lim@nps.gov.


Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

their education in the arts. The early registration fee for each discipline is $25 through February 12 and $35 through February 26. Applicants will be contacted the week of February 27 to audition on Monday, March 6 (Dance), Tuesday, March 7 (Voice), Wednesday, March 8 (Acting). The registration form is available at www. azyoungartistscompetition.org. For information, contact Mary Robinson at 602254-7399, Ext. 104. Tickets to attend The Finals are $10 general admission and $5 for students (with id). The audience votes for their favorite competitors in the “People’s Choice Awards.” Each winner receives $100. Park for $6 at the Arizona Center. Purchase validation online with tickets or at the Herberger Theater Box Office before the Finals event. For information, visit http:// www.herbergertheater.org/calendar/ arizona-young-artists-competition/. FEBRUARY 28, 10AM-11:30 & 12-1:30PM - TOUR OF HACIENDA DE LA CANOA. Historic Hacienda de la Canoa, 5375 S. I-19 Frontage Road, Green Valley. Cost: Free. Online registration required. For more information: www.pima.gov/nrpr, CanoaRanch@pima.gov or 520-724-5220. MARCH 1, 8:30AM-6PM - MAGDALENA THEN AND NOW TOUR. Located just 60 miles south of Nogales, Magdalena has been designated a "Magical Pueblo" because of its historic and colonial charm. This tour includes both a look back to the past and a glance at the contemporary challenges of a small Mexican city. $75 BCA Member, $95 Non Member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ MARCH 2-8 - BIRDING AND CULTURE IN SOUTHERN SONORA - ASH WEDNESDAY WITH THE MAYO. This extraordinary trip takes you via comfortable motor coach to experience the Ash Wednesday ceremonies of the Mayo and Yaqui Indians in Mexico. You will visit the historic Mayo village of Júpare near Navajoa, and stay at the beautiful Hacienda del Santos in the historic town of Alamos. You will experience fabulous birding in lush tropical forests, ancient rituals, gourmet adventures, musical performances, and a special visit to the only active cultivated pearl oyster farm in the Western Hemisphere. Reserve your spot today with a $200 deposit, with the remainder due January 31st. The all-inclusive cost is $2,150 for Tucson Audubon members; $2,200 for non-members; single supplement is $500. Sign up online today at: www.tucsonaudubon.org/alamos MARCH 3 THROUGH 31 - THE SANTA RITA ART LEAGUE OF GVR PRESENTS THE 9TH ANNUAL MEMBERS JURIED ART COMPETITION AT THE CANOA HILLS SOCIAL CENTER (3660 S. Camino Del Sol, Green Valley. In addition to 1st Place--$300; 2nd Place--$200; 3rd Place--$100; four Honorable Mentions--$50, and the People's Choice--$100; there will be a new prize for "Best of Show" --$300. The WINNERS for each category will be ANNOUNCED on Saturday, MARCH 4, AT 6:00 PM. Mark your calendar and be there. The OPENING RECEPTION begins at 4:30 PM. MARCH 3, 3PM-6PM - COOKING A-Z - FRIDA’S MOLE WITH LAURA DUNCAN. $60. Mole is perhaps the most unique dish in Mexico, Made with chocolate, nuts, chilis, sweet spices and dried fruit ground to a smooth sauce, mole has a very complex flavor unlike any other sauce anywhere. Our recipe comes from the kitchen of the famous Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. It is a relatively mild dish that can easily be made spicy if desired. Laura will guide us through the traditional methods of cooking and rehydrating dried spices to maximize flavor, as well as the modern use of a blender to make the process quick and easy. Locally grown pinto beans will be made Charro Style. A cilantro lime rice, a fresh green salad and the ultimate Mexican dessert - Flan - will make this an experience you won’t forget. Wine and Beer will accompany the meal.Tumacookery. www.cookinga-z.com. 520398-9497. MARCH 4, 2PM-4PM - RONDSTAT GENERATION, A return of a favorite group who bring a mix of their Mexican and Southwest heritage with new instrumentalists. UU Church at the Amado Territory, I-19, to Exit 48. East to Territory Lane. MARCH 4, 7:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - DEGRAZIA SPANISH GUITAR BAND. Ages 18 & up = $13 advance / $18 day of show (reduced rates for youth) Domingo DeGrazia, son of the famed artist Ted DeGrazia, performs his artistry in music. Sea of Glass Center for the Arts, 330 E. 7th Street, Tucson, AZ. For info & directions – http://theseaofglass.org or (520) 398-2542. MARCH 4, 2:30PM-8:30PM - KITCHENS OF NOGALES: LA ZONA GASTRONOMICA. This tour begins with a visit to the landmark symbol of Nogales - the statues known as Monument to Benito Juarez and the Mono Bichi, followed by a short craft beer orientation and tasting at Nogales Brewing Company. The tour fee includes transportation by rental van, guide, and a four course meal at a modern central Mexican cuisine dining venue, La Llorona. We'll also visit the new La Granja food truck plaza. Great opportunity for craft beer enthusiasts and those passionate for Latin American cooking. $60 BCA Member, $80-Non-member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/

