Page 1


    

   

             $    $   "  !        !       #     !     "       $ $       #  !   !7 '$:7!'&0 /0'&$ '&7/7 $&, (0-, :"7 7'

  !!$ :$ '&0:%)7!'& '/ 7 '$#0<& ' /& !& %) *$!7/4(??#%+ :/& 88,9 *,+  3,8 *3,(+1 =7/ :/&

;!$!$!7> & 077:0, 0 ))$>, / ;!$$ <& '// > 8(07 > 9?( /'% )/7!!)7!& 7!$/0, &%&!7!0 %>  /.:!/, /0 / &'7 ;!$$ !& '&":&7!'& <!7 &> '7/ '/ & %>  ;/! '/ <!7/<& 7 &> 7!%, :/7 7 7!% ' ):$!7!'& ?4(, /)'07 '$#0<& !&&!$ /;!0, '$ 0'<& 69(??? ,

,2 *,+  39, *,+1 '%!& (, *3,+  , *,(+1  %!00!'&0 ((2  (4#%, &'/%7!'& '//7 7 7!% ' )/!&7,

7&/  !:/0 '/ '%)/7!; ):/)'00, > &'7 /$7 /$ /!;!& /0:$70,


THIS WEEK Issue 6306 | Volume 296 | No 6 ‘It still wobbles like a custard tart over potholes’

58

NEWS 6 Brabham BT62 New 700bhp hypercar unveiled 10 Bentley boss speaks Adrian Hallmark on the future 13 Nissan’s electrification push Hybrids, EVs planned 14 Behold: the car-boat Prodrive’s amphibious vehicle 17 Hybrid confusion New tech is alienating car buyers 18

Ford’s electric future Crossover EV in the pipeline

TESTED 24 Mercedes-AMG G63 Reinvented 4x4 assessed 28 Mini Cooper 5dr Raises its game with a mild revamp 35 Porsche 718 Cayman GTS ROAD TEST 36 Ford Fiesta ST Feisty hatch’s trick tech tested

FEATURES Comparison: Alpina B5 vs BMW M5 Relations fight 46 Interview: David Richards Prodrive’s boss speaks Blades of glory Helicopters in the WRC’s heyday Morgan Plus 8 at 50 Venerable Brit’s birthday Real-world used car heroes Sensible purchases

MIGHTY NEW MERCEDES-AMG G63: TESTED ON, OFF AND ABOVE THE ROAD 28

52 56 58 62

OUR CARS Land Rover Discovery Seven-seater says goodbye Kia Stinger GT The cost of shoddy road repairs Honda Civic Type R Keeping pace with a Maserati

66 68 69

EVERY WEEK Steve Cropley Touring Toyota’s plus-sized museum Subscribe Join Subscriber Extra, get these perks Your views Hydrogen power feels like the future Matt Prior For some jobs only diesel will do

FIRST DRIVE: NEW FORD FIESTA ST 24 21 44 64 90

DEALS James Ruppert The tech you need on your used car Used buying guide Bag a Porsche 944 for peanuts Spied in the Classifieds What’s caught our eye? Road test results Autocar’s data archive New cars A-Z Key stats, from Abarth to Zenos

PORSCHE 944 BUYING TIPS 72

MORGAN PLUS 8’S ANNIVERSARY MARKED 58

`

MAYBE I SHOULDN'T BE SO PLEASED IF a PEOPLE DOZE OFF WHEN I'M DRIVING MATT PRIOR PONDERS THE REASONS FOR HIS DROWSY PASSENGERS 90

70 72 74 77 80

BROTHERLY SHOVE: ALPINA B5 VS BMW M5 46 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 3


COMMENT The original car magazine, published since 1895 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;in the interests of the mechanically propelled road carriageâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; EDITORIAL Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5900 Email autocar@haymarket.com Editor Mark Tisshaw Editorial director, Automotive Jim Holder Editor-in-chief Steve Cropley Executive editor Matt Burt Editor-at-large Matt Prior Digital editor James Attwood Road test editor Matt Saunders Road testers Simon Davis, Richard Lane Online reviews editor Tom Morgan News editor Rachel Burgess Senior staff writer Sam Sheehan Staff writer Jimi Beckwith Used cars editor Alex Robbins Used cars deputy editor Mark Pearson Used cars reporter Max Adams Chief sub-editor Sami Shah Group art editor Stephen Hopkins Art editor Sarah Ă&#x2013;zgĂźl Junior designer Rebecca Stevens Chief photographer Stan Papior Photographer Luc Lacey Videographer Mitch McCabe Video apprentice Oli Kosbab SEO manager Jon Cook SEO executive Oliver Hayman Social media manager Louis Shaw Picture editor Ben Summerell-Youde Editorial assistant Sam Jenkins

DIVERSIFYING BRITISH FIRMS ARE DESPERATELY SEEKING FRESH TALENT

EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTORS European editor Greg Kable Used car correspondent James Ruppert Senior contributing writer Andrew Frankel Contributing writer Dan Prosser Senior contributing editor Richard Bremner Contributing editor Mike Duff Senior consulting editor Tom Evans Special correspondents Mauro Calo, Jesse Crosse, John Evans, Hilton Holloway, Peter Liddiard, Julian Rendell, Richard Webber Special contributors Matt Bird, John Bradshaw, Nic Cackett, Kris Culmer, Claire Evans, John Howell, Steve Huntingford, Maria Iu, Darren Moss, Allan Muir, Will Nightingale, Doug Revolta, Alan Taylor-Jones, Rory White, Will Williams, Neil Winn MEDIA ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)20 8541 3434 Contact Robert Etheridge (robert@performancecomms.com) SUBSCRIPTIONS Tel 0344 848 8816 Overseas +44 (0)1604 251450 Email help@autocar.themagazineshop.com Head of subscriptions Karen McCarthy Direct marketing executive Maria Fernandez SYNDICATION ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)1962 867705 Contact Simon Fox (syndication@autocar.co.uk) LICENSING ENQUIRIES Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5024 Contact Isla Friend (isla.friend@haymarket.com) BACK ISSUES Tel 0344 848 8816 Email help@autocar.themagazineshop.com ADVERTISING Classified +44 (0)20 8267 5733 Display +44 (0)20 8267 5574 Production +44 (0)20 8267 5814 Fax +44 (0)20 8267 5312 Key account director Richard Potton Agency group head Andrew Barclay Agency account manager Olivia Horner New business executive Helen Brown PRODUCTION Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5219 Production manager Anthony Davis Production controller Lee Brister

TROUBLE FINDING AUTOCAR? If you struggle to find a copy of Autocar in your local retailer or area, please send an email to Nicola. Packer@flgroup.co.uk who will investigate the problem for you.

NEWSTRADE MARKETING Head of newstrade marketing Richard Jefferies Newstrade marketing manager Nikki Packer MANAGEMENT Managing director Rachael Prasher Marketing director Darren Pitt Print and events marketing manager Charlene Harry Š 2018, Haymarket Media Group Ltd. Autocar, Motor, Autocar & Motor are registered trademarks. Circulation enquiries: Frontline Ltd, 1st Floor, Stuart House, St Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Street, Peterborough PE1 5DD (01733 555161). Repro by Haymarket Pre-Press. Printed by William Gibbons, Wolverhampton. Registered as a newspaper with the Royal Mail. Member of the ABC. ISSN 1355-8293. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form except by permission. The publisher makes every effort to ensure contents are correct but cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions. Unsolicited material is submitted to Autocar entirely at the ownerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s risk; the publisher accepts no responsibility for loss or damage. With regret, competitions and promotional offers, unless otherwise stated, are not available to readers outside the UK and Eire. North America: Autocar, ISSN number 135589X, is published weekly by Haymarket Media Group, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham TW1 3SP, United Kingdom. Air freight and mailing in the USA by agent named Air Business Ltd, c/o Worldnet Shipping Inc, 156-15, 146th Avenue, 2nd Floor, Jamaica, NY 11434, USA. Periodicals postage paid at Jamaica, NY 11431. Subscription records are maintained at Haymarket Media Group, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham TW1 3SP. Air Business Ltd is acting as our mailing agent.

Autocar is published by Haymarket Automotive, Bridge House, 69 London Road, Twickenham, Middlesex, TW1 3SP, UK haymarketgroup.com Tel +44 (0)20 8267 5900 Autocar magazine is also published in China, Greece, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand. Autocar is a member of the Independent Press Standards Organisation (IPSO). We abide by the Editorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Code of Practice and are committed to upholding the highest standards of journalism. If you think we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t met those standards and want to make a complaint, contact autocar@haymarket.com. For more information, contact IPSO on 0300 123 2220 or visit www.ipso.co.uk

DAVID RICHARDS HAS made a career out of problem solving. Not only has he run one of the most successful multi-discipline motorsport preparation teams in the shape of Prodrive, but he has also become a leading protagonist in the types of lightweight materials and hybrid technologies that will become omnipresent in road cars in the coming years. His latest diverse road projects include making an amphibious car (read more on p17) and turning ambulances from diesel smokers into hi-tech hybrids, while extra-curricular activities range from the development of lightweight folding bikes to Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cup racing yachts (see p52). Prodrive sounds like a great place to work, then, but there are a couple of problems Richards hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t yet been able to solve, namely the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shortage of skilled engineering talent and the industryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inability to attract suicient numbers of young people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a high retention rate of senior people, but the talent is hard to ďŹ nd,â&#x20AC;? he says. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a common story. Our industry needs both companies like   Prodrive and talented young people â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the thought-provokers, never say noâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ers and problem solvers â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to be inspired to work in it if the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s position as a world leader is to be maintained.

              

 

 

Autocar is a member of the organising committee of Car Of The Year caroftheyear.org Haymarket is certified by BSI to environmental standard ISO14001 and energy management standard ISO50001

*%& .%  " .#     &( ( ,%$& &( &!%(&  %  )  % ( $(- (. % ($



 ( *(   &(&( +%  

Mark Tisshaw Editor mark.tisshaw@haymarket.com

@mtisshaw

 &, &( %&

     %&

NEVER MISS AN ISSUE Subscribe p44

EDITORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S PICKS

3()&&HUWLILHG 7KLVSURGXFWLV IURPVXVWDLQDEO\ PDQDJHGIRUHVWVDQG FRQWUROOHGVRXUFHV ZZZSHIFFRXN

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;THERE WAS A GIRAFFEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

A CLASS LEADER IN WAITING

THE MUST-BUY PORSCHE

Why helicopters were a must in the heyday of the Safari Rally, p56

Find out what makes the new Ford Fiesta ST so brilliant, p24

With used prices for most Porsches soaring, the 944 is a bargain, p72

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 5


N E WS G O T A S T O RY ?

Email our news editor rachel.burgess@haymarket.com

Ford readies all-new electric crossover but axes US cars Ford’s first purpose-built EV to hit the UK in early 2020 but US saloons to be canned

F

ord is pressing ahead with its first all-new battery electric vehicle, a front-drive crossover – and it is committed to the Mondeo in Europe until the mid-2020s despite last week’s announcement that it is pulling out of the saloon and hatchback market in the US. The all-electric crossover,

6 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

dubbed Mach 1 in reference to its Mustang-derived styling features, has been confirmed as a globally engineered model to be revealed next year, with UK deliveries starting in 2020. The crossover, codenamed CX430, will be built on the C2 platform used for the new Focus and has been in Ford’s product plan for several years.

The CX430 will be additional to the Kuga and, since it is based on the front-wheel-drive C2 platform, it is expected to be conventional hatchback-like, with a slightly raised driving position. Ford has identified ‘white paper’ models like the CX430 to replace saloons and hatches in its US line-up. Further

crossovers with Mustang design cues and front-drive chassis are a strong possibility because they combine “the best attributes of cars and utilities, such as high ride height, space and versatility”. If the vehicles are sized appropriately, European sales are likely. Last week’s news that Ford is dropping the Fiesta, Focus,

Fusion and Taurus from its North American line-up came as a surprise. The end of the Fiesta had been rumoured for some time, because fuel prices have dropped and the economy recovered, allowing US buyers to return to their preferred larger vehicles. Decisions on the


replacements for the Fusion and Taurus have been pending for a couple of years too. Ford’s new CEO, Jim Hackett, has acted decisively and made the announcement at a financial conference in the US, momentously ending Ford’s 110-year presence in the US passenger saloon market. “We are committed to taking the appropriate actions to drive profitable growth and maximise the returns of our business over the long term,” said Hackett. Analysts said Ford had previously signalled that the mix of car models in its range was forecast to drop to just 10% in the US, leaving 90% of its sales as SUVs and trucks. “This pull back is really just an admission of the stark North American market reality, especially for American brands,” said IHS Markit

analyst Colin Couchman. “Buyers keep shifting to SUVs and crossovers. Big Three sedan [saloon] sales have been very dependent on poorquality fleet sales.” Ford US rivals Chrysler and Dodge have taken similar action under Fiat ownership, killing the mid-sized 200 and Dart saloons and instead investing in Jeep SUVs and RAM pick-ups. Between them, Chrysler and Dodge sell just two saloons – full-sized rearwheel-drive platform twins, the 300 and Charger. Ford will retain only the Mustang and Focus Active passenger cars on sale after 2020, although its bread and butter SUVs and trucks such as the Explorer and F-Series pick-up continue. The end of the Fusion and Taurus can also be seen

in the context of a drive to simplify and reduce Ford’s global platforms to just five. Currently, it has 11. When Alan Mulally took over as CEO in 2006, it was 17. In future, Ford strategy will revolve around an emergingmarkets small car platform (Ka), the C2 (Focus), a midsized SUV platform (Explorer), an electric car platform (Mach 1) and full-sized truck platform (F-Series). The loss of production volume of the Fusion raises a question over the future of the Mondeo in Europe, because they share the same platform. In the short to medium term, Ford Europe is understood to have mapped the future of the Mondeo to the mid-2020s, although the picture after that remains fluid. “The Ford Mondeo remains ◊

BRONCO SET FOR COMEBACK IN 2020

Concept (right) referenced Mk1 (above) While Ford is betting on its upcoming electric car, it’s also bringing back a famous name, the Bronco, to reinvigorate its SUV line-up. The original Bronco arrived in 1966 and become an iconic model for Ford but was withdrawn in 1996. The last we saw of the Bronco

was a concept shown in 2004. But last year, Ford said the name would return on a global SUV in 2020. It will take on the Jeep Compass and be more rugged than Ford’s current mainstream SUVs as the firm bids to reclaim the off-road market.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 7


Mustang will remain on sale in US, along with Focus Active ∆ a core part of our product

WHY FORD NEEDS MORE CROSSOVERS JULIAN RENDELL

There are multiple reasons behind Ford’s decision to can its US saloons and hatches, but the reality is that the company has fallen behind rivals in responding to the significant extra demand for utility vehicles, especially those based on car platforms. In many ways, it is to Ford’s credit: remember, Ford was the only one of the Big Three that didn’t go bust in the post-2007 recession and, to save the company, it cut back on new model programmes and focused on ‘One Ford’, a global efficiency strategy. However, One Ford didn’t generate sufficient creative and management energy to expand Ford’s range of car-like SUVs, so now Ford is playing catch-up. The irony of a company

8 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

whose Explorer almost invented the utility segment in the US in the mid-1990s falling behind on SUVs will not be lost on Ford’s managers and engineers. Hard decisions await in Europe, for example, where there are four seven-seat or 5+2 models on sales – C-Max Grand, Tourneo Grand, S-Max and Galaxy – but no 5+2 SUV. Hyundai, Nissan, Peugeot, Renault and Skoda have large 5+2 SUVs, with a Seat coming and the Chinese with vehicles

ready. Other manufacturers are crowding the B/Csegment crossover market. The PSA Group has at least nine nameplates on offer, Hyundai-Kia has another six, with more due shortly, and Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi has eight. Ford has four (including the Fiesta Active), although the incoming Focus Active and the CX430 will make some difference.

line-up in Europe. We have upgrades coming for Mondeo later this year and Mondeo continues to deliver on its promise of great driving dynamics, leading technologies and competitive pricing,” Ford said in a statement. Details of the autumn upgrade are understood to include a new 2.0-litre diesel engine, codenamed Panther, which will be EU6d-compliant for the new WLTP driving cycle, with its real-world emissions and fuel economy testing, plus a new interior and tweaks to the exterior styling. The interior changes are tipped to include a

new dashboard moulding incorporating the Fiesta/ Focus-style infotainment system with a high-set tabletstyle touchscreen. However, to keep the Mondeo in production to the mid-2020s, Ford Europe will have to fund developments to keep up with legislation without the volume of the US Fusion to offset costs. Analysts believe Ford Europe is prepared to do this for the next five to seven years, helped by a reasonable degree of financial stability, since it has been reliably profitable for the past two years and has had a strong start to 2018. But the crunch will come

`

Ford is lagging behind key rivals in offering crossovers

It is hard to see market demand for the Mondeo providing sufficient volume to keep the nameplate alive a


NEWS FORD’S EXIT FROM US SALOONS: WILL IT BE PERMANENT OR TEMPORARY? ‘Never say never’ is the answer universally delivered by car execs to a question that probes the long-term future. They know the fickle nature of the car industry, which can change direction significantly over a three- to five-year planning horizon. Of course, there is potential for Ford saloons to remain on sale in China, Europe, Latin America and Asia – even if they become as rare as hen’s teeth in the mothership of Detroit. And it is not unprecedented for car companies to return to segments that they have previously abandoned. Nissan, for example, solemnly pronounced in 2004 that it was exiting the C-segment hatchback market in Europe to pave the way for the Qashqai, launched two years later. The future of the C-segment hatch market was presented as debatable at a time when the move to crossovers was an emerging trend. Yet seven years later, in a blaze of publicity, Nissan returned to the C-segment hatch market with the Pulsar. Sports cars have returned, too, after a golden period in the 1950s and 1960s, having been killed off for two decades by US legislation, high fuel prices and economic stagnation.

around 2020-2022 when Ford Europe will have to decide whether to go it alone with its own Mondeo replacement. At the Geneva motor show in March, Ford Europe boss Steve Armstrong told Autocar it was too early to consider the future of the Mondeo, although he conceded that the large saloon sector continues to shrink. “We are constantly updating the car, from new transmission and engine options to a hybrid version and the Vignale trim. The interest is strong and we are a way off having to consider replacing it,” he said. A lifeline for any new Mondeo is the Focus’s new C2 architecture, which is understood to be sufficiently flexible to allow multiple track widths, wheelbases and firewall heights. This allows a large variety of vehicles to be spun off a single component set, like Volkswagen’s adaptable frontwheel-drive MQB set-up. High-cost items such as the electrical system and

Mondeo will continue in Europe until at least mid-2020s, said Ford powertrains can be carried over from the Focus to the Mondeo. But justifying the unique development and tooling costs for a new body and interior and chassis tuning and certification costs will be a bigger challenge, as sales will be small. A planning volume of around 60,000 a year could be expected. Ford’s component costs won’t be able to take advantage of the huge volume that rivals such as the VW Group can. Ford’s sales volume in Europe of all hatchback models

– the Ka, Fiesta, Focus and Mondeo – is forecast to be 520,000 units this year, plus a further 36,000 saloons. By the time Ford needs to make key investment decisions about the Mondeo, Ford’s hatchback volume is forecast to fall by another 40,000 units. When the first Mondeo was launched in 1992, it contributed 350,000 units alone but was already on the slide to 250,000 for the Mk2 Mondeo in 2000. VW can plan on a volume of all brand variants of the

New models from Mazda, MG, BMW, Mercedes and Porsche rejuvenated the market in the late 1980s and early 1990s, although it has since dwindled once more. US muscle cars have also risen from the dead after the fuel crisis killed investment in the 1980s. A burst of nostalgia for the 1960s and 1970s has rekindled demand, helped by more fuel-efficient V8s. However, the challenge for saloons is perhaps more existential, defined by emotion rather than legislation. SUVs have become synonymous with active lifestyles and they look and feel expensive in comparison to saloons, which give off a conservative image. Developments in battery electric vehicle technology and chassis technology are likely only to accelerate that trend. An all-electric SUV is zero-emissions, meaning that the wind-cheating profile and light weight of a saloon counts for less in terms of its green footprint, and a saloon’s low centre of gravity becomes less important as the handling of SUVs continually improves. Saloons need a new impetus – otherwise they risk joining the dinosaurs in extinction.

New Fiesta will continue to be a mainstay of Ford sales in Europe MQB A/B Polo/Golf/Passat of around five million. At the key decision-making moment in 2021, Ford’s SUV sales are forecast by IHS Markit to have risen to nearly 400,000 units. That is key production volume for overall planning purposes but, in the decade from 2011 to 2021, Ford Europe’s ratio of hatchback to SUV sales will have moved from 10:1 in favour of hatchbacks to just about an equal split of 1:1, reflecting the huge increase in popularity of SUVs.

Given the continuing slide in sales of volume-brand large saloons and hatchbacks, and the rise in popularity of SUVs, it is hard to see market demand for the Mondeo providing sufficient volume to keep the nameplate alive. One possible conclusion is that Ford Europe ideally needs to find a partner to share volume on future hatchback developments to maintain a presence with all nameplates in the European market. JULIAN RENDELL

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9


David Brabham unveiled the BT62

Brabham unveils £1m hypercar Track-only 700bhp BT62 presages Brabham’s entry to Le Mans and future road cars

B

rabham Automotive has launched the BT62, a £1 million track-only 700bhp rival to the McLaren Senna, and the company is already planning future road cars and a Le Mans 24 Hours challenger. The Anglo-Australian brand is run by former Le Mans winner David Brabham, son of triple Formula 1 world champion Sir Jack, with backing from Australian investment firm Fusion Capital. The BT62 – which continues the nomenclature established by Brabham Sr’s Motor Racing Developments cars – is a

10 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

rear-wheel-drive two-seater powered by a 5.4-litre naturally aspirated V8 quad-cam engine that produces 492lb ft of torque, directed through a six-speed sequential gearbox. Brabham claims the car produces more than 1200kg of downforce and weighs 972kg, giving a power-to-weight ratio of 720bhp per tonne. The engine is based on a block from an unnamed manufacturer. Development boss Paul Birch, who has worked for firms such as Lotus, Aston Martin and McLaren, said it has been extensively reworked, with a unique

displacement, output and components. The BT62, which has been in development for the past two years, also makes extensive use of motor racing technology, including all-carbon brakes, Michelin competition tyres and a built-in air jack system. The production run of the BT62 will be limited to 70 examples. The BT62 was launched at Australia House in London and David Brabham said it was “a car with the right to carry the Brabham name into the future”. Brabham also confirmed that two “variants” of the BT62 were in the planning stages,

including a race version as part of the firm’s goal of competing at Le Mans and in the World Endurance Championship. Brabham also said: “I’d like to see a road car version of this down the line.” Brabham added: “We’re working towards going racing. The next variant will be more in line with that, and we’re working on another car. We’ve got a long-term plan. We’re not going to be around for just one year, or just one car.” The 70 BT62 cars will be built at a dedicated facility in Adelaide, South Australia. Brabham said the site was

chosen because of Fusion Capital’s base, but added: “The resources in Australia are fantastic. It was developed for so long with manufacturers, and now they’ve left, there’s a lot of expertise.” The BT62 has already conducted a number of track tests in Australia, including at Phillip Island. The 70 owners of the BT62 will be able to join a Brabham driver development scheme, which aims to help them develop the skills and strength required to exploit the cars to their full potential. JAMES ATTWOOD


NEWS MCLAREN SENNA

BRABHAM BT62 VS PRICE

£1m £750,000 700bhp 789bhp 492lb ft 590lb ft 972kg 1198kg 1200kg 800kg 720bhp* 659bhp* POWER

TORQUE

D RY W E I G H T

DOWNFORCE

P O W E R -T O - W E I G H T

* Per tonne

THE HISTORY BEHIND THE BRABHAM NAME Having won two Formula 1 world championships for Cooper in 1950 and 1959, Sir Jack Brabham founded Motor Racing Developments Ltd – better known as Brabham – with long-time friend Ron Tauranac in 1962. They quickly built a thriving business selling customer chassis for various singleseater formulas. The firm claimed its first world championship race win at the 1964 French GP at Rouen, with Dan Gurney driving a Climaxpowered BT7. Two years later, Brabham secured the team’s first F1 title, becoming the only driver to win the championship in a car bearing his name. Team-mate Denny Hulme won the 1967 crown. Brabham sold his share in the team to Tauranac when he retired in 1970, and it was

sold on to Bernie Ecclestone in 1971. With the combination of Nelson Piquet and star designer Gordon Murray, the team won further F1 drivers’ crowns in 1971 and 1973. Ecclestone eventually sold Brabham in 1989 and its fortunes faded as it passed through various owners. It folded after 1992,

when owner Middlebridge Engineering Group went into administration. Brabham cars won 35 races and the first 35 BT62 produced will each be liveried to reflect the colours of the cars that won those races. The green and gold colours on the launch model reference the 1966 French GP winner.

Jack Brabham won the 1966 F1 drivers’ title in his firm’s BT19

Cabin, like the rest of the car, harnesses motorsport tech

Brabham BT62 made its debut at Australia House in London

Q&A PAUL BIRCH, AUTOMOTIVE DEVELOPMENT BOSS, BRABHAM What was the design goal of the BT62? “Our target was to look at the top echelons of sports car endurance racing – Le Mans and the WEC. It’s designed with those regulations in mind, but without the restrictions, so it can deliver a much higher level of performance.” Could it be the basis for a road car? “We wanted to develop a vehicle worthy of Brabham in a motorsport sense, but also with the DNA that could take us forward into a road car for our future. If we need to homologate some [road] cars to go racing,

we have that ability and it’s not a big step.” Any plans to bid for a Nürburgring record? “The Nürburgring doesn’t interest us. It’s not a race track as such. It’s where road car firms go to show off. Lap times on contemporary racing circuits are what interest us.”

Track-only BT62 makes more downforce than the car weighs. A total of 70 examples will be produced 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 11


NEWS INTERVIEW

Bentley boss: ‘Hybrids and EVs are key’ CEO Adrian Hallmark lays out his vision for the British firm’s future drian Hallmark returned to Bentley in February after a 13-year stint at Jaguar Land Rover. His arrival as chief executive has coincided with the launch of a new Continental GT, a model that, since its inception in 2003, has done much to reinvigorate Bentley under Volkswagen Group ownership. Autocar quizzed Hallmark on his work so far and his plans for the Crewe-based car maker’s future model line-up.

A

What key changes have you made since you started? “I’ve spent time taking stock, doing deep dives of all the markets, all of the functions, every project. The key thing we’re focused on is looking at the model cycle plan and future-proofing it. We maybe weren’t as prepared for autonomous, connected and electrified strategies as we could have been. The Bentayga hybrid is a great first step, but we need to do more than one hybrid. “Hence, the first thing we’ve changed is to electrify the model cycle as fast as we can. That’s quite a big change and we’ve shuffled a number of things around to be able to do it. It means that by 2025 every nameplate will have an electrified option – either

hybrid or full electric. We’ll flesh out specific plans in the next three to six months. Certainly by the end of this year, we’ll be in a much clearer position about what we’ll do.” Will the new Continental GT be the next hybrid Bentley? “Let’s see. There are two aspects that drive electrification. One is compliance with regional standards and the other is being competitive. In terms of compliance in certain markets, that will lead us down one direction. The Bentayga is our highest-volume car so that’s the first one we have to hybridise. The next car in terms of volume is probably going to be the saloon [Flying Spur], so if you wanted a second [hybrid] car just for compliance, then that would normally be the next selection.” So we’ll see a Flying Spur hybrid before a Continental? “Possibly. We’ll make that decision in the next six months.” What has been the reaction to the Bentayga hybrid? “I was positively surprised. Of the five declared luxury brands – Lamborghini, Ferrari, Rolls-Royce, Aston Martin and us – we’re the first to do

Hallmark has put more emphasis on electrification it in a mainstream production vehicle. The kudos we’ve received, and the interest, is incredible. Most car companies are unsure about the take-up of hybrids. It’s jumping into the unknown but I cannot imagine it accounting for less than 10% of sales when we launch [the Bentayga hybrid].” When will we see a completely new model in the line-up and will it be pure electric? “I won’t give you a bodystyle but we’re looking at everything. We don’t have unlimited resources so we have got to make some decisions on where we think the brand and the technologies would give us the best bang for our buck. When we launched the Continental GT in 2003, nobody asked for us to do a two-door car. Everyone thought we’d do a saloon. And it recalibrated the brand. It got us

`

The kudos we’ve received for the Bentayga hybrid is incredible a back to our roots when a saloon couldn’t have. “I do know when we will go electric: it will be in the next five years – it has got to be – but [in terms of] bodystyles, we could do anything. We’ll look to customers first.” Is there going to be a new Mulsanne? “There will be a car in a price segment similar to Mulsanne that represents the pinnacle of the Bentley brand but will it be the same format as the current Mulsanne? That’s to be decided. To put it a different way, by 2030, will a 6.75-litre, V8-engined, extended-

S PY S H OT

F LY I N G S P U R

New Continental GT builds on the strengths of its predecessors

Forthcoming Flying Spur will have a more clearly defined identity

wheelbase limousine be the top of our brand? I’m not sure.” Would this new flagship have an electric powertrain? “Let’s see. We’re not going to desert those [Mulsanne] customers but we need to make sure its future-proof and relevant. And I don’t subscribe to the view that wool and modern materials alone create a sustainable proposition. Sustainability is very important but you don’t need to abandon some of the things that people hold and value today. We just need to think about how we do them differently.” What can we expect from the forthcoming third-generation Flying Spur? “If we look at the outgoing Continental and the current Flying Spur, it was absolutely unashamedly the strategy to have as much carry-over as possible. The whole dashboard, the front wings, everything. The facelift then changed it. The new Flying Spur is as pure to its concept as it can be and it will be more differentiated from the Continental than the [outgoing model] is.”

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 13


NEWS

Nissan mounts electric push Brand is turning to mild and plug-in hybrids to increase its line-up of electrified cars

Production version of IMx Kuro concept will be pure electric issan will launch a range of hybrid models to supplement the Leaf and the showroom version of the IMx Kuro electric SUV as part of its electrification plans. The company has yet to provide details of which models will be hybridised and when, but conventional hybrids and plug-ins will be offered. According to advanced product planning manager Warwick Daly, “the [RenaultNissan-Mitsubishi] alliance is evaluating the best technologies available across

N

NISSA N NEEDS TO ACT FAST R ACH E L B U RG ESS

the group for its hybrid programme”, which is why it’s not revealing much about its strategy now. Considerable hybrid expertise rests with new alliance member Mitsubishi, and Nissan and Renault have more than eight years’ experience apiece making and selling pure electric vehicles. Daly said “not overcomplicating” Nissan’s model line-up is a consideration. The addition of hybrids and plug-in hybrids will expand the brand’s powertrain choice from three today (petrol, diesel and

electric) to five, with two hybrid drivetrains. He expects around 35% of Nissan’s European sales to be electrified by 2025. The company is aiming for 20% of its sales to be EVs by 2020. Assuming that this 20% EV share will have grown by 2025, we can guess that hybrids and plug-ins will account for around 10% of its sales by that point. “We want to stay ahead of the curve,” said Daly. From 2025 onwards, Daly also expects that “the mild hybrid will start to become obsolete. Our electrification

Nissan can probably lay claim to having had the earliest impact in the growth of EVs with its Leaf. But we’ve been so busy focusing on that – and the success of the Qashqai and Juke – that, suddenly,

offer will change over time.” Daly expects the Leaf and electric SUV to become major sellers for the brand, alongside the Qashqai and Juke. “The Leaf will play a bigger role,” he said, pointing out that the latest version has 20,000 advance orders across Europe

Nissan risks falling behind its rivals with electrified progress. The electric IMx and hybrids must arrive soon or Nissan will be forgotten as a pioneer and remembered for losing its advantage.

and the sales rate is 40% higher than for the previous model. Nissan will have similar class-leading sales ambitions for the electric SUV, to maintain its position “as the number one crossover brand in Europe”, said Daly. RICHARD BREMNER

New M5 Competition takes fight to Merc-AMG E63 S THE NEW BMW M5 Competition wields 616bhp – 25bhp more than the standard model. That enables a 0-62mph sprint of 3.3sec, 0.1sec quicker than the regular M5, and a 0-124mph run of 10.8sec, a 0.3sec improvement. By comparison, its Mercedes-AMG E63 S rival can cover 0-62mph in 3.4sec. Peak torque of 553lb ft stays the same as the regular M5’s but it’s produced over a

200rpm-wider range. BMW said the model gets “even more direct responses and bespoke chassis tuning to ensure a race-inspired driving experience”. Changes over the standard M5 include a sports exhaust and firmer, 7mmlower suspension. The M5 Competition also gains gloss black for the surround on the front and side grilles, rear boot lip and Competition badging.

This hotter M5 variant is the fourth Competition model in BMW’s line-up, joining the M3 Competition, M4 Competition and newly introduced M2 Competition. The M2 Competition replaces the M2, whereas the other models are offered alongside their standard siblings. First deliveries of the new M5 Competition will take place in September, priced above the £89,645 M5.

OFFICIAL PICTURE

M5 Competition has 616bhp and covers 0-62mph in 3.3sec

SOME ELECTRIFIED CARS FACE GOVT BAN

SPECIAL V12 VANTAGE PACKS 592BHP

The government will ban all new cars that have fewer than 50 miles of electric range from 2040. The plan, called Road to Zero, is likely to mean that not only petrol, diesel and hybrid but also plug-in hybrid cars risk being outlawed.

Aston Martin’s 1998 V8 Vantage V600, one of the most powerful sports cars of its time with 600bhp, has inspired a limited-run V12 Vantage V600. The seven coupés and seven roadsters use a version of Aston’s 6.0-litre V12 with 600PS (592bhp).

14 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


NEWS Richards’ creation was inspired by the Watercar Panther

CONFIDENTIAL GOSSIP | RUMOURS | TRENDS

Prodrive’s new car-boat Boss David Richards says amphibious car could make production

D

avid Richards’ Prodrive engineering company is developing an amphibious car that could make production. The idea is inspired by the Watercar Panther, a USdeveloped amphibious car. Richards bought a Panther for his own use and has since made modifications to it. While Richards originally intended to carry his adapted design through to production, he now wants to create his own amphibious car inspired by the Panther. He said: “I went to see

one in Los Angeles and was pleasantly surprised with the quality, so I bought one with the intention of importing some into Europe. But there’s lots of legislation, and it’s tricky for the EU with emissions and crash testing. Even single type approval had some insurmountable problems. “Now I’m inclined to do our own. We know about them, and I have some young engineers working on it – we’re all excited by it. I have a boat engineer looking at the hull.” The brief, says Richards, is to create a car that can

be driven on the road with sufficient ground clearance and be able to travel at speeds of up to 30 knots on water. It would be priced around £150,000, and Richards has his eyes on a diesel engine to power it. “It needs torque, so a good torquey turbodiesel is needed,” he added. Richards said that much like flying cars that are neither ideal cars nor ideal planes, amphibious cars can be “neither a great car nor a great boat”. He explained: “Make it too short and you have a bad boat,

too long and you have a bad car. That’s inevitably the case, so you err towards making it a better boat, but you can still make it a better car.” Richards has tested his Panther extensively over road, beach and water. He has even used it for waterskiing, but found it not to be suited to choppy waters. “You drive it from the road to the beach, then into the water. Press some buttons and you have a boat,” he said. MARK TISSHAW

MCLAREN DELIBERATED over launching a non-hybrid version of the P1 hypercar but decided against it as it was considered at odds with the ethos of the project. The hybrid system added about 140kg to the kerb weight of the car but that is compensated by the extra power it generated.

» PRODRIVE BOSS PROFILED P52

Going electric proving a challenge for Mini MINI IS “THE MOST urban car brand” but also one of the hardest to switch to full electric power due to the size of its vehicles, according to boss Peter Schwarzenbauer. Highlighting the upcoming Mini E, which will be built in Oxford from 2019, and the alternative version of the vehicle, which will be produced in co-operation with car maker Great Wall in China, Schwarzenbauer, said: “Electrifying Mini is quite a challenge, chiefly because of the small footprint of the cars. It does not leave much room for batteries. “But if you look at the role of electrification in the urban environment and the desire to be local emissions-free, there is no other brand with the

A POTENTIAL EUROPEAN launch of the Skoda Kodiaq coupé, on sale in China later this year, continues to be discussed by the Czech car manufacturer. The problem is that Skoda simply has no spare capacity in its factories to build the model. “Skoda has not got many problems, but one is production capacity,” said R&D boss Christian Strube.

with a sale date mooted to be The BMW Group is known credentials of Mini. It should around 2025. Both smaller to be working on solid-state be a natural fit, and that is and more powerful than batteries in the direction we’re moving today’s batteries, they could partnership towards for the future. The potentially pave the way for a with “The success of Mini E, based range of fully electric Minis. Toyota, the plug-in hybrid on this concept, will Countryman shows be the second electric what can be achieved, model in the BMW and the full electric Group after the BMW Mini that is coming will i3. In 2020, we’ll see show another step.” the BMW Schwarzenbauer ix3. also highlighted that the joint venture to build electric Minis in China – the first time Minis have been made outside of Europe – was necessary in order to qualify for the country’s New Energy Vehicles regulations, which require a proportion of the car’s parts to be sourced and manufactured there. The Smaller, solid-state batteries would benefit small cars like Mini BMW i3 does not qualify.

THE ADVENT OF electric vehicles will create a new category of cars, according to Honda design chief Makoto Iwaki, which could be “larger and taller” than today’s models. He said in the future “we might think it’s not an SUV but a totally new segment”. Iwaki used the example of an iPhone as a market segment that previously never existed. HYUNDAI MOTOR Group powertrain boss Michael Winkler believes adapting to Europe’s increasingly sporadic new emissions regulations is more challenging than engineering new technology in cars. He said “it’s extremely difficult for engineers to predict what powertrains will be right” so manufacturers need more consistent “boundary conditions”.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 17


Confusion hinders hybrid and EV sales A survey of motorists’ attitudes to different fuel types found that inaccurate perceptions of the capabilities of hybrids relative to EVs could be undermining sales growth onfusion over the differences between hybrid and electric vehicles could be inhibiting the growth of alternatively fuelled vehicle (AFV) sales, according to a new survey of motorists. Autocar teamed up with survey research advisor Simpson Carpenter to quiz more than 1000 drivers on their attitudes to different fuel types. The responses suggest a degree of confusion still exists over the relative capabilities of hybrids and EVs. For example, a third of respondents cited concern over driving range as a reason not to consider buying a hybrid model, despite this only being an issue that affects pure electric vehicles. Although 24% of those surveyed expressed a desire to choose an electric or hybrid as their next car purchase, UK car sales do not currently reflect this level of take-up. AFVs accounted for just 5.1% of the UK’s new car sales for the first quarter of 2018 – a total of 36,693 cars. Tom Simpson, managing director of Simpson Carpenter, said: “Potential hybrid buyers are confused by the technology and are being deterred by [perceived] barriers.” Nonetheless, interest in

C

hybrid and electric models appears to be improving notably. The 24% of motorists planning to buy one as their next car is an increase over the 17% who expressed an intention to purchase an AFV in the 2017 survey. This year’s study also asked motorists for their views on cars powered by internal combustion engines. The results indicate that a growing number of car buyers consider new petrol-powered vehicles to be equally as bad for the environment as diesel models. Of those surveyed, 44% considered diesel- and petrolpowered cars that meet EU6 standards – the most up-to-date emissions limits for vehicles – as having the same negative impact on the environment with regard to CO2 emissions. Some 42% thought that both fuel types produced similar amounts of nitrogen oxides (NOx), which have a detrimental effect on air quality, particularly in cities. The results of the survey also highlighted the ongoing effect of the demonisation of diesel, provoked in part by inaccurate information from mainstream media and a lack of coherent policy from the government. Only 20% of the people surveyed said their next car

PETROL 18 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

44%

50% say a higher initial purchase price would put them off buying an EV

think new diesel and petrol cars are as bad as each other in terms of CO2 emissions

`

We are seeing a shift towards alternatively fuelled cars

1 in 4 people plan to buy a hybrid or electric model as their next car

a would use diesel, a drop from 23% in last year’s study. The share of motorists who will most likely buy a petrol car fell from 60% to 56%. Simpson said: “We are seeing a shift towards alternatively fuelled cars among both petrol and diesel car owners. Among

[existing] petrol car owners, the number intending to switch to hybrid or electric power next time they buy a new car went up from 13% in last year’s survey to 22%. A crumb of comfort for diesel is the fact that the number intending to stick with the fuel type next

E L E C T R IC

time they buy remained stable between 2017 and 2018.” Of the motorists surveyed who currently own a dieselpowered vehicle, 45% said they planned to stick with an oil-burner next time around. However, as the recent slump in diesel car sales reflects,

D IE S E L


ANALYSIS WHICH TYPE OF CAR WILL MOTORISTS BUY NEXT?

60%

2018 SURVEY

24%

56%

say worry over resale value is among their main objections to buying a diesel

20%

2017 SURVEY

45%

1 in 3

17%

of existing diesel car owners will stick with diesel for their next new car

say concern over driving range is stopping them buying a hybrid car

60%

23%

Petrol attitudes towards oil-burners are hardening among drivers of other types of cars. More than half of the drivers of petrol cars surveyed said they would definitely not consider diesel power for their next car. The increase in rejection of diesels has been driven by growing economic concerns. Although ‘higher levels of pollution/emissions’ remains the primary reason for not choosing diesel, the share of motorists citing this reason hasn’t changed from the 74% of the 2017 survey. However, in second place this year was ‘worry over future resale values’, with the percentage of buyers stating it as one of their main reasons for objecting to diesel rising from 41% of respondents in 2017 to 59% in 2018. Simpson said: “This bodes ill for the future of diesel cars because financial factors are key drivers of purchase decisions in the market.” More than half of the 1090 respondents now think that petrol cars hold their value better than diesels (up from 40%), while just one in four think that diesels depreciate more slowly (down from 34%). RACHEL BURGESS

Diesel

Hybrid/electric

WHY CAR BUYERS STEER CLEAR OF HYBRID AND ELECTRIC VEHICLES 52%

Higher initial purchase price

50% 45% 46% 44%

Not enough recharging points No experience/never owned one

33% 39%

Cost and limited life of batteries

43% 33%

Limited choice of models on sale

26% 32%

Batteries take too long to charge

41% 31%

Concerns over driving range

43% 28%

Too soon/technology not ready

31% 13% 13% 12%

Worried about resale value Technology too complicated/ prone to breaking down

8% 9% 7%

Poor performance/acceleration

5 Hybrid

Electric

10

15

20

25

30

35

40

45

50

55

Percentage of 1090 survey respondents 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 19


%00 2); 1+ >7 *631 .978 Â&#x2020; Â&#x2020; 4)6 1328, ;-8,  =)%67  %46 36

5YEPMX] VIPMEFMPMX] ERH [MXL E 1+'39/

 1 + 1 383 6

$ 1 + 1 383 6

 =)%6 ;%66%28= %VVERKI E XIWX HVMZI XSHE] EX 1+'39/

1+ >7 JYIP GSRWYQTXMSR 96&%2    QTK `    POQ )<86% 96&%2    QTK `    POQ '31&-2)(    QTK `    POQ '3 )QMWWMSRW  ¯  KOQ %PP QTK ERH '3 ½KYVIW UYSXIH EVI WSYVGIH JVSQ SJ½GMEP )9 VIKYPEXIH PEFSVEXSV] XIWX VIWYPXW8LIWI EVI TVSZMHIH XS EPPS[ GSQTEVMWSRW FIX[IIR ZILMGPIW ERH QE] RSX VI¾IGX ]SYV EGXYEP HVMZMRK I\TIVMIRGI

1SHIP WLS[R 1+ >7 )\GPYWMZI QERYEP [MXL 8VM 'SEX TEMRX STXMSREP I\XVE Â&#x2020; MR (]REQMG 6IH EX Â&#x2020; SR XLI VSEH 386 SV Â&#x2020; E QSRXL JSV E  QSRXL GSRHMXMSREP WEPI EKVIIQIRX [MXL E GYWXSQIV HITSWMX SJ Â&#x2020; 386 TVMGIW MRGPYHI :%8 [LIVI ETTPMGEFPI ZILMGPI ½VWX VIKMWXVEXMSR JII HIPMZIV] RYQFIV TPEXIW ERH  QSRXLW ´³:ILMGPI )\GMWI (YX]´ *VSQ TVMGI FEWIH SR 386 TVMGI SJ Â&#x2020; JSV 1+ >7 )\TPSVI I\GPYHMRK STXMSREP QIXEPPMG TEMRX ERH EGGIWWSVMIW 1SRXLP] JVSQ TVMGI FEWIH SR 1+ >7 )\GMXI QERYEP EX Â&#x2020; SR XLI VSEH 386 I\GPYHMRK STXMSREP QIXEPPMG TEMRX ERH EGGIWWSVMIW SV Â&#x2020; E QSRXL JSV E  QSRXL GSRHMXMSREP WEPI EKVIIQIRX [MXL E GYWXSQIV HITSWMX SJ Â&#x2020;  %46 SJJIV EZEMPEFPI EX TEVXMGMTEXMRK HIEPIVW YRXMP XL .YRI  3JJIV I\GPYHIW 1+ >7 )\TPSVI % QMRMQYQ GYWXSQIV HITSWMX SJ  ETTPMIW XS EPP ZILMGPIW 'SRHMXMSREP 7EPI *MRERGI F] 1+ *MRERGMEP 7IVZMGIW '* =8 7YFNIGX XS WXEXYW EZEMPEFMPMX] ERH XIVQW ERH GSRHMXMSRW %TTPMGERXW QYWX FI  SV SZIV 4VMGIW EVI GSVVIGX EX XMQI SJ FIMRK TYFPMWLIH ERH EVI WYFNIGX XS GLERKI [MXLSYX RSXMGI 4PIEWI WII ]SYV PSGEP HIEPIV SV ZMWMX 1+GSYO JSV HIXEMPW


NEWS

Steve Cropley MY WEEK IN CARS

Cavalcade featured Land Rovers of all shapes and sizes

`

THURSDAY On a lightning-fast trip to Japan, I had a couple of spare hours to visit Toyota’s magnificent museum in Nagoya, not far from the company’s huge and businesslike HQ, and discovered a car collection of such breathtaking variety and interest that I’m already looking to my next visit. Toyota has chosen to illustrate the progress of its own cars by surrounding them with rivals that are relevant in terms of age, mechanical layout and design. It works a treat. You see beautiful cars from many countries, while appreciating how many superb cars Toyota itself built, especially around the time of its first great export push in the 1960s. No better way, for instance, to appreciate again the beauty and clever design of the original Corolla. My sentimental favourite was a pre-war Fiat Topolino, a car that’s been important to me since I saw Gregory Peck drive one in Roman Holiday about 100 years ago…

MONDAY Distinctly humbling for the allegedly professional hack to read former F1 driver Jolyon Palmer’s beautifully turned piece for the BBC Sport website, discussing whether Max Verstappen or Daniel Ricciardo was at fault in the recent, superheated Red Bull Battle of Azerbaijan. His verdict – near-equal fault on both sides – wasn’t a shock, but it was reached with an authority that would have eluded anyone but a former driver of very recent experience. Interesting to watch how expertise declines. David Coulthard has taken to TV presenting very well, but I’d say his days as a razor-sharp pundit are gone.