MARCH 9, 9AM-5:30PM - CROSS BORDER TOUR - NOGALES. Educational and inspirational, these tours provide an orientation to the rising economic and civil sector of Nogales, MX led by Mexican & US guides & a member of the US Consulate staff. Lunch & snack included. Transportation in Mexico is by van; only minimal walking is required. $60 BCA Member, $80 Non Member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ MARCH 11, 9AM-1PM TUMACÁCORI NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK IS OFFERING TOURS TO THE HISTORIC MISSION SITES OF GUEVAVI AND CALABAZAS. These fragile ruins, protected within the national park, are normally closed to the public and can be visited only as part of these special, reserved tours. The cost for the tour is $25 per person. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, visit the National Park Service reservation website, www.recreation.gov. The tours meet at the Tumacácori National Historical Park Visitor Center. For more information, call the Tumacácori visitor center at 520-377-5060 or visit our website at nps. gov/tuma. MARCH 11, 7:30PM - LIVE MUSIC - GLENN WHITE QUINTET. Ages 18 & up = $15 advance / $20 day of show (reduced rates for youth) NYC Jazz saxophonist Glenn White has performed alongside Norah Jones, Paul Banks (Interpol), Greg Camp (Smash Mouth), Michael Eisenstein (Melissa Etheridge), Sunnyside Records artist Jamie Baum, Impulse! artist Greg Tardy, ECM Records artist Art Lande, and the Four Tops (opening for Chuck Berry) and many other notable musicians. Sea of Glass Center for the Arts, 330 E. 7th Street, Tucson, AZ. For info & directions – http://theseaofglass.org or (520) 398-2542. MARCH 16, 9AM-5:30PM - CROSS BORDER TOUR - NOGALES. Educational and inspirational, these tours provide an orientation to the rising economic and civil sector of Nogales, MX led by Mexican & US guides & a member of the US Consulate staff. Lunch & snack included. Transportation in Mexico is by van; only minimal walking is required. $60 BCA Member, $80 Non Member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ MARCH 17, 18 & 19 - SANTA CRUZ VALLEY ARTISTS OPEN STUDIO TOUR. For more information visit The Tubac Center of the Arts at TubacArts.org. MARCH 18, 2:30PM-8:30PM - KITCHENS OF NOGALES: LA ZONA GASTRONOMICA. This tour begins with a visit to the landmark symbol of Nogales - the statues known as Monument to Benito Juarez and the Mono Bichi, followed by a short craft beer orientation and tasting at Nogales Brewing Company. The tour fee includes transportation by rental van, guide, and a four course meal at a modern central Mexican cuisine dining venue, La Llorona. We'll also visit the new La Granja food truck plaza. Great opportunity for craft beer enthusiasts and those passionate for Latin American cooking. $60 BCA Member, $80-Non-member. For more info visit bordercommunityalliance.org/ MARCH 25, 9AM-1PM - TUMACÁCORI NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK IS OFFERING TOURS TO THE HISTORIC MISSION SITES OF GUEVAVI AND CALABAZAS. These fragile ruins, protected within the national park, are normally closed to the public and can be visited only as part of these special, reserved tours. The cost for the tour is $25 per person. Reservations are required. To make a reservation, visit the National Park Service reservation website, www.recreation.gov. The tours meet at the Tumacácori National Historical Park Visitor Center. For more information, call the Tumacácori visitor center at 520-377-5060 or visit our website at nps.gov/tuma.