Fiat Topolino is a star turn in the Toyota museum

I’ve always felt guilty about paying to have a car cleaned a

in charge of) its past and deriving a sustainable income from it. It is a fantastic achievement.

TUESDAY Land Rover has always known how to stage happy events. The mood goes with the models; I see it as the reason so many of us (if we don’t have one) smoulder to own the proverbial ‘old Landie’. Thus, with hundreds of others, I enjoyed Land Rover’s 70th birthday celebrations: first a 70-car classic cavalcade (me at the wheel of a superb sand-coloured early Range Rover), then a party at JLR Classic’s works just outside Coventry. At what has seemed like a stroke, but obviously involved much more work behind the scenes, JLR has jumped from being a company that had its heritage mostly kept alive by enthusiasts and the media to a company truly in touch with (and

AND ANOTHER THING… Land Rover showed a suitably weathered Series 1 cake as the centrepiece of its 70th party. It was ceremonially sliced by CEO Ralf Speth and Nick Wilks, one of the founders’ sons, and we all had a slice to take home.

WEDNESDAY Still no acknowledgement of my recent note to the chancellor, asking whether the damage his recent new car taxes have done to the diesel market and thus vital UK businesses and jobs was the effect he had in mind. In past personal contacts with politicians, I’ve nearly always found them to be well-intentioned, principled people, but you have to wonder sometimes if there’s a special, secret ‘dunce chamber’ for the formulation of policy…

THURSDAY Nearly time to send my Toyota Prius plug-in to a new home, which means it needs a thorough clean at a cost of £20 via the hand-washers down the road from the office. From my teenage years, I’ve always felt guilty about paying to have a car cleaned, yet paradoxically I’ve always noticed how much more enjoyable and desirable a car feels when it’s immaculate inside and out. Fancy a new car and can’t afford it? Get your existing model valeted.

GET IN TOUCH

steve.cropley@haymarket.com

@StvCr

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 21


  

       


&$1 $ &$5 5($//< &+$1*( 7+( :$< <28 )((/ :+(1 '5,9,1*" 6$< +(//2 72 +<81'$,È¢6 38/6(48,&.(1,1* 3(5)250$1&( +$7&+

 

"

$OO WKHVH IHDWXUHV È&#x; SOXV WKURWWOH UHVSRQVH DQG VWHHULQJ ZHLJKW È&#x; DUH FRQWUROOHG ZLWK Ë&#x2039;YH GULYH PRGHV UDQJLQJ IURP (FR WR 1 &XVWRP %XW ZKDW GRHV DOO RI WKDW PHDQ EHKLQG WKH ZKHHO" :H ZDQWHG WR SURYH WKDW WKHUH LV PHDVXUDEOH SK\VLFDO UHDFWLRQ WR GULYLQJ WKH L 1 &DQ PRUH 530 UHDOO\ UDLVH \RXU %30" 7KDWÈ¢V ZK\ ZH JRW D JURXS RI 3LVWRQ+HDGV KRWKDWFK HQWKXVLDVWV WRRN WKHP WR WKH WLJKW WZLVW\ $QJOHVH\ &LUFXLW LQ 1RUWK :DOHV DQG JRW D VSRUWV VFLHQWLVW WR PHDVXUH WKHLU SK\VLRORJLFDO UHVSRQVH WR GULYLQJ WKH L 1 7KH UHVXOWV" 2XU 3LVWRQ+HDGHUVÈ¢ KHDUWUDWHV GRXEOHG È&#x; VRPHWLPHV WRSSLQJ ESP 7KHLU YHUGLFW RQ WKH FDU ZDV HTXDOO\ EUHDWKOHVV 1RW FRQYLQFHG" 3HUKDSV \RX VKRXOG WU\ RXW WKH +\XQGDL L 1 IRU \RXUVHOI DQG VHH LI LW JHWV \RXU KHDUW UDFLQJ

 

KH +\XQGDL L 1 KDV EHHQ GHVLJQHG WR GHOLYHU D GULYLQJ H[SHULHQFH WKDW LV IXQ DQG HQJDJLQJ RQ WKH URDG DQG DEVROXWHO\ WKULOOLQJ ZKHQ \RXÈ¢UH RQ WKH QRKROGVEDUUHG H[SDQVH RI D UDFH WUDFN :LWK D OLWUH WXUER HQJLQH WKDW GHOLYHUV XS WR 36 DQG 1P RI WRUTXH (OHFWURQLFDOO\ &RQWUROOHG 6XVSHQVLRQ DQG DQ DGYDQFHG (OHFWURQLF /LPLWHG 6OLS 'LIIHUHQWLDO WKDW ZDV VSHFLDOO\ HQJLQHHUHG E\ +\XQGDL IRU 1 3HUIRUPDQFH PRGHOV WKH L 1 FHUWDLQO\ KDV WKH SHUIRUPDQFH FUHGHQWLDOV WKDW PDWWHU ,QVLGH ORWV RI WUDFNIULHQGO\ IHDWXUHV DGG WKH IXQ IDFWRU È&#x; LQFOXGLQJ D Ë&#x2039;YH/(' VKLIW LQGLFDWRU ODXQFK FRQWURO UHYPDWFKLQJ IRU VPRRWKHU GRZQVKLIWV DQG DQ DFWLYH YDULDEOH H[KDXVW RQ 1 3HUIRUPDQFH PRGHOV WKDW OHWV \RX KHDU HYHU\ FUDFNOH DQG SRS IURP WKH WZLQSLSH H[KDXVW

7KH SHUIRUPDQFH RI WKH L 1 LV PLQGEORZLQJ È&#x; HVSHFLDOO\ RQWUDFN 7KH WKURWWOH UHVSRQVH DQG EDODQFH DUH IDQWDVWLF /XNH +DQFR[  %30

7KH WKLQJ WKDW LPSUHVVHG PH PRVW ZDV WKH OHYHO RI JULS È&#x; HVSHFLDOO\ ZKHQ WKH L 1 KDV VR PXFK SRZHU

,WÈ¢V D IDQWDVWLF FDU È&#x; UHDOO\ IXQ RQWUDFN ,WÈ¢V LPSUHVVLYH KRZ PXFK SHUIRUPDQFH \RX FDQ JHW RXW RI LW 'DQ &DUOLFN  %30

*HUDLQW -RQHV  %30

L 1 $YDLODEOH IURP e )LQG RXW PRUH DERXW WKH L 1 DW K\XQGDLFRXN


F I R ST D R I V E S N E W C A R S T E ST E D A N D R AT E D

TESTED 1.3.18, BELGIUM ON SALE JULY PRICE £18,995

FORD FIESTA ST Third-generation performance supermini takes a step in a more grown-up direction while hoping to retain its more playful side 24 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


emember when hot hatchbacks felt like a break from the rigorous commercial norm of the car business? Oddballs and extroverts like the Mitsubishi Colt Cyborg R, Citroën AX GT and Renault Clio V6. They certainly don’t make ’em like that any more. The modern descendants of these cars might still be fun to drive but, at least as far as the industry is concerned, they’re now not only serious cars but also serious moneymaking machines. Being seen as key ‘brand-builders’ by the companies producing them, hot superminis are now twice as popular in Europe as they were just five years ago. As a result, both the specification of this new, third-generation Ford Fiesta ST and the evident time and effort lavished on it by in-house tuning department Ford Performance echo that loud and clear. Coming along just a year after the launch of the seventh-generation Fiesta hatchback on which it’s based, the new ST has a list of hardware upgrades and performance features more lengthy and impressive, in many ways, than that of the car with which ‘Team RS’ built its modern reputation: the 2002 Focus RS. That it’s the first fast Fiesta to be available with a helical limited-slip differential for its driven front axle will be the headline-grabbing titbit plucked by many from its specification sheet (it’s optional, and supplied by Quaife). But this is actually a car with so much new and interesting technical content that I’ll do well to cover all of it and find enough room for driving impressions over the following pages. The car’s departure point is a Fiesta chassis braced in key areas on the underside of the body-in-white,

R

which is itself 14% more rigid than that of the standard car. The new ST also has the fastest steering rack and the stiffest torsion beam yet to be fitted to a performance Ford. It has particularly interesting suspension, too, which is well worth examining before we move on. Frequency selective dampers from Tenneco feature front and rear. They are double-valved in order to better handle both high- and lowfrequency inputs than a conventional passive damper could but they’re not ‘adaptive’ as such – just clever. Moreover, Ford fits asymmetrical, directionally wound springs onto the car’s rear axle, which are in effect bent into their fittings in order to apply a stabilising lateral force onto the rear wheels as well as performing the usual load-bearing job. The springs address a key problem that hot hatchbacks with twist-beam rear suspension have always had: that, in order to effectively locate the rear axle and deliver top-level handling precision, you have to fit very rigid suspension mounting bushes which have a detrimental effect on the ride. These ‘torque vectoring’ springs, says Ford, do as good a job as a Watt’s linkage in solving that problem and permit the fitment of much softer bushes. They’re also significantly lighter than a Watt’s linkage would be. The Fiesta ST has a dedicated front hub design of the sort becoming common among cars of its ilk. It has allowed Ford to lower the car’s ride height without lowering its front suspension roll centre too much, and it keeps control of front kingpin angle and wheel offset as necessary in order to avoid too much torque steer and bump steer. The spring ◊

Tyres are Michelin Pilot Super Sports; exhaust note is boosted via the stereo

Ford’s new 1.5-litre turbocharged three-pot makes 197bhp and 214lb ft 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 25


TESTER’S NOTE Why, if you’re bothering to engineer an active exhaust, would you also fit your new hot hatch with audio system engine noise synthesis? The Fiesta ST is one of many performance cars doing it, although even at its noisiest, it doesn’t sound too contrived. MS

This new Fiesta ST’s meaty, fixed-ratio steering offers sublime feel ∆ rate is slightly higher than that of the outgoing car but, as the engineers behind the car’s chassis development will tell you, the new damping and bushing in combination contribute to a more mature, rounded feel to the new car’s ride – and all without taking the all-important playful handling balance and cutting-edge response away from the handling. Those engineers will also tell you that while they loved the last Fiesta ST, it certainly had a yobby, antisocial ride that they simply couldn’t justify transferring directly onto this new version. But before you doubt them, these are the same engineers who,

halfway through the development programme, sent the Pilot Sport 4S tyres originally intended for the car back to Michelin and insisted only grippier Pilot Super Sports would do. The ST’s new engine is one about which, I dare say, you may already have read: an all-aluminium, threecylinder, 1.5-litre turbocharged motor which gives the car identical peak power and torque figures to those of the outgoing ST’s 1.6-litre four-pot, but which can also deactivate its middle cylinder and run on 66% of its normal swept volume in conditions of light load. That’s a three-cylinder

The new ST’s standout feature is its amazingly supple but controlled ride 26 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

engine capable of running on two: a car industry first. Upshot? A 20% improvement on lab-test fuel economy and CO2 emissions compared with the old ST. Perhaps of more interest, the new motor is also lighter than the one it replaces. This is also the first Fiesta ST to have selectable driving modes: Normal, Sport and Track. As you cycle through them, that engine gets fruitier and fruitier-sounding as its active exhaust and engine sound synthesising system combine to bring additional layers of noise. There’s a distant flavour of the original five-cylinder Focus ST both

about the way this engine warbles and its torquey mid-range feel. I’m not totally sold on the time it takes the crankshaft to slow down from high revs, I have to say (it’s a function of the counterbalance measures that three-pots need in order to run smoothly at low engine speeds). Can’t help wondering, either, how much faster the engine would spin, and how much more power it would develop, if Ford dropped the flywheel completely. Still, perhaps that’s just me. All in all, there’s certainly plenty of urgency, plenty of character and, in spite of the torque, a likeable willingness to rev. In lots of ways the Fiesta feels like the car it replaces: it has meaty, fixed-ratio steering with which it’s easy to gel in spite of its pace, as well as supreme handling response and brilliantly flat body control – which we’ll get to. But the way it rides is something else. Having only driven the car at a test track I can’t tell with certainty how it might deal with a British B-road, but there’s quite a lot more suppleness and ride dexterity here than there used to be. Over what lumps and bumps I could find on our test drive, over which the outgoing ST’s dampers might have bristled and its body fidgeted, the new model’s suspension just sucks up the punishment and lets you get on with it. Perhaps more importantly,


FIRST DRIVES

`

The ST has a three-cylinder engine capable of running on two: a car industry first

a

It’s grippier than before, more stable mid-corner and able to carry more speed through turns on surfaces over which drivers of the old ST might have felt the need to apologise to their passenger for the selfishness of their buying decision, I suspect you won’t in the new one. And that’s a bit of a revelation: a Fiesta ST that passes the girlfriend/ mother-in-law test. Hurrah. Equally brilliant is the car’s handling – although that much we expect of a Ford Performance product. The ST feels a shade more precise in its steering response than the last one did, turning in more crisply, gripping harder and staying slightly truer to your intended path

than its forebear did as the lateral load builds into the rear tyres. It’s certainly capable of carrying more cornering speed than the old car and it has a bit more mid-corner stability, while traction on corner exit is subtly but notably stronger than it was thanks to the machinations of that Quaife limited-slip diff. But fear not: the car is still a barrel of fun when you disengage the stability control and unload the rear axle. On a trailing throttle, the Fiesta can be teased into easily tamed oversteer more dependably and willingly than any other hot

supermini I can think of. Its handling balance and adjustability remain exceptional, and in a way that speaks volumes about the philosophy of chassis engineers who think a front-drive performance car that isn’t sensitive to controllable lift-off oversteer just isn’t worth their time and who can’t understand why so many of their rivals seem to be so afraid of the phenomenon that they try to engineer it out entirely. Lucky for Ford, I guess, that they are. Given how many new arrivals have lately come into the market niche that the last Fiesta ST so plainly

FULL OF THE JOYS OF SPRINGS FORD’S LATEST IDEA to address the fundamental limitations of a twist beam rear suspension – the force-vectoring spring – is simple, light and comparatively cheap. From underneath the Fiesta ST, the force-vectoring spring looks as if it has been bent into its mountings but is in fact wound asymmetrically. It applies a lateral force on the rear wheels that increases as the spring flexes. With one spring on each side, this force is equalled out when the rear suspension has no lateral load, but then works to resist the lateral forces that are building into it as you turn the steering wheel. With those forces in play, there is less burden on the rear suspension mounts to hold the rear axle in place and deliver good handling precision – and they can therefore be more compliant and deliver a better ride compromise.

Driving modes broaden ST’s appeal bossed, and how short our initial test drive was, we’ll leave the decision as to whether this car is another Ford Performance class-leader and worldbeater for another day. It’s right up there, mind you, and as good as any ST-badged Ford I’ve yet driven. And it’s none the worse as a driver’s car for what’s pretty plainly an attempt to give it a slightly broader sales appeal. When this year’s very best affordable performance cars are weighed and measured, the Fiesta ST will take some serious beating. MATT SAUNDERS

@TheDarkStormy1

FORD FIESTA ST Plenty of pace and character, a sophisticated ride and outstanding poise. A class leader in waiting

AAAAB £18,995 3 cyls in line, 1500cc (est), turbocharged, petrol Power 197bhp at 6000rpm Torque 214lb ft at 1600-4000rpm Gearbox 6-spd manual Kerb weight na 0-62mph 6.5sec Top speed 144mph Economy 55mpg (combined, est) CO2, tax band 114g/km, 23% RIVALS Volkswagen Polo GTI, Renault Clio 220 Trophy RS Price  Engine 

Partners and the mother-in-law will be more comfortable than in the old ST

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 27


TESTED 24.4.18, FR ANCE ON SALE NOW PRICE £143,305

MERCEDES-AMG G63 The iconic silhouette shrouds a wholesale reinvention that now makes this mighty and capable 4x4 a proper Range Rover rival


FIRST DRIVES unnar Güthenke – head of G-Class at Mercedes-Benz, where he’s known internally as Mr G – believes the people who buy this car fall into one of three categories. There are the ‘true off-roaders’, who, for either professional or recreational reasons, require a device capable of forging a path many would consider too challenging to undertake on foot. Then there are the aesthetes, who feel they can’t get a machine of such unique geometry and bravura anywhere else. The last group will be familiar to West Londoners, because this is the buying demographic that craves the most extravagant, bombastic creation to wear the three-pointed star. It’s a role that’s been comfortably filled since AMG began fettling the G-Class in 1999. The car’s history goes back rather a lot further in time than that, of course. Having been introduced in 1979, the G-Class is Mercedes’ longest-serving model, and it’s also the only one to have no specified ‘end of production’ in the diary. What you see before you represents the most significant upgrade the G-Class has undergone – one that aims to keep

G

all three cliques happy – and it’s no stretch to call it a ‘reinvention’. However, the biggest problem in reinventing an icon lies in knowing what to keep and what to change. In this case, Mercedes has improved almost everything underneath the aluminium skin but left the car’s demeanour well alone. It must have been tempting to increase the rake of the windscreen – less wind noise, more space for the vast digital dials embedded in the dashboard – but the change amounts to less than a single degree and so the fantastically elevated, abrupt view from the front seats remains. Similarly, the hinges of the doors remain visible, and much of the opening and closing mechanism has been carried over so owners can continue to enjoy that richly mechanical crunch. That’s precisely the sort of thing that matters to so many of those prepared to hand over the best part of £150,000. No surprise, then, that the bonnet-mounted indicators also remain, despite costing five times as much to develop as originally planned. Mercedes has safety regulations to thank for that. They stipulate ◊


FIRST DRIVES ∆ that the housing must be deformable from any angle and the light emitted be visible from road level less than a metre from the front of the car. Your passenger will still have the security of a broad dash-mounted grab handle too, although this being 2018 it’s now inlaid, most likely with carbonfibre. All occupants will also benefit from substantially more leg and shoulder room than before. Step from the old W463-generation car into the new one and the growth spurt is palpable. In fact, the new car has grown in every dimension, being 53mm longer, 64mm wider and 15mm taller than before. The other fundamental change to the G-Class is found within the interior. The architecture retains an old-school feel, with its squared-off panels, but that’s juxtaposed against two 12.3in displays mounted side by side. There are various parts borrowed from the E-Class but, for a hand-built car, it feels suitably opulent, not to mention comfortable. There is little here to upset the design junkies, then (moreover, this car looks far more convincing in the metal than in the pictures), although it is the driver who stands to gain most from the wholesale changes Mercedes has wrought. With the help of a new brace that links the front suspension turrets, the torsional rigidity of the ladder frame and bodyshell has increased by more than half. The G-Class has historically been guided by a low-

Exhaust note grabs attention and big brakes are needed to rein in a 2.5-tonne car capable of 0-62mph in 4.5sec geared recirculating ball set-up so infamously indirect that having only just turned the nose of the car in you’d need to begin unwinding the lock simply to avoid running horrifically wide on the exit. Owners have long complained about this, so there’s now electromechanical rack and pinion steering. Laying the foundations for such a change, Mercedes relinquished a rugged solid front axle in favour of using double wishbones mounted directly to the ladder frame (no subframe here). It has not been an easy job. To maintain the G-Class’s tremendous ground clearance, the AMG engineers tasked with the

design have had to position the lower wishbone’s attachment point as high as possible, fighting for every millimetre. Incidentally, ground clearance between the axles has increased by 6mm, to 241mm, and continues to better that of a Toyota Land Cruiser. You could fill a book with this car’s off-road vital statistics – breakover angles, wading depth and so on – but suffice it to say that when going gets tough, the new G-Class is superior to its predecessor in every measurable way, if only by a small margin. By contrast, out on the road – and particularly along those in Languedoc, whose bitumen flows

effortlessly – it is quickly apparent that this car now possesses an attribute that has for decades evaded it entirely: handling. In addition to the modernised front axle, there’s a new rigid rear axle that’s placed by four trailing arms with the continued use of a Panhard rod to prevent any undesirable lateral movement. There is body roll and it can be substantial if you’re really working the Goodyear Eagle F1 rubber fitted to AMG models, but the roll rate is suitably commensurate with steering inputs, allowing you to work the contact points. Likewise, with such a high centre of gravity to fight against, it’s not long before the front tyres are ◊

TESTER’S NOTE Remember the G63 6x6 of the previous generation? Or the 4x4 Squared? Or that grotesque amalgam, the G650 Landaulet? Güthenke refers to these extroverted models as “a tradition”, meaning we can expect future variants based on this new G-Class. RL

High-tech, lavishly equipped interior retains an old-school 4x4 driving position 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 31


         

ÕL 7i“LiÞ ˆÃ > ÌÀÕÞ Õ˜ˆµÕi “Տ̈‡Ãi>ܘ “i“LiÀň« ̅>Ì œvviÀà ܜÀ` V>Ãà …œÃ«ˆÌ>ˆÌÞ >˜` > }Õ>À>˜Ìii` Ãi>Ì >Ì Ãœ“i œv 7i“LiÞ -Ì>`ˆÕ“½Ã Lˆ}}iÃÌ iÛi˜Ìð 9œÕÀ “i“LiÀň« ˆ˜VÕ`ià ̈VŽiÌà ̜\

U “ˆÀ>Ìià è Õ« ˆ˜> U “ˆÀ>Ìià è Õ« -i“ˆ‡ˆ˜>Ã U >À>L>œ Õ« ˆ˜> U /…i è œ““Õ˜ˆÌÞ -…ˆi` U ˜}>˜` -i˜ˆœÀ i˜½Ã ˆ˜ÌiÀ˜>̈œ˜>Ã >Ì 7i“LiÞ *Õà «ÀˆœÀˆÌÞ >VViÃà ̜ ̅i Lˆ}}iÃÌ Vœ˜ViÀÌ >˜` ëœÀ̈˜}à iÛi˜Ìà >Ì 7i“LiÞ] ˆ˜VÕ`ˆ˜} LœÝˆ˜} >˜` ° /œ vˆ˜` œÕÌ “œÀi\ Ã>iÃJÜi“LiÞÃÌ>`ˆÕ“°Vœ“ änää ÇnÎ £{{ä VÕLÜi“LiÞ°Vœ“

      


FIRST DRIVES

This is still a` machine those of a retiring disposition will tire of quickly

a

New-found cruising refinement has been achieved without diluting its ability to perform away from sealed roads ∆ chirping with understeer, but the remarkable thing is that you can accurately predict when that point will arrive and drive accordingly. Play by its rules – be patient on corner entry, basically – and you can get the G63 to adopt a satisfying rear-led balance as you knead progressively more torque into the road surface. It’s old-fashioned if slightly cantankerous fun – farcically quick too – and the decision to adjust the torque split from 50/50 to a rear-biased 60/40 certainly hasn’t hurt the dynamics. The ride quality has dramatically improved too. All G-Class models

will use adaptive suspension, and although there’s still a consistent lowfrequency jostle, it’s subtle enough that you might just consider this car as a long-range rival for a Range Rover or Porsche Cayenne. Barring the odd clunk from a differential and the wind noise at speed, usability and refinement are now a significant part of the G-Class package. But let’s return to the subject of torque, because it’s remarkable that it has taken so long to get to the heart of the matter. In the case of the G63, that heart is MercedesAMG’s M178 4.0-litre twin-turbo V8.

Tuned for duties in a two-and-a-halftonne off-roader, it develops 577bhp at 6000rpm and a bewildering 627lb ft at 2500-3500rpm, making it more potent even than its dry-sumped sibling in the Mercedes-AMG GT R supercar. Top speed is 137mph, but it is a 0-62mph of 4.5sec that widens the eyes. The engine operates through a Mercedes 9G-Tronic torque-converter transmission with quite outstanding aural pomposity, and while not quite as serrated as the 5.5-litre M157 unit, its more hulking tone matches the old boy for sheer volume. Cruise anywhere

remotely near a parallel structure and there’s no doubt the exhausts exit to the sides, so for all its new-found sophistication, this is still a machine those of a retiring disposition will tire of quickly. The G500 and G350d variants will differ in this sense, but neither is yet confirmed for the UK. With so much to take in, a full road test of this G-Class is certainly warranted. What’s clear is that it’s a machine that has comprehensively redefined its bandwidth while richly retaining its core character. RICHARD LANE

@_rlane_

MERCEDES-AMG G63 OFF-ROAD ELECTRONICS BUT OLD-SCHOOL FEEL For those of a certain linguistic persuasion, the mere act of being seen in one of these cars will mean they have themselves entered ‘G-Mode’. As far as Mercedes is concerned, the term refers to the driving program initiated when one of the car’s three 100% differential locks or off-road reduction gear is engaged. In the interests of increased precision on unforgiving terrain, the damping, steering, gearbox and throttle characteristics alter to give the G-Class the best chance of scaling whatever obstacles lie ahead. You won’t find ‘push-button’ settings such as hill descent

control in here because Mercedes wants to retain an old-school feel. It was also interesting to hear that, during testing of rivals, the development team found the Range Rover to be hamstrung by its hyperactive electronics on the most extreme terrain: it’d simply freeze on the spot. This is one reason why the G-Class relies on the dependability of three locking differentials.

G-Class has been tamed and yet also permitted to express its extraordinary character in all the right places

AAAAC £143,305 V8, 3982cc, twin-turbo, petrol Power 577bhp at 6000rpm Torque 627lb ft at 2500-3500rpm Gearbox 9-spd automatic Kerb weight 2485kg 0-62mph 4.5sec Top speed 137mph Economy 22.8mpg CO2, tax band 299g/km, 37% RIVALS Range Rover Autobiography, Porsche Cayenne Turbo Price  Engine 

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 33


            +     

            +                                                         +   

       +               '#%&&. ' %,"%'% 4, 6 !+         2  2   ) 2(77

* (+72(7+52(5+(/ 6$       576 2

)      )* + 0( 26770*+         + 67(1   +    +  -


FIRST DRIVES TESTED 30.4.18, OXON ON SALE NOW PRICE £18,040

MINI COOPER 5DR Tech and design are the main focus of this mid-life facelift MAZDA MX-5 Z-SPORT Price £25,610 On sale Now What’s new? UK-only special edition gains snazzy alloys, a new roof and plenty of kit

ven for a mid-life facelift, the changes Mini has made to its F55-generation hatch are minimal, and pertain chiefly to the infotainment system and design, which is now partly customisable. As such, the Cooper model tested still touts a peppy 134bhp from a turbocharged three-cylinder engine, although you can now choose a seven-speed dual-clutch transmission rather than the sixspeed manual that is standard. One way to tell a 2018 Mini from a pre-facelift version is by looking at the tail-lights. Should they exhibit a Union Jack motif, that’ll be the new one. The daytime-running element of the standard LED headlights is also now a complete ring, within which the indicator is integrated, and it’s now possible to replace the exterior brightwork with piano-black

E

trim, which looks rather fetching. You might accuse the BMW mothership of contemptible complacency in launching a car so light on revisions, but Mini’s marketers have found design to be the main driver of sales for these relatively expensive superminis. It’s why owners will now have the option of ordering bespoke parts for the wing-badges and dashboard insert on the passenger side, as well as laser-etched sillplates. There is a sophisticated new online configurator to reflect the multitudinous 3D-printed options. You’ll have to tack £2000 onto the asking price for the Navigation Plus package that addresses the second most important criterion for Mini buyers: infotainment. The pack brings sat-nav, which uses realtime traffic information, and Apple

CarPlay connectivity. From July, the system will also be compatible with Amazon’s voice assistant, Alexa. With no hardware alterations, the manner in which this car operates is unchanged from before, which is to say it’s pleasingly crisp not just by the standards of a five-door supermini but also by those of any hatchback class. This is a chassis that grips and turns like it actually wants to, and anybody coming from a Volkswagen Polo will be surprised by how indulgently nimble it is. They will, however, have to recalibrate their inputs for a steering rack that’s still a touch too quick and whose slight elasticity manifests as inconsistency mid-corner. The ride also remains on the firm side, which won’t be to everybody’s taste. RICHARD LANE

@_rlane_

MINI COOPER 5DR Ungainly dimensions remain, but this is still a well-mannered little driver’s car that benefits from new tech

AAAAC £18,040 3 cyls, 1499cc, turbocharged, petrol Power 134bhp at 4500-6000rpm Torque 162lb ft at 1480-4200rpm Gearbox 6-spd manual Kerb weight 1160kg 0-62mph 8.2sec Top speed 129mph Economy 55.4mpg CO2, tax band 120g/km, 25% RIVALS Suzuki Swift Sport, VW Polo 1.0 SEL, Ford Fiesta Price  Engine 

The Cooper is spacious up front, though leg room is in short supply behind

THIS IS THE second MX-5 to bear Mazda’s Z-Sport moniker, following the third-generation model from 2007. This time the special edition is limited to just 300 examples and is based on the standard 2.0-litre Sport Nav trim. Changes are purely cosmetic, with the convertible gaining a cherry red fabric roof, 17in black BBS alloys, Machine Grey Metallic paint and Z-Sport badging in the cabin. To drive, it’s business as usual, with the Z-Sport retaining the standard car’s keen handling, precise gearshift and peppy 158bhp engine. While it comes fully loaded as far as kit is concerned, the special edition commands a £1215 premium over the top-tier Sport Nav trim. SD

AAAAC

KIA STINGER 2.2 CRDi GT-LINE S Price £37,725 On sale Now What’s new? Kia’s flagship drops thirsty petrol engines in favour of an economical diesel lump

IF YOU’RE SOLD on the striking looks of Kia’s new flagship but don’t fancy the high fuel bills that will come with a 3.3-litre, twin-turbocharged 365bhp V6 engine, this 2.2-litre diesel variant could be for you. It retains all of the range-topping model’s appeal – think generous standard spec, balanced rear-driven chassis and impressive long-distance touring ability – only it comes with a claimed economy figure of 48.7mpg. Sure, it’s not as fast or theatrical as the V6, but it ticks all the right boxes in terms of cruising refinement. There’s enough shove to make overtaking painless, and at motorway speeds the CRDi powerplant is hushed and not intrusive. SD

AAABC R E AD MOR E ONLINE

autocar.co.uk 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 35


ROAD TEST No 5370

PORSCHE 718 CAYMAN Porsche seeks to answer its Cayman critics with a new range-topping model MODEL TESTED GTS

PHOTOGRAPHY WILL WILLIAMS

Price £59,866

36 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

Power 361bhp Torque 310lb ft 0-60mph 4.8sec 30-70mph in fourth 7.1sec Fuel economy 28.4mpg CO2 emissions 205g/km 70-0mph 41.5m


ROAD TEST he Porsche Cayman is a sports car in search of a missing Autocar road test half star. Throughout the life cycle of the current 718 Cayman’s two predecessors, the original 987 generation and the succeeding 981 were hailed as outstanding five-star affordable sports car class champions on these pages. Their dominance was utterly complete and largely unchallenged and even encompassed two outright wins in our annual Britain’s Best Driver’s Car supertest. But since this 982-generation version came along two years ago, with its choice of slightly unlovely

T

boxer four-pot turbocharged engines, something has been missing. Enough that, when we road tested the 2.5-litre 718 Cayman S in 2016, the enthusiasm of our recommendation was checked by that crucial half star. So is now the time for the Cayman to reclaim its old status? Step forward the subject of road test number 5370: the new top-of-the-range 718 Cayman GTS. This is the second Cayman to get a GTS derivative, but if you’re a little unsure of exactly what that badge means and where this car will ultimately rank in the hierarchy of high-performance Caymans, think of it this way: Porsche intends its GTS derivatives to be cars of enhanced performance and handling precision, but delivered in a style suited to everyday road use. It also distinguishes them with a generous standard equipment level and with some unique design and material touches to broaden their appeal. And so the long and short of it is that this won’t be the ‘ultimate’ hot Cayman of the current crop: another GT4- or R-badged range-topper will come along eventually with even more power, grip and track-ready purpose. Porsche’s history with the GTS nameplate runs back to a version of the 904 from 1963 and includes versions of the 924 and 928 coupés of the 1980s and 1990s. The derivative was revived, defined in its current ‘high performance meets high style’ philosophy, on a Cayenne in 2007 and then on a version of the ‘997’-generation 911 three years later.

DESIGN AND ENGINEERING

AAAAC Straight away, you can tell a GTS apart from its lesser 718 Cayman and Cayman S siblings by its dark accents and restyled bumpers. The tinted lenses, blackened tips of the centrally mounted exhaust and dark intake blades sitting within the opened-up nose imbue the car’s familiar prettiness with a more confrontational tone. With 361bhp at 6500rpm, the GTS gets a slightly more potent iteration of Porsche’s new-generation 2.5-litre twin-turbocharged flat four. That figure represents a 16bhp improvement on the Cayman S and twice that over this car’s sixcylinder predecessor, and it’s the result of a newly developed intake plenum and some fettling to the twin-scroll turbocharger of the drysumped boxer engine. But is a 16bhp power hike, coming without any improvement in torque at all ◊

WE LIKE

Purposeful track handling z Stellar B-road body control and agility z Desirability and usability WE DON’T LIKE

Needs more torque or shorter gear ratios – or both z Handling adjustability hard to unlock z Doesn’t sound much better than any other Cayman

z Small rear wing automatically sits up at speed, although there’s a button inside to raise or lower it manually. It’s body-coloured as standard but can be ordered in gloss-black, as seen here.

z Diffuser element of the rear bumper is accentuated for the GTS, which also gets the Sports exhaust – with its blackout tips – as standard.

z Wheels have 265/35 rear tyres and 235/35s at the front. They’re 20in items borrowed from the 911 Carrera S. Yellow calipers denote the use of optional carbon-ceramic brake discs.

z Bi-xenon headlights with four-point daytime-running LEDs are standard issue for the GTS. Dynamic Light System Plus, whose high-beam adapts to oncoming traffic, is optional.

z Front apron has been spliced open and given new intake blades, which like much of the car’s exterior detailing – including the slim front splitter – are blacked out.

z For traffic behind, there’ll be no mistaking who builds this car thanks to the ‘sweatband’ logo Porsche has introduced for the 718-generation Cayman and Boxster models.

z Tail-light units are integrated neatly into the band that spans the rear of the car and feature a two-tier LED design that’s instantly recognisable.

z Substantial air intakes embedded in the car’s rear haunches hint at a turbocharged powerplant, just like on the 911 Turbo.

Previous Cayman GTS model was the first 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 37


z Mode dial for the Sport Chrono package sits neatly within the spokes of the steering wheel. It manages presets for the exhaust, engine and damping.

z Bucket seats are a pricey addition and won’t suit everybody’s backside, but they look the part, especially with ‘GTS’ embroidery.

M U LT I M E D I A S YS T E M

++++C The Porsche Communication Management system’s screen in the Cayman GTS might be only 7.0in in diameter but it sits nicely flush within the dashboard and, frankly, you don’t need anything larger in a small sports car. Connect Plus comes as standard and includes Apple CarPlay, internet access and a tracking system for which a subscription is required. A reversing camera will

38 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

set you back just over a grand, though. With physical dials for the volume and the zoom function of the satellite navigation but impressive little latency when you do use the touchscreen, this system is both quick and intuitive to use. Our only significant criticism is that although the matt finish looks good in low light, it catches the sun easily, rendering the display unreadable at times.

z Gearlever of our test car is inlaid with carbonfibre. It’s a straightforward design, and all the better for it. Swapping cogs is a pleasure.


ROAD TEST ∆ unless you opt for a car equipped with a PDK dual-clutch gearbox, enough for the GTS – especially given the step from Cayman to Cayman S is worth three times the power hike? It’s certainly a valid question. The car’s electromechanical steering is unchanged from the Cayman S’s and there remains a choice of either a six-speed manual transmission or a seven-speed dualclutcher. Opting for the latter drops Porsche’s 0-60mph acceleration claim from 4.4sec to as low as 3.9sec, although both cars will hit 180mph without the need for an optional package that uninhibits the ECU. We opted to test the manual. Even with a trio of pedals and a compact engine squeezed between the cabin and the rear axle, this isn’t quite the back-to-basics sports car purity you might imagine. Opting for a GTS means torque vectoring and Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) as standard, and the car rides 10mm lower than a regular Cayman S. To lower the centre of gravity further still, optional PASM Sport suspension places the aluminium and steel monocoque another 10mm closer to the road, and our test car was so equipped. This chassis uses MacPherson struts for suspension at each corner

just as any other Cayman’s does, although the GTS’s anti-roll bars are stiffened on account of the less compromising, precision-led GTS mission statement. You also get Porsche Torque Vectoring, a mechanical limited-slip differential, dynamic gearbox mounts and 20in alloy wheels as standard, all of which would come at extra cost on an S.

INTERIOR

AAAAA If there’s anything the Cayman does better than its rivals within the cabin, it is to blend simplicity and functionality with a luxury touch. In the case of our test car, were you to close your eyes and reach out in any direction, the overwhelming likelihood is that your fingertips would meet leather, Alcantara or optional carbonfibre. As always with Porsche, it’s possible to specify a broad range of fabric combinations – from Alcantara for the top of the dashboard to a leather-clad fuse-box cover – but whatever you decide, you’ll not find a stitch out of place. Furthermore, any plastic will be of high quality and limited largely to switchgear, stalks and cowlings. Perceived quality ranks alongside that of the 911, which is itself a strong performer in its own elevated class. That’s the luxury. As for ◊

z Alcantara-festooned GTS cabin manages to feel simultaneously cosseting and spacious. Seatbelts that match the exterior paint colour are a nice touch.

Width 680mm

max

HOW BIG IS IT?

275 litres

ax

150 litres

mm 60m

1286mm

970m m

0.32

10

Length 430mm Height 620mm

Kerb weight: 1375kg 2475mm 4393mm

VISIBILITY Good in all directions. A reversing camera, which comes packaged with ParkAssist parking sensors, is handy when parallel parking.

HEADLIGHTS

z Nose-mounted boot is 150 litres, which is large enough to house a large duffel bag and perhaps another smaller item of luggage.

Optional adaptive LED headlights are powerful on main beam and have a well-set dip level. Height 210-350mm

circle: 11.0m Turning

90mm

15mm 130mm

1527mm

Width 750-1180mm Length 380mm

Centre

1535mm

1801mm 1994mm

W H E E L A N D P E DA L ALIGNMENT Pedals are slightly offset, but only enough to make the brake more comfortable for your right foot. Heel-and-toe changes are easy.

z Cayman packs 275 litres of space in the back. That’s impressive, although how useful it is will ultimately depend on the dimensions of the luggage items.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 39


∆ functionality, look no further than the brace of big storage boots at either end of the car, making this so much more practical than most two-seaters. Simplicity, meanwhile, comes in the joy of a GT sport steering wheel – diameter just 360mm – that is entirely devoid of clutter save for a drive mode dial that’s part of the standard-fit Sport Chrono package on the GTS. Beyond it sits the tachometer, central in the instrument binnacle. Either side are the speedometer and a digital dial that can scroll through navigation and media menus as well as the trip computer and interesting snippets such as boost pressure and instantaneous torque output. Atop the high transmission tunnel sits the perfectly placed gearlever for the manual transmission. The GTS gets two-way adjustable sports seats as standard, with the option to upgrade to 18-way adaptive sport seats for £1990. Our car’s £2315 sports bucket seats look marvellous and are tremendously supportive but can pinch at the base of the rib cage if your composition differs from

what Porsche has catered for. But whichever seat you choose, the lowslung driving environment of the GTS delivers everything you would expect of a mid-engined sports car, with plenty of material quality and practicality to spare.

PERFORMANCE

AAAAC To anyone who has been wondering exactly what 16bhp is worth to a 2.5-litre Cayman in terms of straightline speed, we’ll spare you the big build-up. The truth is, it’s not much. When we recorded the performance of the Cayman S in 2016, we tested a car with 20in alloy wheels and a manual gearbox (in both ways, a match for our GTS test car); and it needed 4.8sec to hit 60mph from rest, 10.5sec to reach 100mph and 13.4sec for a standing quarter mile. The GTS suffers with a similar restriction to engine power during initial launch (which we’ll come on to describing) and needs precisely the same 4.8sec to hit 60mph as its lesser sibling. It goes on to shave 0.3sec off the S’s time both to 100mph and over

a standard quarter, of course; but that’s far from exceptional pace for a £60,000 sports car. The BMW M2 we tested in 2016 was quicker in some respects, and the Audi TT RS quicker across the board. We might have seen a stronger accelerative showing, of course, if the Cayman’s electronics weren’t at such pains to protect its transmission from harm. Just like the Cayman S, the GTS won’t let you use what feels like more than 50% throttle and about 4000rpm while the clutch is disengaged. Since the car’s rear tyres are sufficiently wide and first gear is sufficiently tall that it could plainly handle more torque than the ECU will allow to freely flow until such time as the clutch is fully ‘out’, that must have cost the car at least a couple of tenths of a second against the clock. It also continues to seem unlike a Porsche to deny its driver ultimate control of any of its major mechanicals. Thankfully, on both road and track, the powertrain is far less of an impediment. That new induction system makes the engine slightly keener to work at high crank speeds

than in a 2.5-litre S, so it revs with pleasing freedom and always feels potent enough. But if you didn’t like the way it sounds in an S, you’re unlikely to go a bundle on the irregular, vaguely spluttery rortiness of Porsche’s flat four in the GTS. If, on the other hand, you think a fourcylinder motor with a responsive and linear delivery that revs all the way to 7500rpm can’t be bad in a compact sports car, you’ll likely find little to dislike here. Our testers were split down the middle. The shift quality of the six-speed gearbox is great, so it’s a pleasure to row up and down its intermediate ratios, but you do need to do plenty of rowing to make the car feel genuinely fast. There is a lovely symmetry to the spacing of those intermediate ratios, but at times you do wish the car was simply shorter-geared.

RIDE AND HANDLING

AAAAB The truest measure of a sports car’s greatness is always going to be the manner in which it rises to the challenge set by a particularly testing

T R AC K N O T E S The 718 Cayman GTS has enormously tenacious grip on a dry track. That it set an identical benchmark lap time as the Cayman S we road tested in 2016 surprised everyone. However, the GTS felt ready to be driven a fair bit quicker – albeit only with greater commitment than we were ready to supply on the day. The car’s stability on the limit is formidable, its rear axle able to carry as much apex speed as your bravery will permit without breaking away – and declining most attempts to unstick it for the purposes of amusement. In PSM Sport mode, meanwhile, its stability control system allows plenty of slip angle before intruding. In the wet, the GTS felt a little more direct and highly strung than we’re used to from a Cayman. It didn’t handle standing water as well and its handling wasn’t as forgiving beyond the limit of grip. By sports car standards, though, it coped well.

z You can be super-ambitious with your entry speed into T7 and still be confident of the car’s stability. T6 T2 T5

T3

D RY C I R C U I T Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 1min 12.9sec BMW M2 M DCT (2016) 1min 13.4sec

T7

T1 T4

Start/finish

z Carbon-ceramic brakes need a good press for the big stop into T5.

WET CIRCUIT Porsche 718 Cayman GTS 1min 8.9sec BMW M2 M DCT (2016) na

z A bit of lift-off oversteer can be a helping hand at T2, but the GTS’s rear axle won’t indulge in it readily. T3

T5

T6 T7

T4

T2

T1

T8 z Standing water around T7 can disturb the chassis if you’ve set up a long slide.

Start/finish

AC C E L E R AT I O N Porsche 718 Cayman GTS (12deg C, dry) Standing quarter mile 13.1sec at 113.0mph, standing km 23.2sec at 146.1mph, 30-70mph 3.6sec, 30-70mph in fourth 7.1sec 30mph

40

2.2s 2.8

50

3.8s

60

70mph

4.8s 5.7s

80mph

90mph

7.3s

8.7s

0

100mph

10.2s

110mph

12.5s

120mph

14.6s

130mph

140mph

17.2s

21.0s

10s

150mph

25.0s

20s

Audi TT RS Coupé (2016, 8deg C, damp) Standing quarter mile 12.0sec at 119.6mph, standing km 21.7sec at 151.6mph, 30-70mph 3.0sec, 30-70mph in fourth 6.5sec 30mph

40

50

60

1.6s 2.2 2.9 3.6

70mph

80mph

90mph

100mph

4.6s

5.7s

6.9s

8.4s

0

110mph

10.2s

120mph

12.1s

130mph

14.6s

140mph

150mph

17.7s

21.2s

10s

20s

BRAKING

60-0mph: 2.48sec Porsche 718 Cayman GTS (12deg C, dry) 30mph-0

50mph-0

7.7m

21.1m

0

10m

20m

70mph-0

41.5m 30m

40m

Audi TT RS Coupé (2016, 8deg C, damp) 30mph-0

50mph-0

8.0m 0

40 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

70mph-0

22.1m 10m

20m

43.6m 30m

40m


ROAD TEST

` The engine revs with freedom and always feels potent enough a

stretch of B-road. In this respect, the Cayman GTS rises and shines as well as you’d ever hoped it might. The car’s combination of narrow body, short wheelbase, low centre of gravity, mid-engined weight distribution and rear-drive layout works spellbindingly well. It makes for a car that feels supremely agile and delicately balanced and poised at road speeds and one that juggles body control against bump absorption breathtakingly well. The steering rack, at 2.5 turns lock to lock, manages to feel responsive without quite adding a note of nervousness to the car’s handling, and it’s also well weighted and fairly communicative despite its electromechanical architecture. It doesn’t have the unfettered feel of, say, a Lotus Evora’s helm but blends feedback against ease of use cleverly. The optional PASM Sport suspension, meanwhile, does a superb job of keeping the car’s lateral body roll in check and making reactions that were already keen even more immediate. It also works in partnership with those wider tyres to provide an order of outright sticking power that is way beyond the level of most sports cars. However, the caveat is that a modicum of the handling adjustability and playfulness for which the Cayman is famed is missing in the GTS; or, at least, is much harder to access, even on a circuit. Some will value the more serious disposition that the uprated chassis lends the GTS, but there was a sense among our testers that the

regular Cayman S’s combination of more supple chassis and slighter grip level made for a sports car that was more fun more of the time.

BUYING AND OWNING

AAAAC In a very simplistic sense, spending £60,000 on a 361bhp sports car may not seem like great performance value – but it isn’t terrible, either. Moreover, if you invest a bit of time messing around on Porsche’s online configurator, you can quickly convince yourself that a 718 Cayman GTS is an utter steal. Dress up a Cayman S to have the same wheels, lowered sports suspension with PASM, locking rear differential, sports exhaust and Sport Chrono package (all standard on the GTS) and what started as a £51,853 car ends up incredibly close to the GTS’s £59,866 asking price. And you still won’t have the added power, design tweaks and interior luxuries that are thrown in with the GTS, either. This being a Porsche, though, it has an options list that isn’t dissimilar to a magician’s hat, in that it runs deep and is full of surprises. Our test car came in at £76,673 after options such as ceramic-composite brakes (£5177), ‘Crayon’ exterior paint (£1658) and sports bucket seats (£2315). As for depreciation, the GTS also trumps the standard S car with a forecasted retained value after 36 months and 36,000 miles of 62%, versus 60% for the S. Over the same time frame, the Porsche also betters the Alpine A110 (56%) and a 375bhp Jaguar F-Type V6 (48%). ◊

z It’s agile and poised at road speeds but its limpet-like grip means that its handling behaviour is less receptive than a Cayman S to a keen driver’s playful interjections.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 41


DATA L O G PORSCHE 718 C AY M A N G T S £59,866 £76,673 £37,400 £779 82 pence 42/£1033

EQUIPMENT CHECKLIST

R A N G E AT A G L A N C E POWER 296bhp 345bhp 361bhp

FROM £42,897 £51,853 £59,866

TRANSMISSIONS 6-spd manual 7-spd dual-clutch automatic

£2303

ECONOMY TEST

Track Touring Average

CLAIMED

Urban 23.0mpg Extra-urban 40.4mpg Combined 31.4mpg Tank size Test range

11.0mpg 39.0mpg 28.4mpg

64 litres 400 miles

T E C H N I C A L L AYO U T Longways boxer four-cylinder engine sits just ahead of the rear axle line, with the six-speed manual gearbox slung out behind it and mounted via dynamic mounts in order to better locate its mass during limit handling. Suspension is via MacPherson struts front and rear. Weight was distributed 45/55 front to rear on MIRA’s weighbridge.

POWER & TORQUE

ENGINE Installation

Steel monocoque 1375kg/1390kg 0.32 8.0Jx20in (f), 10.0Jx20in (r) 235/35 ZR20 88Y (f), 265/35 ZR20 95Y (r), Pirelli P Zero Mobility kit

BRAKES

SAFET Y

Front MacPherson struts, coil springs, adaptive dampers, anti-roll bar Rear MacPherson struts, coil springs, adaptive dampers, anti-roll bar

Front Rear Anti-lock

PSM, ABS, EBD, EBA Euro NCAP crash rating Not tested

450

450

361bhp at 6500rpm

400

310lb ft at 1900-5000rpm

350

400 350

STEERING Type Electromechanical, rack and pinion Turns lock to lock 2.5 Turning circle 11.0m

AC C E L E R AT I O N I N G E A R mph 20-40 30-50 40-60 50-70 60-80 70-90 80-100 90-110 100-120 110-130 120-140 130-150 140-160

2nd 2.3 1.9 1.9 2.0 -

3rd 3.9 2.8 2.6 2.6 2.6 2.8 3.1 -

4th 5.1 3.8 3.2 3.3 3.3 3.3 3.5 3.7 4.1 4.8 -

5th 5.4 4.2 3.8 3.9 4.1 4.2 4.5 4.8 5.3 6.0 6.7 -

6th 7.1 5.5 4.7 4.8 4.9 5.2 5.4 5.7 6.3 7.0 8.1 -

300

250

250

200

200

150

150

TRANSMISSION

100

100

Type 6-spd manual Ratios/mph per 1000rpm 1st 3.31/6.3 2nd 1.95/10.7 3rd 1.41/14.8 4th 1.13/18.5 5th 0.95/22.0 6th 0.81/25.8 Final drive ratio 3.89:1

50

50

Engine (rpm) 2000 4000 6000

0 0

0

8000

350mm carbon-ceramic discs 350mm carbon-ceramic discs Standard, with brake assist

Spare

E M I S S I O N S & TA X Idle 49dB Max rpm in 3rd gear 92dB 30mph 65dB 50mph 71dB 70mph 75dB

MAX SPEEDS IN GEAR

CO2 emissions Tax at 20/40% pcm

205g/km £369/£738

R E S I D UA L S 70

Porsche 718 Cayman GTS

47mph 111mph 165mph

60

7500rpm 7500rpm 7500rpm

1

3

40 30 20

2

4

6

80mph 139mph 180mph* 7500rpm 7500rpm 6985rpm *claimed

Jaguar F-Type V6 S 380 R-Dynamic Coupé

50

5

RPM in 6th at 70/80mph = 2716/3104 THE SMALL PRINT Power-to-weight and torque-to-weight figures are calculated using manufacturer’s claimed kerb weight. © 2018, Haymarket Media Group Ltd. Test results may not be reproduced without editor’s written permission. For information on the 718 Cayman GTS, contact Customer Services, Porsche Cars GB, Bath Rd, Calcot, Reading, RG31 7SE (0118 930 3666, porsche.com/uk ). Cost-per-mile figures calculated over three years/36,000 miles, including depreciation and maintenance but not insurance; Lex Autolease (0800 389 3690). Insurance quote covers 35-year-old professional male with clean licence and full no-claims bonus living in Swindon; quote from Liverpool Victoria (0800 066 5161, lv.com). Contract hire figure based on a three-year lease/36,000-mile contract including maintenance; Wessex Fleet Solutions (01722 322888).

Tyres

300

CABIN NOISE

MPH 0-30 0-40 0-50 0-60 0-70 0-80 0-90 0-100 0-110 0-120 0-130 0-140 0-150 0-160

42 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

Construction Weight/as tested Drag coefficient Wheels

SUSPENSION

AC C E L E R AT I O N TIME (sec) 2.2 2.8 3.8 4.8 5.7 7.3 8.7 10.2 12.5 14.6 17.2 21.0 25.0 -

C H A S S I S & B O DY

Mid, longitudinal, rear-wheel drive Type 4 cyls horizontally opposed, 2497cc, twin-turbo, petrol Made of Aluminium block and head Bore/stroke 102.0mm/76.4mm Compression ratio 9.5:1 Valve gear 4 per cyl Power 361bhp at 6500rpm Torque 310lb ft at 1900-5500rpm Redline 7500rpm Power to weight 263bhp per tonne Torque to weight 225lb ft per tonne Specific output 145bhp per litre

Torque (lb ft)

ENGINES 2.0 2.5 S 2.5 GTS

64 litres

Power output (bhp)

20in alloy wheels, PASM suspension Sport Chrono package with drive mode switch Porsche Communication Management infotainment with navigation, Apple CarPlay, 8-speaker audio, DAB PTV torque vectoring, limited-slip diff ‘Crayon’ paint £1658 GTS interior package £2096 GTS Alcantara package £1242 LED headlights including PDLS Plus £1397 ParkAssist parking sensors with reversing camera £1086 Rear wing, window trims, door handles and headlight elements painted high-gloss black £801 PASM Sports suspension £168 PCCB carbon-ceramic brakes £5177 Sports bucket seats £2315 Cruise control £228 Options in bold fitted to test car = Standard

Value (£1000s)

On-the-road price Price as tested Value after 3yrs/36k miles Contract hire pcm Cost per mile Insurance/typical quote

Alfa Romeo 4C Coupé

10 0 New

1 year

2 years

3 years

4 years

z High-end Cayman is expected to hold its value very well indeed over a typical three-year ownership period.

R OA D T E S T N o 5370

Read all of our road tests autocar.co.uk


ROAD TEST

VERDICT TESTERS’ N O T E S

PORSCHE 718 CAYMAN Outstanding in lots of ways but, so far, less Cayman may still be more

AAAAB t’s a mark of the completeness of the 718 Cayman that it plays an almost equally convincing hand at a near-£60,000 price as it does at just north of £40,000. No rival can quite shade it – even in new top-of-the-range form – in 2018. By a whisker, though, the GTS isn’t quite our favourite Cayman, and it doesn’t quite seem to be the perfect, added-excitement Cayman flagship it could have been. For anyone crying out for greater richness, performance and character from the Cayman’s flat four engines, the GTS doesn’t provide too much. Its four-cylinder boxer still isn’t as aurally thrilling as you’d like and it could plainly offer some more spectacular fireworks. Meanwhile, what the GTS does serve up – added grip, body control, security and handling immediacy – begins to look like a superfluous mix of ‘improvements’ in a car whose chassis is an awfully long way from broken in its ‘lesser’ states of tune. That said, the Cayman GTS has no shortage of selling points and its brilliance can easily bear a £60,000 price.

I

R OA D T E S T R I VA L S

1

2

3

4

5

PORSCHE 718 CAYMAN GTS £59,866 Still brilliant, but also still waiting for an engine that can do its chassis justice. Even so, the best in its class.

BMW M2 COUPE £46,700 Knocks the Porsche’s engine for six. Ride and handling narrowly fail to follow suit, though.

LOTUS EVORA 400 £73,500 Looks pricey but our Cayman GTS test car was pricier still after options. Even more feedback and delicacy here.

JAGUAR F-TYPE 3.0 V6 P340 R-DYNAMIC £57,765 More proof that GTS money ought to buy you a six-cylinder engine. Soulful and handsome.

AUDI TT RS COUPE £52,450 The class’s nuclear performance option. So fast, and so easy to drive fast. Could be more involving.

++++B

++++B

++++C

++++C

++++C

V E R D I C T S O N E V E RY N E W C A R , P 8 0

RICHARD LANE There’s no bad choice when it comes to picking a PDK or manual ’box but, if you’re worried about convenience, the manual features a rev-matching function for when you can’t be bothered to smooth things out with a pivoting ankle. SIMON DAVIS The optional ceramiccomposite brakes let you brake harder and later into tight corners, lap by lap, and get away with it.

S P E C A DV I C E If you like your sports cars to feel fast across the ground, go for a PDK (£2303). Painted model badging is a nice ‘GTS’ distinguisher (£101). Also have LED headlights (£1397), Bose surround audio (£834) and a combination of paint, hide and interior trim you can be selfish about.

JOBS FOR T H E FAC E L I F T z A little more reach in the steering column wouldn’t go amiss. z Keep refining that exhaust note. z An even shorter, more connected-feeling throw would be welcome in the manual gearchange.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 43


IGNITING YOUR PASSION FOR CARS SINCE 1895 We are proud of our heritage, but the future is exciting for us car fans too. Join Autocar Subscriber Extra today and be part of the next 123-year story.

SAVE 50% when you subscribe today


SUBSCRIBE TO AUTOCAR For 123 years, Autocar has been dedicated to sharing with you our love of cars every week. You can turn your support of Autocar into access to an even more exclusive club by subscribing. Every Wednesday you’ll be first to read the magazine packed with news, reviews, insightful features, star columnists, used car buying advice and our expanded data section. You’ll also receive regular free supplements and gain access to exclusive benefits (see below). There has never been a more interesting or significant time for the car industry and we’d love for you to join us on what promises to be an exciting journey.

SUBSCRIBE

ORIGINAL PHOTOGRAPHY

SUBSCRIBER EXTRA BENEFITS... 1.

WEEKLY NEWSLETTERS Exclusive content in weekly newsletters

2.

DISCOUNTS Exclusive discounts from carefully selected partners

3.

SUBSCRIBER EVENTS Access to exclusive subscriber-only events

4.

COMPETITIONS Subscriber-only competitions

13 ISSUES FOR ONLY £24.70 VISIT AUTOCAR.CO.UK/SUBSCRIBE or call 03448 488 816 and quote promotional code ‘AC518MP’ Terms and conditions: This offer is open to UK residents only. Overseas rates are available on +44 (0) 1604 251 450. Please allow 35 days for delivery of your first issue. Should you wish to cancel your subscription, it will be cancelled on expiry of the current term, which will not be refundable, other than in exceptional circumstances. Savings are based on the standard UK cover price of £3.80. Offer ends 6 June 2018.


46 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


BMW M5 v ALPINA B5 COMPARISON

Best of 5 Series Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s little to separate the majestic new BMW M5 and Alpina B5, but only one can win the super-saloon crown. Andrew Frankel referees PHOTOGRAPHY STAN PAPIOR

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 47


lpina has always kept a respectful distance from the products of BMW’s M division, despite a relationship with BMW that is far closer than most imagine and involves far more than knocking out 1700 factoryapproved cars every year. Alpina exists within the very fabric of BMW, with an entire other side to the business dedicated to developing the manufacturer’s own products on projects as diverse as the suspension for the 2 Series Active Tourer and the powertrain of the Dakar Mini. Remember the thundering V8 in the old BMW X5 4.8iS (and, indeed, the brand new Morgan Plus 8)? We have Alpina to thank for its existence. But you only need to look at the spec box (p50) to know that with its new B5, Alpina is no longer feeling so coy about treading on the toes of its in-house rival. Indeed, so close is it to the new M5 in almost every regard, it appears to be something closer to a kick in the shins. While wearing steel-capped boots. However, does it not seem inherently implausible that this new B5 will have what it takes to hobble BMW’s masterly new M5? Alpina is so small that it will make fewer than 500 B5s over the next year of which just 18 have been allocated to the UK. Of those 18 at least 10 will be estates, which means no more than eight of these B5 saloons will be sold here in the next 12 months. Mastery of the mighty M seems something of an ask. Except that on the way to our Welsh rendezvous, it felt like it just might be possible. I have long been a fan of the considered and understated Alpina approach – but accepted too that thrill-seekers would always and understandably have their heads

A

more readily turned by the output of BMW’s M division. But this one felt different. At times the engine it has created for itself – similar to but by no means the same as the almost identically powerful M5 unit – barely feels turbocharged at all, so Yep, it’s that close between these two cars seamlessly does it deliver its punch across such a wide rev range. Were it not for its cultured but quiet soundtrack, this could a seven-litre naturally aspirated engine. But even at its best, it serves mainly as facilitator and factotum for a chassis that picks up the already outstanding characteristics inherent within its 5 Series underpinnings, and sprints into the distance. So despite the liquorice-thin sidewalls of its tyres and the monster footprints they support, the B5 offers an implausibly sumptuous ride, better by far than, say, that of the previousgeneration 7 Series limo. Together with the seamless transition of power available from the eight-speed ZF transmission, the B5 presents just about the most sophisticated supersaloon ever to head to the hills. Which is where it finds the M5 lying in wait for it. And even on first acquaintance, it looks like the Alpina upstart is going to get mugged. BMW has done a pretty welljudged job in pumping up the appearance of the M5 without making it look like a hot-rod. It’s only when you park it next to a car as subtle as the B5 and see that jutting jaw and beefy side skirts that it starts to look slightly steroidal. It’s an impression the interior makes no attempt to dispel. While the Alpina cabin is clearly that of

Only 18 B5s will reach the UK initially

The B5’s sense of calm when driven at speed is infectious 48 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

This is the sixth-generation M5 (F90)


BMW M5 v ALPINA B5 COMPARISON FA B F I V E S H E R E A R E O U R FAV O U R I T E 5 - BA S E D A LPI N A U S E D B U YS

B10 3.5 (E28) Price: £25,000-£35,000 A rare beast with that classic BMW shark nose and a 261bhp version of the M30 straight six. Find one with the classic Alpina stripes and few cars ooze early 1980s chic better.

B10 B ITU RBO (E34) Price: £40,000-£50,000 This was at launch the world’s fastest four-door saloon. Those two turbos are a weak point, though, so do your research, and be prepared for high running and repair costs.

` The B5 presents just about the most sophisticated super-saloon ever to head to the hills a a 5 Series reclothed in exquisite upholstery that doesn’t sit quite as comfortably with its electric blue dials as you might hope, the M5 cockpit is a breed apart. Instead of discreetly concealing its many set-up functions in electronic sub-menus like the B5, the M5 not only has many more, it puts them front and centre. There are individual buttons that control mapping for the steering, suspension and powertrain, a selector that allows you to choose how aggressively the M5 changes gear and, of course, two red ‘M’ buttons on the steering wheel that allow fast-track access to your tailored set-up options. And while a part of me thinks the approach is, as Jeeves might say, a trifle sudden, a rather larger, unreconstructed chunk of me

finds it all frightfully exciting and makes me want to go driving right away. And good though the Alpina’s cabin is, it never quite does that. So you climb aboard the M5, aim it up the road and invite it to do its thing. The next thing that happens is that the thunderous reply from the V8 is joined by a new and alien sound that appears to be emanating from you. It largely takes the form of expletives. Now, I have no idea why this should be, given that both cars are so close in power, torque, weight, share the same gearbox and have all but identical acceleration figures, but I can report only as I find. While the B5 can make you feel like you’ve been flung from a catapult, the M5 experience is closer to that of an artillery shell’s. On a dry, smooth, ◊

B10 V8 S (E39) Price: £15,000-£20,000 While blisteringly fast, the V8 S’s emphasis was on luxury, with a leather-swathed interior putting the E39 M5’s to shame. Feels a tad undervalued, so a good buy now.

The M5 driver has an extensive range of customisable options at their fingertips 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 49


RATING Price Engine  Power  Torque  Gearbox  Kerb weight   0-62mph Top speed  Economy  CO2, tax band 

Alpina B5 saloon

BMW M5

AAAAB £89,000 V8, 4395cc, petrol 600bhp at 5750rpm 589lb ft at 3000rpm 8-spd automatic 1950kg 3.5sec 205mph 26.9mpg 240g/km, 37 %

AAAAB £89,645 V8, 4395cc, petrol 592bhp at 5600rpm 553lb ft at 1800rpm 8-spd automatic 1930kg 3.4sec 155mph (limited) 26.9mpg 241g/km, 37%

1st

If you ever wondered if Alpina could make a car to out-M an M, the answer is before you. Albeit only just, that answer is yes

∆ straight road, its tyres momentarily break traction before the electronics chime in even if you leave it in fourwheel drive. And then you’re off, bellowing your way towards the horizon. It is utterly thrilling, not least because the engine is so much louder, deeper in voice and sharper-edged too. And that’s not the only reason it’s quicker than the Alpina from one place to the next. With tyres two sections wider than the B5’s at the front and one section narrower at the rear, the clear intent here is that the M5 should resist understeer like no other two-tonne tank in history; and it does. Aided by pretty aggressive off-centre steering response, the M5 has an insatiable appetite for apices and, once the nose is in, you can trust

50 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

its iron body control to ensure the rest will duly follow. Where you guide the Alpina along a great mountain road, you fire the M5 at it because that is the way it insists on being driven. Game over for Alpina, then? By no means. The M5’s approach is not without its drawbacks and you don’t need long in the Alpina to appreciate it. For all its extra speed, the M5 is not as relaxing a car to drive fast and you might not think that matters too much. To me it does: a car relaxes you when being driven rapidly because it gives you confidence, and a car that gives the driver confidence is, by my definition at least, a fine handling car. And in three distinct ways, the B5 inspires more confidence than the M5: specifically its steering is more linear, better weighted and,

crucially, has more feel. Doubtless it will understeer more and I’m sure that ultimately the M5 has more body control but, on even the quietest public roads, for nearly all people nearly all of the time and in the context of two-tonne saloon cars, the fact that the B5 feels more natural, predictable and reassuring counts for more. It has better brake feel than the M5 on its optional ceramic rotors too. But what’s so fascinating about this contest is that having seen the Alpina banging tent pegs into pristine M5 turf, the M5 turns around and repays the compliment in kind. Set everything to its least hyperactive mode, go for a long lollop of the kind for which the B5 exists and you’ll find the M5 does an outstanding impression of a luxury saloon. Its ride

is close enough to B5’s that I’m sure some would actually prefer its slightly more controlled gait and, while you can never quite escape the presence of the mighty V8, there will be plenty who will consider the car none the worse for that, myself included. Which is why it is so devilishly hard to choose a winner. I never much liked the previous M5, which was just not a very pleasant car to drive quickly, but this one is improved in every way that matters to me, the least important being the fact that it is faster. What BMW has achieved here is to make the M5 exciting again in a way it has not been since the demise of the gloriously unhinged V10 E60 M5 eight years ago, yet it has done so while also creating a car so usable it recalls the spirit of the E34 M5 of the


For customers who would like a 600bhp BMW estate, it is no contest, because Alpina alone can provide such a car.

2nd

BMW M5 v ALPINA B5 COMPARISON

A car of real character and triumphant return to form for the M5, but here up against a car of dazzling completeness and appeal The rambunctious BMW provides the most thrills, but the Alpina is even more rounded

The two-tonne cars can do 0-60mph in 3.5sec thanks to these 4.4-litre twin-turbo V8s

` What BMW has achieved is to make the M5 exciting again while also creating a car so usable a Thrill-a-minute M5 is a return to form for the super-saloon

early 1990s. It really is a superb car. But the Alpina is more rounded still, an exquisitely judged car of quite stunning deftness whose appeal, while perhaps less obvious than that of the M5, is no less compelling for that. The essential choice, then, is this: do you go for the car that is more exciting or more satisfying? Were this a sports car comparison, there would a strong case to give the nod to the M5. But these are cars in which people do huge distances, very few of them on roads such as these. So even if you say the M5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flaws are cancelled by its stronger performance and call it a draw on the open road, the rest of the time the Alpina just has the edge. As good to drive and an even easier car with which to live, it is the B5 that is our winner. L

The first M5, seen as a performance titan in 1985, now has less power than a VW Golf hatchback and less than half the power of the modern M5.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 51


‘WE APPROACH EVERYTHING WE DO WITH OUR RACING DNA’ Although its business interests have diversified, Prodrive’s motorsport heritage continues to give the engineering group a competitive edge, David Richards tells Mark Tisshaw PHOTOGRAPHY WILL WILLIAMS ’ve always looked at ambulances as heavy, old technology. How do you bring them into the modern era? That’s what we’re working on next.” David Richards, the boss of the Prodrive race team and engineering company he set up in 1984, is nothing if not diverse in his business. While closely associated with high-profile World Rally Championship (WRC), World Endurance Championship (WEC) and Formula 1 campaigns, the Prodrive of 2018 is very different to the company from the days of Colin McRae and Richard Burns piloting Subaru Imprezas to rally titles. So diverse is Prodrive today that Richards says its core business has now moved beyond motorsport, while still being informed by it: “It’s now the racing culture, the DNA that comes from it. Everything we do is approached with that racing DNA.” The company still races – in fact, it runs Aston Martin’s works entry with the new Vantage in the WEC, and has just designed and developed a new Renault Sport Mégane for an assault on the World Rallycross Championship. But these days Prodrive is busy making hybrid Ford Transit vans and ambulances, being involved in the development of America’s Cup racing boats and

I

52 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

folding bikes, and working on elements of high-performance cars such as the McLaren P1 and Aston Martin Vulcan. The ambulance project is born out of a job recently completed by Prodrive: the hybridisation of the Transit van. The Banbury-based firm designed a range-extender hybrid system to integrate into Ford’s 1.0-litre Ecoboost engine. It proved to be a surprisingly tight fit, even in the engine bay of a Transit. “You’d assume there was plenty of room, but it was very tight under the bonnet,” says Richards of the project, which brought together several partners including Ford, the Advanced Propulsion Centre and Transport for London. The 27 vans have now been built and are being tested around London, a process designed to evaluate the viability for production and to assess the opportunity to reduce pollution in the UK’s vans fleet. The Transit project is a poster child for Prodrive’s abilities. “We’re good at conceptual work and bringing multiple parties together,” says Richards. “It’s not just cutting-edge design, but how [an idea] works in practice, and integrating it into a product that works.” He sees ever more of Prodrive’s work involving electrification and

is in the process of positioning the company as an expert in that field. “We need to be realistic because most development funds are going in that direction,” he says. “The internal combustion engine is not going to disappear, but now it’s [a question of] how to integrate hybrids into it.” The nature of such contract work means a constant balancing act between current projects and knowing what’s coming next, which is why Richards is well known for launching his own skunkworks projects, including his latest plans to build an amphibious car (page 17). Prodrive is also involved in projects you wouldn’t naturally associate it with, such as building the luxurious rear centre consoles for certain Range Rover models, and the diversification into racing yachts and folding bikes. “I’ve known [America’s Cup sailor] Ben Ainslie for many years. When he set up his own team, I said there’d be lots to learn from motor racing. That level of racing in the America’s Cup is just as sophisticated as F1,” says Richards. Prodrive ◊

Subaru Impreza (top) and Aston Martin Vant age


DAVID RICHARDS INTERVIEW

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 53


Jenson Button’s F1 car and Prodrive’s amphibious vehicle

∆ is involved in the development and integration of various electrical and hydraulic systems on Ainslie’s boat. The folding bike, meanwhile, came about after a friend showed Richards a prototype, rode it round his kitchen and asked him if he’d develop and make it. The Hummingbird, the world’s lightest folding bike at 6.9kg, is now in production, using Prodrive’s composite expertise after a year’s development work by a team of engineers. An electric-powered version is coming too. It currently weighs 10.3kg but, with a 9.9kg target set by Richards, there’s still more development work to do. Prodrive is even selling them directly through the Hummingbird website, another new-business avenue. “It’s like how Tesla sells cars,” he explains. “It’s better and cheaper – why wouldn’t we?” In addition to its main Banbury headquarters, Prodrive also has a facility in Milton Keynes specialising in composites. The 160 people working there make it the largest composite manufacturer and supplier in the UK, and something Richards sees as one of his biggest business opportunities in the future. “Composites will become the everyday,” he says. “Taking weight out is as important for efficiency as batteries and a motor. I see us partnering with a manufacturer for the long term, looking at how we integrate composites into production with new systems and the car manufacturing process. “I see that expanding in the next decade to an industrial scale, the only thing we’d do at that level. Once we’re there, we’d move away. Our DNA is in the creative side of it, that’s what we push.” That creativity is what appeals to Richards most in taking on a project and why Prodrive is able to provide a resource car makers simply are not. He says: “With a mainstream manufacturer, the technical approach is risk-averse – you take your time to do it and are not as creative. You’re efficient and organised. We would not make better conventional cars, but we can do things that push the boundaries in a particular direction. We are a quick resource, with creative engineers, and work to short timelines that we’re used to. In racing, they don’t move the Le Mans race date for us if we’re not ready. That also makes it an interesting environment for us to work in.” That said, Prodrive is finding

54 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

Racing cars now share factory space with vans, yachts and ambulances

SIX OF PRODRIVE’S BEST If you take a tour of Prodrive’s headquarters, guide Jackie Irwin will show you “her babies”, some of the icons from the company’s past that now reside in the workshop to inspire its engineers. Here are a selection of Prodrive’s greats…

PO RSCH E 911 SC RS

SU BARU I M PREZA 555

1984 This was the car that started it all for Prodrive. It won 15 rallies in all, and was followed soon after by the iconic MG Metro 6R4.

1995 Prodrive’s most iconic rally car took Colin McRae to his World Rally Championship. One of motorsport’s greatest cars.

SU BARU I M PREZA WRC 99

BAR - H O N DA 006

2000 The ‘Mad Max’ Impreza took Richard Burns to Safari Rally glory, a year before his WRC title. The last of the original-shape Impreza WRC cars.

2004 Prodrive turned around the ailing BAR F1 team, taking Jenson Button to third in the drivers’ title and claiming second in the constructors’ standings.

FO RD M O N D EO SU PE R TOU RE R 2000 The last and perhaps the greatest title-winning car of the BTCC’s legendary Super Touring era.

ASTO N MARTI N V8 VANTAG E GTE 2017 The curtain came down on the last Vantage racer with Jonny Adams claiming Le Mans glory on the last lap.


DAVID RICHARDS INTERVIEW RICHARDS ON MOTORSPORT’S FUTURE Running Prodrive is not David Richards’ only job. He owns two hotels in St Mawes, Cornwall, and this year has become chairman of the Motor Sports Association with quite a large in-tray. “I could sit on the sidelines and complain or do something about it,” he says. “When you’ve benefited from a sport like I have my whole life, to sit on the sidelines and not play a part would be a derogation of my responsibilities.” Richards’ priorities are to reduce the costs of motorsport at the grassroots level to help bring through the next generation of drivers and cut the red tape around the sport and its governance to prepare it for future technologies. He says: “People say the cost of F1 should be reduced, but we should be reducing the costs of grassroots motorsport. There is too much bureaucracy and cost; we have to find a way. It should be fun. “It will never be cheap, but if we don’t reduce the entry costs, we will never have another Lewis Hamilton. People from a modest background can’t afford to go karting now.” Bringing through a new generation of drivers would ultimately help the economics of a British Grand Prix. “Without that, we’re in trouble,” says Richards.

it hard to find talented young engineers, owing to not only a wider skills shortage in the sector but also the company’s proximity to many F1 teams. Richards says: “We have a high retention rate of senior people, but the talent is hard to find. The glamour of F1 appeals to young engineers. They come to us from university for a few years, head to F1, and then we welcome them back with open arms. In F1, you’re dealing in minutiae of one car; we give them broad concepts.” Richards knows all about the appeal of F1, having had two stints as a team boss, at Benetton in the 1990s and then with British American Racing (BAR) in the early 2000s, where he oversaw a secondplace finish in the constructors’ championship in 2004. Yet Richards fears for the sport and its future: “[New F1 owner] Liberty has great ideas and understands entertainment, but the barrier is the incumbents: the aerodynamicists and the engineers. They create problems. “You’ll never turn them around. It’s like turkeys voting for Christmas. If you have two wind tunnels, you don’t want to equalise the performance to make it better for the spectator and the entertainment. Great entertainment and technology do not sit well next to each other.

“At the other end, we need to create regulations for the future with ambition, and give the opportunity for British racing teams to maintain their world-leading position in the future. “A vast amount of investment in motorsport has come from manufacturers promoting fast vehicles. Now it’s all going in the other direction towards EVs and autonomous cars, and our tech is in danger of being seen as archaic. “An idea: suppose the BTCC regulations changed to be a hybrid formula, and the first lap and last lap were done on electric power. Could we then demo the tech for manufacturers and address that?” Richards is also proposing a challenge for university students to develop an autonomous racing car and pit their machines against each other three times around the Silverstone circuit. He is in talks with a major car maker about getting the project off the ground.

The Hummingbird is the world’s lightest folding bike at 6.9kg

Richards (l) wants motor racing to be more accessible “I think Liberty will get it right as they come from the entertainment point of view. The purists will hate it, but they know what the markets want.” Although Richards is full of praise for how readily F1 has embraced hybrid technology, he believes it has done a “very poor” job in promoting it. “I think F1 has lost its way to a certain extent,” Richards says in that regard, although he adds a cost cap is not a solution as it is “just an excuse for poor regulations. You don’t want motorsport run by accountants.” Richards is no longer seeking a third crack at F1, having come close in 2008 to being on the grid with a Prodrive team. “If there was a third time, we would have had all our experiences packaged up,” he says.

Prodrive engineers never have to look far for inspiration “We were going to run a customer car with McLaren. We might have been bankrupt at the end of it, but at least we’d have given it a go.” He remains involved in rallying, however, and is keen to play a role in the future electric plans of World Rallycross, which is “the perfect use for EVs” in motorsport and will be “transformational in the imagery of an electric vehicle”. Richards is also not ruling out a return to the WRC, but of greater interest is a run at Dakar. “I would love to get back to the WRC if the opportunity came up one day. It’s on the up again,” he says. “I’ve never done Dakar, and have clear ideas on how to do it with the right opportunity. It’s the one box left to tick. Dakar is one of

` We were going to run an F1 car with McLaren. We might have been bankrupt at the end of it a

the big motorsport challenges. It’s not as well known in Britain, but on the continent it’s as big as anything. We could raise the profile of it with British cars and drivers.” Richards, who served as chairman of Aston Martin from 2007 to 2013, is still involved with the firm through Prodrive’s running of the works racing arm, and is now racing the new Vantage in the WEC’s ‘superseason’, spanning two years and two Le Mans 24 Hours contests. Prodrive was embedded in the design and development of the new Vantage racer. Richards calls it a “pivotal moment” for Prodrive and a “big step forward” over the car’s predecessor that should ensure the firm competes at the sharp end of international motorsport for some time yet. Looking to the future, Richards says Prodrive will always be involved in motorsport, and believes that this gives his company the creative edge at a time when the car industry has more problems to solve than ever. He concludes: “How we continue to challenge boundaries and look at it in a different way to other people is what will make us unique. Motorsport is the greatest test environment.” L

» THE WRC’S HELICOPTER ERA P56 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 55


Rally strategy could literally be worked out on the fly

Spotter would watch out for car problems and menacing wildlife

The Safari Rally was so extreme that each car had its own helicopter escort. Dan Prosser talks to the men who remember the WRCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s maddest event

56 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


ome people say the World Rally Championship has lost its sense of adventure. And when you consider there was once an event that was so rife with peril – oncoming local traffic, giant hidden boulders, holes in the road that could swallow a car whole, giraffes, elephants – that the only way to compete with any degree of safety was to be tracked the whole way by a helicopter, it’s hard to argue otherwise. You’ll still find helicopters on WRC events today, both for filming and to get a “In the midsignal from in-car trackers, but nothing 1990s we had on the scale seen in East Africa’s Safari a mechanic in the Rally. The event was last part of the helicopter, plus lots of WRC in 2002, when the Prodrivespares, but that was run Subaru World Rally Team team banned eventually,” was at its peak. Since the Group B era says Howarth. of the 1980s, it had been protocol for the top teams to assign each car its own spotter helicopter, due to the event’s vast, uncontrolled stages. It was “hideously expensive,” according to Paul Howarth, the Subaru team’s former operations director, “but bloody exciting.” Howarth flew in Petter Solberg’s spotter chopper on four occasions: “During the rally there would be the pilot, myself and a very experienced paramedic in the helicopter, because if Petter had an accident we would be first on the scene. “The Safari was the only rally held on open roads, so you would get local traffic on the stages. We were there to warn the locals a rally car was coming, to relay instructions from the engineers and to clear wildlife out of the way. You could scare most animals away but the donkeys would just stare at you. You could virtually put the skids on top of them and they wouldn’t move. “On some parts of the rally the car would be climbing over rocks at 20kph, so you spent a lot of time in hover. Then in the fast sections you had to be 500 metres in front, looking for hazards. “It was one of the most memorable experiences I’ve ever had. It was like you were actually doing the rally. The wildlife was incredible too.” Just how essential were the spotter helicopters, though? Nicky Grist, who won the event three times as Colin McRae’s co-driver, recalls two occasions that highlighted their importance. “During one particular test we didn’t have a helicopter,” he recalls. “We were driving over a plain and came around a left-hand corner when all of a sudden, Christ, there was a giraffe. It was running with us, but running across us at the same time. One hoof came right up to the window on my side. Fortunately it veered off at the last moment. If you hit a giraffe at those speeds, it’s sayonara.” A spotter helicopter would have scared the giraffe off before the car came through. “On another occasion, in 1997, “We had we got into some mechanical an incident troubles,” continues Grist. one year,” recalls “Things were going well Howarth, “when and we were in second an engine problem place. We were 80km from brought us down in the end of a stage and the the middle of the alternator light came on. bush.” We reported the issue to the helicopter crew. They flew high to get radio contact with base and they were relaying instructions to us – ‘turn off this fuel pump, turn off this, turn off that’ – trying to conserve battery power to get us to the end. Then they said: ‘Right, we need you to turn off the radio. If we want to speak to you, we’ll swoop down over the top of you.’ We just made it to the end of the stage, where there was a service. The team changed the alternator and the battery, and Colin and I went on to win the Safari Rally for the first time.” L

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 57

©MCKLEIN PHOTOGRAPHY

SAFARI RALLY MOTORSPORT


GOLDEN OLDIE This 50th Anniversary Edition Morgan Plus 8, among the last of its kind, represents a bygone era â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not only in how it looks but in how it drives too. And, as Andrew Frankel discovers, therein lies its charm PHOTOGRAPHY STAN PAPIOR

58 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


MORGAN PLUS 8 DRIVE

This Speedster is one of 50 swansong Plus

8 models

erhaps the biggest problem today for the motoring hack facing a clump of empty pages armed with nothing more than a new car to review is that such cars are usually irritatingly complete, rarely terminally flawed and as a result almost always poor objects at which to aim your trenchant criticism. So how refreshing it is to review a new car that is manifestly flawed in most regards and properly deficient in one or two. Then again, the Morgan Plus 8 is not new at all. This year marks its half-century and, to celebrate, Morgan is going to kill it stone dead. But not before it’s knocked out 50 of these anniversary models, one for each year of its life. The car is mechanically standard but presented so as to evoke the memory of the original and most famous Plus 8, a well-raced car known as MMC 11 after its numberplate. So alongside the usual plaque, there’s a domed aluminium cover where you’d have once seen a spare wheel, a front towing eye painted yellow, wheels designed to mimic closely those of the original Plus 8, white tipped ‘cannon’ exhausts and white brake calipers. There is bespoke instrumentation and upholstery too. The car comes in two colours – green for those equipped with a conventional soft top and blue for the Speedster version seen here. Yet there is something of the smoke and mirrors about this car, because the only thing about today’s Plus 8 that’s actually 50 years old is the name. The car itself died in 2004 when supplies of the Rover V8 that had powered it since 1968 ran out. What you’re looking at here is an Aero 8 attending a retro-themed Plus 8 fancy dress party that’s been going on since 2012. It has the Aero’s bonded, riveted aluminium chassis and, while its 4.8-litre motor is a V8, it’s supplied by BMW. So there’s no ash frame, nor even sliding pillar front suspension. It’s all far more modern than that. Then again, a new Porsche 911 is probably even less closely related to an original so maybe nobody cares. And the Plus 8 certainly feels suitably aged. In fact, whether by design or not, at times it feels absolutely ancient. The door handles are the same as those on my elderly ◊

P

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 59


New Plus 8 has been designed to resemble the MMC 11 original ∆ Land Rover, the primary dials all but illegible at speed. The tub may be made in a relatively modern way but it still wobbles like a custard tart over potholes, while the steering flies in the face of the modern vogue for ultra-aggressive off-centre response: turn the Plus 8’s wheel and you’ll be shocked by how little happens at first. Oh, and the brakes are overservoed, there’s no storage space for anything on board nor any luggage space, the modern BMW column stalks look ridiculous in here and if you’re going to take the Speedster on a motorway, you’ll look ridiculous too because unless you’re insane, you’ll have a full-face crash hat protecting your bonce if not your dignity. And yet. I’m not that sensitive to a car’s appearance because I’m always more interested in how it drives, but in this spec even I can see the anniversary Plus 8 looks fabulous. Low, wide and with something of the vintage hot-rod about it, its shape suggests a certain kind of rarefied driving experience, something more physical, challenging and engaging than the modern norm. I already knew it would be terribly flawed because I’ve not driven a Morgan that was not, but did that make me want to drive it any less? On the contrary. Besides, let’s not forget what’s in front of us here, namely an 1100kg sports car directing the power of a

4.8-litre V8 motor through a manual gearbox (an auto is available but why would you?) to the rear wheels alone. If someone published that spec as a prospectus for a brand new sports car, we’d all be leaping around the room with excitement. And it’s not as if it’s gained nothing from its Aero underpinnings. The last time I had a proper go in a Plus 8 was in 1989 (pictured above) when I drove around the Lake District noting that, even by the standards of nearly 30 years ago, the car “hops wholesale across the road as soon as look at a bump”. The ride was “truly appalling” while the steering could “generate kickback that wrenches the wheel from your hands”. By those standards, this Plus 8 has the chassis sophistication of a McLaren. Most importantly, this is a car where the numbers just don’t matter. Yes, it has 367bhp and will reach 62mph from rest in a not-thatimpressive 4.5sec, but the engine is a woofling, rumbling delight

M O R GA N T O DAY The Morgan business is split three ways between the Three Wheeler, the so-called ‘Classic’ line and the Aero 8. For these purposes, the Plus 8 counts as a Classic despite its Aero underpinnings. Perhaps unexpectedly, Morgan’s bestseller is not the Three Wheeler but the ultra-traditional Classic, which still comes with an ash frame and a front suspension design that dates back to the Great War. Plus 8 aside, it comprises the 110bhp 1.6-litre 4/4, the 154bhp 2-litre Plus 4 and the 3.7-litre, 280bhp V6 Roadster. But the interest today lies in the Aero, which dies alongside the Plus

60 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

8 this year as supplies of BMW’s venerable N62 V8 finally dries up. And Morgan is not saying very much about what happens next. But we know there will be a new car, we think with a new name and we know it will be here later this year. It is also certain to remain highly traditional in style and outlook – this is emphatically not the moment Morgan goes state of the art. It seems possible the engine will be turbocharged, though with Ford supplying the four- and six-cylinder motors in the Classic range, the normally aspirated V8 in the Mustang cannot be ruled out.