Calendar listings are welcome from advertisers , government agencies

and non-profit, public events. Please format: Date, Time, Event, Details, Contact Info Repeat contact info on repeat entries and renew event listing each month. Send to editor@tubacvillager.com or mail to PO Box 4018, Tubac, AZ 85646

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THE A R T OF HEALTH By Jennifer Bek, R.N., CHHC

REVERSING ALZHEIMERS The words “reversing” and “Alzheimer’s” are seldom used in the same sentence. The statistics are staggering. Over 45,000 Americans currently living are predicted to develop the disease for which we have no cure.

The research on Alzheimer’s has focused on removing beta-amyloid, the sticky protein that is present on the brain of those with the disease. Amyloid kills the neurons, causing the dementia associated with Alzheimer’s. To date there has been no success with experimental drugs to remove or stop the amyloid from forming on the brain. Slowing the progression of the dementia has been the only positive outcome. Neurologist Dr. David Perlmutter, author of Grain Brain and Brain Maker, believes that in order to have a healthy brain, you need to have a healthy gut. This means we need to keep our microbiome (gut bacteria) healthy and we do that by the food we eat. He explains that diet has the dominant role in maintaining a healthy gut microbiome and that changing the balance of gut bacteria through a poor diet may actually cause disease.

Research now shows that the brain runs on fat, not sugar as we thought for years. In fact, sugar is actually damaging to the brain. Alzheimer’s, an inflammatory disease, is now being referred to as Type 3 Diabetes. Dr. Perlmutter reports the brain burns fat more efficiently than it does sugar, creating fewer free radicals (dangerous exhaust.) And the cause of the inflammation comes from our gut. He says that is was humbling for him, a neurologist who treated the brain for many years, to find out that he needed to be concerned about gut issues. Dr. Mark Hyman, Director of the Functional Medicine program at Cleveland Clinic, also talks about preventing and even reversing dementia by controlling your insulin and balancing your blood sugar levels in an effort to prevent diabetes and diabesity (pre-diabetes.) According to Hyman, people with diabetes are four times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s. Some of his suggestions to enhance the brain-gut relationship and reverse memory loss are: 1.

Balance your blood sugar by eliminating the bad stuff (refined carbs, sugar, processed foods, dairy and vegetable oils like safflower, canola & soy.)

Exercise daily – even a 30-minute walk will help.

2. 3.

Eat healthy fats like wild-caught salmon, extra-virgin unrefined coconut oil, extra-virgin olive oil, avocados, whole eggs, nuts & seeds, grass-fed meats and pastured chicken.

4. Take a multi-vitamin and mineral supplement plus an omega 3 fat supplement, extra B6, B12, folate, vitamin D3 and a good probiotic. 5. Control your stress levels by learning to relax through deep breathing, meditation or yoga – whatever will help you to calm down.

6.

Get 8 hours of sleep every night.

Dr. Dale Bredesen, a neuroscientist and neurologist who is CEO of The Buck Institute on Aging, has spent most of his career studying Alzheimer’s. He is preparing to release a book and a documentary on reversing dementia in May of this year. I will be standing in line to get a copy of both.

SUPER FOOD OF THE MONTH: BLUEBERRIES

Blueberries make every health expert’s “super foods” list. Buy organic when available and eat them often!

• Blueberries contain plant pigments that protect the brain and can help improve memory. • They have anti-inflammatory properties and contain antioxidants plus lots of vitamin C and E.

• Blueberries are the most nutrient dense berry and are believed to contain the highest antioxidant capacity of ALL commonly consumed fruits and vegetables. • attacks.

A few studies have shown blueberries lower the risk of heart

• Along with other berries, blueberries are considered to be among the world’s top cancer-fighting foods. HEALTHY HABIT OF THE MONTH: LEMON WATER IN A.M.

Drink a cup of warm lemon water every morning upon awakening. Squeeze 1/2 of a lemon into a cup of warm water. Add a pinch of cayenne pepper if you can, stir and enjoy! Some of the benefits are:

• Makes your body more alkaline. (Lemons are acidic but once fully metabolized the effect is alkalizing, raising pH of the body.

Flushes toxins from your body by stimulating your liver.

Can boost your immune system.

• •

Helps improve your digestion.

Lemons are a good source of potassium.

You can use Bragg’s apple cider vinegar (ACV) instead of lemon juice, if you don’t like lemons as it is similar to lemon juice. Both of them are “diuretics” that help to detox the body.