The driver must work to even out the flaws. And that’s a good thing and its slow but positive six-speed transmission perfectly in keeping with the car’s character. The power delivery is delightfully lazy, awash with torque from 2000rpm so you change gear mainly because you can. I was surprised also by how much grip was available: with a standard limited-slip diff and suspension modifications made for the Aero 8 in 2016, it clings on grimly in the curves. Actually, I’d rather it had a lower limit because, by the time you start the allin wrestling as the car starts to slide, you’re going fairly rapidly, and for me that’s part of the fun with the Plus 8. Instead of the car doing it all for you like so many moderns, with the Morgan it’s the driver who ends up helping out the car. You have to anticipate how the steering will react


MORGAN PLUS 8 DRIVE MORGAN PLUS 8 50TH ANNIVERSARY Flawed and expensive, the final Plus 8 relies on charm to talk you round. On the right road, it does just that RATING AAABC Price £129,000 Engine V8, 4799cc, petrol Power  367bhp at 6200rpm Torque  370lb ft at 3600rpm Gearbox 6-spd manual Kerb weight 1100kg Top speed  155mph 0-62mph  4.5sec Economy  23.0mpg CO2, tax band  282g/km, 37% Rivals Jaguar F-Type SVR Cabriolet, Mercedes-AMG GT Roadster

to any given input, make sure your entry speed is not too high, then rely on torque and traction to spit you out the corner. And because the car is actually fundamentally stable, it first needs a bit of provocation and then some accurate helmsmanship with its somewhat approximate steering when it finally breaks loose. It is one of those cars whose character is derived not from what it does well, but what it does badly. And it is nothing if not involving as a result. But what I liked most about this final Plus 8 is that it knows what it is. It’s not pretending to be a track-day warrior, any more than it might try to con you into thinking it’s an everyday car. It is an honest, back-to-basics, road-going sports car and if you don’t try to force upon it roles it was never

BMW engine is even older than the Aero-based Plus 8, starting life in 2001 and existing in 4.8-litre form from 2004 to 2010.

Car comes with a Christopher Ward watc h

designed to do, it will not disappoint. In short, if you take it at face value, there’s still a lot of fun to be had here. But £129,000-worth of fun? Not for me, but I’m not the target audience. For someone wanting a no-nonsense, belt-and-braces traditional British roadster of a kind unavailable anywhere else, the Plus 8 not only looks the part, it does the business too – not despite all those flaws but, in the main, because of them. L

Engine purrs delightfully; only shame is it’s drowned out by wind noise over 50mph 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 61


LUXURY

2013 JAGUAR XJ 3.0 D I ES E L

JAMES

£15,990, 75,000 miles

RUPPERT ’S

First-choice barges remain the Germans, so these slow sellers are great value and have never looked better. They’ll deliver 46mpg too.

D L R O W L REA S E O HER

2014 SSANGYONG REXTON EX £12,995, 30,000 miles

nt, but a w u o y t what e g s u need. y a o y w l t a a h ’t You can s you can get w here are the e s, sometim d by the Stone re not the ire at a So, insp d used buys th e of ten t rl real-wo s choices – qui r obv iou re much bette they a at t ha n t h

SUV LOOK

Those who want to do the SUV pose will be getting into debt with a Range Rover; others up for hard work have an alternative Toyota Land Cruiser for much less. The Rexton has loads of kit but, most important, it will tow Tabitha’s horsebox and seat seven. Even better, a used one should have unexpired warranty for peace of mind. Not posh enough? It’ll be your loss.

4X4

2012 M ITSU B IS H I ASX 1.8 TD CLE ARTEC £7295, 40,000 miles

Sports Ubiquity Vehicles, more like. Everyone wants one; however, they don’t need the four-wheel-drive gubbins to weigh them down, just the ability to look down on others – and the ASX is a very subtle way of doing it. So we’ll go with the diesel 1.8 in 2WD please. A Cleartec 3 will have alloy wheels, cruise control and electric windows. The Mitsubishi badge on the grille means reliability is very much assured.

2015 SUZU KI SWI F T S PO RT FIVE- DOO R

F A M IL Y

£7500, 30,000 miles

There is the cult of the Mini, which remains overpriced and rather common, so it pays to look around at other perky offerings where there is just one simple choice: three or five doors. Only you know what suits your lifestyle best. Recent ones have sat-nav and DAB radio, which is nice. Not nearly enough examples have an offset body stripe, which is far better than a chequered-flag roof.

C H IC C IT Y

2014 VAUXHALL I N S I G N IA 2.0 CDTi ECO FLE X TECH LI N E £8495, 50,000 miles

A great big good-looking family car with lots of kit? That would have to be an Insignia. They will also take colossal mileages without question. If you are prepared to take a six-figure mileage hit, then you will pay just a few grand. The ecoFLEX will deliver over 70mpg, so it is hard to see any diesel downside.

62 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


REAL-WORLD HEROES BUYING USED 2013 VO LVO V60 TD D3 BUS I N ESS E D ITI O N

E S TAT E

£7450, 90,000 miles

If you need an excuse not to buy a people carrier, here it is. Long saloons with a hatch are still a thing and the V-Class Volvos are best of breed. In Business spec, it has a tonne of fixtures and fittings including a long list of safety kit. So a great place to put the family and it will return over 60mpg.

FUN F A M IL Y 2010 MAZDA 3 M PS £9995, 60,000 miles

Not sure if anyone can picture one of these in their head and that’s mainly because it isn’t a Ford Focus. Here’s a sporty package that does the shopping and commute without any complaint. Because it is a Mazda, reliability is not even a concern. The hot MPS is quite long in the tooth now and a Sport has 100bhp less but is £5500 for a 2011 example if you are only going shopping.

H Y B R ID

2013 H O N DA I N S I G HT H S £9500, 34,000 miles

Trying to find an environmentally friendly set of wheels is very problematic these days, unless you accept that the Japanese had it sort of sussed some time ago with the petrol hybrid. The highly dreary Insight, not the funky old one, is the answer. Forgettable, but it delivers over 60mpg without any diesel baggage. Easy to live with and drive, plenty of room and a snazzy digital dash.

E L E C T R IC

2013 RE NAU LT ZO E DYNAM I QU E

SPORTY 2013 TOYOTA GT86/SU BARU B RZ £12,400, 40,000 miles

You could save up for a supercar, but why bother when something more usable, fun and practical is available? It is just a question of which flavour you want. Prices are similar and the differences quite subtle. It’s hard to go wrong, but avoid suspiciously cheap cars that might have sustained damage.

£4995, 30,000 miles

At the moment, the best way to regard used electric motors is in the short term and for equally short journeys. Yes, there’s a Leaf, but a funky, chic Zoe is much better and great value too. You will get plenty of electrical kit with it, air-con, rear power windows, Bluetooth, rain sensor wipers and really everything else you need, except road tax.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 63


YO U R V I E WS WRITE TO

autocar@haymarket.com Depreciation to appreciate

LETTER OF THE WEEK

I read with interest readers’ various tales of woe regarding horrific shortterm depreciation. The solution (and it’s not rocket science) is to keep one’s car a long time. I bought my BMW 325i in 1987 for £17,000 and sold it 20 years later for £500, so I lost £16,500, or less than £850 per year. The bad news is that they are now fetching over £6500!

Is parking on pavements a problem?

Brian Taylor Via email

Push comes to shove Reading Richard Battle’s letter of the week (Your Views, 11 April), I couldn’t believe that a cyclist could call drivers ‘a sub-class’. If cyclists and motorcyclists did not push to the front of queues at traffic lights and pedestrian crossings, drivers would be more considerate. Drivers have to obey the Highway Code and so should they. It’s time to buy a dashcam to prove that cyclists and motorcyclists are possibly more irresponsible road users than car drivers who can’t cut up traffic queues and they can push to the front. Dave Bardsley Via email

Richard wasn’t referring to all drivers as ‘a sub-class’, merely those who don’t always appear to be treating other road users with respect – MB

Golf vs Golf Unlike your editor, I went down the Volkswagen Golf R route (Our Cars, 11 April). When details of the Mk7.5 were released, I chose to go for a GTI to the spec I wanted. However, when I specced-up a GTI, an equivalent R cost less than 10% more, hence I went for that. Mine is a three-door manual in Pure White with cloth interior, Dynamic Chassis Control, black 19in wheels, reversing camera, black door mirrors and 90% dark rear windows. The R, like the GTI, is too quiet. At time of order, VW had just listed an Akrapovic exhaust as an option for £2975. That is too much, but after

Hydrogen isn’t hot air

Steve Cropley and I are among the few talking up hydrogen-powered vehicles. He was right when in the 28 March issue he said: “Hydrogen will solve a lot of the issues that dog electric cars.” Once the refuelling infrastructure has been developed, hydrogen will become dominant. Given the proposed bans on new petrol and diesel vehicles, it won’t be long before the oil companies diversify into alternatives such as hydrogen. A number of issues will need to be addressed before these vehicles are common on our roads, especially around the maintenance and end-of-life recycling of the powertrain and the safety of the system in an accident. I would be happy to use one of these vehicles right now, but as a high-mileage user it is logistically impossible because the refuelling infrastructure is not there yet. Which of the big oil companies will be first to develop a hydrogen infrastructure? Get the fuel to the country and the vehicles will follow. Andy Latham Via email

a few weeks I had a Milltek system fitted for £1800. It does the trick. In all it cost £38,000, which is still loads less than an equivalent Audi RS3 or Mercedes-AMG A45.

64 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

SUV antidote

Howard Clements Via email

What an excellent article by Richard Webber on Jim Clark in your 11 April issue. So evocative and so sad – and a suitable antidote to the weekly fables on the latest of an interminable supply of 500bhp-plus SUVs.

Practicality prevails

Esler Crawford Carrickfergus, County Antrim

I read Mark Tisshaw’s comparison of the Volkswagen Golf GTI and Golf R with interest, because I’ve been wavering between the two myself. The red highlights/eyeliner on the GTI put me off, as does its ‘not quite the best Golf’ positioning, but ultimately it wins because the R has a smaller boot than the new Polo, which surely is a deal breaker.

Jim Clark: better than a Cayenne Turbo

WIN Letter of the week wins this ValetPRO exterior protection and maintenance kit worth £48

Sam Livingstone Via email

Antipodean indifference As a visitor from Oz holidaying in Cornwall, I was interested to read the letter from George Knight (Your Views, 21 March) about car salesmanship, or rather the lack of it. Well, it’s no different in Australia. They’re just not interested in making an effort. If someone walks in and is willing to take a car off the showroom floor, then fine, but if it becomes any

more difficult than that, forget it. The reality is that, after a while, many of them become indifferent about it all. To them, cars become just units to put on the weekly sales figures and they forget that to most people their new, or even secondhand cars, are their pride and joy and are costing them a lot of money. Buyers expect some reciprocal enthusiasm, only to be disappointed when they don’t get any. Maybe we’re just too naive. Maybe we’d get like that too after dealing with tyre kickers all day long – and I’ve done a fair bit of that in my time. Martin Player Via email

Judge dread Reading Matt Prior’s article on pavement parking (11 April) reminded me of an incident in 1981 when I was prosecuted for obstruction when parking with two wheels on a six-foot-wide pavement. The 12-foot-wide road plus pavement was not public highway and was wholly owned by a hotel where I was holding an exhibition. I had the hotel’s permission to park where I was, as did several other vehicles. Despite the land being in private ownership and providing a letter of consent, I lost the case in the

Golf GTI vs Golf R: opinion is split on which is better


LETTERS Magistrate’s Court. Incensed, I appealed and lost again, the judge ruling that although no actual obstruction occurred, I had caused a technical obstruction in that the public had a right of access to the hotel and had a right to the use of the whole of the pavement. He cited a 1936 case of a deliberate obstruction to a private golf course access as justification for his decision. We often hear that the law is an ass but, sometimes, it is the judges who are asses, rather than law.

G R E AT R E A S O N S T O B U Y

NEXT WEEK’S ISSUE O N S A L E 1 6 M AY

SPECIAL ISSUE

John J Duffy Antigua

Future shock

Mark Gilbert Portishead, Somerset

BUMPER 100-PAGE SPECIAL ISSUE Autocar Awards 2018: our cars and people of the year We reveal the past year’s highest-achieving cars and the industry people who made them R OA D T E S T

FIRST DRIVE

Alpine A110

Tesla Model 3

Is Renault’s reborn sports car one of the world’s best?

It’s the electric 3 Series for the masses, but is it any good?

EVERY WEEK USED BUYING GUIDE

L O N G -T E R M T E S T

FIRST DRIVE

Renault Wind

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

Ford Fiesta Active

Compact roadster is more than just a curiosity: it’s now a bargain used buy

Merc’s making a pick-up. Steve Cropley gets the keys for three months

Can a Fiesta on stilts appeal where the Ecosport doesn’t? We find out

SUBSCRIBE

autocar.co.uk/subscribe or see p44 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 65

CONTENTS SUBJECT TO CHANGE

We seem to be on the verge of a revolution in private transportation with profound consequences. Since its inception in the late 1800s, the motor car has retained a clear identity: driver controlled, internal combustion engine and conventional controls such as steering wheel and pedals. However, with the advent of new powertrain and control technologies, this is about to change. Many of the technologies already under development could be used to make vehicles easier to operate. Why continue to use pedals, a steering wheel and mirrors when these could be replaced with an electronic drive-by-wire joystick and cameras providing vision all round the vehicle? Airbus has used electronic sidestick fly-by-wire controls on its commercial airliners for decades. Many of the technologies under development for autonomous vehicle operation can also be used to improve safety under driver operation. These should lead to vehicles that can also be operated by people with disabilities and older people who may otherwise have to give up driving a conventional car. Eventually, with fully autonomous vehicles, there may be no age limits or even a need for a driving licence. While this vision may not appeal to today’s driving enthusiast, it should lead to a more mobile population with fewer accidents on the roads.


O U R CA RS F E AT U R E D T H I S W E E K

HONDA CIVIC TYPE R

KIA STINGER

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY

SSANGYONG REXTON

VAUXHALL INSIGNIA

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF GTI

The Discovery excels at cosseting its driver on motorway runs

LAND ROVER DISCOVERY SUV, seven-seater, executive express: the Discovery does it all. So what’s the catch? FINAL REPORT

MILEAGE 27,495

WHY WE R AN IT To see how well suited this luxury off-roader is to executive travel

f there’s a common phrase about Land Rovers to take away from the correspondence we receive, or from browsing internet forums, it’s this: “I love the car, but…” Following it might be many things. A quirk, a quibble, a complaint. It’s rare that ‘but’, phrased within “I love you, but…”, is followed by a positive. To the Land Rover Discovery 5, then, which landed on Autocar’s fleet

I

66 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

last autumn. So do I love this car? I do. The Discovery was launched last spring. I liked it then and I like it now. It’s the big one, the practical one, the one to take on all comers and seat seven while it’s at it. It’s a TD6 HSE Luxury, which puts it at £64,195 – a lot, granted, but the majority of Discovery buyers opt for HSE or HSE Lux spec, so it’s clearly where Land Rover is: this isn’t just a 4x4; it’s an executive or luxury car rival. The donkey is a 3.0 V6 diesel with 255bhp and, more important for a car with a 3.5-tonne towing limit (and a 2230kg kerb weight, to which you could add another 200kg with options), 442lb ft from 1750rpm. It

drives all four wheels through an eight-speed automatic gearbox, plus there’s a low-range transfer case and Land Rover’s full gamut of off-road systems. This, they said at the launch, will go farther than a Defender (although bear in mind that off road, as on asphalt, there’ll be some give and take over different terrain). This was one of the initial launch cars, too, and it performed duties as an early press demo. That means it’s a very early build and it had 12,500 miles on it when it arrived. We put it to stern use straight away because, well, it’s arguably the most broadly capable car in the world.

What might rival it? Some Range Rovers are more luxurious; a Bentley Bentayga is too, plus a bit more sporty; and a Lamborghini Urus or Porsche Cayenne are keener still on road. But I don’t think any will go as far off road, and probably only a Range Rover rides better. And that matters, because of all the things we’ve done with this car – towing, getting it filthy, using all the seats, all the space – it’s perhaps been at its best when it’s late, I’ve been tired, the weather is rubbish and I’ve got 80 mostly motorway miles to get home. It’s perfect for that.


TEST DATA

It got used. It got dirty. It got cleaned

L A N D R O V E R D I S C O V E RY T D 6 H S E L U X U RY

The Discovery has an excellent ride and it’s very stable

How much wood can a woodchuck chuck if he drives a Disco?

`

No surprise that in inclement weather, the Discovery is where you’d want to be a SECOND OPINION A quick drive is all it takes to work out the secret of the Disco’s success. The sense of imperiousness our long-term test car bestows upon its driver is intoxicating. Throw in an interior that never fails to make you feel special, a luxuriant ride and a thumping engine, and it’s hard not to fall for it. AR

The driving position is great, with large seats and easy armrests. Visibility is good: you see a lot of bonnet and the mirrors are massive, although it’s harder to place than a Disco 4. (There are cameras all round but flicking between the ones you want is less straightforward.) The ride is excellent, really well isolated, with steering that has terrific stability, and the directional stability is top rate. Puddles don’t remotely make it flinch. No surprise, then, that in inclement weather – so from October until, er, last week – the Discovery is where you’d want to be. Fortunately, when it snowed, it was where I was. If you’ve half an ounce of sense, in all conditions, getting stuck is

something you won’t do. All smooth sailing, then? Not quite. The infotainment system is sufficiently sluggish and the nav so quirky that I appended my phone to the dashboard and looked at the nav on that. The sound system is good but would sometimes forget my device was plugged into it. And while sometimes a few months with a car breezes by without a second thought, the Discovery has kept me busy – mostly reasonably, sometimes not. The TD6 is necessarily complex so it meets exhaust emissions standards. It runs with a urea exhaust solution: about a litre every 300-350 miles or so (10-litre tub every month or two). And when the diesel particulate filter runs through a burn cycle, to clean itself, it draws a little diesel into the engine oil. Apparently, that’s normal too, and the car monitors the dilution. What it means is that, on this car, every 9000 miles or so, rather than 20,000, the oil wants changing: it was done under warranty at 19,000 and needed doing again nearing 28,000, when the car returned to Land Rover. Land Rover Milton Keynes also replaced a faulty, smoky, dieselpowered heater, which helps with

TEST STARTED 2.10.17 Mileage at start 12,565 Mileage at end 27,495 PRICES List price new £64,195 List price now £66,595 Price as tested £74,420 Dealer value now £57,000 Private value now £55,000 Trade value now £53,000 OPTIONS Dynamic Design pack (shiny trim, different 21in alloy wheels) £2340, metallic paint £1660, head-up display £1035, timed climate control £1035, Capability Plus pack (limited-slip rear diff, off-road cruise) £1000, electrically deploying towbar £985, TV £880, climate second-row seats/heated third-row seats £835, privacy glass £390, tow assist £365, activity key £315, cool box £235, second row 12V sockets £110 FUEL CONSUMPTION AND RANGE Claimed economy 39.2mpg Fuel tank 85 litres Test average 28.2mpg Test best 32.5mpg Test worst 25.8mpg Real-world range 527 miles TECH HIGHLIGHTS 0-62mph 8.1sec Top speed 130mph Engine V6, 2993cc, diesel Max power 255bhp at 3750rpm Max torque 442b ft at 1750rpm Transmission 8-spd automatic Boot 258-2406 litres Wheels 9.5Jx21in, alloy Tyres 275/45 R21 Kerb weight 2230kg SERVICE AND RUNNING COSTS Contract hire (pcm) £610 189g/km CO2 Service costs £0 Other costs 40 litres AdBlue, £52 Fuel costs £2967 Running costs inc fuel £3019 Cost per mile 20 pence Depreciation £7000 (est, since 12,565 miles) Cost per mile inc dep’n 67 pence Faults Fuel-burning heater (replaced under warranty), early oil changes (changed under warranty) PREVIOUS REPORTS 18 Oct 2017, 15 Nov, 6 Dec, 10 Jan 2018, 24 Jan, 7 Feb, 28 Feb, 14 Mar, 28 Mar, 11 Apr, 25 Apr

cold start and quick cabin heating. That kind of thing isn’t unusual anecdotally, meaning Land Rover placed 31st out of 32 car makers in the What Car? annual reliability survey last year. Sigh. There are so many terrific features on this car: perhaps if there were 10% fewer but they did them 10% better, that would help. Or maybe people wouldn’t like it so much if it wasn’t 100% the way it is. I’ll admit it too: as a car to drive, to be comfortable in, to want in poor conditions, to relax you, to move things, to pull things, to go where others cannot, I love this car. But… MATT PRIOR

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE matt.prior@haymarket.com

L OV E I T

STORAGE CUBBIES Loads of space everywhere to save snacks for later or lose important paperwork.

ALL-ROUND PRACTICALITY Store people, luggage or even three tonnes of logs (not all at once) in the Discovery’s vast load bay.

OFF-ROAD PROWESS Discovery is superb off road, or even on road but in snow and ice or rain.

L OAT H E I T

SAT-NAV So fiddly to use and so out of touch with traffic that I ended up using my phone.

ADBLUE THIRST One litre per 300-350 miles or so is seemingly normal. Using a 10-litre container means a guaranteed spill.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 67


KIA STINGER GT S If you don’t want to know the score, look away now: Kia Stinger nil, pothole two MILEAGE 4158 WHY WE ’ R E RU N N I N G IT To get fully familiar with the dynamic successes and foibles of an alluring driver’s car. And to see if the UK public can ‘get’ the idea of a truly desirable Kia

ow many British drivers have found out how costly and inconvenient a meeting of 19in alloy wheel and ominously deep pothole can be over the past six weeks? It must be in the thousands – and two Autocar road testers are certainly among their number. It was one particular pothole found by m’colleague Matt Prior late at night on his way home from the airport that befell the nearside of our long-term Kia Stinger GTS recently. The pothole had been cut out for repair but left unfinished – and, Matt reported, made him very glad he hadn’t taken the motorbike to Heathrow on that occasion. The meeting burst the car’s front

H

LOVE IT B R I G HT PAI NT WO R K The recent sunshine really makes the paintwork zing. I’m currently too afraid to look directly at it for fear of retina damage. But in a good way.

LOATHE IT LI M ITE D S E T- U P CH O I CES No ‘custom’ driving mode. Sorry, Kia: ‘smart’ isn’t the same thing if you want to pick steering, damping and powertrain maps à la carte.

68 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

Warranty is long but won’t cover pothole-damaged alloy wheels nearside tyre, and so Matt spent a goodly chunk of Easter holiday time that should have been dedicated to chocolate egg consumption sourcing a particularly elusive Continental ContiSportContact 5 tyre on a bank holiday weekend. Bless him, he succeeded, though, and returned the car to the office the following Tuesday sorted. Or so he thought. A few days later, however, yours truly stopped to buy fuel on a Friday night commute home to find a bubble blister the size of a tennis ball in the sidewall of the Stinger’s nearside rear tyre, having already been somewhat perturbed by a slight but detectable wobble emanating from the car’s front axle under braking. All was clearly not well. So I sourced the car’s second replacement tyre in a week and booked in to my nearest fitter, which was inundated with demand already from people, many of whom had probably been similarly unlucky

with potholes, and so couldn’t squeeze the car in for three days. When the fitting was finally done, having taken the opportunity to have both nearside wheels rebalanced, I discovered the source of the wobble on that front axle: a front rim sufficiently altered by its run-in with a Northamptonshire crater that it needed 125g of balance ballast strategically sticking to it – and it still doesn’t feel quite right on the car, even after that. Good news? There’s no warped disc, as I suspected there might be when last I wrote. The nice bloke at the fitters even let me check that much for myself. Either way, the inevitable main dealer service appointment will now have to made, I fear – and I worry it’ll be expensive; because Kia’s sevenyear warranty might be good, but I doubt it extends to cover the fallout of shoddy road repairs. Replacement 19in rims can’t be cheap, can they?

And I’m also told (by the same nice chap at the fitters, since you ask) that I should get the tracking checked by Kia while I’m at it. “Don’t leave it too long,” he said. “Bad tracking gets set in its ways and becomes harder to fix with use. It’s a bit like breaking in a new shoe with the tongue out of place. After that, you know that tongue will never sit straight on the bridge of your foot, where it should, no matter how many times you adjust it.” Somebody give that man a TV show on Discovery. In better news, I’ve come across the function, buried a couple of menus inside the trip computer, to deactivate the dreaded ‘welcome chimes’ the car plays as you enter and exit. They make it sound like a 10-year-old Windows laptop computer. Although they’re minutely different ditties, they’re about as ‘welcome’ – by the time your 99th rendition comes around, at any rate – as a jab in the ear with a cotton wool bud. Suffice it to say I’ve disabled them for the foreseeable – or at least until just before the next time I see fit to lend the car to Mr Prior for an airport run. MATT SAUNDERS

TEST DATA KIA STI N G E R GT S Price £40,495 Price as tested £40,495 Faults None Expenses £386.46 (two replacement tyres and wheel balancing) Economy 27.4mpg Last seen 25.4.18

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE matt.saunders@haymarket.com


OUR CARS

HONDA CIVIC TYPE R Now the engine’s run in, there’s no holding the hot hatch back Vauxhall Insignia MILEAGE 5968

LAST SEEN 25.4.18

Business buyers are big business for the Insignia: in-car 4G wi-fi hotspot must be hot stuff to them. I’m in the imaging business, so uploading files on the go is absolutely my business, and a multi-megabit transfer proved a decent test at Beaconsfield services. A couple of minutes later, the visual accompaniment to my next long-term report was on the web. Speedy business. MM

MILEAGE 5771 WHY WE ’ R E RU N N I N G IT To determine whether the most ferocious front-wheel-drive hot hatch on sale today is usable on a daily basis

ur Honda Civic Type R has passed the 5000mile mark. That’s the kind of distance in a car’s life where minor faults start to become full-on irritations, but not in this case. In fact, the Type R is actually improving with age. The engine has benefited from being properly run in, for one thing. When we first jumped into the Type R, the 2.0-litre turbocharged VTEC engine felt a bit tight, as such highly tuned units often are at first. But in recent months it’s begun to loosen up, making the 306bhp engine more responsive. That’s good for the car’s performance and it’s also been good for my wallet. Honda claims a 36.7mpg fuel efficiency for the Type R, but in our early days with the car we were lucky to average in the 28s. Granted, some of that is down to our desire to sample the engine’s full potential – purely in the name of research, clearly – but the vast bulk of our

O

LOVE IT E X TE R I O R ST YLI N G Even now the novelty has faded, I love the Type R’s edgy touring car-esque styling.

LOATHE IT NOISE The engine can drone at motorway speeds. Once you hear it, you can’t unhear it.

The Civic was a match for Frankel’s Maser mileage has been normal, everyday driving. Thankfully, as the engine has been run in, so the economy has improved, and we’re now achieving an average of around 32mpg. That improvement adds up over time. Of course, the Type R is never going to be a particularly frugal car to run. It’s a performance hot hatch, after all. I was reminded of that when idly flicking through the owner’s manual, a document so thick it puts some novels to shame. I found an instruction telling you to check the car’s oil every time you stop for petrol. That might have been true of cars of yesteryear but it seems somewhat excessive in 2018. Still, the next time I was filling up I gave the oil a check and topped it up. I was quite surprised I needed halfa-litre of oil, which was more than I’d expected after 5000 miles, and could add up over time. Having to fiddle around checking my oil more frequently is a small price to pay for the sheer joy of driving the Type R, though: it’s so rewarding in that respect. That was hammered home to me when I was given the task of snapping Andrew Frankel’s recent

tour of the sites of some of Sir Stirling Moss’s finest moments, a 370-mile trek that spanned from Aintree to Goodwood. Frankel was in a £108,780 Maserati GranTurismo MC, powered by a 4.8-litre V8 engine, while I got to follow him round in my £33,520 Type R. It shouldn’t have been much of a fight, if you went by the list price. And yet, in challenging conditions on twisting country roads, I had absolutely no problem keeping up with him. Frankel, who is no slouch of a driver, just couldn’t get away – and I wasn’t even pushing. The Type R just has incredible traction and speed, and the handling is predictable and consistently rewarding, with a hint of benign lift-off oversteer. It made what could have been a long slog of a trip hugely entertaining. I’m sure I saw Frankel give a few envious glimpses in the rear-view mirror of the GranTurismo too. In fact, the only real area in which I reckon it lost out to the Maserati – a car nearly four times as expensive, remember – was noise: the Type R’s turbocharged unit will never sound as good as a mighty Italian V8. STAN PAPIOR

Volkswagen Golf GTI MILEAGE 8111

Ssangyong Rexton MILEAGE 2159

TEST DATA H O N DA CIVI C T YPE R GT 2 .0 V TEC TU R BO MAN UAL Price £32,995 Price as tested £33,520 Faults None Expenses None Economy 31.8mpg Last seen 25.4.18

OWN ONE? SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE stan.papior@haymarket.com

LAST SEEN 11.4.18

I knew it’d happen eventually: I reached for a rear door that wasn’t there. It took a few months, but for the first time I craved an extra pair of doors. The cause was a constant getting in and out of the car in changeable spring weather conditions. I can see why the game is nearly up for three-door hatches, as you’ll always want two more… MT

LAST SEEN 25.4.18

This is not a characteristic that the makers of the Rexton will likely enjoy, but there’s slightly foolish pleasure to be had from driving a vehicle an example of which you’re unlikely to see coming the other way. That’s partly because this Ssangyong is a new model, of course, but also because it’s a niche vehicle. For now, it’s a pleasingly rare beast. RB

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 69


What to buy, where to buy it and how much to pay

USED CARS W H A T WS TE ALMO T B O U G HE E K T H IS W

LE XUS I S - F If you want the practicality and Q-car capability of a hot fourdoor saloon but your budget is limited, don’t overlook the thundering Lexus IS-F. For £20k – or less, if you’re lucky – you’ll have a fire-breathing 5.0-litre V8 that revs to 7000rpm and hits 62mph from rest in just 4.8sec. Oh, and it’ll do plenty of sideways stuff too.

James Ruppert THE HIGH PRIEST OF BANGERNOMICS

Volvo’s XC90 has been rated the safest car in the UK

SAFE BETS FOR BUYERS It’s not only posh cars that come equipped with life-saving tech e now know, according to the boffins at Thatcham Research, just what the safest car in the UK is. I was thinking that it could be one of those barn finds we see, so many of which have not turned a wheel in decades. Instead, the title belongs to the Volvo XC90. Apparently, since it was launched in 2002 and after 50,000 have been sold, no driver or passenger has been killed inside one. Jolly well done to Volvo, which has had a commitment to keeping its customers safer for generations. It has also cultivated a civilised, middle-class image that I think helps keep us all safe and sound. The secret of the big V’s success in the real world is the early adoption of hazard-detection technology that warns drivers of possible collisions. Maybe artificial intelligence in the form of Autonomous Emergency Braking (AEB), which automatically applies the car’s brakes, is the main explanation, and it can be found on plenty of cars, especially Germans, these days. Perhaps that’s the sort of used motor we should be targeting? Starting small, a Kia Picanto 1.25 2 from 2016 will have AEB. I found a 2016 example with just over 40,000 miles and a full service history for £7490. Then there is the Fiat Tipo, which you might remember from the 1980s, except that a less boxy version bounced back into the

W

showrooms recently, which you may not have noticed – perhaps because most cars these days now look like Kias. Anyway, a 1.6 MultiJet has AEB and a 2017 with fewer than 5000 miles is £9450. Actually, there are lots in circulation right now. You would probably be a lot happier with a Ford Focus or a Vauxhall Astra, but a Tipo would at least be different. As you might expect, Renault is

`

Apparently, no one has been killed inside a Volvo XC90 a

very active in this safety market and there are lots of 2017 Scenics around, which will keep you out of trouble. For £15,300, you will get a 1.5 dCi Energy with around 6000 miles. Actually, with a Dynamique, you get a whole suite of fatigue alert and pedestrian detection systems. Posh cars have AEB, so here’s another reason to consider a Jaguar XE. How about the 2.0 i4: a petrol one in Prestige trim with 12,000 miles and all the AEB assistance you will need. A 2016 example is £19,500. The late, great boss of Bristol Cars, Tony Crook, once told me that no one had ever died behind the wheel of a Bristol. “Mind you, one chap drove off Beachy Head,” he said. “Not sure that counts as an accident.” I’m off out to buy a Beaufighter. Wish me luck.

£9450 for a Tipo 1.6 MultiJet with AEB and fewer than 5k miles


TA L E S F R O M R U P P E R T ’ S GA R AG E

MILE AGE 36,003

VOLKSWAGEN GOLF Say hello to the new arrival, part-financed by the sale of our daughter’s Polo, the contents of her piggy bank and the Bank of Mum and Dad. We turned up at a dealer who sold us the Polo and there was this Golf, which wasn’t even on their stocklist. The nipper drove it and hats off to the dealer for not having kittens about letting a youngster get behind the wheel. So we bought it. And why not? It has a full dealer history, is immaculate and, as a 1.4 Bluemotion Tech, will do 53.3mpg to the petrol gallon.

READERS’ QUESTIONS

I’m very tempted by QUESTION a Mk3 Toyota MR2 as a bit of summer fun. Is there anything I need to watch out for? Michael Hughes, via email Mk3 MR2s are generally pretty reliable little cars but they do have ANSWER one fatal flaw, which is that the precatalytic converter can break down and bits can be ingested into the engine, wrecking it. There’s plenty online about this problem, so do a bit of research on it first. AR

BA N G E R PE D I A

I’ve always wanted a classic Mini and I’ve just come into a bit of money. Is now a good time to buy one and how much should I pay? QUESTION

Dee Smith, Southampton

G is for Golf There was only one truly classless yet classy car in the 1980s: the Volkswagen Golf. It had the broadest appeal: a basic GL was fine for the family unless they wanted to get somewhere in a hurry, then it would have to be the GTI. The VW badge was the guarantee of quality while

SEND YOUR USED CAR TALES TO

the Golf meant modernity and practicality. The brilliant twist was the GTI, a charismatic combination of sports and family car. There are not too many in circulation now, but they are still relatively affordable in dreary Driver trim. Now may be the time to buy.

Classic Minis always used to be quite pricey, but they aren’t ANSWER shooting up in value like some other classics. As long as we’re not talking about a special model like the 1275 GT, £2500 gets you a solid, roadworthy example, £5000 gets you a good one and £8000 or so buys you a cracker. AR

james@bangernomics.com AND READERS' QUESTIONS TO autocar@haymarket.com 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 71


W H Y YO U N E E D A U S E D

PORSCHE 944 I N YO U R L I FE

Starter motor Don’t worry – even a healthy one can turn slowly

MUCH APPRECIATED Prices for the once-popular Porsche 944 have picked themselves up off the floor and are strengthening rapidly. John Evans says now is the time to buy he 944 in ‘One we found’ on the opposite page could be your last chance to buy a classic Porsche for peanuts before prices rise beyond reach. That it’s been in storage is a worry, though. A 944’s rubber seals and belts, and its alloy engine, need a regular workout or they’ll deteriorate. Many sellers who say their 944s have full service histories stop maintaining them the moment they go into storage, as if a rest doesn’t count. In this case, it does. On the other hand, if this 944 is as good as its seller says, it could be the basis for a project and a nice little investment. There’s certainly enough interest in these cars. The 944 was launched in 1982 to provide a much-needed bridge

T

72 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

between the 924 and the 911 SC. Its Porsche-developed 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine, fitted with balancer shafts for smoothness, produced 161bhp, while its rearmounted transaxle (made by Audi) helped achieve a near-perfect weight balance. Buyers could choose between a standard five-speed manual gearbox or a three-speed automatic. Most chose the former. It was joined three years later by the 944 Turbo, with essentially the same engine but now with 217bhp. A limited-edition, 247bhp Turbo S arrived in 1988. Today the Turbo is the rarest and most sought-after 944. Both standard – called Lux – and Turbo models were a roaring success, inspiring Porsche to roll out a raft of improvements for the 1986

model year. They included revised suspension, a new, flush-mounted windscreen and new ‘phone-dial’ alloys. Inside, the interior gained a curvier fascia and seats from the 911. The 944 S arrived in 1987 with a 2.7-litre 16-valve engine producing 187bhp (look for the optional ‘16 Ventiler’ badge behind the indicator repeaters). Unlike the 2.5, which relied on torque, this engine was a revvy unit that liked hard work but which most drivers didn’t rate. These days, with good examples of all 944s thin on the ground, buyers can’t afford to be so sniffy. A detuned version of this engine replaced the 2.5 in 1989. It produced 163bhp but more mid-range torque than the 2.5. That same year the S2 arrived,

displacing the 944 S and almost elbowing aside the Turbo thanks to its 3.0-litre, 16-valve four that produced 205bhp. It even looked like the Turbo but for that car’s rear wing, which it would eventually gain in 1991. It was offered in cabriolet and coupé forms. Realising the threat the new S2 presented, Porsche replaced the Turbo’s 217bhp engine with the 247bhp unit from the Turbo S. With only a few months to spare before the axe fell on the 944 range, the Turbo cabriolet landed in 1991. So which 944 to buy? In a perfect world you’d have an S2 for cruising, a Turbo for kicks, an S for hooning around and an early model for the track. As it is, whichever 944 is in the best condition for your budget is probably the one for you.


USED CARS H O W T O G E T O N E I N YO U R GA R AG E

Fascias can crack; from 1983 the 944 got 911 seats

An expert’s view

DID YOU KNOW? Porsche based the 944 on the 924 platform. When the car was discontinued, it bequeathed 20% of its parts to its successor, the 968.

Power outputs range from 161bhp to the Turbo S’s 247bhp

Q W H E E L S A N D T Y R E S Check for cracked alloys and look out for perished tyres.

NASH HUNTER, RETRO RESTORER “I bought my first 944 in 2005 and after I got it running right, other owners asked me to work on theirs. Soon I had a business and I haven’t looked back. For a long time, the 944 was under-appreciated and as recently as five years ago prices were on the floor. Often, 944s were worth no more than a new clutch (£800). Today you’ll need £8000 for a good car and from £14,000 for a genuinely tidy one. Everyone wants the Turbo or, if they can’t find one, the S2. My favourite is a 1983 944 with manual steering. They feel quite agricultural but much more connected to the road.”

Also worth knowing

Buyer beware…

£ 4 0 0 0 - £6 9 5 0 Mix of pre- and post-1985 161bhp 2.5s, with mileages up to 130k.

Q E N G I N E Check for oil changes at 6k miles on pre-’86 cars and Turbos, 12k on later cars. Needs timing and balancer shaft belts every 40k miles or three years, new water pump every 80k. Check exhaust camchain tensioner on 2.7 S engines. Vibes at idle could be the engine mounting or clutch thrust bearing. Test the latter by resting your foot on the clutch – if it’s failing, the vibes stop. Oil and water mixing suggests a failed head gasket or integrated oil cooler on all engines bar post-’89 Turbos. Smoke on start-up is worn valve stem seals; smoke in general running is the cylinder liners.

Q I N T E R I O R Check all ancillary motors work, the headlining is secure and the fascia isn’t cracked.

Porsche dealers are an excellent source of OE parts. Everything is available, often at prices that beat independent suppliers. However, as new OE suppliers replace old ones, prices may rise, so still shop around.

How much to spend £70 0 0 - £ 8 9 9 5 The first (1989) 208bhp 3.0 S2s with mileages around 110k. £9 0 0 0 - £ 1 0 , 9 9 5 Leggy 3.0 S2s but also 2.5s around 75k miles, most with patchy histories. £ 1 1 , 0 0 0 - £ 12 , 9 9 5 Usual mix of 3.0 S2s but also a tidy ’87 187bhp 2.7 S with 100k miles for £12k. £ 13 , 0 0 0 - £ 1 4 , 9 9 5 Low-mileage 2.5s plus an ’87 Turbo with 73k miles and an ’89 3.0 S2 convertible with 100k, each for £15k.

Q S T E E R I N G , B R A K E S A N D SUSPENSION Clonking noises or front wheel shake suggests worn suspension bushes; floaty handling means worn wishbone ball joints or dampers. On non-powerassisted cars, vague steering could indicate a worn rack; on assisted cars, look for steering pump leaks.

`

With good examples of all 944s thin on the ground, buyers can’t afford to be sniffy a

Q B O DY Rust hits the sills, rear wheel arches, suspension mounts and front jacking points. On early cars check the fuel tank. Check for even shut lines front and rear and a rippled boot floor.

One we found PORSCH E 944 2.5, 1986 D - R E G , 13 0 K M I L E S , £3 5 0 0 Described as having a full history, although like many 944s, the last service was five years ago, since when it has been stored. No rust but failed its MOT on discs and hubs. Private seller says these will be replaced and the car sold with a year’s MOT and a service.

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 73

Thanks to Nash Hunter (retrorestorer.co.uk)

Q T R A N S M I S S I O N Expect transaxle whine. Clutches last 70k miles but are expensive to replace. Check for leaking master cylinder.


BUY THEM BEFORE WE DO

SUPERCAR MOULD BREAKER

Honda NSX £56,995 ere at Autocar we know a thing or two about game changers, because once a year at the Autocar Awards ceremony we nominate half a dozen cars that have managed in some way to bring higher standards to their class or defy conventions. We know, too, that once every so often a car comes along that caps that completely and simply rips up the rulebook, and back in 1990 the

H

original Honda NSX was one of those – it was a supercar game changer. Before the NSX, supercars were difficult buggers to get along with, having recalcitrant gearboxes, awkward driving positions and intractable powertrains. If you could see out of one you were lucky, and you were blessed if you could complete a journey without AA assistance. By contrast, the aluminium NSX was easy to drive and easy to see out

Bristol Fighter

FIGHTER BET TER THAN ISA

£199,950

WILD CARD

of, and both its marvellous highrevving V6 VTEC engine and its sweet gearbox (automatic even, if you prefer) were super-responsive. It was supremely reliable, too, but also thrillingly quick; it handled beautifully and, for the discerning, it was rammed full of exquisite engineering details. This was a grown-up and graceful supercar, and such was its brilliance it made every other manufacturer up their game.

Once upon a time you could buy a used NSX for small change, but now you’ll need over £50,000 for a good one. The reasonable mileage and full service history example we found in our classifieds is nudging £60k. However, what you’d get is a delightful and thoroughly usable supercar, a sound investment and a chunk of history that you could use every day and derive enormous pleasure while doing so.

TEMPTING COUPE FOR £7K

Volkswagen Scirocco £6995

It might not always look like it, but they knew a thing or two at Bristol. The Fighter had a low centre of gravity, perfect weight distribution and a very low-drag body, plus it was luxurious, comfortable and incredibly fast. They’re extremely rare, too, so you could think of this car as a V10engined investment.

Once the Golf stopped being so tall and boxy, the Scirocco’s days seemed to be numbered, but there’s still decent value to be found in a used one. Here we have a good, clean example of the sparkling 197bhp 2.0-litre petrol version, up for a tempting £6995. It’s fast, fun and, on these 18in alloys, rather handsome.

Morgan 3 Wheeler

Chrysler Crossfire

£42,000

£2500

This fully restored three-wheeled Moggie isn’t the latest incarnation but the original low-slung F-Series in which it was possible to sit and touch the ground with your fingertips. With a history dating back to 1935, this one’s a sure-fire, open-top V-twin winner. Just add goggles and a handlebar moustache.

A stiff car, the Crossfire, and as a result it could corner in excess of 1g. However, if you don’t fancy the prospect of owning an American car, consider that, under the skin, most of it is a Mercedes-Benz SLK and it was made by Karmann in Germany. Anyway, £2500 for a Crossfire in good nick is a bit of a steal.

SLK IN UNCLE SAM DR AG

For more like this, visit pistonheads.com/classifieds/used-cars

74 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018


USED CARS AU C T I O N WAT C H

CLASH OF THE CLASSIFIEDS U S E D C A R D E S K D O E S B AT T L E BRIEF

Gentlemen, I’m after something Italian. It should bubble with brio and make me tremendously excited. You each have £50k to fulfil my wishes.

FIAT X1/9 Imagine a low, strong and pleasingly agile mid-engined targa-topped two-seater, designed by Marcello Gandini and equipped with a lively and eminently tunable engine created by the great Aurelio Lampredi, that gripped like a limpet and could be bought in its day for the price of a family hatchback, and you can imagine the delight with which the world greeted the Fiat X1/9. Alas, its day was a long time ago now and most are no more, but this late-1989 car with an extensive history and a current MOT made £2730 at a recent auction. That strikes us as a very good deal indeed.