GROUND TURKEY LOAF

Ingredients: • • • • • • • • • • •

2 small onions, chopped 1/4 cup grated carrots 1/2 teaspoon each: rosemary, basil, thyme & marjoram (or 2 teaspoons Herbs de Provence) 1/2 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon garlic salt 2 ½ pounds ground turkey breast 1/2 cup quick-cooking oats 1 cup organic tomato sauce 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 2 eggs, beaten Organic catsup for top of loaf

Instructions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees Sauté onion, carrots and spices in small amount of olive oil. Mix remaining ingredients (except catsup) in a bowl and add onion mixture, combining well. Shape into a loaf and put on ungreased baking sheet, spreading catsup on top of the loaf. Bake 1½ hours until loaf is cooked through.

For the Turkey Loaf in the photo, the recipe was doubled. (Recipe compliments of Tubac resident, Dr. Fran Moore.)


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SUPER BLUEBERRY MUFFINS

SKILLET RATATOUILLE

Ingredients: • 1 small eggplant • 1 zucchini squash • 1 Mexican grey squash or yellow squash • 1 small onion, chopped • 1 small red pepper, chopped • 1 small yellow pepper, chopped • 1 clove garlic, minced • 1 can 28 oz. can organic crushed tomatoes • 2 teaspoons fresh basil, chopped or 1 teaspoon dried basil • Olive oil, basil, salt & pepper mixture for topping

Ingredients: • • • • • • • • • • •

2 cups almond flour 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 large organic eggs (or 3 medium) 1/4 cup melted butter (or coconut oil) 1/3 cup pure maple syrup 1 ½ teaspoons vanilla 1 ¼ cups blueberries Extra blueberries and sunflower seeds for top

Instructions: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Preheat oven to 350. Prepare a 12-cup muffin pan with baking cups. Wisk together dry ingredients, breaking up clumps of flour. Mix wet ingredients in separate bowl, then combine with dry. Fold in the blueberries. Divide batter between the 12 baking cups by using 2 spoons to fill each cup approximately 3/4th full. Place 3 blueberries and a few sunflower seeds on top. Bake 25-30 minutes or until the tops are brown.

(Adapted from a Thrive Market recipe.)

Directions: 1. Cut eggplant and squash into 1/4" rounds, cutting large end of eggplant in quarters if necessary. 2. Cook onions, peppers and garlic in small amount of olive oil for few minutes then add tomatoes and spices. 3. Put eggplant and squash in rows, alternating the slices. 4. Place rows in 10” skillet (cast iron preferred), circling them on top of tomato mixture. 5. Brush top of vegetables with the mixture olive oil and spice mixture. 6. Cover pan with foil and bake at 350 for 40 minutes. 7. Remove foil and return to oven for 10 more minutes. 8. When finished baking, sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. (Recipe compliments of Tubac/Seattle resident, Jo Lyn Baker.)

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A Tribute to Byrd By Maggie Milinovitch

B

yrd Baylor has received a tribute for her efforts to preserve the Sonoran Desert with a beautiful poster titled, “Desert Dwellers Know – Byrd’s Words.” Inspired by ancient Hohokam spiral petroglyphs on Tumamoc Hill, the poster's design was created by Arizona artist, Paul Mirocha and sponsored by Pima County Department of Environmental Quality in partnerships with Tucson Audubon Society, Tucson Water, Tucson Association of Realtors Green Forum, UofA College of Science & Bahti Indian Arts. The poster is available for sale and proceeds will go to support the non-profit education and conservation missions of Tucson Audubon Society (TAS) and the Desert Dwellers Education Project. For many years Byrd's writing has inspired others to have a deeper understanding and appreciation for the desert. She has also been an active advocate for conserving natural habitats. With over thirty published books, numerous published essays and articles Byrd is an internationally known author. Her ability to craft stories – both heartwarming and instructive – is masterful. The books are written in lyrical verse, each word carefully chosen to illuminate her unique observations. Her children’s books, loved by kids and adults alike are charmingly illustrated. Four books were awarded Caldecott Honors: “When Clay Sings,” “Hawk, I’m your Brother,” “The Way to Start a Day” and “The Desert is Theirs.” The stories she tells offer lessons on understanding the desert and celebrating the wonders it offers. Born in San Antonio, Texas Byrd’s family later moved to Tucson. She studied Creative Writing at the University of Arizona. After graduation she was a writer for the Tucson Citizen. She also contributed to Charles Bowden’s City Magazine. About thirty years ago Byrd bought remote acreage outside of Arivaca on a road best described