GET IT WHILE YOU CAN

Alfa Romeo SZ £49,995 What you need is an Alfa SZ. The angular styling caused such a stir at launch that people called it ‘Il Mostro’. The SZ grips the road like a ferocious beast – Alfa claimed it could pull 1g in corners. Then there’s the noise of that glorious V6, the lightweight composite bodywork, the rear transaxle… I could go on, but I think I’ve made my point. MAX ADAMS

Iso Lele £49,995 Allow me to present the Iso Lele, a GT rival to the Lamborghini Espada with 325bhp and an epic soundtrack. Yet where an Espada costs around £150k now, a Lele will set you back a third of that. Inside, the lavish cabin is swathed in quilted leather, chrome and wood, while outside it oozes 1970s cool. A superrare Italian GT with supercar pace for a super-reasonable price? If that’s not interesting, I don’t know what is. ALEX ROBBINS VERDICT

Mercedes-Benz A180 Sport Price new £23,170. Price now £16,990 The new A-Class might be causing a stir, but this third-generation model never quite captured our hearts. In a class of highly proficient competitors, its firm ride and poor handling let it down, as did its noisy diesels and scratchy interior quality. However, it still looks smart, the engines are at least efficient and the new model means you can pick up a delivery mileage version of this old one and save over £6k, which isn’t to be sniffed at.

Man, that Lele is cool and as 1970s as an episode of The Persuaders. But I’m not sure I can resist the cluster of slashes that is the Alfa SZ. MARK PEARSON 9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 75


1580 29.3.17 1659

3.1.18

940

27.1.16

ALPINA B3 Biturbo 4dr saloon AAAAB B3 Biturbo 155 4.7 10.3 3.8 6.8 2.9 404 443 41.5

27/35

1610 29.8.13

ARIEL Atom 0dr open AAAAB V8 170 3.0 5.7 1.9 3.7 2.55 475 268 16.4 21/37 Nomad 0dr open AAAAA Nomad 125 4.5 12.7 3.9 7.7 3.10 235 221 26.7 —/—

650

10.8.11

735

24.6.15

ASTON MARTIN V8 Vantage 2dr coupé AAAAC GT8 190 4.6 10.4 3.6 6.1 2.6 440 361 25.3 19/29 DB11 2dr coupé AAAAB Launch Edition 200 4.0 8.4 3.0 10.1 2.6 600 516 46.2 24/34 Rapide 4dr saloon AAAAC Rapide S 190 5.3 11.3 4.3 8.3 3.03 550 457 33.6 19/23

1530 12.10.16 1910

21.9.16

1990 20.3.13

AU D I A1 3dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 TFSI Sport 126 8.4 22.4 8.9 12.8 2.2 S1 155 5.9 14.4 5.2 5.4 2.6 A3 3dr/5dr hatch AAAAC 2.0 TDI Sport 134 8.9 25.9 11.4 10.8 2.7 S’back e-tron 138 7.9 20.9 6.6 8.5 3.0 RS3 Saloon 155 4.0 9.9 3.5 9.0 2.7 A4 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.0 TDI S line 147 8.4 22.2 7.3 11.2 3.1 RS4 Avant 155 4.0 9.6 3.5 11.0 3.0 A5 2dr coupé/convertible AAABC S5 155 4.9 11.7 4.4 9.7 3.0 A5 Sportback 4dr saloon AAABC 2.0 TFSI S line 155 5.7 15.1 5.3 17.2 2.5 A6 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 3.0 TDI SE 155 7.2 20.3 6.4 3.9 2.9 RS6 Avant 155 3.7 8.7 3.1 12.8 2.4 A7 Sportback 4dr saloon AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI 155 6.7 18.7 6.5 *4.0 2.8 TT 2dr coupé/convertible AAAAC 2.0 TFSI S-line 155 6.6 14.5 5.0 6.5 2.5 RS 155 3.6 8.4 3.0 7.8 2.7 Q2 5dr SUV AAABC 1.4 TFSI Sport 132 8.1 23.9 8.2 9.8 2.7 Q3 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 TDI SE 132 8.3 25.5 8.1 *11.5 2.7 RS 155 5.0 12.6 4.5 8.3 2.8 Q5 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDI S line 135 8.3 26.4 8.5 14.7 3.1 SQ5 quattro 155 5.5 13.7 5.0 11.1 2.6 Q7 5dr SUV AAAAC 3.0 TDI S line 145 6.2 17.6 6.2 *3.8 — SQ7 4.0 TDI 155 5.1 12.6 4.4 7.0 2.9 R8 2dr coupé AAAAC V10 Plus 205 3.1 6.7 2.6 5.7 2.8

1165 10.11.10 1390 28.5.14

148 236 30 48/59 201 258 30.7 45/49 394 354 33.7 29/35

1355 26.9.12 1540 31.12.14 1515 6.9.17

Veyron 2dr coupé AAAAB Super Sport 268 2.6 5.0 1.7

187 295 37.1 45/50 444 443 38.4 24/37

1940 4.11.15 1790 14.2.18

Seven 2dr roadster AAAAC 160 100 8.4 — 8.7 7.6 4.8 80 79 16.7 620S 145 3.8 9.2 3.2 5.7 2.7 310 219 21.2

349 369 40.5 26/33

1615

11.1.17

249 273 42.2 30/41

1535

201 295 39.9 34/46 552 516 40.0 20/28

1805 19.10.11 2010 3.7.13

241 369 42.9 31/40

1940

227 273 30.1 394 354 35.1

1305 26.11.14 1440 7.12.16

29/35 27/37

148 184 29.4 45/56

1265

8.3.17

9.2.11

9.11.16

175 280 35.8 33/46 306 310 32.4 32.4

1710 1655

16.11.11 1.1.14

187 295 42.0 37/43 349 369 45.2 26/32

1770 15.3.17 1870 21.6.17

268 443 47.6 32/36 429 664 47.6 24/38

2245 12.8.15 2330 26.10.16

602 413 26.8 15/23

1555 30.12.15

626 664 52.4 20/26

2244 2.5.18

616 590 44.5 18/26

2475

7.8.13

505 752 44.8 18/21

2745

21.9.11

600 664 48.2 20/25 429 664 48.7 29/39

2440 18.5.16 2499 5.4.17

BMW 1 Series 3dr/5dr hatch AAABC 116d ED Plus 124 10.2 30.0 10.0 17.3 — 114 2 Series 3dr coupé/convertible AAAAB 220d SE 143 7.8 20.9 7.3 8.8 2.9 181 220d C’vble 140 8.5 24.7 8.4 9.0 2.1 187 M235i 155 6.3 14.7 5.7 5.4 2.7 322 M2 155 4.4 10.3 3.6 6.2 2.6 365 2 Series Active Tourer 5dr MPV AAAAC 218d Luxury 129 8.9 26.5 8.7 12.1 3.0 148

199 37.7 54/60

1395 27.5.15

280 295 332 343

46/62 50/53 26/35 31/37

1450 19.3.14 1610 1.4.15 1530 23.4.14 1595 15.6.16

243 40.4 42/56

1450 24.12.14

39.6 34.5 28.1 33.7

41/57 43/54 40/47

TEST DATE

1535 22.2.12 1735 21.11.12 1660 4.10.17

28/37 29/36

1585 18.9.13 1585 9.7.14

40/52 22/28

1635 31.5.17 1855 18.4.18

40/54

1880

8.11.17

40/49

1795

11.11.15

294wh/m 1385 21.2.18 50/40

1560

43/49

1625 14.10.15

37/49

1825

17.9.14

1895 27.8.14

28/34 21/26

2265 13.11.13 2350 13.5.15

1995

2.3.11

C AT E R H A M 39/45 25/29

490 20.11.13 610 9.3.16

CHEVROLET Camaro 2dr coupé AAAAC 6.2 V8 155 5.6 12.4 4.5 12.2 2.7 426 419 43.3 23/29 Corvette 2dr coupé AAAAC Stingray 181 4.4 9.4 3.3 11.7 2.3 460 465 48.4 22/33

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

0-100mph

i10 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SE 96 14.7 — 16.2 19.9 i20 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.4 SE 114 12.2 42.4 12.1 17.3 i30 5dr hatch/estate AAABC i30 N 155 6.4 14.8 5.6 6.1 1.4 Premium SE 129 9.5 28.9 9.7 10.9 i40 5dr estate AAABC 1.7 CRDi 118 12.2 41.4 12.5 12.3 Santa Fe 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2 CRDi 118 9.0 27.6 9.2 *5.5

27

109 151

27.5 35/39

187 36.1

47/62

47/62

148 273 34.7 44/52

1175 20.6.12 1539 8.10.14

1050 28.12.16 1159

7.3.18

1225

16.7.14

1430 27.11.13

DACIA Sandero 5dr hatch AAACC 1.2 75 Access 97 15.3 — 17.6 23.0 3.0 74

79

20.3 32/38

941

27.2.13

DS 3 5dr hatch AAABC BlueHDi 120 118 9.9 32.2 9.4 11.1 3.1 118 4 Crossback 5dr hatch AAACC BlueHDi 120 117 12.0 48.8 12.3 18.0 2.9 118 5 5dr hatch AAABC 2.0 HDi 160 134 9.1 26.5 8.7 11.0 2.9 161

210 36.4 59/67

1150 23.3.16

221 36.7 49/50

1290

251 40.1

1660 18.4.12

42/55

6.1.16

FERRARI

1343 28.1.15 1599 4.5.16

258 39.5 44/46

1725 26.8.15

236 26.7 40/45

1785

6.8.14

258 38

1597

14.1.15

53/56

391 35.1

19/25

1720 24.2.16

151

39/48

1384

251 31.6

34/39

1707 13.3.13

332 37

36/39

1949 27.7.16

28

3.9.14

2.7 180 177 26.6 39/49

1357

2.8 316 295 25.4 29/43

1380 25.10.17

2.5 148 258 32.4 36/45

1806 24.10.12

2.9 174

221 na

221 34.4 56/57

118

51/72** 1872

2.7 573 476 35.8 25/32

1324

19.4.17

12.7.17 16.9.15

1725 5.10.16

2.9 65

70

20.0 44/51

925

29.1.14

3.0 99

99

21.8

1060

7.1.14

43/54

3.1 271 260 27.4 31/43 2.7 138 178 28.1 39/49

1478 27.12.17 1423 13.9.17

2.9 114

1555

7.9.11

1940

19.9.12

192 29.4 44/51

2.7 194 311

37.5 36/43

INFINITI 1436 17.2.16 1750

5.2.14

1896 25.2.15

JAG UAR F-Type 2dr convertible/3dr coupé AAAAB V8 S Convertible 186 4.0 9.4 3.4 8.0 2.8 488 460 V6 S Coupé 171 4.9 12.1 4.2 12.7 2.7 375 339 2.0 Coupé R-Dy 155 5.8 14.7 5.1 9.5 2.8 296 295 XF 4dr saloon AAAAB R-Sport 2.0 136 9.4 26.1 9.0 16.1 2.9 178 317 XE 4dr saloon AAAAB R-Sport 2.0 147 7.6 19.0 6.9 13.3 2.7 197 206 XJ 4dr saloon AAAAC 3.0d LWB 155 6.3 16.5 6.6 *3.6 2.7 271 443 E-Pace 5dr SUV AAABC D180 AWD SE 127 9.9 30.9 10.5 14 3.6 178 317 F-Pace 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0d AWD 129 9.2 30.9 9.7 7.4 — 178 317

46.8 19/29 36.2 24/33 33.2 31/44

1655 12.6.13 1594 11.6.14 1640 22.11.17

44.1

1595 2.12.15

47/56

33.8 30/49

1530

1.7.15

43.5 28/36

1960

9.6.10

45.8 36/49

1843

11.4.18

41.3

1775

11.5.16

37/40

Renegade 5dr 4x4 AAABC 2.0 M’jet 4x4 L’d 113 10.8 37.6 11.2 10.0 3.5 138 258 34.0 41/53 Cherokee 5dr 4x4 AABCC 2.0 140 4x4 Ltd 117 12.3 43.4 13.0 13.8 2.7 138 258 34.7 39/43

1502 28.10.15 1846 24.6.14

KIA Stinger 4dr saloon AAABC 2.0 T-GDI GT-L S 149 7.4 18.2 6.4 Rio 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 T-GDI 3 Eco 115 10.0 37.0 10.5 Niro 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 GDI DCT 2 101 9.7 30.0 9.5 Sportage 5dr SUV AAABC 1.7 CRDi ISG 2 109 12.1 46.4 13.1 Sorento 5dr 4x4 AAABC 2.2 CRDi KX-4 128 9.3 28.6 9.4

10.9 2.9 244 260 36.7 32/43

1717 25.4.18

12.3 3.2 99

1228

127 27.1

40/50

12.8 3.5 139 108/125 31.9 49/50 16.8 3.3 114 *5.7 —

1.3.17

1500 31.8.16

207 34.4 50/51

1500

2.3.16

197 325 35.2 35/39

1953

8.4.15

LAMBORGHINI Huracán 2dr coupé AAAAB Performante 201 2.9 5.9 2.0 4.9 3.0 630 442 24.5 17/22

1382 11.10.17

L AN D ROVE R

488 GTB 2dr coupé AAAAA 488 GTB 205 3.0 5.9 2.0 3.7 2.43 661 561 28.9 —/— F12 2dr coupé AAAAB F12 Berlinetta 211 3.0 6.5 2.3 5.4 2.2 731 509 29.7 13/18

1525 25.5.16 1630

6.11.13

F I AT Panda 5dr hatch AAAAB 1.2 Easy 102 14.6 — 15.3 19.9 3.0 68 4x4 Twinair 103 14.6 — 15.8 16.0 3.0 84 500 3dr hatch AAAAC Abarth 595 130 7.5 20.1 6.4 7.0 2.8 158 500 Twinair 108 11.7 — 13 15.3 3.3 84 Tipo 5dr hatch AABCC 1.6 M’jet Lounge 124 9.6 31.6 9.8 8.7 2.9 118 124 Spider 2dr roadster AAABC Lusso Plus 134 7.3 20.9 7.1 7.2 2.8 138 Abarth 124 Spider 2dr roadster AAAAC 124 Spider 144 6.8 18.6 6.5 6.5 2.8 168

199 33.1 59/63 325 27.3 28/37

JEEP

109 151

99

2.1.13 9.8.17

Q30 5dr hatch AAABC 1.6t Premium 124 9.4 26.4 9.1 15.5 2.85 120 148 31.6 35/39 Q50 4dr saloon AABCC 2.2 Premium 143 8.7 25.0 8.7 5.1* 3.0 168 295 42.5 49/59 Q70 4dr saloon AABCC 2.2 Pre’m Tech 137 9.6 28.6 9.6 15.8 3.2 168 295 40.8 39/45

CITROEN C3 5dr hatch AAABC P’tech 110 Flair 117 9.6 36.6 9.4 10.5 2.6 C3 Aircross 5dr hatch AAABC P’tech 110 Flair 115 11.5 36.4 10.7 12.3 3.5 C4 Cactus 5dr hatch AAACC 1.6 BlueHDi 100 114 11.8 41.2 11.7 7.2 2.9 C4 Grand Picasso 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 BlueHDi 130 10.1 30.1 9.6 12.5 2.9

1345 1147

HYU N DAI

2275 11.6.08

B U G AT T I 5.9 2.6 1183 1106 40.6 12/18

Civic 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 i-VTEC Turbo 126 7.8 19.3 7.0 8.7 Civic Type R 5dr hatch AAAAB 2.0 Type R GT 169 5.7 12.5 4.4 6.1 CR-V 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 i-DTEC EX 118 9.7 31.3 9.9 5.9 Clarity FCV AAAAC Clarity FCV 104 9.0 29.2 8.3 *5.3 HR-V 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 i-DTEC SE 119 10.5 34.9 10.4 11.2 NSX 2dr coupé AAAAB NSX 191 3.3 7.3 2.6 4.3

17.1.18

34/45

26/31

147 23.6 35/41 125 29.3 42/52

H O N DA Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

3 Series 4dr saloon/5dr estate/5dr hatch AAAAB 320d Sport 146 7.7 20.9 7.6 9.7 2.6 181 280 36.2 330d Touring 155 5.5 14.2 5.1 8.8 2.6 255 413 45.2 330e M Sport 140 6.3 15.7 5.7 6.9 2.9 249 310 40.8 4 Series 2dr coupé AAAAC 435i M Sport 155 5.5 13.2 5.2 6.3 2.7 302 295 28.2 M4 155 4.1 8.8 3.2 6.1 2.4 425 406 34.0 5 Series 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAB 520d M Sport 146 7.4 21.3 7.4 14.3 2.7 188 295 42.2 M5 155 3.3 7.5 2.7 8.9 3.1 591 553 41.1 6 Series GT 5dr hatch AAABC 630d xDrv M Spt 155 5.9 15.7 5.4 7.6 2.8 261 457 50.2 7 Series 4dr saloon AAAAC 730Ld 153 6.4 17.1 6.0 8.2 3.1 261 457 50.2 i3 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.3S Range Ext 99 7.7 — 6.6 *4.0 3.0 181 199 — i8 2dr coupé AAAAB i8 155 4.5 10.6 3.7 3.3 2.8 357 420 33.3 X1 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive20d xLine 136 8.2 24.2 8.0 11.8 2.8 187 295 35.1 X3 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive20d M Spt 132 8.3 26.6 8.6 17.5 3.3 188 295 41.2 X4 5dr SUV AAABC xDrive30d 145 5.9 16.9 5.8 11.1 2.6 255 416 43.7 X5 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive M50d 155 5.7 15.3 5.2 9.5 2.9 376 546 40.5 M 155 4.2 9.8 3.5 10.2 2.8 567 553 42.3 X6 5dr SUV AAAAC xDrive35d 147 7.3 21.2 7.1 *4.1 2.6 282 428 34.0

120 148 30.2 34/43 228 273 25.6 30/39

BENTLEY Continental GT 2dr coupé AAAAB W12 First Edition 207 3.6 8.1 2.9 8.9 2.8 Flying Spur 4dr saloon AAABC W12 200 4.5 10.4 3.6 8.4 3.0 Mulsanne 4dr saloon AAAAC 6.75 V8 184 5.7 13.7 4.8 *2.8 2.6 Bentayga 5dr SUV AAAAA W12 187 4.9 11.6 4.4 8.7 3.0 Diesel 168 5.2 12.6 4.6 7.6 2.9

FORD B-Max 5dr MPV AAAAB 1.0T Ecoboost 117 11.6 39.0 11.1 11.0 2.8 118 Fiesta 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1.0T Ecoboost 122 9.6 28.1 9.6 13.2 3.2 123 Focus 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 TDCi Zetec 121 10.9 36.3 10.9 10.3 3.35 118 RS 165 5.3 13.9 5.3 6.9 3.5 345 S-Max 5dr MPV AAAAC 2.0 TDCi T’ium 123 10.5 32.0 10.4 13.9 2.5 148 Grand Tourneo Connect 5dr MPV AAAAC 1.6 TDCi T’ium 103 13.2 — 13.9 19.1 2.9 114 Mondeo 4dr saloon/5dr/estate AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 130 10.0 28.8 9.4 12.7 3.1 148 Mustang 2dr coupé AAAAC 5.0 V8 GT F’back 155 5.2 11.6 4.2 9.4 2.7 410 Ecosport 5dr SUV AABCC 1.5 TDCi 99 14.3 — 15.2 14.4 2.7 89 Kuga 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 122 10.9 44.2 11.8 7.4 2.6 161 Edge 5dr SUV AAABC 2.0 TDCi 131 9.7 27.6 9.2 5.6* 2.6 207

» 50 -70 M PH Recorded in top gear (*kickdown with an automatic) and demonstrates flexibility » FU E L ECO N O MY Prior to 7.1.15, figures are touring (recorded over a set road route) and test average. From 7.1.15 on, figures are average and extra-urban, to the What Car?/True MPG standard. **denotes mpkg (miles per kilogram) for hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles » B R AKI N G 60 - 0 M PH Recorded on a high-grip surface at a test track » M PH/1000 R PM Figure is the speed achieved in top gear Make and model

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

0-60mph

Top speed

Make and model

A L FA R O M E O Giulia 4dr saloon AAAAB Quadrifoglio 190 4.5 9.2 3.2 10.3 2.57 503 443 38.7 34/49 Stelvio 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2D 210 Milano 134 6.8 20.6 7.0 7.3 3.01 207 347 41.3 38/50 4C 2dr coupé/convertible AAACC Spider 160 5.1 12.4 4.0 5.8 2.97 237 258 29.6 32/44

0-60mph

Facts, figures, from the best road tests

Top speed

Make and model

AAAAC

50-70mph

Purposeful track handling Stellar B-road body control and agility Desirability and usability Needs more torque or shorter gear ratios – or both Handling adjustability hard to unlock Doesn’t sound much better than any other Cayman

ROAD TEST RESULTS No one produces as thorough a judgement on a new car as Autocar. As well as acceleration, braking, fuel economy and noise tests, we carry out benchmark limit-handling tests, setting lap times if appropriate. But we don’t just drive at the track, essential as it is for finding the limits of performance; we also drive on a wide range of roads. Where we have tested more than one model in a range, the rating is for the range overall; where a model within the range meets our coveted five-star standard, it is highlighted in yellow. » 30 -70 M PH Indicates overtaking ability through the gears

ROAD TEST RESULTS

ROAD TEST

T

with a new range-topping model

30-70mph

ROAD TEST No 5370

PORSCHE 718 CAYMAN

Porsche seeks to answer its Cayman critics

75 22.2 39/49 107 20.8 37/44

1020 25.4.12 1050 17.4.13

170 23.9 34/39 107 22.9 35/39

1035 26.2.14 1070 24.11.10

236 35.0 49/62

1295

177 24.9 34/38

1050 28.9.16

184 25.2 35/45

1060 22.3.17

2.11.16

Discovery Sport 5dr SUV AAAAB TD6 HSE Luxury 130 8.7 27.7 8.7 8.9 3.4 254 Range Rover 5dr SUV AAAAB 4.4 SDV8 135 7.0 19.0 6.7 *3.8 2.9 334 Range Rover Evoque 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2 DS4 121 8.4 30.8 9.5 *5.7 3.1 187 Range Rover Velar 5dr SUV AAABC D240 HSE 135 9.3 27.4 9.0 15.7 3.8 237 Range Rover Sport 5dr SUV AAAAB 3.0 TDV6 130 7.8 22.5 7.5 12.2 3.1 255 SVR 162 4.4 10.3 3.8 12.6 2.6 542

443 37.1

26/34

2230 12.4.17

516 41.8

25/35

2625 12.12.12

310 37.3 30/36

1815

369 41.8

33/48

2089 30.8.17

13.7.11

442 43.1 502 41.8

33/42 22/19

2115 2.10.13 2335 15.4.15

LEXUS LC 2dr coupé AAAAC LC500 Sport+ 168 5.2 11.3 4.2 12.0 3.1 471 398 60.6 27/39 GS 4dr saloon AAABC GS250 144 9.2 26.0 9.0 16.2 2.9 207 187 34.4 26/32

1970 18.10.17 1695

1.8.12

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 77


24/28

LOTUS Elise 2dr roadster AAABC Cup 250 154 4.7 11.9 4.5 7.2 2.5 243 184 24.7 27/32 Evora 2dr coupé AAAAC Evora S 2+0 172 4.5 11.3 4.0 6.8 2.4 345 295 34.8 21/26 Exige S 2dr coupé AAAAB Exige S 170 4.1 9.6 3.7 5.5 2.5 345 295 27 21/30

M A S E R AT I Ghibli 4dr saloon AAABC Diesel 155 6.5 17.2 6.0 5.1 2.7 271 443 43.3 31/40 Levante 5dr SUV AAACC Diesel 143 6.8 19.9 6.9 4.3 3.4 271 443 46 26/42

3.1 89

2205 30.11.16

109 27.9 51/55

2.7 173 309 35 3.3 129 111

44/56

24.5 46/49

104 199 34.8 59/60

3.0 148 280 37.0 43/53

McLAREN 570S 2dr coupé AAAAA 3.8 V8 204 3.1 6.4 2.2 10.2 2.6 562 443 36.5 23/37 720S 2dr coupé AAAAA 4.0 V8 212 2.9 5.6 2.0 7.7 2.4 710 568 35.4 19/24 P1 2dr coupé AAAAA P1 217 2.8 5.2 2.2 6.0 2.3 903 664 36.0 19.6/—

MERCEDES-AMG C63 4dr saloon AAAAB C63 155 4.4 9.7 3.4 C63 S C’vertible 155 4.6 10.2 3.4 GT 2dr coupé AAAAC S 193 3.6 7.8 2.8 R 198 3.6 7.3 2.7 SLC 2dr convertible AAABC SLC43 155 5.5 12.3 4.2

7.5 2.7 469 479 38.1 19/25 7.1 2.7 503 516 35.6 21/27

1440 30.3.16

Tivoli XLV AAACC ELX auto 107 12.0 44.5 12.6 7.9 3.1 113

12.7 3.0 115 117 19.5 36/46 7.2 2.5 197 184 23.8 31/39

1230 3.11.10 XV 5dr SUV AAACC 1295 22.5.13 2.0i SE L’tronic 120 10.1 27.7 9.0 Levorg 5dr estate AAACC 7.3 2.8 107 207 8.76 320Wh/m 1545 27.4.11 GT 1.6i L’tronic 130 8.4 24.6 7.9 Forester 5dr SUV AAACC 12.9 2.9 109 192 35.0 49/56 1365 19.2.14 2.0d XC 118 9.9 36.5 10.5 WRX 4dr saloon AAACC 11.2 3.0 128 236 32.8 42/48 1550 13.8.14 STi Type UK 159 5.4 13.3 5.1 5.3 2.7 562 470 28.0 22/31

NOBLE

9.1 2.9 81 87 21.2 41/45 6.7 2.9 205 221 25.6 41/42 13.9 3.0 114

199 38.5 48/59

5.8 2.57 161

255 32.3 32/46

11.8 3.2 114

199 32.7 49/59

13.2 3.2 118

221 34.6 42/53

11.5 2.7 148 273 37.6 51/60

78 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Mpg test/touring

27.0 3.4 154 145 41.5

31/39

21.0 2.6 168 184 31.9

34/36

1537

13.1.16

11.0 2.9 145 258 33.0 41/49

1540

5.6.13

9.4 2.8 296 300 27.6 23/31

1534 25.6.14

Swift 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SZ5 121 10.5 33.0 10.3 11.8 Celerio 5dr hatch AAABC 1305 14.10.09 1.0 SZ4 96 12.9 — 14.3 25.0 Baleno 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0T B’jet SZ5 124 9.8 29.5 9.7 11.2 SX4 S-Cross 5dr SUV AAABC 1080 18.7.12 1.6 DDiS SZ4 111 10.0 32.6 10.1 8.9 1160 11.2.15 Vitara 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 SZ5 112 9.5 29.8 9.5 15.5 1395 15.1.14

2.9 110

125 26.3 45/56

925

3.0 67

66

835 25.3.15

2.9 110

125 26.3 50/55

950

2.57 118

236 35.1

57/67

1290 30.10.13

115

24.3 49/47

1075 29.4.15

118

Model S 4dr saloon AAAAB P90D 155 5.2 9.1 3.0 1.9 2.9 525 713 8.5 19.6.13 Model X 5dr SUV AAAAC 90D 155 4.7 13.1 2.8 2.5 2.7 416 487 8.5 1300 18.1.17

420Wh/m 2200 20.4.16 611Wh/m 2508 15.2.17

T OYO TA

1490

1495

28/44

3.8.16

1180

2.4 493 339 24.2 20/28

3.0 416 627 50.7 32/43

22.4 54/57

17.5.17

1680 25.5.11

1335 1430 1375

2.3 874 944 41.2

1451 28.2.18

TESLA

2.5 296 280 25.8 26/36 2.5 345 310 25.8 28/29 2.5 361 310 25.8 28/39

2.9 414 369 36.4 27/31

1425 14.9.16

SUZUKI

1752 16.11.16

PORSCHE

718 2dr coupé/roadster AAAAB 1420 24.5.17 Boxster 171 5.4 12.2 4.3 5.2 Cayman S 177 4.8 10.5 3.9 4.8 — 7.5.14 Cayman GTS 180 4.8 10.2 3.5 4.7 911 2dr coupé AAAAB GT3 RS 193 3.4 7.8 2.8 6.9 New 911 2dr coupé AAAAB 1715 3.6.15 Carrera S 190 4.5 9.4 3.4 7.3 1850 8.2.17 918 Spyder 2dr coupé AAAAA 4.6 V8 214 2.6 5.3 1.9 2.2 1715 29.7.15 Panamera 4dr saloon AAAAA 177 4.1 10.3 3.8 — 1555 10.5.17 4S Diesel Macan 5dr SUV AAAAB 165 4.7 11.8 4.3 7.9 1595 6.7.16 Turbo

221 33.2 45/58

SUBARU

1535

1.11.17 Yaris 3dr hatchback AAABC GRMN 143 6.4 15.4 5.4 GT86 2dr coupé AAAAA 2.0 manual 140 7.4 18.8 6.8 8.6.16 Prius 5dr hatch AAAAC 10.8.16 Business E’tion 112 11.1 32.0 10.7 9.5.18 Mirai 4dr saloon AAAAC Mirai 111 10.1 36.5 10.2 19.8.15 C-HR 5dr SUV AAAAC Excel 1.8 Hybrid 106 11.6 43.5 11.9 20.1.16

9.8 2.9 209 184 27.7 27/39

1135 28.3.18

10.6 2.6 197 151

23.5 30/45

1235

*6.4 3.1 121

1400 16.3.16

53/63

4.7.12

*6.5 3.3 152 247 22.5 44/62** 1400 27.4.16 *7.3 2.7 121

49/60

1420

21.8

4.1.17

VA U X H A L L

Adam 3dr hatch AAACC 1.2 Jam Ecoflex 103 14.3 — 15.3 20.8 2.8 68 85 1.2.17 Viva 5dr hatch AAABC 1.0 SE A/C 106 13.0 — 14.1 19.0 — 74 70 2.4 394 406 35.7 22/31 2000 4.6.14 Corsa 3/5dr hatch AAABC 12.7 3.0 362 384 40.4 27/33 1.4T SRi VX-Line 115 11.7 45.1 12.1 15.3 2.9 99 148 MERCEDES-BENZ RADICAL VXR 143 7.2 18.3 6.4 7.8 2.4 202 181 A-Class 5dr hatch AAABC SR3 SL 2dr roadster AAAAC Crossland X 5dr SUV AAACC A200 CDI Sport 130 8.9 28.3 9.0 10.1 2.5 134 221 37.1 48/58 1475 7.11.12 SR3 SL 161 3.4 8.4 3.7 4.8 2.7 245 265 24.9 14/765 30.11.11 1.2T 130 Elite 128 9.8 31.4 10.3 8.9 2.9 128 170 A45 AMG 168 4.2 11.5 4.3 4.5 2.8 355 322 38.1 27/37 1555 14.8.13 Astra 5dr hatch/estate AAAAC R E N A U LT 1.6 CDTi 136 SRi 127 8.8 25.7 8.8 8.6 2.6 134 236 B-Class 5dr MPV AAABC B200 CDI Sport 130 9.4 28.8 9.6 11.9 2.7 134 221 37.8 20/52 1495 29.2.12 Twingo 5dr hatch AAABC ST CDTi B’tbo SRi137 8.4 22.2 7.7 8.1 2.6 158 258 Dynamique 94 17.6 — 19.1 29.4 2.9 69 67 20.8 42/52 865 29.10.14 Insignia Grand Sport 5dr hatch AAAAC C-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC C220 Bluetec 145 8.1 22.9 8.1 11.7 2.8 168 295 42.4 41/51 1700 23.7.14 Zoe 5dr hatch AAABC 2.0D SRi VX-Line140 8.7 23.8 7.9 8.9 2.7 168 295 Dynamique 84 12.3 — 13.9 9.1 2.9 87 162 7.8 250Wh/m 1468 31.7.13 Zafira Tourer 5dr MPV AAABC CLA 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAABC 220 CDI Sport 143 8.3 23.1 8.0 4.8 2.9 168 258 37.3 44/54 1525 26.6.13 Clio 5dr hatch AAAAC 2.0 CDTi 165 129 10.4 36.8 10.2 14.3 3.2 163 258 113 13.4 — 13.9 19.1 2.8 89 100 23.8 38/47 1009 6.3.13 Mokka 5dr SUV AAABC 200 CDI S’t S’Brk 134 10.1 29.7 9.6 11.9 3.4 134 221 33.5 53/59 1555 18.11.15 0.9 TCE 118 10.0 30.6 9.4 13.7 3.0 138 148 RS 200 Turbo 143 7.4 20.9 6.9 9.1 2.8 197 177 20.8 32/37 1204 23.10.13 1.4T E-Class 4dr saloon/5dr estate/2dr convertible/2dr coupé AAAAC E400 Coupé 155 5.6 13.4 4.9 14.8 2.9 328 354 46.7 30/39 1845 14.6.17 Mégane 3dr hatch AAAAB VXR8 4dr saloon AAAAC 155 4.8 9.6 3.3 6.6 3.1 587 546 CLS 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 275 Trophy-R 158 6.4 14.0 5.0 6.4 3.1 271 266 27 26/33 1297 5.11.14 GTS-R 350 CDI S’Brake 155 7.0 18.5 6.4 *3.8 2.9 261 457 39.6 36/43 1980 9.1.13 New Mégane 5dr hatch AAACC V O L K S WA G E N 1.5 dCi Dyn. S Nav 116 11.1 35.2 11.1 13.2 2.8 108 192 33.9 47.2 1387 17.8.16 S-Class 4dr saloon/2dr coupé AAAAA S350 Bluetec 155 7.3 19.0 6.8 *3.9 2.7 255 457 45.6 34/44 1975 16.10.13 Grand Scenic 5dr MPV AAABC Up 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1601 25.1.17 1.0 High Up 106 13.8 — 14.7 18.6 2.8 74 70 S63 AMG Coupé 155 4.5 9.6 3.4 6.8 2.7 577 664 42.8 22/25 2070 3.12.14 dCi 130 Dyn. S Nav 118 11.4 35.8 11.3 10.2 3.4 129 236 32.1 47/61 Kad jar 5dr SUV AAAAC GTI 1.0 TSI 115 122 8.5 25.7 7.8 7.6 2.8 114 147 GLA 5dr SUV AAABC GLA220 CDI SE 134 8.1 23.8 7.8 4.7 2.65 168 258 36.4 40/48 1535 14.5.14 dCi 115 Dyn. S Nav 113 14.5 — 14.6 17.2 2.3 108 192 35.0 52/69 1380 21.10.15 Polo 5dr hatch AAAAB Koleos 5dr SUV AAACC 1.0 TSI 95 SE 116 10.7 34.4 11.1 12.1 2.8 94 129 GLC 5dr SUV AAAAC GLC250d 143 7.8 23.5 7.8 15.7 3.2 201 369 46.9 39/43 1845 10.2.16 dCi 175 4WD Sig. 126 9.8 31.3 10.1 14.3 2.9 175 280 — 34/38 1747 20.8.17 Golf 3/5dr hatch AAAAB GL 5dr SUV AAAAC GTI Perf. DSG 155 6.5 16.4 5.9 8.9 2.8 227 258 R O L L S - R OYC E GL350 AMG Sp’t 137 8.3 24.8 8.2 5.0* 2.6 255 457 37.7 28/33 2455 24.7.13 2.0 TDI 134 9.6 27.6 8.6 11.7 2.9 148 236 SL 2dr convertible AAAAC Phantom 4dr saloon AAAAA GTE 138 7.7 18.2 6.1 7.7 2.5 201 258 SL500 155 4.3 9.9 3.6 6.5 2.7 429 516 39.6 10/24 1815 8.8.12 Phantom 155 5.5 11.8 4.4 *2.5 2.8 563 664 51.2 8/28 2560 4.4.18 1.5 TSI R-line 134 8.8 22.7 8.1 9.9 2.1 148 184 Ghost 4dr saloon AAAAC T-Roc 5dr SUV AAAAB MG Ghost 155 4.9 10.6 3.9 *2.3 2.6 563 575 46.0 18/23 2450 7.7.10 2.0 TSI SEL 4Mn 134 6.7 20.2 6.5 13.3 3.2 187 236 Wraith 2dr coupé AAAAB 3 5dr hatch AAABC Arteon 5dr hatch AAABC 1.5 3Form Sp’t 108 11.4 41.5 11.6 19.6 2.8 105 101 22.2 37/41 1150 25.12.13 Wraith 155 4.6 10.0 4.5 *2.1 2.9 624 590 45.9 15/27 2435 21.5.14 2.0 BITDI 240 152 6.5 17.7 6.2 8.9 3.3 237 369 GS 5dr SUV AAACC Dawn 2dr convertible AAAAC Passat 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 1.5 TGI Excite 118 8.9 25.5 8.3 12.4 2.8 164 184 29.3 29/38 1395 20.7.16 Dawn 155 5.2 11.6 4.2 *2.4 2.9 563 575 47.7 19/25 2560 1.6.16 2.0 TDI 190 GT 144 8.7 23.6 8.1 13.1 3.2 187 295 GTE 140 7.6 19.0 6.1 7.8 3.3 215 295 MINI S E AT Touran 5dr MPV AAAAC Mini 3dr hatch AAAAB Ibiza 5dr hatch AAAAB 2.0 TDI 150 SE 128 9.9 29.3 9.7 13.6 3.2 148 251 Cooper S 146 6.9 17.1 5.9 6.7 2.5 189 221 26.4 35/54 1235 2.4.14 SE Tech’y 1.0 TSI 113 10.0 34.1 10.0 10.1 3.0 94 129 27.2 45/56 1047 19.7.17 Tiguan 5dr SUV AAAAB C’per S Wks 210 146 7.2 16.4 6.0 6.5 3.0 207 221 26.5 31/47 1235 6.12.17 Leon 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 SE 127 10.4 33 9.6 12.4 3.2 148 251 Clubman 5dr hatch AAABC SC 2.0 TDI FR 142 8.0 22.1 7.5 9.6 2.9 181 280 35.6 47/54 1350 4.9.13 Caravelle 5dr MPV AAAAC Cooper D 132 8.6 25.9 8.2 10.0 2.9 148 243 34.9 51/52 1320 25.11.15 Cupra SC 280 155 5.9 13.6 4.4 7.1 2.7 276 258 27.2 28/36 1441 26.3.14 2.0 BITDI Exec. 126 11.6 36.1 11.7 10.2 3.2 201 332 Convertible 2dr convertible AAAAB Alhambra 5dr MPV AAAAC V O LV O Cooper 129 9.2 25.4 8.8 12.4 2.7 134 162 31.0 46/53 1280 6.4.16 2.0 TDI 170 DSG 127 10.5 38.3 11.2 *7.0 3.0 168 258 30.5 35/40 1935 1.12.10 Countryman 5dr hatch AAABC V40 5dr hatch AAABC Arona 5dr SUV AAAAC Cooper D 129 9.0 26.4 8.4 11.5 2.8 148 243 36.2 42/48 1480 22.2.17 SE Tech’y 1.0 TSI 107 10.5 — 10.6 11.9 3.1 94 129 26.2 37/41 1165 15.11.17 D3 SE Lux 130 8.9 26.6 8.7 10.2 2.8 148 258 Plug-in Hybrid 123 6.7 24.4 6.2 5.5 3.5 221 284 30.1 42/50 1735 26.7.17 Ateca 5dr SUV AAAAB XC40 5dr SUV AAAAB 1.6 TDI SE 114 10.5 35.6 9.3 14.0 2.9 114 184 36.4 50/62 1300 19.10.16 D4 AWD First Ed. 130 8.5 24.8 8.5 13.7 3.0 188 295 MITSUBISHI S60 4dr saloon AAAAC SMART ASX 5dr SUV AAABC D4 SE Nav 143 7.6 20.4 6.9 9.2 3.0 179 295 1.8 DiD 3 124 10.0 28.8 10.1 8.6 2.8 148 221 29.6 49/57 1490 21.7.10 Forfour Electric Drive 5dr hatch AABCC S90 4dr saloon AAAAC Prime Premium 81 13.2 — 14.5 10.6 2.8 80 118 — 260Wh/m 1200 23.8.17 D4 Momentum 140 8.2 22.1 7.9 11.1 2.6 187 295 Eclipse Cross 5dr SUV AAACC 1.5 First Ed 2WD 127 9.0 26.5 8.3 13.8 3.0 161 184 30.9 34/45 1455 14.3.18 V60 5dr estate AAABC S KO DA Polestar 155 5.3 13.1 4.6 9.0 2.6 345 369 Outlander 5dr SUV AAABC 2.2 DiD GX5 118 10.2 32.9 10.1 11.1 3.07 147 265 34.7 38/45 1675 27.3.13 Fabia 5dr hatch AAAAC XC60 5dr SUV AAABC 1109 21.1.15 D4 AWD R-Des’n 127 8.9 26.2 8.8 14.2 2.8 188 295 PHEV GX4hs 106 10.0 30.5 9.5 6.2 3.0 200 245 — 44/38 1810 16.4.14 1.2 TSI 90 SE-L 113 12.6 46 12.5 15.0 3.4 89 118 26.1 45/49 New Octavia 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC XC90 5dr SUV AAAAC MORGAN vRS 245 Estate 155 6.9 16.2 5.8 7.3 2.9 242 273 29.8 33/39 1392 16.8.17 D5 Momentum 137 8.3 23.9 8.3 *5.0 — 222 347 Plus 8 2dr roadster AAACC Rapid 4dr saloon AAABC WESTFIELD 4.8 V8 — 4.9 11.1 4.0 8.3 3.2 390 370 36.0 24/32 1230 22.8.12 1.2 TSI 114 11.3 45.5 11.5 14.2 2.9 84 118 26.1 40/47 1175 5.12.12 Sport 0dr roadster AAAAC 3 Wheeler 2dr roadster AAAAA Superb 5dr hatch/estate AAAAB 3 Wheeler 115 8.0 29.9 7.7 5.1 3.56 80 103 21.3 30/520 6.6.12 2.0 TDI SE 135 8.8 24.9 8.2 11.2 2.8 148 251 37.2 47/54 1505 9.9.15 Sport 250 142 3.6 11.1 6.4 4.0 2.7 252 270 Kodiaq 5dr SUV AAAAC NISSAN ZENOS 2.0 TDI Edition 121 9.5 34.7 10.1 12.2 2.8 148 251 33.5 37/48 1751 23.11.16 Micra 5dr hatch AAAAC E10 0dr roadster AAAAB 0.9 N-Connecta 109 12.1 44.7 11.7 15.6 2.8 89 103 24.3 45/57 1068 26.4.17 S 140 4.3 11.2 4.1 5.3 2.9 250 295 5.5 2.5 503 479 34.7 20/29 4.6 2.4 577 516 30.7 19/23

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

Top speed

0-60mph

TEST DATE

S S A N GYO N G 81

M600 2dr coupé AAAAB M600 225 3.5 6.8 2.5 4.7 2.45 650 604 29.9 18/25

1050 22.4.15 208 3/5dr hatch AAACC 1.2 VTI Active 109 14.2 — 14.5 1470 4.12.13 GTi 30th 143 6.5 16.1 5.8 308 3/5dr hatch AAAAC 1480 23.1.13 1.6 e-HDi 115 118 10.1 32.6 10.4 508 SW estate AAAAC 1050 2.9.15 2.0 HDi 163 138 9.6 28.6 9.7 2008 5dr SUV AAABC 1275 22.7.15 1.6 e-HDi 117 10.7 37.8 11.5 3008 5dr SUV AAABC 1594 28.6.17 1.6 Bl’HDi GT L’e 117 12.0 44.3 12.1 5008 5dr MPV AAABC 2.0 Bl’HDi GT L’e 129 10.8 28.8 9.7

Weight (kg)

1307 12.11.14

Torque (lb ft)

13.1 2.9 108 192 35.7 50/57

Power (bhp)

1036 9.10.13

Make and model

Braking 60-0mph

42/54

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

Top speed

21.8

20.3 2.9 79

PEUGEOT

3.0 148 280 29.7 46/60

0-60mph

1.10.14

MAZDA 2 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.5 Sky’v-G SE 114 10.4 38.0 7.0 20.2 3 5dr hatch AAAAC 2.2 SE-L 130 9.0 26.6 9.1 9.9 6 4dr saloon/5dr estate AAAAC 2.2 Sport Nav 139 7.9 21.2 7.1 7.9 MX-5 2dr roadster AAAAB 1.5 SE-L Nav 127 8.4 24.8 7.9 14.7 CX-3 5dr SUV AAABC 1.5D SE-L Nav 110 10.3 34.7 10.3 10.3 CX-5 5dr SUV AAAAC 2.2D Sport Nav 127 9.4 26.3 9.1 10.4

Make and model

TEST DATE

Weight (kg)