as an axle-breaker. But she loved the freedom to roam and the quiet surroundings. With the help of family and friends she built her solar-powered home of adobe and rock. Mesquite trees offered shade for her outdoor ‘office’ where she wrote her stories on an old manual typewriter (finding ribbons was a regular problem). It was perfect for her - living not just close to nature but as a part of it. She began each day rising with the sun then walking the hillsides. Most nights she slept under the stars in her outdoor bedroom. This gentle, generous soul always greeted visitors with a smile. Not only a naturalist, she is a true humanitarian. Byrd donated a portion of her 37 acres to the No More Deaths group that provides aid to viajeros lost or injured trying to cross the desert. Her doors were always open to travelers

whether she was at home or not. Some had set up an altar with a statute of Guadalupe on her fireplace mantle. There the next traveler often left tokens of gratitude to the saint and for the food and shelter. Her essays are full of humor. Many are about her experiences living a life of simplicity, which can be more complicated than one might image. Driving old pickup trucks down the rocky, rutted roads of the southwest can lead to interesting adventures. She writes with candor about her life, in which Byrd can even find the humor in being mistaken for a homeless person. Essay titles include, “The Rules of Denim,” “Confessions of a Desert Druid,” “Byrd’s Nest – A Mess.” Byrd’s essays were published in the Arivaca Connection so the paper was contacted numerous times by people across the country who wanted to tell Byrd how much her books have meant to them. One gentleman, a fan of her books from Maine, after reading about her troubles with her pickup, offered to buy her a new one. A young man who had read the Japanese translation of “Everybody Needs a Rock” traveled to the U.S. from Japan because wanted to see her desert and a coyote. A meeting was arranged. He bicycled down from Northern Arizona to Arivaca and they met at the coffee shop. They became instant friends. It was quite a tribute to the power of her words; her love stories to the desert and its inhabitants. Byrd is now 92 years old and currently living in Tucson with her grandson, Jesse. If all goes well she will attend Arivaca’s EcoFest on Saturday, January 28th. Perhaps she will read us one of her stories.

Byrd Baylor and poster artist, Paul Mirocha. Image courtesy of Pima County Department of Environmental Quality.


The “Desert Dwellers Know – Byrd’s Words” poster tribute to Byrd Baylor is part of a campaign to raise awareness about living ethically in the desert. Protecting wildlife and their habitats, conserving precious water resources, using land wisely and conserving energy are some of the campaign goals. The Tucson Audubon Society, Pima County Department of Environment Quality and other departments and organizations are sponsoring the project. The beautiful poster is available through the Tucson Audubon Society Nature Shop or online at tucsonaudubon.org/nature-shops

The posters will also be available at the Arivaca Eco-Fest. Jan 28th.


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overcome physical and mental resistance. The value of listening to your body and heart is more clear. Touch your toes. Bend from your hips and take your finger tips to the 10 digits at the end of your feet. Keep your legs engaged with lots of muscle energy, straighten your knees, tone your belly and extend your spine toward the floor. How hard is that? For many of us easier said than done. I think saying what you will do gives it a start. Then add some conviction and a plan. This year I want to create a plan. Not the plan that makes me rigid and inflexible, but a proposal to pick a yoga pose (asana) that continues to elude me and achieve it to my fullest capabilities. My teacher, Darren Rhodes, said he always ask himself what kind of person did he have to be to do a particular asana. That’s a brilliant start. How do I have to change to benefit more than just physically by doing a difficult pose? Yoga supports self-inquiry and self-revelation. By exploring asana there is a chance to manifest a better sense of myself, both in my physiology and in my heart and head. What does a better sense of myself do for me? It connects me to my actions and my words. It links me to the ancient tenants and philosophy of Yoga. The old texts are full of insightful directions urging me to be conscious and kind. How do I embody those teachings and use them as a way to create depth in my physical practice? What I learn can inhabit my form and help me find insight into the mystery of yoga. Alignment in my body creates the same in my mind and

from that I learn “right action.” So being mindful is paying attention to how muscles react and move. Then, I attempt the hard stuff. Most folks come to yoga to become more flexible so they can really touch their toes. There is the possibility it may never materialize. However, as they practice the active and physical asana something else begins to happen. Stressful situations are handled with an inner calm that is suddenly a new tool. Eating habits change. Emotionally charged moments dissipate with less pain and drama. There is an overwhelming move toward curiosity about the practice and interaction with its twists and turns. Better stamina appears as well as the ability to

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Being attentive to those changes are the sustenance for depth in the physical practice. The work is to hold onto the intuitive moments. I know I must be consistent to keep the steady and reflective mind active in asana practice. Unblocking energy I hold that tells me I cannot do something and bring it to a place of trust is much more difficult than any bendy yoga pose I can try. Here comes the insight. You only face yourself on the mat. Not being able to do that asana is likely. Being able to let go of old fears and ideas is totally possible. The enigmatic unfolding of yoga never ends for me. Stepping onto my mat and touching my toes is simply the first step. I have learned that I have great freedom to pursue the deep questions about my existence, my form, being in this place and why I might even want to try some outrageous yoga pose. Another favorite teacher, Judith Hanson Lasater, said, “Yoga is not just about touching your toes, it’s about what you learn on the way down.” It makes me believe that the challenging asana I want to accomplish is the path to wisdom. Who doesn’t want that? Kathy Edds, Yoga Instructor (ERYT500), Ayurvedic Lifestyle Coach, www.kathedds.com Kathy teaches yoga at The Tubac Healing Arts Center in Tubac. www.tubachealingarts.com

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Goober Guys Teach Values To Elementary Students By Byron Thompson, Tubac Rotary president One of the things I have always loved about Rotary is our work with kids of all ages. Kids are our future and when the school year starts I get a little excited. Although my children are grown-ups now school time means I get to go back to second grade with my other family—The Goober Guys.

The Goober family consists of parents Gus and Gerty and their children GiGi, Gomer and Grady who all live in Gooberville, USA with their dog, Grover. They are bright and colorful coloring book characters who are faced with real life situations and learn how to deal with things using an element of the Rotary Four Way Test. For the past two year the Tubac Rotary Club has had the pleasure of bringing the Goober family into second grade classrooms in the Santa Cruz Valley Unified School District. The family helps us teach the kids values for life that Rotarians live by.

The Four Way Test is a tool used by Rotarians worldwide to help maintain high ethical standards in truth, fairness and compassionate actions, and integrity in both business and personal lives. The object of the Goober Guys is to teach these decision-making tools to children to help them become honest, fair decision makers that build good will and friendships that are beneficial to all concerned. Typically second graders can be a little ruckus at times but when it comes to learning they are bright, attentive (mostly), engaging and fun to be around. This school year Tubac Rotary members will teach a total of ten classes of second graders. It’s some of the most pleasurable kid time I get to spend each year.

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Each Goober Guys session includes reading followed by discussion and an activity associated with the lesson. Each week a different lesson is taught. The kids love the whole process and they are responsive, even at 7 years of age, and relate to the examples. This year students from our local Rotary Interact Club at Rio Rico High School (the youth version of Rotary for student ages 12 to 18) are helping with the teaching of the classes and the kids love it. I guess it’s more fun to do stuff with the young adults who are the age of their own brothers and sisters rather than a bunch of old people!

Although fun is a big part of the program our comical Goober family serves an even greater purpose. One teacher told us that the Goober Guys helped combat bullying in her school. Others tell us the students often correct each other when they aren’t following the “rules” of the Four Way Test. I love the Goober family because combining learning with fun always makes the learning easier and often more effective. When the power of strong ethical values is added the results can be amazing. The contribution

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They have a funny family name, for sure, but the Goober Guys are helping children develop great values. And yes, the hugs and smiles and thanks from the kids insures that we all want to return to the classroom each school year! Rotary Four Way Test

1. 2.

Is it the Truth?

Is it fair to all concerned?

3. Will it build goodwill & better friendships?

4.

Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

Photo: Rotary Interact Member Rafael Romero, a student at Rio Rico High School, worked with second graders during a recent Goober Guys session. The children loved him! Image courtesy of Tubac Rotary Club.

PAWZ WALKER/ WALKS - PLAYS - CUDDLES Retired Elementary DOGS&CATS

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This year, for the first time ever, our Goober family is actually going international. Our club member Bill de Jarnette introduced the Goober family to his former club in Hermisillo, Mexico and they loved our family. That club has plans to work with the Goober Guys in all of their schools this year. All of the lessons have already been translated into Spanish and the family has gone bilingual!!

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that Rotary makes to young people is almost immeasurable. As we look to the future we are talking about children who are going to become our leaders. The Goober Guys stories help teach kids an easy to understand a moral and ethical approach to the Rotary Four Way Test. This will help them in the future to make honest, fair decisions that build goodwill and friendships and are beneficial to all concerned. We are helping to ensure that those leaders have good values.