Note 5dr hatch AAAAC 1.2 Acenta Pr’m 106 12.6 — 13.4 Pulsar 5dr hatch AAACC 1765 18.2.15 1.5 dCi N-tec 118 10.9 35.5 10.8 Juke 5dr SUV AAABC Acenta 1.6 111 10.3 41.6 9.9 Nismo 1.6 134 6.9 17.2 6.0 920 29.6.16 Leaf 5dr hatch AAABC Leaf 91 10.9 — 11.4 1430 30.3.11 Qashqai 5dr SUV AAAAB 1.5 dCi 2WD 113 10.8 39.2 11.1 1176 3.4.13 X-Trail 5dr SUV AAABC 1.6 dCi 2WD 117 11.2 39.7 11.7 GT-R 2dr coupé AAAAB Recaro 196 3.4 7.8 2.7 1835 12.3.14 1905

Mpg test/touring

32/38

Mph/1000rpm

NX 5dr SUV AAACC 300h 112 9.7 30.4 9.1 *5.6 2.7 194 na — RC F 2dr coupé AAACC RC F 168 4.8 10.7 3.9 12.9 2.9 471 391 39

Mpg test/touring

Mph/1000rpm

Torque (lb ft)

Power (bhp)

Braking 60-0mph

50-70mph

30-70mph

0-100mph

Top speed

0-60mph

Make and model

ROAD TEST RESULTS

1740 22.10.14

39/45

1086

6.2.13

20.3 49/55

938

15.7.15

34.8 37/42 23.8 29/34

1176 19.11.14 1280 6.5.15

2050

30.5 40/54

1199

33.4 55/58 33.7 57/59

1350 30.9.15 1435 13.4.16

36.1

1507

39/51

7.6.17

3.5.17

37.7 38/46

1805 15.2.12

26.1

1350 28.11.12

32/40

34.9 20/27

1858

10.1.18

20.5 44/59 24.7 39/54

945 7.12.11 1070 21.3.18

27.1

43/57

1145

34.4 37.4 7.6 28.0

32/38 44/56 44/45 40/52

1402 10.7.13 1390 16.1.13 1599 20.5.15 1324 2.8.17

31.1.18

35.6 31/37

1495 24.1.18

37.8 38/56

1828 27.9.17

37.9 45/52 32.3 38/43

1614 1722

4.2.15 7.9.16

37.0 54/60

1571

3.2.16

40

44/52

1683 22.6.16

22.7 38/45

2386 23.12.15

36.5 46/52

1545 15.8.12

39.8 38/44

1735

7.2.18

39.4 46/59

1580

5.3.14

40.1

1717

13.7.16

40/51

34.8 26/32

1834 15.10.14

38.9 40/49

1836

33.6 37/39

2009 17.6.15

22.7 32/42

665 29.11.17

33.9 21/23

725

5.7.17

7.10.15


a  -),,)/ . 2YHU

$335 29('


w Po

(b er

hp

)

T

op

e sp

ed

(m

ph

)

0-6

2 0/6

mp

h o Ec

m no

y (m

pg

)

C

k (g/ O2

m)

w Po

(b er

hp

)

T

op

e sp

ed

(m

ph

)

0-6

2 0/6

mp

h o Ec

m no

y (m

pg

)

C

k (g/ O2

m)

ABARTH

2.0 Turbo Petrol 280 276 149 5.7 46.3 141 AAABC 2.2 Turbo Diesel 150 148 137 8.2 67.3 109 2.2 Turbo Diesel 180 177 143 7.1 67.3 109 2.9 BiTurbo Quadrifoglio 503 191 3.9 34.4 189 1.4 T-jet 145 143 130 7.8-8.0 47.1-48.7 134-139 1.4 T-jet 160 Trofeo 157 135 7.3 47.1 139 AAAAB Stelvio 5dr SUV £33,990–£69,500 1.4 T-jet 165 Turismo 162 135 7.3-7.4 47.1-48.7 134-139 Alfa’s first SUV is a solid effort. Choosing the petrol version gives it 1.4 T-jet Competizione 177 140 6.7-6.9 47.1-48.7 134-139 charisma. LxWxH 4687x1903x1671 Kerb weight 1604kg 2.2 Turbo D 180 177 130 7.6 60.1 124 695 3dr hatch/2dr open £20,360–£26,210 AAABC 2.2 Turbo D 180 Q4 AWD 177 130 7.6 58.9 127 A convincing track-day 500 with decent dynamic ability. Overly 2.0 Turbo D 210 Q4 AWD 207 134 6.6 58.9 127 firm ride spoils it, though. LxWxH 3657x1627x1485 Kerb weight NA 2.0 Turbo 200 Q4 AWD 197 134 7.2 40.4 161 1.4 T-jet XSR Yamaha 162 135 7.3-7.4 47.1-48.7 134-139 2.0 Turbo 280 Q4 AWD 276 143 5.7 40.4 161 1.4 T-jet 180 Rivale 177 140 6.7-6.9 47.1-48.7 134-139 2.9 BiTurbo Quadrifoglio 503 197 3.8 31.4 210 1.4 T-jet 190 Biposto 187 143 5.9 45.9 145 4C 2dr coupé/spider £52,820–£59,820 AAABC 124 Spider 2dr open £29,620–£31,920 AAAAB It may be flawed but it’s rewarding to drive, if not the last word in

595 3dr hatch/2dr open £15,260–£21,960

The Fiat 500’s Abarth makeover makes it a true pocket rocket. LxWxH 3657x1627x1485 Kerb weight NA

Only a mildly upgraded version of the standard car – but what a revelation it is. LxWxH 4054x1740x1233 Kerb weight 1060kg 1.4 T-jet 170

167

142-144 6.9

finesse. LxWxH 3989x1864x1183 Kerb weight 934kg 1.75 TBi 240

236

160

4.5

hp

)

T

op

e sp

ed

(m

ph

)

0-6

2 0/6

mp

h o Ec

DB11 2dr coupé £147,900–£161,900

m no

y (m

pg

)

C

k (g/ O2

m)

AAAAA

The stunning replacement for the already seductive DB9 is tyreshreddingly good. LxWxH 4385x1865x1270 Kerb weight 1760kg 4.0 V8 5.2 V12

503 600

187 200

4.0 3.9

20.9 17.0

A1 3dr hatch £15,565–£29,590

AAABC

AAAAC 1.0 TFSI 95 93 116 11.1 62.8-67.3 97-103 Mito 3dr hatch £13,840–£21,380 AAACC Previously falling behind in the power stakes, but the recent 1.4 TFSI 125 123 127 8.9 54.3-57.6 112-123 facelift rectifies that. LxWxH 4632x1811x1431 Kerb weight 1705kg 1.4 TFSI 150 Likeable, good-looking hatch is practical, too, but dynamic flaws 148 134 7.9 56.5-58.9 111-117 make it an also-ran. LxWxH 4063x1720x1446 Kerb weight 1080kg 3.0 BiTurbo 433 188-190 4.3 34.9-35.8 180-185 2.0 TFSI S1 quattro 227 155 5.9 39.2-39.8 166-168 1.4 78hp 76 103 13.0 50.4 130 1.6 TDI 116 114 124 9.5 70.6-74.3 99-106 0.9 TB Twinair 105 103 114 11.4 67.3 99 B4 S 2dr coupé/open £63,277–£68,403 AAABC 1.4 TB Multiair 140 138 130 8.1 52.3 124 A retuned version of the 4 Series that feels more at home on the A1 Sportback 5dr hatch £16,185–£30,210 AAABC track than the road. LxWxH 4640x1825x1373 Kerb weight 1690kg Rear doors add convenience to an already attractive package. 1.4 TB Multiair 170 167 136 7.3 52.3 124 1.3 JTDM-2 95 93 112 12.5 83.1 89 3.0 BiTurbo 433 189-190 4.2-4.3 34.0-35.8 180-190 LxWxH 3973x1746x1422 Kerb weight 1035kg 1.0 TFSI 95 93 116 11.1 62.8-67.3 97-103 Giulietta 5dr hatch £19,715–£29,950 123 127 8.9 54.3-57.6 112-123 AAACC B5 4dr saloon/5dr touring £94,118–£96,891 AAAAC 1.4 TFSI 125 148 134 7.9 56.5-58.9 111-117 Long in the tooth but still seductive, shame it’s not rounded or Is it the best alternative to an M5? Yes, at least from a practicality 1.4 TFSI 150 lavish enough. LxWxH 4351x1798x1465 Kerb weight 1305kg viewpoint. LxWxH 4956x1868x1466 Kerb weight 2015kg 2.0 TFSI S1 quattro 227 155 5.9 39.2-39.8 166-168 114 124 9.5 70.6-74.3 99-106 1.4 TB 120 118 121 9.4 45.6 144 4.4 V8 BiTurbo 599 200-205 3.5-3.7 26.2-26.9 240-247 1.6 TDI 116 1.4 TB Multiair 150 148 130 8.2 51.4 127 1.4 TB Multiair 170 167 135 7.6 57.7 114 B6 2dr open £108,571 AAAAC A3 Sportback 5dr hatch £21,810–£44,755 AAAAC 1.75 TBi 240 236 152 6.0 41.5 157 A ballistic coupé and convertible best suited to pounding the All the above but with the added convenience of five doors and a autobahns. LxWxH 4894x1894x1375 Kerb weight 1945kg usefully larger boot. LxWxH 4313x1785x1426 Kerb weight 1180kg 1.6 JTDM-2 120 118 121 10.0-10.2 74.3 99 2.0 JTDM-2 150 148 130 8.8 67.3 110 4.4 V8 BiTurbo 591 203 4.2 29.4 224 1.0 TFSI 116 114 128 9.9 60.1-62.8 104-108 2.0 JTDM-2 175 167 136 7.8 65.7 113 1.4 TFSI 150 e-tron 148 138 7.6 156.9-166.2 38-40 B7 4dr saloon £122,793 AAAAC 1.5 TFSI 150 148 136 8.2 54.3-58.9 110-118 Giulia 4dr saloon £29,550–£61,595 AAAAB A 7 Series with a power boost gives BMW a worthy challenger to 2.0 TFSI 190 187 151 6.8-6.9 48.7-50.4 129-130 the AMG S-Classes. LxWxH 5250x1902x1491 Kerb weight 2060kg 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro Handsome and special dynamically but lacks finesse and only 187 146 6.2 47.9-48.7 133-134 comes as an auto. LxWxH 4643x1860x1436 Kerb weight 1429kg 4.4 V8 BiTurbo 599 205 4.2 29.4 222 2.0 TFSI S3 quattro 305 155 4.6-5.3 39.8-43.5 150-163 2.0 Turbo Petrol 200 197 146 6.6 47.1 138 2.5 TFSI RS3 quattro 394 155 4.1 33.6-34.0 189-192 D3 4dr saloon/5dr touring £48,824–£53,277 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 116 114 125 10.4 67.3-72.4 103-109 An intoxicating mix of performance and frugality makes the D3 a 2.0 TDI 150 148 135 8.1-8.6 62.8-67.3 109-116 compelling choice. LxWxH 4632x1811x1428 Kerb weight 1660kg 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 148 133 8.3 58.9 126-127 S TA R R AT I N G S E X P L A I N E D 3.0 BiTurbo 345 170-171 4.6 52.3-53.3 139-142 2.0 TDI 184 181 145 7.4 61.4-62.8 118-119 2.0 TDI 184 quattro 181 143 6.8 56.5-57.6 129-130 CCCCC Inherently dangerous/unsafe. Tragically, D4 2dr coupé/open £51,429–£58,403 AAAAC irredeemably flawed. Precise dynamics with added Alpina kudos and a great engine. A3 Saloon 4dr saloon £23,530–£45,705 AAAAC

BCCCC Appalling. Massively significant failings. ACCCC Very poor. Fails to meet any accepted ABCCC AACCC AABCC AAACC AAABC AAAAC AAAAB AAAAA

class boundaries. Poor. Within acceptable class boundaries in a few areas. Still not recommendable. Off the pace. Below average in nearly all areas. Acceptable. About average in key areas, but disappoints. Competent. Above average in some areas, average in others. Outstanding in none. Good. Competitive in key areas. Very good. Very competitive in key areas, competitive in secondary respects. Excellent. Near class-leading in key areas and in some ways outstanding. Brilliant, unsurpassed. All but flawless.

LxWxH 4640x1825x1382 Kerb weight 1660kg 3.0 BiTurbo

345

171-173 4.6-5.0

47.9-53.3 139-155

Undercuts the case to own an A4. Upmarket interior and good to drive. LxWxH 4458x1796x1416 Kerb weight 1240kg

1.0 TFSI 116 114 128 9.9 60.1-62.8 106-107 AAAAC 1.5 TFSI 150 148 139 8.2 54.3-56.5 112-119 The excellent 5 Series receives some Alpina tweaking to make it a 2.0 TFSI 190 187 155 6.8-6.9 48.7-50.4 128-131 brilliant cruiser. LxWxH 4956x1868x1466 Kerb weight 1870kg 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro 187 150 6.2 47.9-49.6 132-136 3.0 BiTurbo 345 171 4.9 46.3 161 2.0 TFSI S3 quattro 305 155 4.6-5.3 39.8-43.5 151-163 2.5 TFSI RS3 quattro 394 155 4.1 33.6-34.0 188-191 ARIEL 1.6 TDI 116 114 127 10.4 68.9-70.6 105-108 Atom 0dr open £30,572 AAAAB 2.0 TDI 150 148 139 8.1-8.6 61.4-67.3 110-118 Exhilarating, superbike-fast mentalist is less usable than some but 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 148 136 8.3 57.6-58.9 126-129 still marvellous. LxWxH 3410x1828x1195 Kerb weight 520kg 2.0 TDI 184 181 149 7.4 61.4-62.8 117-120 2.0 K20Z i-VTEC 245 145 3.1 NA NA 2.0 TDI 184 quattro 181 147 6.8 55.4-57.6 129-133 3.5R 350 NA NA NA NA A3 Cabriolet 2dr open £29,685–£42,095 AAAAC Nomad 0dr open £38,000 AAAAA Compact, affordable, usable and refined. Strong performance, too.

D5 S 4dr saloon £73,866

Well inside the top 10 list of our favourite cars. A revelation and a riot to drive. LxWxH 3215x1850x1425 Kerb weight 670kg

LxWxH 4423x1793x1409 Kerb weight 1380kg

1.5 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro ASTON MARTIN 2.0 TFSI S3 quattro Vantage 2dr coupé £120,900 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 116 It looks the part with slick styling but will it be as menacing as 2.0 TDI 150 before? LxWxH 4465x1942x1273 Kerb weight 1530kg 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 4.0 V8 496 195 3.6 NA NA 2.0 TDI 184 2.0 TDI 184 quattro

2.4 K24 i-VTEC

235

125

3.4

NA

NA

hp

)

T

op

e sp

ed

148 187 187 305 114 148 148 181 181

137 155 150 155 125 139 136 149 147

8.9 7.2-7.3 6.9 4.6-5.3 11.2 8.7-8.9 8.8 7.9 7.4

52.3-56.5 46.3-48.7 44.8-46.3 39.8-43.5 64.2-67.3 60.1-65.7 56.5-57.6 58.9-60.1 53.3-55.4

112-119 128-131 132-136 151-163 110-114 113-122 129-132 122-125 134-138

(m

ph

)

0 0-6

/62

A4 4dr saloon £27,815–£46,080

mp

h o Ec

no

my

(m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

AAAAC

High quality and competent but leaves the dynamic finesse to its rivals. LxWxH 4726x1842x1427 Kerb weight 1320kg

1.4 TFSI 150 148 130 2.0 TFSI 190 187 149 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 248 155 Vanquish 2dr coupé £199,950–£223,995 AAAAC 3.0 V6 TFSI S4 quattro 349 155 Dazzlingly beautiful and expressive big Aston plays the long2.0 TDI 150 ultra 148 130 legged cruiser well. LxWxH 4692x1912x1294 Kerb weight 1739kg 2.0 TDI 150 148 136-137 6.0 V12 Vanquish S 595 201 3.5 21.6 302 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 187 130 6.0 Vanquish S Volante 595 201 3.7 21.6 302 2.0 TDI 190 187 147-149 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 187 146 Rapide S 4dr saloon £149,500–£152,000 AAAAC 3.0 V6 TDI 218 215 155 The Rapide is one of the most elegant four-door sports cars in the 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 155 world. LxWxH 5019x1929x1360 Kerb weight 1990kg 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 268 155 6.0 V12 552 203 4.4 21.9 300 A4 Avant 5dr estate £29,255–£72,175

Audi’s answer to the Mini is fun and refined. LxWxH 3973x1740x1416 Kerb weight 1035kg

ALPINA

B3 S 4dr saloon/5dr touring £61,261–£65,210

w Po

(b er

230 265

AU D I

40.9-41.5 157-161

42.8-44.1 148-153

A L FA R O M E O

w Po

(b er

8.5-8.7 7.3 5.8 4.7 8.7-8.9 8.7-8.9 7.7 7.7 7.2 6.6 6.3 5.3

50.4-53.3 52.3-55.4 43.5-47.9 37.7 68.9-74.3 65.7-70.6 67.3-72.4 62.8-67.3 61.4-64.2 62.8-67.3 58.9-61.4 54.3-57.6

126-131 122-129 116-122 170 99-107 101-111 102-109 111-118 114-121 109-117 119-127 129-137

AAAAC

Classy and demure estate lacks the dynamic sparkle of rivals. LxWxH 4725x1842x1434 Kerb weight 1370kg 1.4 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI S4 quattro 2.9 V6 TFSI RS4 quattro 2.0 TDI 150 ultra 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 218 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro

148 187 248 349 443 148 148 187 187 187 215 215 268

130 8.9-9.0 149 7.5 155 6.0 155 4.9 155 4.1 130 9.0-9.2 132-133 9.0-9.2 130 7.9 143-146 7.9 143 7.4 152 6.7 152 6.4 155 5.4

A4 Allroad 5dr estate £40,235–£44,715

48.7-51.4 50.4-53.3 42.8 37.2 32.1 67.3-70.6 64.2-67.3 65.7-68.9 61.4-65.7 60.1-62.8 61.4-64.2 57.6-60.1 52.3-55.4

126-139 121-128 149-150 175 199-200 104-110 111-116 106-112 113-121 116-123 114-121 123-129 134-142

AAAAC

Quality load-hauler gets a rugged makeover to make it even more capable. LxWxH 4750x1842x1493 Kerb weight 1580kg 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro

148 187 215 268

153 136 143 155

6.1 7.8 6.6 5.5

A5 2dr coupé £33,845–£76,115

41.5-43.5 55.4-57.6 53.3-55.4 51.4-53.3

148-154 128-134 137-143 139-146

AAAAC

Refreshed coupé gets a sharper look and a refreshed interior. Still mundane to drive. LxWxH 4673x1846x1371 Kerb weight 1390kg 1.4 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI S5 quattro 2.9 V6 TFSI RS5 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro

148 187 248 349 443 187 187 187 215

130 8.9 149 7.2-7.3 155 5.8 155 4.7 155 3.9 130 7.7 148-149 7.7 146 7.2 155 6.2

A5 Sportback 5dr coupé £31,945–£48,880

50.4-53.3 47.9-55.4 44.1-45.6 38.2 32.5 67.3-70.6 62.8-67.3 61.4-64.2 58.9-61.4

122-127 124-129 141-144 170 197 105-111 111-118 114-121 119-127

AAAAC

Refined, good-looking four-door coupé is sadly short on charm and finesse. LxWxH 4733x1843x1386 Kerb weight 1425kg 1.4 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI S5 quattro 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro

148 248 349 148 187 187 187 215

130 8.9 155 6.0 155 4.7 135-136 8.9-9.0 130 7.9-8.0 146-148 7.9 146 7.4 152 6.4

A5 Cabriolet 2dr open £38,085–£52,540

50.4-52.3 43.5-44.1 37.7 65.7-67.3 65.7-68.9 61.4-67.3 60.1-62.8 58.9-61.4

124-130 144-148 170 109-114 106-113 109-119 117-124 119-125

AAAAC

More practical than smaller options. Lower-powered, steel-sprung trim is best. LxWxH 4673x1846x1383 Kerb weight 1600kg 2.0 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI S5 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro

187 248 349 187 187 215

A6 4dr saloon £33,165–£59,605

147-148 149 155 144 144 149

7.9 6.3 5.1 8.3 7.8 6.8

46.3-50.4 42.2-42.8 36.2 60.1-62.8 57.6-60.1 54.3-57.6

127-139 149-152 177 118-124 122-128 128-137

AAAAC

Supremely well-constructed but a bit soulless to drive. A smart office on wheels. LxWxH 4932x1874x1455 Kerb weight 1570kg

The new T-Roc. With £500 towards your deposit with Solutions PCP.* An utterly irresistible offer.

*At the end of the agreement there are three options: i) pay the optional final payment and own the vehicle; ii) return the vehicle: subject to excess mileage and fair wear and tear, charges may be required. Offers are not available in conjunction with any other offer and may be varied or withdrawn at any time. Accurate at time of publication [04/18]. Freepost Volkswagen Financial

fuel consumption for the Volkswagen T-Roc range in mpg (litre/100km): urban 33.2 (8.5) – 46.3 (6.1); extra urban 5.2% APR Official for comparative purposes. May not reflect real driving results.


N E W CAR PR I CES P

1.8 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 3.0 BiTDI 320 quattro 4.0 V8 TFSI S6 quattro

e ow

187 248 187 187 268 315 443

r (b

hp

)

T

s op

pe

145 155 144 143 155 155 155

ed

(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

7.9 6.5 8.2-8.4 7.7 5.5 5.0 4.4

ph E

n co

om

y (m

47.9-50.4 40.9-42.2 62.8-67.3 56.5-57.6 54.3-55.4 45.6-47.1 30.1-30.7

) pg

C

(g/ O2

km

)

130-138 153-158 109-119 128-133 133-138 159-164 214-218

A capable stress-buster. BiTDI engine is a giant killer; the RS6 is simply monstrous. LxWxH 4943x1874x1461 Kerb weight 1635kg 187 248 187 187 268 315 443 552 596

140 155 140 139 155 155 155 155 155

8.2 6.7 8.5-8.7 7.9 5.7 5.2 4.6 3.9 3.7

47.1-49.6 39.8-40.9 60.1-64.2 54.3-55.4 52.3-53.3 44.1-45.6 29.4-30.1 29.4 29.4

A6 Allroad 5dr estate £48,110–£58,340

134-142 157-163 114-124 132-138 138-144 164-169 219-224 223 223

215 268 315

143 155 155

7.1 6.2 5.5

49.6 50.4 43.5

149 149 172

155 155 155

4.6 3.9 3.7

A8 4dr saloon £69,100–£74,995

29.7 29.7 29.7

220 221 221

282 335 282 335

T

s op

pe

147 143

ed

(

0

/6 -60

2m

7.3 7.0

ph E

n co

58.9 50.4

om

y (m

C

(g/ O2

km

155 155 155 155

5.9 5.6 5.9 5.7

Q2 5dr SUV £21,6650–£37,235

532 532 601

198 198 205

3.7 3.5 3.2

48.7-50.4 36.2-37.7 48.7-50.4 36.2-37.7

145-152 171-178 146-152 171-178

AAAAC

22.8 22.4 21.1

283 287 306

BAC

Mono 0dr open £165,125

AAAAB

An F-22 Raptor for the road, only significantly better built. LxWxH 3952x1836x1110 Kerb weight 580kg 305

170

2.8

NA

NA

BENTLEY

Continental GT 2dr coupé £156,700

AAAAC

Refined and improved in every area, making the Conti a superb grand tourer. LxWxH 4850x1966x1405 Kerb weight 2244kg 626

207

3.6

23.2

Flying Spur 4dr saloon £132,800–£169,800

278 AAABC

Undoubtedly luxurious but misses the mark on refinement and tech sophistication. LxWxH 5299x1984x1488 Kerb weight 2417kg 500 521 616 626

183 190 199 202

4.9 4.6 4.3 4.2

25.9 25.9 19.2 19.2

Mulsanne 4dr saloon £229,360–£275,000

254 254 335 335 AAAAC

If the Rolls Phantom is best from the back seat, the Mulsanne is best in the front. LxWxH 5575x1926x1521 Kerb weight 2685kg 6.75 V8 6.75 V8 Speed

505 530

184 190

5.1-5.3 4.8

18.8 18.8

Bentayga 5dr SUV £135,800–£232,000

342 342 AAAAB

Crewe’s first attempt at a luxury SUV is a solid effort. The Diesel is wondrous. LxWxH 5140x1998x1742 Kerb weight 2505kg

1.0 TFSI 116 1.4 TFSI 150 2.0 TFSI 190 quattro 1.6 TDI 116 2.0 TDI 150 quattro

6.0 W12 4.0 V8 Diesel

122 131 141 122 131

10.1 8.5 6.5 10.3-10.5 8.1

53.3-55.4 48.7-54.3 44.1-44.8 61.4-68.9 56.5-58.9

117-121 119-130 144-146 109-120 125-131

P

M240i 218d 220d AAAAC 225d 129 147

Audi’s smallest SUV is a decent stepping stone from the A3 to the Q range. LxWxH 4191x1794x1508 Kerb weight 1205kg 114 148 187 114 148

)

600 429

187 168

4.0 4.6

21.6 35.3

296 210

Appealing combination of Audi allure, affordable SUV practicality and attractiveness. LxWxH 4663x1893x1659 Kerb weight 1720kg 187 248 349

135 147 155

7.9 6.3 5.4

53.3-56.5 132-138 39.2-40.4 157-164 33.2-34.0 189-195

AAAAC

hp

)

T

s op

pe

ed

(

0

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

) pg

C

(g/ O2

km

)

335 148 187 220

155 132 143 151

4.7-4.9 8.8-9.0 7.5-7.6 6.5

34.0-38.2 54.3-58.9 55.4-58.9 56.5

169-189 127-136 126-135 130

134 181 248 335 148 187 187

127 142 125 121 129 141 138

9.3 7.4 6.7 11.1 9.0-9.1 7.6 7.5

48.7 47.9-50.4 113 65.7 62.8 64.2 60.1

132 134 57 112-113 119 117 124

make it sparkle. LxWxH 4633x1811x1429 Kerb weight 1470kg BMW

A proper compact coupé now. Could be better equipped, however. LxWxH 4432x1774x1418 Kerb weight 1420kg 130 143 155 155 155 132 143 140 151

8.8-8.9 7.2 5.6 4.6-4.8 4.3-4.5 8.3-8.5 7.1-7.2 7.0 6.3

2 Series Convertible 2dr open £27,540–£39,615

50.4-53.3 47.9 47.9 36.2-39.8 33.2-35.8 61.4-62.8 61.4 55.4 60.1

124-130 134-136 134 163-179 185-199 119-120 121-122 135 124

AAABC

134 181 181 248 321 114 148 160 187 187 254 254 308

130 146 144 155 155 127 133 143 146 144 155 155 155

9.2-9.3 7.5 7.7-7.9 5.9-6.0 5.1 11.3-11.4 8.9-9.0 8.2-8.3 7.5-7.7 7.7 5.6 5.4 4.9

47.9-51.4 44.8-48.7 38.7-44.8 42.2-46.3 40.4 58.9-60.1 58.9-60.1 57.6-62.8 55.4-58.9 52.3-55.4 49.6-50.4 47.1 44.8

129-137 134-147 147-169 143-157 164 124-127 124-127 119-128 125-135 136-141 148-149 157-158 165-167

640i 650i M6 M6 Competition pack 640d

TT Roadster 2dr open £30,605–£54,230

138 141-150 153 159-168 187-192 124 142

AAAAC

Plenty of pace and driver reward, along with prestige and designicon style. LxWxH 4177x1832x1355 Kerb weight 1300kg 1.8 TFSI 180 2.0 TFSI 230 2.0 TFSI 230 quattro 2.0 TFSI TTS quattro 2.5 TFSI TT RS quattro

177 226 226 305 394

147 155 155 155 155

7.2 6.1-6.2 5.6 4.9-5.2 3.7

46.3 42.2-45.6 40.9 37.7-39.8 33.6-34.4

142 144-155 158 163-173 187-192

218i 220i 230i

134 181 248

130 143 155

9.4-9.6 7.7 5.9

48.7-50.4 131-139 46.3 138-140 45.6 142

155 155 155 155 146 155 155

pe

ed

(m

ph

0

)

/6 -60

6.3-6.4 5.4 4.4-4.6 4.3-4.5 8.1-8.2 5.9 5.2

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

40.4-44.8 39.2 29.7-32.5 29.7-32.5 54.3-56.5 48.7 44.1

146-162 167 203-218 203-218 132-138 153 169

AAAAC

Hatchback practicality meets 3 Series dynamic talent. Dull but decent. LxWxH 4824x1828x1508 Kerb weight 1580kg 320i 320i xDrive 330i 340i 320d 320d xDrive 330d 330d xDrive 335d xDrive

181 181 248 321 187 187 254 254 308

146 144 155 155 146 144 155 155 155

8.0-8.1 8.1-8.4 6.1 5.1 7.8-7.9 7.8 5.7 5.4 4.9

4 Series 2dr coupé £33,985–£91,055

44.1-47.9 39.8-44.1 45.6 38.7 56.5 53.3 48.7 47.1 44.1

134-146 146-161 136-141 161-166 131-136 141 152 158 168

181 181 248 321 425 444 453 187 187 254 254 308

146 144 155 155 155 155 155 146 144 155 155 155

46.3-48.7 40.9-45.6 43.5-48.7 36.7-41.5 31.0-34.0 31.0-34.0 33.6 58.9-60.1 54.3 51.4 47.9 45.6

134-141 144-161 136-151 159-179 194-204 194-204 197 124-125 136 144 154 162

155 155 155 155 155

5.5 4.6 4.3 4.0 5.5

35.8-36.7 31.0 27.4 27.4 48.7-50.4

179-184 213 239 239 149-153

AAAAC

315 443 552 591 308

155 155 155 155 155

5.4 4.6 4.2 3.9 5.4

36.2-37.7 32.1 27.4 28.5 49.6

178-182 206 231 231 152

6 Series Gran Turismo 5dr hatch £47,925–£57,810 AAABC A large improvement on the 5GT and dynamically sound. Still an oddball, though. LxWxH 5007x1894x1392 Kerb weight 1720kg 630i 640i xDrive 630d 630d xDrive

254 335 261 261

155 155 155 155

6.3 5.3 6.1 6.0

7 Series 4dr saloon £62,725–£138,265

42.8-43.4 34.4-35.3 49.0-49.5 48.0-48.7

148-152 183-187 151-154 154-156

AAAAC

Rules on in-car entertainment and diesel sophistication; otherwise too bland. LxWxH 5098x1902x1478 Kerb weight 1755kg

AAAAC 725d 7.3-7.5 7.6-7.8 5.8-5.9 5.0-5.2 4.1-4.3 4.0-4.2 3.9 7.2-7.4 7.3 5.5 5.2 4.7

315 443 552 591 308

The 6 Series receives a pair of rear doors and they’re a brilliant visual coup. LxWxH 5007x1894x1392 Kerb weight 1750kg

420i 420i xDrive 430i 440i M4 M4 Competition pack M4 CS 420d 420d xDrive 430d 430d xDrive 435d xDrive

47.1 43.5-46.3 42.8 38.7-40.9 33.6-34.4 60.1 52.3

T

s op

6 Series Gran Coupé 4dr coupé £62,465–£106,395

1.8 TFSI 180 2.0 TFSI 230 2.0 TFSI 230 quattro 2.0 TFSI TTS quattro 2.5 TFSI TT RS quattro 2.0 TDI 184 ultra 2.0 TDI 184 quattro

6.9 5.9-6.0 5.3 4.6-4.9 3.7 7.1 6.7

)

Great engines and interior, but more of a GT than sports car. LxWxH 4894x1894x1365 Kerb weight 1890kg

A talented GT and a brilliant B-road steer that is very well-equipped. 730d LxWxH 4640x1825x1377 Kerb weight 1475kg 730d xDrive

149 155 155 155 155 149 145

hp

Essentially a prettier 3 Series. Good, but not better than the regular saloon. LxWxH 4640x1825x1404 Kerb weight 1520kg

Still serves up plenty of pace, style and usability for the money. It’s Better than its 1 Series forebear but lacks truly distinguishing better to drive, too. LxWxH 4177x1832x1353 Kerb weight 1210kg premium qualities. LxWxH 4432x1774x1413 Kerb weight 1440kg 177 226 226 305 394 181 181

248 321 425 444 187 254 308

r (b

4 Series Gran Coupé 4dr coupé £33,985–£48,655

640i 650i M6 M6 Competition pack AAAAB 3 Series Gran Turismo 5dr hatch £31,420–£44,610 AAAAC 640d

2 Series 2dr coupé £25,010–£48,945 134 181 248 335 365 148 187 187 220

P

e ow

420i 181 146 7.5-7.7 46.3-48.7 134-141 420i xDrive 181 144 7.8-8.1 40.9-45.6 144-161 430i 248 155 5.9 43.5-48.7 136-151 440i 321 155 5.1 41.5 159 420d 187 146 7.4-7.6 57.6-58.9 126-128 2 Series Gran Tourer 5dr MPV £26,730–£36,610 AAAAB 420d xDrive 187 144 7.5 54.3 136 Brings a proper premium MPV to the table. Third row seats aren’t 430d 254 155 5.6 51.4 144 adult-sized, though. LxWxH 4556x1800x1608 Kerb weight 1475kg 430d xDrive 254 155 5.3 47.9 155 218i 134 127 9.5-9.8 47.1 137 435d xDrive 308 155 4.8 45.6 163 220i 181 137 7.8 44.8-47.9 134-143 216d 335 119 11.8 62.8-64.2 116-117 5 Series 4dr saloon £36,710–£89,645 AAAAB 218d 148 127 9.6 60.1-61.4 121-125 The perfect compromise between the comfy E-Class and dynamic XF, and then some. LxWxH 5493x1868x1479 Kerb weight 1530kg 220d 187 138 8.2 61.4 122 220d xDrive 187 135 8.0 57.6 129 520i 181 146 7.8 50.4-52.3 124-129 530i 248 155 6.2 48.7 132 3 Series 4dr saloon £26,790–£59,600 AAAAB 540i xDrive 335 155 4.8 39.2 164 Decent cabin space and engine range but doesn’t measure up on M5 592 155 3.4 26.9 241 handling and finesse. LxWxH 4633x1811x1429 Kerb weight 1425kg 530e 248 146 6.2 141.2 46 318i 134 130 8.9-9.1 51.4-54.3 122-129 520d 187 147 7.5 60.1-62.7 119-123 320i 181 146 7.2-7.3 47.9-51.4 134-138 520d xDrive 187 144 7.6 56.4-57.6 129-132 320i xDrive 181 144 7.5-7.6 41.5-51.4 142-159 525d 227 155 6.6 56.4-57.6 128-131 330i 248 155 5.8-5.9 43.5-48.7 136-151 530d 261 155 5.7 55.3 134 340i 321 155 5.1-5.2 36.7-41.5 159-179 530d xDrive 261 155 5.4 51.3 144 M3 425 155 4.1-4.3 32.1-34.0 194-204 M3 Competition package 444 155 4.0-4.2 32.1-34.0 194-204 5 Series Touring 5dr estate £39,000–£53,730 AAAAB 330e 248 139 6.1 134.5 45-49 The excellent 5 Series made in more practical form. The 520d is 316d 114 127 10.8-10.9 60.1-61.4 120-124 still the best. LxWxH 4942x1868x1464 Kerb weight 1630kg 318d 148 133 8.5-8.7 60.1-61.4 121-123 520i 181 139 8.2 47.8-48.7 132-136 320d Efficient Dynamics 160 143 7.9-8.0 61.4-65.7 114-122 530i 248 155 6.5 46.3 139 320d 187 146 7.3-7.4 57.6-60.1 124-127 540i xDrive 335 155 5.1 37.6 172 320d xDrive 187 144 7.4 54.3-55.4 135-137 520d 187 147 7.8 60.1-61.4 121-124 330d 254 155 5.6 51.4 144-146 520d xDrive 187 144 7.9 53.2-54.3 137-140 330d xDrive 254 155 5.3 48.7 153-154 525d 227 152 6.8 54.3-60.1 134-138 335d xDrive 308 155 4.8 45.6 162-164 530d 261 155 5.8 52.3 141 530d xDrive 261 155 5.6 49.5 151 3 Series Touring 5dr estate £28,130–£45,620 AAAAB 6 Series Convertible 2dr open £68,465–£109,995 AAABC There are more practical estates, but the 3 Series’ dynamism

1 Series 3dr/5dr hatch £22,400–£37,105

218i 220i Q7 5dr SUV £51,425–£89,905 AAAAC 230i Unengaging to drive and light on feel, but the cabin is both huge M240i and classy. LxWxH 5052x1968x1740 Kerb weight 2060kg M2 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 215 134 7.3 45.6-48.7 150-161 218d 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 268 145 6.5 44.1-47.1 158-168 220d 3.0 V6 TDI quattro e-tron 254 143 6.2 148.7-156.9 48-50 220d xDrive 4.0 V8 TDI SQ7 quattro 429 155 4.9 37.2-39.2 190-199 225d

TT 2dr coupé £28,855–£52,480

r (b

)

some of its rivals. LxWxH 4342x1800x1555 Kerb weight 1360kg

318i AAABC 320i Strong on performance and economy and as good as it could be. 320i xDrive Q3 5dr SUV £27,915–£37,235 AAABC LxWxH 4329x1765x1421 Kerb weight 1375kg 330i Typically refined and competent but feels more like an A3 than an 118i 134 130 8.5-8.7 52.3-56.5 112-126 340i Audi SUV. LxWxH 4388x1831x1608 Kerb weight 1385kg 120i 181 139-142 7.1 46.3-48.7 133-140 316d 1.4 TFSI 150 148 126 8.9-9.2 45.6-51.4 127-143 125i 220 151 6.1 47.9 134 318d 2.0 TFSI 180 quattro 177 135 7.6 40.4-42.8 152-161 M140i 335 155 4.6-4.8 36.2-39.8 163-179 320d Efficient Dynamics 2.0 TDI 150 148 126 9.6 60.1-62.8 117-124 116d 114 124 10.5 62.8-67.3 111-118 320d 2.0 TDI 150 quattro 148 126 9.3 53.3-57.6 129-140 118d 148 131 8.2-8.4 61.4-64.2 115-118 320d xDrive 2.0 TDI 184 quattro 181 136 7.9 50.4-54.3 136-146 120d 187 141 7.1-7.2 60.1-62.8 120-124 330d 120d xDrive 187 138 6.9 54.3-55.4 135-138 330d xDrive Q5 5dr SUV £39,840–£51,955 AAAAC 125d 220 149 6.4 58.9 126 335d xDrive 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 3.0 V6 TFSI SQ5 quattro

e ow

h mp

430i 440i M4 M4 Competition pack 420d 2 Series Active Tourer 5dr hatch £24,905–£34,885 AAAAC 430d BMW’s FWD hatch is a proper contender but not as practical as 435d xDrive

218i 220i R8 Spyder 2dr open £121,210–£149,890 AAAAC 225xe Taking the roof off the R8 enhances the drama tenfold. 216d LxWxH 4426x1940x1245 Kerb weight 1680kg 218d 5.2 V10 FSI RWS 532 197 3.8 22.4 286 220d 5.2 V10 FSI quattro 532 197 3.6 22.1 290 220d xDrive 5.2 V10 FSI Plus quattro 601 204 3.3 20.8 309

4.0 V8 4.0 V8 S 6.0 W12 AAAAC 6.0 W12 Speed

Technical tour de force benefits from Audi’s knack of making very good limousines. LxWxH 5172x1945x1473 Kerb weight 1920kg 3.0 V6 50 TDI quattro 3.0 V6 55 TFSI quattro 3.0 V6 50 TDI quattro LWB 3.0 V6 55 TFSI qu’tro LWB

)

AAAAC

Curiously droopy-looking but otherwise impressive. RS7 is brutally quick, too. LxWxH 4974x1911x1420 Kerb weight 1955kg 4.0 V8 TFSI S7 quattro 443 4.0 V8 TFSI RS7 quattro 552 4.0 TFSI RS7 Performance 596

hp

) pg

Usable but no less involving or dramatic for it. V10 is deliciously brutal. LxWxH 4426x1940x1240 Kerb weight 1590kg

6.0 W12

A7 5dr coupé £66,725–£94,185

181 181

r (b

)

R8 2dr coupé £112,520–£141,200

AAAAC 2.5 VVT

Rugged version of the A6 Avant sports a degree of off-roading ability. LxWxH 4938x1898x1534 Kerb weight 1890kg 3.0 V6 TDI 218 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 3.0 BiTDI 320 quattro

2.0 TDI 184 ultra 2.0 TDI 184 quattro

5.2 V10 FSI RWS 5.2 V10 FSI quattro AAAAC 5.2 V10 FSI Plus quattro

A6 Avant 5dr estate £35,305–£88,385 1.8 TFSI 190 2.0 TFSI 252 quattro 2.0 TDI 190 ultra 2.0 TDI 190 quattro 3.0 V6 TDI 272 quattro 3.0 BiTDI 320 quattro 4.0 V8 TFSI S6 quattro 4.0 V8 TFSI RS6 quattro 4.0 TFSI RS6 Performance

P

e ow

h mp

740d xDrive 740e 740Le xDrive 740Li 750i M760Li V12 xDrive

227 261 261 315 254 254 321 443 601

152 155 155 155 155 155 155 155 155

6.9 6.1 5.8 5.2 5.4 5.3 5.6 4.7 3.7

X1 5dr SUV £27,625- £38,635

55.3-56.4 132-133 51.3-52.3 143-145 48.7-49.5 151-152 46.3-47.0 159-160 128.4-134.5 49-50 113.0-117.7 54-56 40.4-41.5 159-164 34.9-35.3 186-189 22.0 294 AAAAC

Pick of the premium bunch but a tad unrefined and has ordinary handling. LxWxH 4439x1821x1598 Kerb weight 1395kg

sDrive18i xDrive20i sDrive18d 4 Series Convertible 2dr open £39,205–£66,805 AAAAC xDrive18d A talented gran tourer with the ability to remove the roof. What’s xDrive20d not to like? LxWxH 4640x1825x1384 Kerb weight 1700kg xDrive25d 420i 181 146 8.2-8.4 42.8-45.6 144-153

138 189 148 148 187 227

127 138 126 126 136 146

9.7 7.4 9.3-9.4 9.3-9.4 7.8 6.6

48.7 44.1-45.6 61.4 56.5-58.9 58.9 55.4

132-133 141-146 120-121 127-132 126 133-138

apply; or iii) replace: part exchange the vehicle. With Solutions Personal Contract Plan. 18s+. Subject to availability and status. T&Cs apply. Offer available when ordered by 31st May 2018 from participating Retailers. Indemnities may Services. Model shown £21,000 RRP.

48.7 (5.8) – 62.8 (4.5); combined 41.5 (6.8) – 55.4 (5.1); CO2 emissions 117 – 155g/km. Information correct at time of print. Standard EU figures


P

e ow

r (b

hp

)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

X2 5dr SUV £31,445–£38,335

om

y (m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

P

AAAAC 1.2 PureTech 110

e ow

r (b

hp

)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

P

e ow

r (b

hp

)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

P

e ow

r (b

hp

)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

GTC4Lusso 2dr coupé £200,165–£240,402

179 137-138 8.8 46.3-50.4 128-140 AAAAB 1.5T Ecoboost 182PS 2.0T Ecoboost 250 ST 246 154 6.7 41.5 159 1.5 TDCi 95 93 112 12.2 74.3 99 1.5 TDCi 105 103 116 12.1 83.1 88 sDrive20i 186 141 7.7 47.9-51.4 126-134 1.6 BlueHDi 120 3.9T V8 592 198 3.5 24.3 265 1.5 TDCi 120 118 119-120 10.7-11.0 74.3 99 sDrive18d 148 129 9.3-9.8 60.1-62.8 120-124 6.3 V12 670 208 3.4 18.4 350 1.6 TDCi 95 93 112 12.5 67.3 109 xDrive18d 148 128 9.2 54.3-57.6 128-137 C4 5dr hatchback £18,750–£22,730 AAACC 113 120 10.8 67.3 109 xDrive20d 185 137 7.7 57.6-60.1 124-128 A good-looking hatchback but lacks the polish and refinement of 812 Superfast 2dr open £262,963 AAAAA 1.6 TDCi 115 its latest rivals. LxWxH 4329x1789x1489 Kerb weight 1200kg 148 129-130 8.9-9.0 64.2-70.6 105-115 More powerful than the F12, but with better road manners making it 2.0 TDCi 150 the star of the range. LxWxH 4657x1971x1276 Kerb weight 1630kg 2.0 TDCi 185 ST 182 135 7.8-8.3 61.4-67.3 110-119 X3 5dr SUV £39,120–£51,705 AAAAC 1.2 PureTech 110 107 114 10.9 58.9 112 Continues where the last one left off. Dynamically good and more 1.2 PureTech 130 126 122-124 10.8-10.9 55.4-58.9 110-117 6.5 V12 777 211 2.9 18.9 340 luxurious inside. LxWxH 4708x1891x1676 Kerb weight 1750kg Mondeo 5dr hatch £19,450–£30,600 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 111 11.5 78.5 95 AAAAC F I AT xDrive20i 181 134 8.3 38.7-39.8 163-166 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 122 10.6-11.1 72.4-74.3 100-104 Does what great Fords do, by over-delivering on practicality, M40i 355 155 4.8 33.6-34.4 188-193 500 3dr hatch/2dr open £11,615–£21,115 AAABC handling and value. LxWxH 4871x 1852x1482 Kerb weight 1455kg xDrive20d 187 132 8.0 51.4-53.5 140-144 C4 Cactus 5dr hatchback £16,580–£21,170 AAABC Super desirable, super-cute city car. Pleasant, if not involving to 1.0 SCTi Ecoboost 125 123 124 12.0 55.4 119 drive. LxWxH 3571x1627x1488 Kerb weight 865kg xDrive30d 261 149 5.8 47.1-48.7 154-158 Interesting and novel to look at but flawed to drive. 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 133-138 9.1-9.2 44.8-48.7 134-146 LxWxH 4157x1729x1480 Kerb weight 965kg 1.2 69hp 68 99 12.9 60.1-65.7 99-110 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 236 149 7.9 38.7 169 X4 5dr SUV £42,900–£55,315 AAABC 1.2 PureTech 82 79 106-107 12.9-15.0 61.4-65.7 98-107 0.9 Twinair 85 83 107 11.0 67.3-74.3 88-90 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 119 11.7 78.5 94 Downsized X6 is respectable enough if not loveable, but the X3 is a 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117 9.3-9.7 61.4-65.7 100-105 0.9 Twinair 105 103 117 10.0 67.3 99 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 132-134 9.3-9.9 61.4-68.9 107-120 better option. LxWxH 4671x1881x1624 Kerb weight 1735kg 1.2 PureTech 130 128 120 8.2 58.9 110 1.3 Multijet 95 93 112 10.7 83.1 89 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 134 10.3 58.9 124 xDrive20d 187 131 8.0 50.4-52.3 142-146 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 114 10.6-11.2 78.5-91.1 82-95 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 139-140 8.3-8.6 61.4-64.2 115-120 xDrive30d 254 145 5.8 46.3-49.6 149-159 500L 5dr MPV £16,195–£21,320 AAACC 2.0 TDCi D’torq 180 AWD 177 140 9.3 54.3 134 xDrive35d 308 153 5.2 47.1 157 C4 Spacetourer 5dr MPV £21,125–£29,190 AAAAC A costly option but has some style to fill out some of its missing 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 210 207 145 7.9 58.9 134 substance. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA M40d 322 155 4.9 42.8-44.1 170-173 Plushness and an improved dynamic make for a better car. LxWxH 4438x1826x1610 Kerb weight 1280kg 1.4 95 93 103-111 12.8-13.2 45.6-46.3 143-144 Mondeo Estate 5dr estate £20,950–£32,410 AAAAC X5 5dr SUV £49,540–£97,115 AAAAC 1.2 PureTech 110 107 116 11.5 55.4 115 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 114-117 10.2-11.0 42.2 155-157 A vast and enjoyable estate that majors on everything a great Ford Accomplished and luxurious but no longer the standard-setter on 1.2 PureTech 130 126 125-128 10.1 55.4-56.5 115-116 1.3 Multijet 95 93 101-106 13.9-15.5 67.3-72.4 104-109 should. LxWxH 4867x 1852x1501 Kerb weight 1476kg SUV handling. LxWxH 4886x1938x1762 Kerb weight 1995kg 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 109 12.7 74.3 99 1.6 Multijet 120 118 114-117 10.7-11.5 65.7-67.3 112-114 1.0 SCTi Ecoboost 125 123 121 12.1 54.3 120 sDrive25d 227 136 7.7 52.3 141 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117 11.2-11.3 72.4-74.3 100-103 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 130-135 9.2-9.3 43.5-47.9 137-152 xDrive25d 227 236 7.7 50.4 148 1.6 BlueHDi 150 145 129-130 9.7-10.1 64.2-68.9 106-115 500L Wagon 5dr MPV £18,495–£22,320 AAACC 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 236 146 8.0 37.7 174 xDrive30d 254 143 6.8 40.3 183 Loses more of its charm as it gets bigger, but it does come as a 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 116 11.9 74.3 99 xDrive40d 308 146 5.9 40.3 183 Grand C4 Spacetourer 5dr MPV £23,425–£30,890 AAAAC seven-seater. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 129-130 9.4-10.0 58.9-67.3 109-123 M50d 375 155 5.3 36.2 205 Alternative MPV offers something fresh, comfy, spacious and 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 117 10.6 40.9 158 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 130 10.5 57.7 127 quietly upmarket. LxWxH 4602x1826x1638 Kerb weight 1297kg xDrive40e 241 130 6.8 83.1 78 1.3 Multijet 95 93 105-106 14.4-15.7 68.9-72.4 104-107 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 135-137 8.4-8.7 58.9-62.3 117-123 xDrive50i 442 155 4.9 29.1 226 1.2 PureTech 130 126 125-128 10.8 55.4-56.5 115-116 1.6 Multijet 120 118 117 10.9 67.3 112 2.0 TDCi D’torq 180 AWD 177 137 9.5 53.3 137 X5 M 567 155 4.2 25.4 258 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 109 13.1 74.3 99 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 210 207 142 8.1 56.5 129 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117 11.5-11.7 70.6 105-106 500X 5dr hatch £15,430–£26,650 AAABC X6 5dr SUV £61,105–£100,085 AAABC 1.6 BlueHDi 150 145 129-130 9.8-10.1 64.2-68.9 106-115 Familiar styling works rather well as a crossover. Drives okay, too. Mondeo Saloon 4dr saloon £26,050–£29,000 AAAAC

A more stylish version of the X1, but we’ll have to wait and see how 1.2 PureTech 130 it fares dynamically. LxWxH 4360x1824x1526 Kerb weight 1460kg 1.6 BlueHDi 100

The world’s first off-road coupé, but appearances make it difficult to love. LxWxH 4909x1989x1702 Kerb weight 2065kg

107 127 96 116

115 124 109 114

11.3 10.4 12.8 10.7

56.5 53.3 70.6 68.9

115 119 104 107

Another four-wheel-drive grand tourer Ferrari that is more usable than the FF. LxWxH 4922x1980x1383 Kerb weight 1865kg

LxWxH 4248x1796x1600 Kerb weight NA DACIA

1.6 E-Torq 110 108 112 11.5 44.1-47.1 139-147 AAACC 1.4 Multiair 140 138 118 9.8-9.9 47.1-49.6 133-139 A clever budget prospect but its limitations are unavoidable, even 1.4 Multiair 170 AWD 167 124 8.6 42.2 157 after a smart facelift. LxWxH 4069x1733x1519 Kerb weight 969kg 1.3 Multijet 95 93 107 12.9 68.9 107 1.0 SCe 75 71 98 14.2 54.3 117 1.6 Multijet 120 118 116 10.5 65.7-68.9 109-113 0.9 TCe 90 87 109 11.1 57.6 109 2.0 Multijet 140 AWD 138 118 9.8 51.4 144 1.5 dCi 90 87 107 11.8 80.7 90 i3 5dr hatch £34,075–£40,130 AAAAB Panda 5dr hatch £9405–£18,155 AAABC Our favourite high-end small car happens to be an EV, and it could Sandero Stepway 5dr hatch £9595–£12,195 AAABC Hasn’t kept pace with its rivals, but sells robust, practical charm xDrive30d xDrive40d M50d xDrive50i X6 M

254 308 375 442 567

143 146 155 155 155

6.7 5.8 5.2 4.8 4.2

40.3 40.3 36.2 29.1 25.4

183 183 205 227 258

change motoring. LxWxH 3999x1775x1578 Kerb weight 1245kg 94Ah 94Ah Range Extender 94Ah S 94Ah S Range Extender

167 167 180 180

93 93 99 99

7.3 8.1 6.9 7.7

NA 470.8 NA 403.5

i8 2dr coupé £112,735

0 13-14 0 14

A more expensive and slightly more rugged cheap car – but still limited. LxWxH 4089x1761x1555 Kerb weight 1040kg 0.9 TCe 90 1.5 dCi 90

87 87

104 104

11.1 11.7

55.4 74.3

Logan MCV 5dr estate £8495–£12,695

115 98 AAACC

AAAAC Lacks its stablemates’ charms but retains their cheapness.

If BMW’s plug-in hybrid is what the future of the sports car looks like, we welcome it. LxWxH 4689x1942x1293 Kerb weight 1485kg 1.5 eDrive

Sandero 5dr hatch £6995–£11,195

374

155

4.4

148.6

42

LxWxH 4501x1733x1552 Kerb weight 980kg 1.0 SCe 75 0.9 TCe 90 1.5 dCi 90

71 87 87

98 109 107

14.7 11.1 11.8

52.3 57.7 80.7

120 109 90

AACCC

Sharp-looking saloon is a replacement for the CTS. Still needs a diesel option. LxWxH 5184x1880x1472 Kerb weight 1950kg 3.0 V6 AWD

411

155

5.7

28.8

CTS-V 4dr saloon £76,550

223 AAAAC

Eat your heart out, Germany – but lacks handling finesse of its European rivals. LxWxH 5050x1863x1447 Kerb weight 1850kg 6.2 V8 RWD

640

199

3.7

21.7

Escalade 5dr SUV £82,515–£97,050

298 AACCC

Cadillac’s luxury SUV remains too large and ungainly for the UK. LxWxH 5179x2061x1896 Kerb weight 2635kg 6.2 V8 AWD

420

112

6.7-6.9

22.4

287

C AT E R H A M

Seven 2dr open £17,495–£51,990

AAAAB

The 360 is the sweet spot in the revised range, giving the Seven just the right hit of performance. LxWxH NA Kerb weight 490kg 0.6 Suzuki 160 0.6 Suzuki Super Sprint 1.6 Sigma Ti-VCT 270 1.6 Sigma Ti-VCT 310 2.0 Duratec 360 2.0 Duratec 420 2.0 Supercharged 620S 2.0 Supercharged 620R

80 95 135 152 180 210 310 310

100 100 122 127 130 136 145 155

6.91 6.91 5.0 4.9 4.8 3.8 3.4 2.79

57.6 57.6 NA NA NA NA NA NA

114 114 NA NA NA NA NA NA

CHEVROLET

Camaro 2dr coupé/convertible £32,540–£45,030

AAABC

An affordable American muscle car, but LHD only and less usable and unrefined. LxWxH 4784x1897 Kerb weight 1539kg 2.0 Turbo 6.2 V8

268 446

149 5.9-6.1 155-180 4.4-4.8

Corvette 2dr coupé/open £64,010–£110,250

34.9-35.3 181-184 22.1-25.4 252-290 AAABC

LHD only and less usable and less able than rivals, but disarming and inimitable. LxWxH 4492x1872x1239 Kerb weight 1539kg 6.2 V8 6.2 V8 Z06

459 650

180 196

4.1-4.2 3.7-3.8

22.8-23.0 282-284 20.0-22.2 291-322

CITROEN

C-Zero 5dr hatchback £20,495

Logan MCV Stepway 5dr estate £12,095–£13,695

9.2

67.3

99 AAAAC

American muscle built for the UK. What’s not to like? LxWxH 4784x1916x1381 Kerb weight 1653kg 2.3 Ecoboost 5.0 V8

312 410

145 155

5.8 4.8

28.8-35.3 179-225 12.8-23.5 281-306

better than most. LxWxH 3653x1643x1551 Kerb weight 940kg

B-Max 5dr MPV £16,145–£20,595

Sliding doors, responsive handling and keen value make this a decent small MPV. LxWxH 4077x1751x1604 Kerb weight 1274kg

68 83 88 93

96-102 103-110 104 104

14.2-14.5 11.2-12.1 12.0 12.5-12.7

51.4-55.4 57.6-68.9 57.6 62.8-64.2

119-129 133-139 114 117-119

1.4 90 88 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 Punto 5dr hatch £11,895–£13,770 AAACC 1.6 105 103 Spacious and characterful but severely dated and out of its depth 1.5 TDCi 75 72 now. LxWxH 4065x1687x1490 Kerb weight 1030kg 1.5 TDCi 95 93 1.2 69hp 68 97 14.4 53.3 124 1.4 77hp 76 103 13.2 49.6 132 C-Max 5dr MPV £21,945–£28,445

9.5 11.7-11.9 9.9 9.2

AAACC

Tipo 5dr hatch £13,795–£19,795

47.9 68.9-70.6 65.7 62.8

136 104-108 113 117

Appeals for its dynamics, but not as it once did. Spacious, stylish and well-priced. LxWxH 4360x2010x1469 Kerb weight 1276kg

1.6 Duratec Ti-VCT 85 83 106 14.9 47.9 136 1.6 Duratec Ti-VCT 105 103 116 12.3 47.9 136 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 115 12.5 61.4-65.7 99-105 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 119-120 11.0-12.0 51.4-60.1 108-125 AAABC 1.5T Ecoboost 150 148 129-130 8.9-9.2 46.3-51.4 127-140 LxWxH 3455x1615x1460 Kerb weight 855kg DS’s first premium SUV certainly has the right price tag, equipment 1.5T Ecoboost 182PS 179 137-138 8.6-8.9 46.3-51.4 127-140 and appeal. LxWxH 4570x1895x1620 Kerb weight 1420kg 1.0 VTI 68 67 99 13.0-15.9 67.3-68.9 95-97 2.0T Ecoboost 250 ST 246 154 6.5 41.5 159 1.2 PureTech 82 79 106 10.9 65.7 99 1.6 THP 225 EAT8 218 141 8.3 57.9 135 2.3T Ecoboost 350 RS 345 165 4.7 36.7 175 1.5 BlueHDi 130 NA 121 11.7 68.9 107 107Kw Electric Motor 140 84 11.0 NA 0 C3 5dr hatchback £11,560–£18,050 AAABC 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 171 134 9.9 57.6 128 1.5 TDCi 95 93 112 12.0 74.3 99 Funky, fresh look gives a lease of life, shame that underneath isn’t 1.5 TDCi 105 103 116 11.9 83.1 88 FERRARI the same. LxWxH 3996x1749x1474 Kerb weight 976kg 1.5 TDCi 120 118 119-120 10.5-10.8 74.3 99 Portofino 2dr open £166,180 AAAAC 2.0 TDCi 150 1.2 PureTech 68 66 107 14.0 60.1 108 148 129-130 8.7-8.8 64.2-70.6 105-115 The entry-level Ferrari has the power, the looks and the touring 1.2 PureTech 82 79 107 12.8 60.1 109 2.0 TDCi 185 ST 182 135 7.7-8.1 61.4-67.3 110-119 ability. LxWxH 4586x1938x1318 Kerb weight 1664kg 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117 9.3 61.4 110 3.9T V8 591 199 3.5 26.4 245 AAAAC 1.6 BlueHDi 75 72 106 13.7 78.5 93 Focus Estate 5dr estate £22,640–£30,300 Well-mannered and comfortable, but a Skoda Octavia will carry 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 115 10.6 76.3 95 488 2dr coupé/open £197,418-£219,274 AAAAA more. LxWxH 4560x2010x1469 Kerb weight 1313kg AAABC Calm ride mixed with explosive performance. 1.6 Duratec Ti-VCT 105 103 116 12.5 47.1 139 C3 Aircross 5dr hatchback £14,350–£20,025 LxWxH 4568x1952x1213 Kerb weight 1475kg Funky-looking C3 gets a jacked-up, rugged SUV look. 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 115 12.7 58.9 109 LxWxH 4155x1765x1637 Kerb weight 1088kg 3.9T V8 650 203-205 3.0 24.7 260 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 119-120 11.2-12.2 51.4-58.9 110-125 1.2 PureTech 82 79 103 15.9 55.4 116 1.5T Ecoboost 150 148 129-130 8.9-9.2 46.3-50.4 128-140

82 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

116

AAABC 106 109 117 112 98 108

13.8 13.2 10.9 12.1 15.1 13.0

47.1 55.4 57.7 44.1 74.3 74.3

139 119 114 149 98 98 AAABC

A fun-to-drive and easy-to-live-with five-seat MPV.

AAABC LxWxH 4379x1828x1610 Kerb weight 1391kg Given a rugged makeover but still lacks charm. Extremely A 90s reboot that has been on a diet. Decent to drive and ample 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 108 12.6 55.4 127 practical, though. LxWxH 4528x1761x1559 Kerb weight 1090kg interior space. LxWxH 4368x1792x1495 Kerb weight 1195kg 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 116 11.4 55.4 129 0.9 TCe 90 87 106 12.4 55.4 115 1.4 95 93 115 12.1 49.6 132 1.6 Ti-VCT 125 123 117 11.5 44.1 149 1.5 dCi 90 87 106 13.0 72.4 100 1.6 E-Torq 110 108 119 11.5 44.8 147 1.5 TDCi 105 103 114 12.1 74.3 99 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 124 9.6 47.1 139 1.5 TDCi 120 118 113-114 11.3-12.4 67.3-68.9 105-109 Duster 5dr SUV £9495–£15,495 AAABC 1.3 Multijet 95 93 112 12.0 76.3 99 2.0 TDCi 150 148 126-127 9.5-10.3 58.9-64.2 114-124 A value champion. If cheap family transport is what you require, 1.6 Multijet 120 118 124 9.8-10.2 74.3-76.3 98-99 the Duster delivers. LxWxH 4315x2000x1625 Kerb weight 1147kg Grand C-Max 5dr MPV £23,545–£30,095 AAAAC 1.6 SCe 115 111 104-105 11.0-12.0 41.5-44.1 145-155 Tipo Station Wagon 5dr estate £14,795–£20,795 AAABC Mid-sized Ford handles well and can be had in five- or seven-seat form. Good value, too. LxWxH 4379x1828x1610 Kerb weight 1493kg 1.2 TCe 125 121 109-110 10.4-11.0 44.1-46.3 138-145 Estate version is more practical, which mixes well with its driving 1.5 dCi 110 105 104-105 11.8-12.4 60.1-64.2 115-123 characteristics. LxWxH 4571x1792x1514 Kerb weight 1205kg 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 107 13.6 54.3 133 1.4 95 93 115 12.3 49.6 132 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 115 12.2 54.3 134 DS 1.6 E-Torq 110 108 119 11.7 44.8 147 1.5 TDCi 120 118 111-112 12.3-13.4 62.8-64.2 131 3 3dr hatch/2dr open £15,370–£26,170 AAAAC 1.4 T-Jet 120 118 124 9.8 47.1 139 2.0 TDCi 150 148 124-126 9.8-10.4 56.5-61.4 119-129 Premium-brand philosophy and aesthetics appeal, but the 3 lacks 1.3 Multijet 95 93 112 12.3 76.3 99 dynamic refinement. LxWxH 3948x1715x1483 Kerb weight 1090kg 1.6 Multijet 120 118 124 10.1-10.4 72.4-76.3 98-101 S-Max 5dr MPV £26,450–£38,710 AAAAC 1.2 PureTech 82 79 108 12.3 61.4 107 Better to drive and better looking than most but not quite the class 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117-118 9.6-10.2 61.4-65.7 100-105 124 Spider 2dr open £21,050–£27,060 AAABC leader it was. LxWxH 4976x1916x1655 Kerb weight 1645kg 1.2 PureTech 130 126 126-127 8.9-9.0 62.8 105 The 124 name has been revived. Although not perfect, it is fun to 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 124 9.9 43.5 149 drive. LxWxH 4054x1740x1233 Kerb weight 1050kg 1.6 THP 165 158 135 7.6 50.4 129 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 236 140 8.4 35.8 180 1.6 THP 210 202 143 6.5 52.3 125 1.4 Multiair Turbo 140 138 134 7.5-7.6 42.8-44.1 148-153 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 114 13.4 56.5 129 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 113-117 10.8-11.2 80.7-83.1 87-92 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 122-123 10.8 56.5 129-134 FORD 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 118 9.3 78.5 94 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 122 12.1 52.3 139 Ka+ 5dr hatch £9800–£12,100 AAABC 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 129-131 9.5-9.7 56.5 129-134 4 5dr hatch £21,360–£26,630 AAABC The Ka gets two extra doors, and it’s a breath of fresh air for the 2.0 TDCi D’torq 180 AWD 177 128 10.5 48.7 149 range. LxWxH 3929x1910x1524 Kerb weight 1055kg A jack of all trades, master of none. Nice styling, though. 2.0 TDCi 210 Bi-turbo 207 135 8.8 51.4 144 LxWxH 4284x1810x1497 Kerb weight 1255kg 1.2 Ti-VCT 70 69 99 15.3 56.5 114 1.2 PureTech 130 126 123 9.9 56.5-57.6 114-116 1.2 Ti-VCT 85 83 105 13.3 56.5 114-120 Galaxy 5dr MPV £28,000–£38,960 AAABC 1.6 THP 165 158 131 8.7 50.4 130 Huge seven-seat MPV. Easy to place on the road but not cheap to 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117-120 10.9-11.4 67.3-74.3 100-111 Fiesta 3dr/5dr hatch £13,695–£22,245 AAAAB buy. LxWxH 4848x1916x1747 Kerb weight 1708kg 1.6 BlueHDi 180 175 127-135 8.6 64.2 115 Dynamically superb and continues the Fiesta legacy. No longer the 1.5 SCTi Ecoboost 160 157 124 10.0 43.5 149 class leader, though. LxWxH 4040x1735x1476 Kerb weight 1113kg 2.0 SCTi Ecoboost 240 236 140 8.6 35.8 180 4 Crossback 5dr hatch £23,660–£30,250 AAABC 1.1 Ti-VCT 70 69 99 14.9 64.2 101 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 120 118 114 13.6 56.5 129 A more rugged version of the DS4 doesn’t make it any better. 1.1 Ti-VCT 85 83 105 14.0 64.2 101 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 150 148 122-123 10.9 54.3-56.5 129-134 LxWxH 4284x1810x1497 Kerb weight 1255kg 1.0T Ecoboost 100 98 111-113 10.5-12.2 54.3-65.7 97-118 2.0 TDCi D’torq 150 AWD 148 122 12.2 52.3 139 1.2 PureTech 130 126 123 9.9 56.5 116 1.0T Ecoboost 125 123 121 9.9 65.7 98 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 177 129-131 9.6-9.8 52.3-56.5 129-134 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117 10.9-11.4 67.3-72.4 103-111 1.0T Ecoboost 140 138 125 9.0 62.8 102 2.0 TDCi Dtorq 180 AWD 177 128 10.6 48.7 149 1.6 BlueHDi 180 175 127-135 8.6 64.2 115 1.5 TDCi 85 83 108 12.5 88.3 82 2.0 TDCi 210 Bi-turbo 207 135 8.9 51.4 144 1.5 TDCi 120 118 121 9.0 88.3 89 5 5dr hatch £28,485–£34,755 AAABC EcoSport 5dr SUV £17,945–£21,595 AAACC A design marvel. Shame it doesn’t function all that well. Focus 5dr hatch £20,220–£39,925 AAAAC Facelifted version of the pumped-up Fiesta is okay, but developing-

AAACC LxWxH 4530x2128 Kerb weight 1605kg 1.6 THP 165 158 126 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117-119 Electric 64 80 15.9 NA 0 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 127 2.0 BlueHDi 180 175 137 C1 3dr hatch/5dr hatch £9,125–£13,480 AAABC Slightly cheaper than its Toyota sibling but less visually charming. 7 Crossback 5dr SUV £28,095–£43,580

Well-engineered electric city car, but too expensive and lacks the range of rivals. LxWxH 3475x1475x1600 Kerb weight 1120kg

157

Mustang 2dr coupé/open £33,675–£44,965

1.2 69hp 0.9 Twinair 85 0.9 Twinair 90 1.3 Multijet 95

CAD I LL AC

CT6 4dr saloon £71,670

The least practical of the three bodystyles but still as usable as a Mondeo should be. LxWxH 4871x 1852x1482 Kerb weight 1579kg 2.0 iVCT Hybrid 187PS

world roots show. LxWxH 4096x1765x1653 Kerb weight 1280kg 1.0T Ecoboost 125 1.0T Ecoboost 140 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 100 1.5 TDCi Duratorq 125

123 138 99 123

111 116 99 112

12.7 11.8 14.0 10.9

Kuga 5dr SUV £22,595–£36,095

48.7-54.3 54.3 68.8 62.7

119-134 119 107 116-119

AAAAB

Bigger and sharper-looking than before but still retains its taut, responsive handling. LxWxH 4524x1838x1689 Kerb weight 1560kg 1.5 Ecoboost 120 1.5 Ecoboost 150 1.5 Ecoboost 182PS AWD 1.5 TDCi 120 1.5 TDCi 150 1.5 TDCi 150 AWD 1.5 TDCi 180 AWD

118 148 179 118 148 148 177

112 12.5 121 9.7 124 10.1 106-108 12.4-12.7 119-121 9.9-10.1 118 10.9 124-126 9.2-10.0

Edge 5dr SUV £35,510–£43,025

44.8 44.8 37.7 58.9-64.2 54.3-60.1 54.3 54.3

145 145 173 115-124 122-135 134 134-135

AAABC

Mid-sized, US-developed SUV joins Ford’s fleet to take on Europe’s big SUVs. LxWxH 4808x1928x1692 Kerb weight 1912kg 2.0 TDCi Duratorq 180 2.0 TDCi Bi-turbo 210

177 207

124 131

9.9 9.4

47.9-48.7 149-152 47.9-48.7 149-152


N E W CAR PR I CES P

e ow

r (b

hp

)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

) pg

C

(g/ O2

km

)

P

e ow

r (b

hp

)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

Kona 5dr hatch £16,450–£26,245

om

y (m

) pg

C

(g/ O2

km

)

AAAAC

Hyundai’s first crossover is the perfect blend of practicality, value and style LxWxH 4165x1800x1550 Kerb weight 1233kg 1.0 T-GDi 120 2WD 1.6 T-GDi 177PS 4WD

P

e ow

r (b

hp

To

GT 2dr coupé £420,000

AAAAC

112 127

12.0 7.9

p ps

ee

d(

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

F-Type Convertible 2dr open £56,295–£118,165

om

y (m

) pg

650

216

3.0

NA

NA

197

G I N E T TA

AAABC

A balanced, affordable and fine-looking track-day car. Some of the finish isn’t quite up to snuff. LxWxH NA Kerb weight 840kg

Q30 5dr hatch £20,600–£36,435

52.3-54.3 117-125 42.2 153

155 161 171 171 171 171 186 195

5.7 5.3-5.7 4.9-5.5 5.1 4.8 4.9 4.1 3.7

39.2 28.8-33.6 28.8-32.9 31.7 32.9 31.7 25.0 25.0

AAABC the F-Pace’s? LxWxH 4411x1984x1649 Kerb weight 1775kg 2.0 D150 148 124 9.5 60.1 2.0 D150 AWD 148 120 9.9-10.1 50.4-54.3 42.8-47.1 159-174 2.0 D180 AWD 177 127-128 8.7-9.4 50.4-54.3 2.0 D240 AWD 236 139 7.0 45.6 2.0 P250 AWD 245 143 6.6 36.7 AAABC 2.0 P300 AWD 295 151 5.9 35.3

Infiniti’s first hatch uses the A-Class blueprint. Great to look at, not so good to drive. LxWxH 4425x1805x1495 Kerb weight 1407kg

1.6t 122 1.6t 156 H O N DA 2.0t 211 Jazz 5dr hatch £14,115–£18,215 AAAAC 2.0t 211 AWD Not the most compact or vivacious but has decent handling and is 1.5d 109 cleverly packaged.LxWxH 3995x1694x1550 Kerb weight 1066kg 2.2d 170 1.3 DOHC 99 113-118 11.2-12.3 55.4-61.4 106-120 2.2d 170 AWD 135

125

9.0-9.6

INFINITI

G40 Club Car 2dr coupé £35,000 (+champ pack) 1.8 Zetec

126

NA

NA

NA

120 153 208 208 107 167 167

124 134 146 143 118 137 134

9.4 8.9 7.2 7.3 11.9-12.0 8.3 8.5

49.6 48.7 45.6 42.2 65.7-72.4 64.2 57.6

133 134 143 156 103-111 115 127

some dynamism. LxWxH 4518x1799x1434 Kerb weight 1275kg

car. LxWxH 4425x1815x1530 Kerb weight 1542kg

1.0 VTEC Turbo 129PS 1.5 VTEC Turbo 182PS 2.0 VTEC Turbo Type R

2.2d 170 AWD

125-126 10.2-11.2 55.4-60.1 106-117 125-136 8.2-8.5 46.3-48.7 133-139 169 5.8 36.7 176

167

134

8.5

AAAAC LxWxH 4790x1820x1445 Kerb weight 1676kg 2.2d 170 167 143-144 8.7-8.9 2.0t 211 208 152 7.2 1.6 i-DTEC 118 121 10.3 72.4-74.3 99-103 3.0t V6 405 399 155 5.1 1.8 i-VTEC 140 127-130 9.2-11.3 42.8-45.6 146-155 3.5 V6 Hybrid 364 359 155 5.1 3.5 V6 Hybrid 364 AWD 359 155 5.4 HR-V 5dr SUV £19,320–£26,860 AAABC Cleverly packaged and comfortable. Bland performance and Q60 2dr coupé £34,300–£47,275

Outgoing estate is versatile, comfortable and frugal; only its price marks its scorecard. LxWxH 4370x1770x1470 Kerb weight 1382kg

forgettable, though. LxWxH 4294x1772x1605 Kerb weight 1241kg 1.5 i-VTEC 1.6 i-DTEC

128 118

116-119 10.2-11.4 49.6-52.3 125-134 119 10.0-10.5 68.9-70.6 104-108

CR-V 5dr SUV £23,760–£35,565

AAAAC

Tardis-like SUV stalwart has lots of space for five and a big boot. LxWxH 4605x1820x1685 Kerb weight 1515kg 1.6 i-DTEC 2.0 i-VTEC

118 152

52.3

Q50 4dr saloon £29,860–£48,820

F-Pace 5dr SUV £34,775–£53,405

113-125 9.6-11.2 53.3-64.2 115-139 113-118 10.0-12.3 36.7-39.2 168-179

114-119 146 206 144 159

208 399

146 155

7.3 5.0

AACCC 41.5 30.1

137 155 155

8.9 6.2 5.3

57.6-58.9 124-128 26.2 249 45.6 145

Honda’s supercar given a modern reboot, and it’s some piece of engineering. LxWxH 4487x1939x1204 Kerb weight 1725kg

QX70 5dr SUV £45,720–£57,220

3.5 V6 hybrid

A big, powerful SUV but with none of the finesse of the BMW X5 or Land Rovers. LxWxH 4865x1640x1680 Kerb weight 2012kg

492

191

2.9

28.2

HYU N DAI

228

3.7 V6 320 AAAAC 5.0 V8 390

i10 5dr hatch £9695–£13,915

Prioritises maturity over fun, resulting in a car that is practical and well-priced. LxWxH 3665x1660x1500 Kerb weight 933kg 1.0 DOHC 1.2 DOHC

64 84

96-97 14.7-14.9 60.1-70.6 93-108 103-109 12.1-13.8 47.9-57.6 114-139

315 384

6.8 5.8

22.4-23.4 282-292 20.9 316

JAGUAR

108 138 167 118 138 167

110 112 122 111 113 122

11.8 10.9-11.0 8.8 10.2 9.5-10.2 8.9

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph E

n co

om

y (m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

AAABC

244 365 197

149 168 143

5.8 4.7 7.3

35.8 28.5 48.7

Venga 5dr hatch £12,760–£19,905

181 225 154 AAACC

A versatile interior, but firm ride and high price disappoint. LxWxH 4075x1765x1600 Kerb weight 1253kg 89 123 89 114

104 111-115 103 113

12.4 10.4-11.1 13.7 11.0

50.4 43.4-47.9 64.2 64.2

130 139-150 115 115

AAABC

Nicely up to scratch without feeling cheap or austere, but no class leader. LxWxH 4525x1805x1605 Kerb weight 1483kg 1.6 GDi 1.7 CRDi 114 1.7 CRDi 139

133 114 139

115 10.9 45.6 143 110 12.7 62.8-67.3 109-118 117-120 10.0-10.9 58.9 127

Niro 5dr SUV £23,140–£31,060

AAABC

Kia’s first full hybrid is a solid attempt, but it lacks the refinement of better rivals. LxWxH 4355x1805x1545 Kerb weight 1500kg 1.6 GDi Hybrid 1.6 GDi Hybrid PHEV

139 139

101 107

11.1 10.4

74.3 217.3

Stonic 5dr SUV £16,300–£21,065

88 29 AAABC

Kia’s first crossover is striking and reasonably good considering the value. LxWxH 4140x1760x1520 Kerb weight 1160kg 1.4 MPI 1.0 T-GDi 1.6 CRDI

98 118 108

107 115 112

12.2 9.9 10.9

51.4 56.5 67.3

125 115 109

LxWxH 4480x1855x1635 Kerb weight 1454kg

47.1 47.1-47.9 40.9 64.2 48.7-55.4 47.9

141 137-140 160 115 134-150 155

AABCC

138 138 182 197 268

116 117 127 126 112

10.9 12.0 8.8 8.5-8.7 8.4

53.3 50.4 50.4 46.3-50.4 29.4

Grand Cherokee 5dr SUV £48,880–£56,420

139 147 149 149-159 223

1.6 GDi 1.6 T-GDi 1.7 CRDi 114 1.7 CRDi 139 2.0 CRDi 134 2.0 CRDi 182

247 461

126 160

8.2 5.0

184 315

Heavy-duty off-roader lacks on-road manners. LxWxH 4223x1873x1840 Kerb weight 1827kg 107 112

11.1 8.8-9.2 11.1 11.1 10.1-11.6 9.2

42.2-44.8 37.2-37.7 61.4 57.6 47.9-54.3 44.8-47.9

147-156 175-177 119 129 139-154 154-166

AAAAC

2.2 CRDi

197

127

9.0-9.6

42.8-49.6 149-170

KTM

X-Bow 0dr open £57,345–£70,717

AAAAC

Eccentric looks and sharp handling but expensive. LxWxH 3738x1915x1202 Kerb weight 847kg 290 280

143 143

3.9 4.1

34.0 34.0

189 189

LAMBORGHINI

Huracán 2dr coupé £162,900–£215,500

AAAAC

Junior Lambo mixes usability and drama skilfully. Performante is AABCC the most rounded. LxWxH 4459x1924x1165 Kerb weight 1389kg

Wrangler 2dr/4dr SUV £36,740–£39,875 197 280

113 125-126 109 115 114 125

Kia moves upmarket with a smart, well-priced and nicely appointed seven-seater. LxWxH 4780x1890x1685 Kerb weight 1932kg

AAABC 2.0 R 2.0 GT

40.4 20.9

130 174 114 139 134 182

Sorento 5dr SUV £29,310–£42,940

The best Jeep on sale by some margin. Comfortable and wellequipped. LxWxH 4828x1943x1792 Kerb weight 2266kg

2.8 CRD 3.6 V6

XE 4dr saloon £30,270–£48,045

129 134 134-139 153 159 170 174 209

p ps

Sleek coupé-shaped saloon has the appeal and dynamics to rival Europe’s best LxWxH 4830x1870x1400 Kerb weight 1717kg

Carens 5dr MPV £19,505–£29,010

Hamstrung by poor UK specification. Uninspiring but practical and roomy. LxWxH 4624x1859x1670 Kerb weight 1738kg

3.0 V6 CRD AAACC 6.4 V8 Hemi SRT 145 149

57.7 55.4 53.3-54.3 48.7 47.1 38.2 37.0 31.7

Cherokee 5dr SUV £33,000–£43,180

156 210

coarse and slow. LxWxH 4980x1845x1493 Kerb weight 1826kg 167 315 359

10.2 8.5 8.7 7.2 6.2 6.8 6.0 5.5

)

Stinger 4dr saloon £32,025–£41,180

124 137-147 137-147 162 174 181

charm. LxWxH 4236x1805x1667 Kerb weight 1346kg 1.6 E-torQ 110 1.4 Multiair II 140 1.4 Multiair II 170 4WD 1.6d Multiair II 120 2.0d Multiair II 140 4WD 2.0d Multiair II 170 4WD

2.0d 140 FWD 2.0d 140 4WD 2.2d 185 4WD Q70 4dr saloon £34,260–£48,105 AAACC 2.2d 200 4WD Big Infiniti is spacious but has limited practicality. Daimler diesel is 3.2 270 4WD

2.2d 170 3.7 V6 320 AAAAB 3.5 V6 Hybrid 364

NSX 2dr coupé £144,755

62.8-65.7 44.8 31 45.6 41.5

Good-looking coupé that is half-baked in most places compared with its rivals. LxWxH 2850x2052x1390 Kerb weight 1722kg 2.0t 211PS 3.0t V6 405

121 129 129 135 150 135 145 155

hp

To

2.0 T-GDi 3.3 V6 T-GDi 2.2 CRDi

AAAAC

160 177 177 236 295 246 295 374

r (b

JEEP 143 Renegade 5dr SUV £18,255–£30,140 AAABC Sportage 5dr SUV £18,810–£33,350 AAABC AAACC Middling compact crossover with chunky looks but no obvious Good ride, handling and usability. Looks good and is decent value.

Credible compact saloon competitor with some novel touches.

Civic Tourer 5dr estate £21,405–£23,660

P

e ow

163 199-234 203-234 211 203 211 269 269

Credible first SUV effort is as refined and dynamic as a Jaguar should be. LxWxH 4746x2070x1667 Kerb weight 1690kg

2.0d 163 2.0 20d 180 2.0 20d 180 AWD 2.0 25d 240 AWD 3.0 V6 30d 300 AWD 2.0 25t 250 AWD Civic 5dr hatch £18,890–£32,995 AAAAC QX30 5dr hatch £28,590–£34,440 AAABC 2.0 30t 300 AWD A fresh look while remaining practical, refined and upmarket. Lacks Q30 with a more rugged look, but doesn’t improve on the standard 3.0 V6 S 380 AWD 127 179 315

)

1.4 1.6 AAAAC 1.4 CRDi Jaguar’s second SUV looks enticing, but can it make an impact like 1.6 CRDi

Santa Fe 5dr SUV £33,425–£39,785 2.2 CRDi Blue Drive 200

km

AAAAB

The GT is back as a race car for the road. Compelling if not perfect. Another big Korean SUV with lots of space for not a lot of cash. LxWxH 4808x1928x1692 Kerb weight 1912kg Slick and comfy. LxWxH 4700x1880x1675 Kerb weight 1939kg 3.5 V6 Ecoboost

C

(g/ O2

Costs serious money, but you get a serious car with a likeable wild side. LxWxH 4482x1923x1308 Kerb weight 1545kg

2.0 i4 300 295 3.0 V6 340 335 3.0 V6 380 374 Tucson 5dr SUV £20,160–£34,230 AAABC 3.0 V6 380 AWD 374 Classy, roomy cabin and predictable handling. A very competitive 3.0 V6 400 394 SUV. LxWxH 4475x1850x1650 Kerb weight 1379kg 3.0 V6 400 AWD 394 1.6 GDi Blue Drive 132 130 113 11.5 44.8 147 5.0 V8 550 R AWD 542 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 116 114 109-115 11.5-13.7 57.6-61.7 119-129 5.0 V8 575 SVR AWD 567 2.0 CRDi Blue Drive 136 134 114-116 10.6-12.0 47.1-58.9 127-156 2.0 CRDi Blue Drive 185 182 125 9.5-9.9 43.5-47.9 154-170 E-Pace 5dr SUV £28,545–£50,740 118 175

)

h mp

10.6-10.7 31.4-32.1 231-235 8.1-8.9 23.7-25.0 273-276

AAAAB

5.2 V10 580-2 5.2 V10 610-4 5.2 V10 Performante

562 593 621

198-199 3.4-3.6 201 3.2-3.4 201 2.9

17.0-19.6 278-283 16.0-17.0 280-285 20.6 314

Aventador 2dr coupé £278,000

AAAAC

KIA Tops the pile thanks to outstanding driver appeal. Poised and Big, hairy V12 has astonishing visuals and performance. Handling engaging but refined. LxWxH 4672x1967x1416 Kerb weight 1450kg Picanto 5dr hatch £9500–£14,515 AAACC could be sweeter. LxWxH 4797x2030x1136 Kerb weight 1575kg i20 Coupé 3dr hatch £14,015–£16,415 AAABC 2.0d 163 160 132 8.2-8.4 68.9-75.0 99-106 Nice drive and cabin, but now overshadowed by rivals. 6.5 V12 S 718 217 2.9 16.7 394 LxWxH 3595x1406x1485 Kerb weight 935kg Appealing budget supermini in sleek coupé form, but lacks a little 2.0 20d 180 177 140 7.8 67.3 109-111 dynamically. LxWxH 4045x1730x1449 Kerb weight 980kg 2.0 20d 180 AWD 177 140 7.9 60.6 123 1.0 MPI 66 100 13.8 64.2 101 Urus 2dr coupé £NA AAAAC 1.2 84 82 106 12.8 55.4 119 2.0 25d 240 AWD 236 155 6.1 54.4 137 1.25 MPI 83 100-107 11.6-13.2 52.3-61.4 106-124 Lambo’s second SUV is more alluring and aims to use the V8’s power better. LxWxH 5112x2016x1638 Kerb weight 2200kg 1.0 T-GDi 100 98 116 10.8 61.4 107 2.0 20t 200 197 148 7.1 45.1 144

2.0 25t 250 246 155 6.3 45.1 144 AAAAC 2.0 25t 250 AWD 246 155 6.2 42.2 154 2.0 30t 300 AWD 295 155 5.5 41.5 157 3.0 V6 S 380 374 155 5.0 34.9 194 1.2 75 74 99 13.6 55.4 119 1.2 84 82 106 12.8 58.9 112 XF 4dr saloon £32,515–£51,140 AAAAB 1.4 100 98 106 13.2 45.6 143 Outstandingly broad-batted dynamically, plus a pleasant cabin. 1.0 T-GDi 100 98 109-116 10.7-10.9 57.6-64.2 102-117 LxWxH 4954x1987x1457 Kerb weight 1545kg 1.0 T-GDi 120 118 118 10.2 56.5 115 2.0d E-Performance 163 160 132 8.7 68.9-70.6 104-109 2.0 20d 180 177 136 8.0-8.1 65.7 114 i30 5dr hatch £17,000–£28,010 AAABC 2.0 20d 180 AWD 177 136 8.4 57.7 129 As good as we’ve come to expect from Hyundai, but not one inch 2.0 20d 240 236 153 6.5 53.3 139 better. LxWxH 4340x1795x1455 Kerb weight 1194kg 2.0 20d 240 AWD 236 153 6.5 51.4 144 1.0 T-GDi 120 118 118 11.1 56.5 115 3.0 V6 30d 300 295 155 6.2 51.4 144 1.4 T-GDi 140 138 127-130 8.9-9.2 51.4-52.3 124-125 2.0 20t 200 197 146 7.5 41.5 154 1.6 CRDi 110 108 118 11.0-11.2 68.9-74.3 99-109 2.0 25t 250 246 152 6.6 41.5 154 2.0 T-GDi 250 N 247 155 6.4 40.4 159 2.0 25t 250 AWD 246 150 6.6 40.9 159 2.0 T-GDi 275 N Performance 272 155 6.1 39.8 163 2.0 30t 300 AWD 295 155 5.8 40.0 163 3.0 V6 S 380 374 155 5.3 34.4 198 i30 Tourer 5dr estate £17,500–£25,830 AAABC Another solid car. Good value and practical but lacks excitement. XF Sportbrake 5dr estate £34,910–£52,730 AAAAB

i20 5dr hatch £11,910–£17,915

Combines decent performance with good practicality and running costs. LxWxH 4035x1734x1474 Kerb weight 980kg

LxWxH 4585x1795x1465 Kerb weight 1245kg 1.0 T-GDi 120 1.4 T-GDi 140 1.6 CRDi 110 1.6 CRDi 136

118 138 108 134

117 126-129 117 123

11.4 9.2-9.5 11.3 10.9

54.3 51.4 74.3 65.7

120 125-129 99 112

Superb XF is now available in the more practical Sportbrake form. It’s a win-win. LxWxH 4954x1987x1496 Kerb weight 1660kg