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Tu b a c Vi l l a g e r J a n 1 8 - F e b 1 8

Out My Backdoor

Every day is a renewal,

flip-flops, fancy tennis shoes, little boys and girls shoes, ugly shoes, used shoes--one thing we found out, after the fact, you have absolutely no idea what you're going to get or anyway to even find out. Oh, one more thing, we did not know one word of Spanish, much less how to add up purchases and give change in their language.

every morning the daily miracle.

This joy you feel is life.                      - Gertrude Stein

Happy New Year! A fresh new year has begun. It's hard to believe that 2016 is over and we are on our way into 2017 so quickly. I look in the paper every day to see how much daylight there will be on that day.  Looking day we will have 10 hours and 12 minutes of daylight.  By June it will be up to 14 hours and 26 minutes.  Of course, we will have more heat but that's one of the reasons we live here, right? Oh, glorious sunlight. It won't be long until we see the cottonwoods down by the river develop the 'greening'  that signifies Spring is close.  Take more time to really see what is out our front and back doors.  Look up and down, all around.  After the wonderful

rains and the little bit of snow we had over the holidays, the tiny new beginnings of desert flowers are making a comeback. What amazing, resilient foliage.  Our pet gopher has been really working hard and fast all over the yard,  He turns over this beautiful dark soil and aerates it at the same time.  Of course, some plants go missing when he moves on to another part of the yard, but he needs to eat, right?  I like the fact that he doesn't eat desert plants, so there may lie the solution, don't feed them! Stop planting what the gopher likes, I may finally have a solution. It really hasn't worked in the past but one never knows.

Back years ago after living in Tubac for about a year, husband Gary came upon a brilliant plan. We needed to diversify, he said. At the time we had a lot going on but what's one more little side venture when you're young?  The plan?  Buy 10,000 pairs of shoes at $1.00 a pair from a major discount store and sell them at the Nogales Flea Market behind the WP Market off of Grand Avenue in Nogales.  What could go wrong, besides the fact that 10,000 of anything is beyond the pale. We're full of excitement-no knowledge mind youjust ready for an adventure.  Off we go, our old Bronco II loaded with hundreds of pairs of every kind of shoe you can imagine.  Slippers, boots,

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Needless to say we were exhausted at the end of that first day. It was slow going but we were learning on the fly and our customers were patient and charming. They were excited too. We sold every pair and we got to do it all over again the next day.  We would literally be swarmed by the people when they saw us drive up in that Bronco. After several weekends of the flea market we were getting weary and more than tired of shoes.  So, these lovely customers started coming to us, to our office on Grand Ave in Nogales. We would place all the shoes that would fit on the floor at the time and the people would come by bus from Mexico and buy as many shoes as they could carry home, and business was great.  After all was said and done, it was a huge learning experience.  The best part was getting to know the super people of Nogales, they were so accepting of us, such a mutual fondness existed.

Getting outside your comfort zone is a good thing. Again, I find that we are so privileged to live in this sweet spot of Santa Cruz County. We have wonderful neighbors to the south of us, we are so lucky to live here. One last word, the last few days have been full of magnificent sunshine.  You want your mood elevated, just step outside and stand in the sun.  That will do it!

Join us for YOGA every morning:

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FEBRUARY WORKSHOP The Yoga of Ganesh – Away, Around and Through with Tanya Witman February 18th and 19th - 11 am to 5 pm each day.

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Explore ways to work with your own obstacles, from the physical www.tubachealingarts.com to the spiritual, the mundane and the cosmic, the everyday to Inquiries and Details: the eternal. Call 520-275-2689 for further inquiries. 520.275.2689

Then, treat yourself to a massage or acupuncture treatment!


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Visit our gift shop with a wide selection of herbs, seasonings and spices, as well as a variety of southwestern jellies, mustards, sauces and dry soup mixes. Check out our Western museum and go through the wide selection of cookbooks, childrens’ books and books on local history. And pick up some Santa Cruz Chili Paste, Chili Powder and Salsa for all your favorite recipes.

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Tubac villager jan-feb 2017 web  

The Jan-Feb issue of the Tubac Villager printed 6,000 copies. Celebrating the Art of Living in Southern Arizona. Tubac, Arizona art, nat...

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