2.0d E-Performance 163 2.0 20d 180 2.0 20d 180 AWD 2.0 20d 240 AWD i40 4dr saloon £20,360–£28,280 AAABC 3.0 V6 30d 300 Useful, inoffensive and well-priced, but don’t expect any fireworks. 2.0 25t 250

160 177 177 236 295 246

136 138 136 150 155 150

9.3-9.4 8.8 8.9 6.7 6.6 7.1

62.8 61.4 56.5 48.7 49.6 41.5

118-119 120 132 153 149 155

Rio 5dr hatch £12,000–£18,455

AAABC 4.0 V8

Looks great and is well-priced, but nowhere near its European rivals. LxWxH 4065x1725x1445 Kerb weight 1155kg 1.0 T-GDi 118 1.25 MPi 1.4 MPi 1.4 CRDi 76 1.4 CRDi 89

118 83 98 76 89

118 9.8 107 12.5 103-108 11.8-13.4 102 13.5 108 11.6

60.1 58.8 46.3-56.5 80.7 74.3

107 109 114-140 92 98

Another looker from Schreyer, but dynamically forgettable. LxWxH 4065x1725x1445 Kerb weight 1254kg 1.4 1.6 GDi 1.0 T-GDi 1.6 T-GDi 1.6 CRDi

98 133 118 201 134

114 118 118 143 117-124

12.3 9.8 10.7 7.3 9.5-10.2

47.1 52.3 57.6 38.2 72.4-78.5

Cee’d Sportswagon 5dr estate £18,550–£25,910 118 134

116 11.0 54.3 102-109 121-122 10.1-10.5 67.3-72.4 120

22.2

290

Range Rover Evoque Coupé 3dr SUV £33,175–£55,230 AAAAC 145 174 234 281

113 121 135 144

10.6 8.5 6.9 6.0

67.3 57.7 48.7 37.2

109 129 153 173 AAAAC

Slightly more practical and easier to live with thanks to those two rear doors. LxWxH 4370x1985x1635 Kerb weight 1679kg

2.0 eD4 2.0 TD4 2.0 SD4 2.0 Si4 240 AAABC 2.0 Si4 290

Pro_cee’d 3dr hatch £19,240–£24,075

3.6

Range Rover Evoque 5dr SUV £30,805–£55,630 138 124 115 170 94-103

Slightly bigger than the hatch but equally forgettable. LxWxH 4505x1780x1485 Kerb weight 1305kg 1.0 T-GDi 1.6 CRDi

189

Dripping with desirability; poised and capable on- and off-road. Not practical, though. LxWxH 4370x1980x1605 Kerb weight 1621kg

2.0 eD4 2.0 TD4 2.0 SD4 AAABC 2.0 Si4

Cee’d 5dr hatch £15,3705–£24,575

631

L AN D ROVE R

145 174 234 234 281

113 121-124 135 135 144

10.6 8.5-9.5 6.9 6.9 6.0

65.7 55.4-58.9 48.7 38.7 37.2

113 125-134 153 165 173

Range Rover Evoque Convertible 2dr SUV £45,565–£55,915

AAABC

Loses its roof but retains its ability to stray from the asphalt. LxWxH 4370x1980x1609 Kerb weight 2037kg

AAABC 2.0 TD4 174 121 9.7 49.6 149 2.0 SD4 234 135 7.5 45.6 164 2.0 Si4 234 135 7.6 32.9 201 1.6 GDi 133 118 9.8 52.3 124 1.0 T-GDi 118 118 10.7 57.6 115 Range Rover Velar 5dr SUV £45,145–£72,670 AAAAC LxWxH 4745x1815x1470 Kerb weight 1497kg 1.6 T-GDi 201 143 7.3 38.2 170 Dubbed the most car-like Landie ever and it doesn’t disappoint. 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 115 113 119 12.4 67.3 110 XJ 4dr saloon £60,310–£93,780 AAAAC 1.6 CRDi 134 117-124 9.5-10.2 72.4-74.3 99-103 Expensive. LxWxH 4803x2032x1665 Kerb weight 1829kg 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 141 139 126 10.3-10.8 60.1-65.7 114-123 Mixes dynamism and refinement so well, but not as spacious or 2.0 D180 174 125 8.9 52.5 142 cosseting as some. LxWxH 5130x1899x1460 Kerb weight 1835kg Soul 5dr hatch £14,525–£30,495 AAABC 2.0 D240 234 135 7.3 48.7 154 i40 Tourer 5dr estate £21,610–£29,630 AAABC 3.0d V6 300 295 155 6.2 49.6 149 Looks divide opinion. Better value now but still hardly the best 3.0 V6 D300 292 150 6.5 44.1 167 option. LxWxH 4140x1800x1600 Kerb weight 1275kg A practical estate but still rather dull and ordinary. 3.0 V6 340 335 155 5.9 31.0 211 2.0 P250 243 135 6.7 37.2 173 LxWxH 4775x1815x1470 Kerb weight 1514kg 5.0 V8 510 503 155 4.9 25.5 264 1.6 GDi 130 115 10.6 43.5 152 2.0 P300 292 145 6.0 36.2 178 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 115 113 118 12.6 67.3 110 5.0 V8 R 575 567 186 4.2 25.5 264 1.6 T-GDi 201 122 7.5 40.9 156 3.0 V6 P380 370 155 5.7 30.1 214 1.7 CRDi Blue Drive 141 139 124 10.5-11.0 60.1-65.7 114-123 1.6 CRDi 134 112-113 10.7-10.8 56.5-58.8 127-130 F-Type 2dr coupé £50,810–£112,750 AAAAB 30kWh Electric Drive 109 90 11.0 NA 0 Range Rover Sport 5dr SUV £61,615–£99,680 AAAAB Ioniq 5dr hatch £21,420–£29,645 AAABC A full-blooded assault on Porsche’s backyard, with noise, power Bigger and better; a cut-price Range Rover rather than a jumped-up and beauty. LxWxH 4482x1923x1311 Kerb weight 1525kg First attempt at electrification for the masses is a good effort. Optima 4dr saloon £21,660–£34,560 AAACC Discovery. LxWxH 4850x2073x1780 Kerb weight 2111kg LxWxH 4470x1820x1450 Kerb weight 1370kg 2.0 i4 300 295 155 5.7 39.2 163 Looks the part but is well off the pace set by its European rivals. 2.0 SD4 234 128 8.3 45.6 164 1.6 Hybrid 141 139 115 10.8-11.1 70.6-83.1 79-92 3.0 V6 340 335 161 5.3-5.7 28.8-33.6 199-234 LxWxH 4855x1860x1465 Kerb weight 1590kg 2.0 P400e PHEV 398 137 6.3 101.0 64 1.6 Plug-in Hybrid 141 139 110 10.6 256.8 26 3.0 V6 380 374 171 4.9-5.5 28.8-32.9 203-234 1.7 CRDi 139 121-126 9.7-10.6 64.2-67.3 110-116 3.0 SDV6 297 140 6.8 40.4 185 Electric Motor 118 103 10.2 NA 0 3.0 V6 380 AWD 374 171 5.1 31.7 211 2.0 GDi PHEV 202 119 9.1 176.6 37 4.4 SDV8 330 140 6.5 33.6 219 3.0 V6 400 394 171 4.8 32.9 203 3.0 V6 330 130 6.8 26.9 243 AAABC 3.0 V6 400 AWD ix20 5dr hatch £15,450–£19,040 394 171 4.9 31.7 211 Optima Sportswagon 5dr estate £22,500–£35,710 AAACC 5.0 V8 495 155 5.0 22.1 298 Usable high-roofed hatch is short on overall flair. Engine and finish leave it well behind rival European estates. 5.0 V8 550 R AWD 542 186 4.1 25.0 269 5.0 V8 SVR 535 162 4.5 22.1 298 LxWxH 4120x1765x1600 Kerb weight 1267kg LxWxH 4855x1860x1465 Kerb weight 1620kg 5.0 V8 575 SVR AWD 567 200 3.7 25.0 269 1.4 90 88 104 12.8 50.4 130 1.7 CRDi 139 124 9.8-10.7 61.4-64.2 113-120 1.6 125 123 112 11.5 43.5 150 2.0 GDi PHEV 202 119 9.1 201.8 33 1.6 CRDi 115 113 114 11.4 64.2 115

Slightly smaller and with dynamic looks, but still not a car to remember. LxWxH 4310x1780x1430 Kerb weight 1263kg

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 83


Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

Range Rover 5dr SUV £80,035–£141,650

o on

my

(m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

AAAAB

Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

Levante 4dr SUV £56,690–£70,185

o on

my

(m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

Po

AAACC 1.6 C200d

Wherever you are, the Rangie envelops you in a lavish, invincible sense of occasion. LxWxH 4999x2220x1835 Kerb weight 2249kg

2.1 C220d Italian flair and good looks in abundance, but diesel not as sonorous as petrols. LxWxH 5003x1968x1679 Kerb weight 2109kg 2.1 C220d 4Matic

2.0 P400e PHEV 3.0 TDV6 258 4.4 SDV8 339 3.0 V6 340 5.0 V8 510 5.0 V8 550

3.0d V6 3.0 V6 3.0 V6 S

398 251 330 330 495 535

137 130 135 130 140-155 140-155

6.4 7.4 6.5 7.1 5.2 5.1

101 40.9 33.6 26.4 22.1 22.1

64 182 219 248 299 299

271 339 424

143 156 164

6.9 6.0 5.2

39.2 26.4 25.9

189 249 253

2.1 C250d 2.1 C250d 4Matic 2.1 C300h

132 165 165 198 198 198

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

134-135 9.7-10.2 145-146 7.5-7.7 143 7.5 153 6.6 150 6.8 152 6.4

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

65.7-72.4 64.2-70.6 61.4 64.2 61.4 78.5

(m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

101-119 103-124 122-132 112-124 122-132 94-103

Po

2.0 CLA45 AMG 4Matic 2.1 CLA200d 2.1 CLA220d 2.1 CLA220d 4Matic

370 132 171 171

r we

(bh

p)

To

155 137 144 143

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

4.2 9.0-9.5 7.7 7.7

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

40.9 67.3-70.6 67.3 58.9

CLA Shooting Brake 5dr estate £27,385–£49,915

(m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

162 105-109 106 123

AAABC

The most practical of the A-Class range, but it suffers for its

C-Class Estate 5dr estate £30,240–£70,365

AAAAC challenging styling. LxWxH 4640x1777x1435 Kerb weight 1430kg 2 5dr hatch £13,295–£19,095 AAAAC Decent practicality and fantastic interior. It’s a shame that it’s only 1.6 CLA180 119 130 8.8-9.1 48.7-50.4 130-134 ordinary to drive. LxWxH 4702x1810x1457 Kerb weight 1495kg Grown-up, well-made and drives with charm and vigour; engines 2.0 CLA250 4Matic 211 149 6.7 40.9 160 Discovery Sport 5dr SUV £28,400–£49,425 AAAAB aren’t brilliant. LxWxH 4060x1695x1495 Kerb weight 1075kg 2.0 C200 178 145-146 7.5-7.7 49.6-51.4 128-139 2.0 CLA45 AMG 4Matic 370 155 4.3 40.9 162 Seven seats, at home on-road and off-road, plus new-found 1.5 Skyactiv-G 75 74 106 12.1 60.1 111 2.0 C200 4Matic 178 145 7.3 40.9 155-165 2.1 CLA200d 132 134 9.2-9.7 65.7-68.9 106-111 desirability. LxWxH 4599x2069x1724 Kerb weight 1732kg 1.5 Skyactiv-G 90 88 110-114 9.4-12.0 58.9-62.8 111-118 2.0 C350e 271 153 6.2 134.5 49-55 2.1 CLA220d 171 142 7.8 67.3 108 2.0 eD4 145 112 10.0 60.1 123 1.5 Skyactiv-G 115 113 124 8.7 56.5 127 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 356 155 4.7 34.9 185 2.1 CLA220d 4Matic 171 140 7.8 58.9 126 2.0 TD4 E-Capability 145 112 11.0 57.7 129 4.0 V8 AMG C63 462 155 4.2 33.6 196 2.0 TD4 174 117 8.4-9.4 53.3 139 3 5dr hatch £18,995–£24,795 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S 495 155 4.1 33.6 195 CLS Coupé 4dr saloon £57,640–£60,740 AAAAC 2.0 SD4 234 127 7.1 44.1 169 Pleasing dynamism teamed with good practicality and punchy 1.6 C200d 132 132-133 10.1-10.6 65.7 109-124 Retains the sleek coupé style and has more tech – without losing diesel engines. LxWxH 4060x1695x1495 Kerb weight 1351kg 2.0 Si4 240 234 124 7.1 35.3 182 2.1 C220d 165 142-143 7.6-7.9 64.2-67.3 106-127 its allure. LxWxH 4996x1896x1436 Kerb weight 1935kg 2.0 Si 290 281 135 6.5 33.6 190 2.0 Skyactiv-G 120 118 121 8.9 55.4 119 2.1 C220d 4Matic 165 143 7.5 60.1 124-134 3.0 CLS350d 4Matic 277 155 5.7 48.7 156 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 130 8.2 48.7 135 2.1 C250d 198 150 6.9 62.8 117-130 3.0 CLS400d 4Matic 330 155 5.0 47.9 156 Discovery 5dr SUV £46,335–£68,655 AAAAB 1.5 Skyactiv-D 105 103 115 11.0 74.3 99 2.1 C250d 4Matic 198 150 6.8 60.1 124-134 3.0 CLS450 4Matic 356 155 4.8 36.2 184 The country bumpkin given elocution lessons without losing its 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 130 8.1 68.9 107-127 2.1 C300h 198 148 6.7 74.3 99-106 rugged capabilities. LxWxH 4970x2073x1888 Kerb weight 2115kg SLC 2dr open £32,444–£48,075 AAABC 2.0 SD4 234 121 8.0 43.5 171 3 Fastback 4dr saloon £20,395–£21,295 AAAAC C-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £32,330–£70,425 AAAAC Another small convertible exhibiting all the charm that a Mercedes should. LxWxH 4143x1810x1301 Kerb weight 1435kg 3.0 V6 Td6 251 130 7.7 39.2 189 Refined and dynamically satisfying in a saloon bodystyle. Nice balance of style, usability and driver reward. LxWxH 4060x1695x1495 Kerb weight 1345kg LxWxH 4696x1810x1405 Kerb weight 1505kg 2.0 Si4 295 125 7.3 29.4 222 1.6 SLC180 152 139-140 7.9-8.1 48.7 132-133 3.0 V6 Si6 330 130 6.9 26.0 254 2.0 Skyactiv-G 120 118 123 8.8 55.4 119 2.0 C200 178 146-147 7.3-7.7 48.7-53.3 123-134 2.0 SLC200 178 147-149 6.9-7.0 43.5-47.9 137-150 5.0 V8 SVX 510 100 5.3 NA NA 2.0 C200 4Matic 178 142 7.5 41.5 153-157 2.0 SLC300 237 155 5.8 47.1 138 6 4dr saloon £21,095–£28,695 AAABC 2.0 C300 237 155 6.0 44.8 143-148 3.0 V6 AMG SLC43 356 155 4.7 36.2 178 LEXUS A compelling mix of size, economy and performance. Interior is a 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 356 155 4.7 35.3 183 CT 5dr hatch £23,495–£31,245 AAAAC let-down. LxWxH 4870x1840x1450 Kerb weight 1465kg 4.0 V8 AMG C63 462 155 4.0 32.8 200 SL 2dr open £76,985–£117,785 AAAAB Hybrid-only hatch has a pokey cabin and mismatched character 2.0 Skyactiv-G 145 143 129 9.5 51.4 129 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S 495 155 3.9 32.8 200 Big, luxurious drop-top is classier than a royal stud farm. Few feel traits. LxWxH 4350x1765x1445 Kerb weight 1465kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 135 9.1 47.9 135 2.1 C220d 165 145 7.5-7.8 64.2-68.9 106-117 more special. LxWxH 4631x1877x1315 Kerb weight 1735kg 1.8 VVT-i CT200h 134 112 10.3 68.9-78.5 82-94 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 130 9.1 68.9 107 2.1 C220d 4Matic 165 143 7.6 61.4 122-127 3.0 V6 SL400 356 155 4.9 36.7 175-179 2.2 Skyactiv-D 175 172 139 7.9 62.8 119-127 2.1 C250d 198 153 6.7 64.2 115-120 4.7 V8 SL500 442 155 4.3 31.4 205-210 IS 4dr saloon £32,895–£42,395 AAABC 2.1 C250d 4Matic 198 149 6.9 61.4 122-127 5.5 V8 AMG SL63 568 155-186 4.1 28.8 234 Sleek compact executive car is well-made and interesting but still 6 Tourer 5dr estate £23,095–£29,795 AAABC a left-field choice. LxWxH 4680x1810x1430 Kerb weight 1620kg Attractively styled but only average to drive. C-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £36,950–£73,810 AAAAC AMG GT 2dr coupé/open £100,00–£144,730 AAAAC LxWxH 4805x1840x1480 Kerb weight 1465kg 2.5 VVT-i IS300h 220 125 8.3 60.1-67.3 97-107 Take all the good bits about the coupé and add the ability to take Million-dollar looks and a railgun V8, but extremely firm chassis the roof off. Bingo. LxWxH 4686x1810x1409 Kerb weight 1645kg affects its usability. LxWxH 4544x1939x1287 Kerb weight 1615kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 145 143 128 9.6 50.4 131 GS 4dr saloon £36,125–£73,375 AAABC 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 133 9.1 47.9 136 2.0 C200 178 145-146 7.8-8.2 46.3-47.1 136-141 4.0 V8 GT 462 188-189 4.0 30.1-30.4 216-219 Engine range limits its appeal, but refinement and cabin quality 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 130 9.3 67.3 110-129 2.0 C300 237 155 6.4 42.2 155-155 4.0 V8 GT S 507 193 3.8 30.1 219 make amends. LxWxH 4880x1840x1455 Kerb weight 1730kg 2.2 Skyactiv-D 175 172 137 8.0 61.4 121-129 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 356 155 4.8 33.6 194 4.0 V8 GT C 541 196-197 3.7 24.8-25.0 259 2.5 VVT-i GS300h 220 118 9.2 56.5-64.2 104-115 4.0 V8 AMG C63 462 155 4.2 31.7 208 4.0 V8 GT R 568 198 3.6 24.8 259 3.5 V6 VVT-i GS450h 340 156 5.9 45.6-46.3 141-145 CX-3 5dr SUV £18,695–£25,595 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S 495 155 4.1 31.7 208 5.0 V8 GS F 470 167 4.6 25.2 260 Another supermini SUV with a sporting bent. Quite pricey but nicely 2.1 C220d 165 144 8.2-8.3 61.4-62.8 136-138 GLA 5dr SUV £26,525–£53,735 AAABC appointed. LxWxH 4275x1765x1535 Kerb weight 1230kg 2.1 C220d 4Matic 165 140 8.1 56.5 130-134 Not the most practical crossover but good looking and very decent LS 4dr saloon £72,595–£105,595 118 119 9.0 47.9 136-137 2.1 C250d 198 151 7.2 61.4 121-126 to drive. LxWxH 4417x1804x1494 Kerb weight 1395kg AAABC 2.0 Skyactiv-G 120 148 124 8.7 44.1 150 Luxury saloon gets more tech and opulence but is let down by its 2.0 Skyactiv-G 150 1.6 GLA200 152 134 8.1-8.4 48.7-50.4 131-138 hybrid powertrain. LxWxH 5235x1900x1460 Kerb weight 2270kg 1.5 Skyactiv-D 105 103 110 10.1 70.6 105-136 E-Class 4dr saloon £36,030–£107,620 AAAAC 2.0 GLA250 4Matic 204 143 6.6 43.5 155 3.5 V6 VVT-i LS500h 348 155 5.4 43.5 147 A wee bit pricey, and less sporting than its rivals, but still comfy 2.0 GLA45 AMG 4Matic 370 155 4.4 38.2 172 CX-5 5dr SUV £24,095–£33,795 3.5 V6 VVT-i LS500h AWD 348 155 5.4 39.8 161 AAAAC and luxurious. LxWxH 4940x1852x1452 Kerb weight 1680kg 2.1 GLA200d 132 127 9.1-9.5 67.3 108-115 Offers powerful diesel engines and strong performance, plus a 2.0 E200d 145 139 8.4 72.4 102-112 2.1 GLA200d 4Matic 132 124 9.1 58.9 127-130 RC 2dr coupé £39,140–£69,620 AAABC welcoming interior. LxWxH 4550x1840x1675 Kerb weight 1575kg 2.0 E220d 189 149 7.3 72.4 102-112 2.1 GLA220d 4Matic 171 135 7.7 58.9 127-130 An also-ran, but the V8 RC F packs plenty of character and handles 2.0 Skyactiv-G 165 162 125 10.4 44.1 149 2.0 E220d 4Matic 189 149 7.5 62.8 117-129 well enough. LxWxH 4695x1840x1395 Kerb weight 1736kg 2.2 Skyactiv-D 150 148 112-127 9.4-10.3 48.7-56.5 132-152 3.0 V6 E350d 251 155 5.9 48.7 153 GLC 5dr SUV £38,865–£91,284 AAAAC 2.0 VVT-i RC200t 241 143 7.5 38.7 168 2.2 Skyactiv-D 175 172 128-129 9.0-9.5 48.7-52.3 142-152 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 5.9 44.8 167 Not exactly exciting to drive, but does luxury and refinement better than most. LxWxH 4656x1890x1639 Kerb weight 1735kg 2.5 VVT-I RC300h 220 118 8.6 56.5-57.6 113-116 2.0 E350e 277 155 6.2 134.5 49-57 5.0 V8 RC F 470 168 4.5 26.2 251 MX-5 2dr open £18,995–£26,610 AAAAA 3.0 V6 AMG E43 4Matic 389 155 4.6 33.6 192 2.1 GLC 220d 4Matic 165 130 8.3 56.5 129 Brilliantly packaged, priced and perfectly poised but more vibrant 4.0 V8 AMG E63 4Matic+ 555 155 3.5 31.0 207 2.1 GLC 250d 4Matic 198 138 7.6 56.5 129 LC 2dr coupé £76,595–£91,995 AAAAC than the original. LxWxH 3915x1735x1225 Kerb weight 1050kg 4.0 V8 AMG E63 S 4Matic+ 594 155 3.4 31.0 207 3.0 V6 GLC 350d 4Matic 251 148 6.2 47.9 159 Superb-looking coupé shows flickers of what made the LFA great. 1.5 Skyactiv-G 131PS 129 127 8.3 47.1 139 3.0 V6 AMG GLC43 4Matic 356 155 4.9 34.0 189 LxWxH 4770x1920x1345 Kerb weight 1935kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 160 157 133 7.3 40.9 161 E-Class Estate 5dr estate £38,030–£109,620 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 4Matic+ 462 155 4.0 27.4 234 5.0 V8 LC500 470 168 4.4 24.4-24.6 263-267 Far more practical than its rivals, but pricier and less sporty than 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 S 4Matic+ 495 155 3.8 26.4 244 3.5 V6 LC500h 354 155 4.7 43.5-44.1 145-148 MX-5 RF 2dr open £22,495–£27,595 AAAAA those closest to it. LxWxH 4933x1852x1475 Kerb weight 1780kg Remains perfectly poised and vibrant, even with a folding metal 2.0 E200d 145 135 8.7 67.3 109-120 GLC Coupé 5dr SUV £42,050–£93,679 AAAAC NX 5dr SUV £34,895–£44,395 AAACC roof. LxWxH 3915x1735x1230 Kerb weight 1090kg 2.0 E220d 189 146 7.7 67.3 109-120 A coupé-shaped SUV destined to be outrun by the X4 – unless Some good ideas, but dramatically off the pace to drive. 1.5 Skyactiv-G 131PS 129 126 8.6 46.3 142 2.0 E220d 4Matic 189 145 7.8 57.7 126-137 you’re in an AMG. LxWxH 4732x1890x1602 Kerb weight 1785kg LxWxH 4630x1845x1645 Kerb weight 1905kg 2.0 Skyactiv-G 160 157 134 7.4 40.9 161-167 3.0 V6 E350d 251 155 6.0 46.3 162 2.1 GLC 220d 4Matic 165 130 8.3 56.5 131-143 2.5 VVT-I NX300h 4WD 194 112 9.2 54.3-56.5 116-121 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.0 42.8 174 2.1 GLC 250d 4Matic 198 138 7.6 56.5 131-143 McLAREN 3.0 V6 AMG E43 4Matic 389 155 4.7 32.8 197 3.0 V6 GLC 350d 4Matic 251 148 6.2 47.1 161-169 RX 5dr SUV £48,645–£59,645 AAABC 540C 2dr coupé £126,055 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG E63 4Matic+ 555 155 3.6 30.1 214 3.0 V6 AMG GLC43 4Matic 356 155 4.9 33.6 192 Low flexibility, but hybrid option makes a degree of economic The affordable end of McLaren’s spectrum isn’t any less enthralling 4.0 V8 AMG E63 S 4Matic+ 594 155 3.5 30.1 214 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 4Matic+ 462 155 4.0 27.4 234 sense. LxWxH 4890x1895x1690 Kerb weight 2100kg to drive. LxWxH 4530x2095x1202 Kerb weight 1495kg 4.0 V8 AMG GLC63 S 4Matic+ 495 155 3.8 26.4 244 2.0 RX200t 234 124 9.2-9.5 34.9-36.2 181-189 3.8 V8 562 204 3.2 26.6 249 E-Class All-Terrain Edition 5dr estate £59,320 AAAAC 3.5 V6 RX450h 308 124 7.7 51.4-54.3 120-127 A rugged version of a practical estate, which is also lavishly GLE 5dr SUV £55,020–£101,955 AAAAC 570S 2dr coupé/open £145,305-£164,750 AAAAA appointed. LxWxH 4947x1861x1497 Kerb weight 2010kg The ML replacement isn’t inspiring to drive but does come with a LOTUS classy interior. LxWxH 4819x2141x1796 Kerb weight 2165kg Blisteringly fast and exciting supercar-slayer with hugely appealing 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.2 41.5 179 Elise 2dr open £37,450–£46,550 AAAAC handling. LxWxH 4530x2095x1202 Kerb weight 1344kg 2.1 GLE 250d 4Matic 198 130 8.6 47.9 156 A delicate, vivid and unfettered drive; if you want a daily driver, 3.8 V8 562 204 3.2 25.5-26.4 249-258 E-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £40,225–£51,855 AAAAC 3.0 V6 GLE350d 4Matic 251 140 7.1 42.8 192 shop elsewhere. LxWxH 3824x1719x1117 Kerb weight 830kg Big, laid-back four-seat tourer. Borrows looks from the ravishing 3.0 V6 GLE500e 4Matic 429 152 5.3 76.4 84 1.8 VVT-i 220 217 145 4.2 37.7 173 570GT 2dr coupé £154,000 AAAAA S-Class Coupé. LxWxH 4846x1860x1431 Kerb weight 1685kg 3.0 V6 AMG GLE43 4Matic 379 155 5.7 31.7 205 1.8 VVT-i 246 242 151 3.8 37.7 175 The 570GT retains the lusty, fast appeal of its sister car, even with 2.0 E220d 189 150 7.4 61.4 119 5.5 V8 AMG GLE63 S 4Matic 568 155 4.2 23.9 276 added practicality. LxWxH 4530x2095x1201 Kerb weight 1495kg 2.0 E220d 4Matic 189 149 7.6 53.3 137 Exige 2dr coupé £56,850–£72,575 AAAAB 3.8 V8 562 204 3.4 26.6 249 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.0 42.8 174 GLE Coupé 5dr SUV £63,860–£104,145 AAAAC Sharp, uncompromising track car. Unforgiving on the road. 2.0 E300 237 155 6.4 40.4 160 Not the prettiest SUV you will ever see, but a decent option against LxWxH 4084x1802x1129 Kerb weight 1125kg the BMW X6. LxWxH 4900x2129x1731 Kerb weight 2240kg 720S 2dr coupé £218,020 AAAAA 3.0 V6 E400 4Matic 323 155 5.3 33.6 189 3.5 V6 VVT-i 350 345 162-170 3.8-3.9 28.0-30.1 219-235 The start of an era for McLaren and what a way to begin it is. 3.0 V6 GLE 350d 4Matic 251 140 7.0 39.2 187 3.5 V6 VVT-i 380 374 170-178 3.6-3.7 27.2-29.1 225-242 LxWxH 4543x2059x1196 Kerb weight 1322kg E-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £44,720–£56,350 AAAAC 3.0 V6 AMG GLE43 4Matic 379 155 5.7 30.0 215 4.0 V8 710 212 2.9 26.4 249 Refined and sophisticated four-seater in the same mould as the 5.5 V8 AMG GLE63 S 4Matic 568 155 4.2 23.7 278 S-Class Cabriolet. LxWxH 4846x1860x1429 Kerb weight 1780kg Evora 2dr coupé £76,225–£86,775 AAAAC MERCEDES-BENZ Dynamically it puts nearly everything else in the shade. Shame 2.0 E220d 189 147 7.7 57.7 126 G-Class 5dr SUV £92,140–£152,670 AAABC about the interior. LxWxH 4084x1802x1129 Kerb weight 1395kg A-Class 5dr hatch £20,720–£48,690 AAABC 3.0 V6 E350d 4Matic 251 155 6.1 41.5 179 Massively expensive and compromised, but with character in abundance. LxWxH 4764x1867x1954 Kerb weight 2550kg 3.5 V6 VVT-i 400 394 174-186 4.2 29.1 225-230 Desirable and attractive but lacking a distinguishing drive. 2.0 E300 237 155 6.6 39.2 167 3.5 V6 VVT-i 410 404 174-190 4.1-4.2 29.1 225-230 LxWxH 4299x1780x1433 Kerb weight 1370kg 3.0 V6 E400 4Matic 323 155 5.5 32.8 194 3.0 V6 G 350d 4Matic 237 119 8.9 28.5 261 3.5 V6 VVT-i GT430 424 190 3.8 NA NA 1.6 A160 99 118 10.4-10.6 52.3-54.3 121-126 5.5 V8 AMG G63 4Matic 555 130 5.4 20.5 322 1.6 A180 119 118 8.6-8.9 51.4-54.3 121-131 S-Class 4dr saloon £73,020–£187,310 AAAAA M A S E R AT I 1.6 A200 152 139 7.8-8.1 49.6-52.3 126-132 Mercedes has given the S-Class a refresh and an added boost of GLS 5dr SUV £73,090–£106,020 AAABC Ghibli 4dr saloon £51,495–£66,560 AAACC 2.0 A250 211 149 6.3 41.5-44.8 145-158 tech. LxWxH 5141x1905x1498 Kerb weight 1970kg The replacement for the massive GL can still seat seven in comfort. LxWxH 5162x1982x1850 Kerb weight 2475kg Maser’s compact exec has the allure but lacks power and is poorly 2.0 A250 4Matic 211 149 6.3 42.2 156 3.0 V6 S350d 277 155 6.0 52.3 139 finished in places. LxWxH 4971x1945x1461 Kerb weight 1810kg 2.0 A45 AMG 4Matic 370 155 4.2 40.9 162 3.0 V6 S500 444 155 4.8 40.9 157 3.0 V6 GLS 350d 4Matic 251 138 7.8 37.2 199 3.0d V6 271 155 6.3 47.8 158 1.5 A180d 105 118 11.3 76.4-80.7 89-102 4.0 V8 AMG S63 594 155 4.3 32.1 199 5.5 V8 AMG GLS63 4Matic 568 155-168 4.6 23.0 288 3.0 V6 345 166 5.5 31.7 207 2.1 A200d 132 130 8.8-9.3 68.9 99-111 6.0 V12 AMG S65 611 155 4.2 23.7 279 MG 3.0 V6 S 424 177 4.9 29.4 223 2.1 A220d 171 139 7.5 68.9 107 6.0 V12 S650 Maybach 611 155 4.7 22.2 289 3.0 V6 S Q4 424 177 4.7 29.1 226 2.1 A220d 4Matic 171 137 7.5 58.9 124 3 5dr hatch £8695–£11,695 AAABC S-Class Coupé 2dr coupé £103,745–£189,685 AAAAC Neatly tuned and nice sporty styling. Breaks the mould for sub£9000 superminis. LxWxH 4018x1729x1507 Kerb weight 1125kg GranTurismo 2dr coupé £94,355-£109,990 AAACC B-Class 5dr hatch £23,200–£32,310 AAABC More tech and cleaner engines make the opulent luxury tourer more appealing. LxWxH 5027x1912x1414 Kerb weight 2065kg Not short on richness or desirability and well capable of stirring A slightly odd prospect, but practical and classy nonetheless. 1.5 VTI-Tech 104 108 10.4 51.5 124 the soul. LxWxH 5652x1948x1481 Kerb weight 1873kg LxWxH 4393x1786x1557 Kerb weight 1395kg 4.0 V8 S560 455 155 4.6 34.0 188 4.7 V8 453 185 4.8 19.7 331 1.6 B180 119 124 8.7-9.0 50.4-51.4 127-132 4.0 V8 AMG S63 594 155 4.2 31.7 203 1.6 B200 152 137 7.9-8.2 49.6-51.4 127-132 6.0 V12 AMG S65 611 155 4.1 23.7 279 GranCabrio 2dr open £108,410–£116,455 AAACC 1.5 A180d 105 118 11.6 70.6 104-107 Fantastic looks and soundtrack but an average chassis overall. 2.1 A200d 132 130 8.9-9.4 67.3-70.6 104-112 S-Class Cabriolet 2dr open £115,950–£197,580 AAAAC LxWxH 4971x1945x1461 Kerb weight 1973kg 2.1 A220d 171 139 7.6 67.3 108 As above but with the added allure of a retractable fabric roof. LxWxH 5027x1912x1420 Kerb weight 2150kg 4.7 V8 453 177-179 4.9-5.0 19.4 337 2.1 A220d 4Matic 171 137 7.9 56.5 130 4.0 V8 S560 455 155 4.6 31.4 204 AAACC C-Class 4dr saloon £29,040–£69,165 AAAAC 4.0 V8 AMG S63 Quattroporte 4dr saloon £80,260–£118,585 594 155 4.2 28.8 225 Now a full-sized executive limo, with some added flair. Off the pace Merc ramps up the richness, but the engines and dynamics aren’t 6.0 V12 AMG S65 611 155 4.1 23.5 272 MAZDA

in several key areas. LxWxH 5264x1948x1481 Kerb weight 1860kg refined enough. LxWxH 4686x1810x1442 Kerb weight 1450kg 3.0d V6 3.0 V6 3.0 V6 S 3.0 V6 S Q4 3.8 V8 GTS

271 339 424 424 522

155 167 179 179 190

6.4 5.1 5.1 4.8 4.7

84 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

35.8 31.0 29.4 29.1 26.4

163 212 223 226 250

2.0 C200 2.0 C200 4Matic 2.0 C350e 3.0 V6 AMG C43 4Matic 4.0 V8 AMG C63 4.0 V8 AMG C63 S

178 178 271 356 462 495

147 145 155 155 155 155

7.2-7.5 7.4 5.9 4.7 4.1 4.0

52.3-53.3 41.5 134.5 35.3 34.5 34.5

123-137 153-162 48-54 183 192 192

CLA Coupé 4dr saloon £26,495–£49,380

AAABC

Still suffers from divisive styling, although it adds further appeal to the A-Class. LxWxH 4640x1777x1432 Kerb weight 1395kg 1.6 CLA180 2.0 CLA250 2.0 CLA250 4Matic

119 211 211

130 155 155

8.7-9.0 6.4-6.5 6.4

51.4-52.3 124-128 42.2-45.6 143-156 41.5 160


N E W CAR PR I CES Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

ZS 5dr SUV £12,495–£17,495

o on

my

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

508 4dr saloon £25,340–£33,210

AAACC

o on

my

(m

Competent and likeable enough, but it lacks any real spark. LxWxH 4830x1828x1456 Kerb weight 1410kg

1.5 VTi-Tech 1.0T GDi

1.6 BlueHDi 120 2.0 BlueHDi 150 2.0 BlueHDi 180

109 112

10.9 12.4

49.6 44.9

GS 5dr SUV £15,095–£21,095

129 144

163

112-118 9.6

1.6 BlueHDi 120 2.0 BlueHDi 150 2.0 BlueHDi 180 2.0 Hdi HY4 ETG

AAAAB

101 93 134 114 189 167 227

121 10.1-10.2 118 11.0 130 7.8-7.9 127 9.2 145-146 6.7-6.8 140-141 7.2-7.3 152 6.1-6.3

57.6-58.9 83.1 60.1-62.8 76.3-80.7 49.6-54.3 70.6 44.8-49.6

5dr Hatch 5dr hatch £16,600–£23,030

109-114 89-92 105-112 92-99 122-136 104-109 133-147

AAAAB

Mini charm in a more usable package, but still not as practical as rivals. LxWxH 3982x1727x1425 Kerb weight 1240kg 101 93 134 114 189 167

119 10.1-10.5 116 11.4 129 8.1-8.2 125-126 9.4-9.5 143-144 6.8-6.9 139-140 7.3-7.4

57.6-58.9 80.7 58.9-60.1 74.3-78.5 47.9-52.3 68.9

Convertible 2dr open £19,790–£29,430

112-116 92-94 109-114 95-102 125-139 107-112

AAABC

A fun open-top car but compromised on practicality and dynamics. LxWxH 3821x1727x1415 Kerb weight 1280kg 1.5 Cooper 1.5 Cooper D 2.0 Cooper S 2.0 Cooper SD 2.0 John Cooper Works

134 114 189 167 167

128-129 125-126 142-143 149 149

8.7-8.8 9.9 7.1-7.2 6.5-6.6 6.5-6.6

55.4-57.6 72.4-74.3 47.1-50.4 43.5-47.9 43.5-47.9

Clubman 5dr hatch £21,040–£32,195

114-123 100-109 131-142 138-152 138-152

AAAAC

Cheery and alternative Mini ‘six-door’ takes the brand into new territory. LxWxH 4253x1800x1441 Kerb weight 1375kg 1.5 Cooper 1.5 Cooper D 2.0 Cooper S 2.0 Cooper S All4 2.0 Cooper SD 2.0 Cooper SD All4 2.0 John Cooper Works

134 148 189 189 187 187 227

127 132 142 142 139 139 148

9.1 8.5-8.6 7.1-7.2 6.9-7.0 7.4 7.2 6.3

55.4 68.9 45.6-48.7 40.9-44.8 62.8-65.7 58.9 38.2-41.5

Countryman 5dr hatch £23,340–£33,495

118-123 109-115 134-147 146-162 114-122 126-129 154-168

AAABC

Bigger than before, but still more funky than useful. Still not all that pretty, either. LxWxH 4299x2005x1557 Kerb weight 1440kg 1.5 Cooper 1.5 Cooper All4 1.5 Cooper D 1.5 Cooper D All4 2.0 Cooper S 2.0 Cooper S All4 2.0 Cooper SD 2.0 Cooper SD All4 2.0 John Cooper Works 1.5 Cooper S E-Hybrid

)

Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

72.4-74.3 99-102 67.3 109 67.3 110

my

(m

pg

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

RADICAL

RXC GT 2dr open NA

AAABC

Designed for pounding around a track; out of its element on the road. LxWxH 4300x1960x1127 Kerb weight 1125kg 3.5 V6 400 3.5 V6 650

400 650

179 180

2.8 2.7

NA NA

NA NA

134 135 148 148 189 189 187 187 227 220

126 122 129 127 140 138 137 136 145 123

9.6 9.8 8.8-8.9 8.7-8.8 7.4-7.5 7.2-7.3 7.7 7.4 6.5 6.8

51.4 46.3-47.1 64.2-65.7 58.9 45.6-47.1 40.4-44.1 61.4 57.6 38.2-40.9 134.5

126-130 136-143 113-120 126-132 137-144 146-162 121-125 129-133 158-169 49-52

Aero 8 2dr open £88,194

116 145 175 197

123-124 130 137-140 132

R E N A U LT

AAABC

Twizy 2dr hatch £6995–£7995

As good as the saloon but better looking. LxWxH 4829x1828x1476 Kerb weight 1430kg

MINI

Three-pot engines and cleverly designed interior make the Mini a superb choice. LxWxH 3821x1727x1414 Kerb weight 1190kg

1.5 One 1.5 One D 1.5 Cooper 1.5 Cooper D 2.0 Cooper S 2.0 Cooper SD

125-126 11.0 130 8.9 143 8.5

508 SW 5dr estate £26,685–£35,125

45.5-46.3 139-141

3dr Hatch 3dr hatch £15,900–£26,090 1.5 One 1.5 One D 1.5 Cooper 1.5 Cooper D 2.0 Cooper S 2.0 Cooper SD 2.0 John Cooper Works

km

AAACC

MG’s first attempt at a small SUV is an attempt to re-establish the brand. LxWxH 4500x1800x1665 Kerb weight 1385kg 1.5 TGI

116 145 175

C

(g/ O2

AAABC

Much improved on previous MGs, but still lacks the sophistication of its closest rivals. LxWxH 4314x1809x1611 Kerb weight 1190kg 104 109

p

g)

11.2-11.3 9.1 8.6-8.9 8.8

67.3-74.3 67.3 61.4-64.2 61.4

100-108 110 114-119 109

AAABC

Zany solution to personal mobility is suitably irreverent and impractical. LxWxH 2338x1381x1454 Kerb weight 474kg MB L7e

17

50

NA

NA

Zoe 5dr hatch £18,420–£27,020

0 AAABC

A far more practical zero-emission solution. Attractive price, too.

AAABC

2008 5dr SUV £16,500–£22,350

AAABC LxWxH 4084x1730x1562 Kerb weight 1470kg 5AGEN2 86 84 13.5 NA 0 4.4 V8 367 170 4.5 23.0 282 5AGEN3 89 84 13.5 NA 0 1.2 PureTech 82 79 105 13.5 57.6 114 NISSAN 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117-119 9.9-10.3 58.9-64.2 103-110 Twingo 3dr hatch £10,000–£15,520 AAACC Micra 5dr hatch £12,295–£20,365 AAAAC 1.2 PureTech 130 126 124 9.3 58.9 110 Handsome, unusual rear-engined city car but not a class leader. LxWxH 3595x1646x1554 Kerb weight 865kg Refreshed look and better handling makes it an enticing choice. 1.6 BlueHDi 75 74 103 13.8 76.3 97 Has its flaws, though. LxWxH 3991x1743x1455 Kerb weight 1490kg 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 112 11.3 76.3 97 1.0 SCe 70 67 94 14.5 56.5-67.3 95-112 1.0 71PS 70 98 16.4 61.4 103 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 119 9.6 76.3 96 0.9 TCe 90 87 103 10.8 58.9-65.7 99-108 0.9 IG-T 90 88 109 12.1 64.2 99 0.9 TCe 110 105 113 9.6 54.3 115 1.5 dCi 90 88 111 11.9 88.3 85 3008 5dr SUV £22,770–£34,210 AAAAC Cleverly packaged Peugeot offers just enough SUV DNA to make Clio 5dr hatch £12,450–£23,000 AAAAC Pulsar 5dr hatch £13,280–£20,910 AAABC the difference. LxWxH 4447x2098x1624 Kerb weight 1250kg An attractive,stylish and practical proposition, but cheap in places Undeniably fit for purpose, but its appeal goes no deeper than that. 1.2 PureTech 130 126 117 10.5-10.8 54.3-55.4 117-120 and feels dated. LxWxH 4062x1732x1448 Kerb weight 1059kg LxWxH 4387x1768x1520 Kerb weight 1245kg 1.6 THP 165 159 128 8.9 48.7 129 1.2 16V 75 71 103 14.5 50.4 127 1.2 DIG-T 115 113 115-118 10.7-12.7 54.3-56.5 117-121 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 108 13.1 70.6 103 0.9 TCe 90 87 112 12.2-13.1 60.1-67.3 94-105 1.5 dCi 110 108 118 11.5 78.5 94 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 115-117 11.2-11.6 70.6 104-108 1.2 TCe 120 115 124 9.0-9.2 52.3-53.3 118-120 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 129 9.6 64.2-67.3 114 1.6 Turbo RS 200 194 143 6.7 47.9 133 Juke 5dr hatch £15,085–£26,030 AAABC 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT6 175 131 8.9 58.9 124 1.6 Turbo RS 220 214 146 6.6 47.9 135 High-riding, funky hatch is a compelling package. High CO 2 figures, 1.5 dCi 90 87 109-112 12.0-12.9 80.7-88.3 82-92 though. LxWxH 4135x1765x1565 Kerb weight 1605kg 5008 5dr SUV £25,020–£36,460 AAAAC 1.5 dCi 110 107 121 11.2 80.7 90 1.6 94 92 104 12.0 47.1 138 Less MPV, more SUV, and shares its siblings’ good looks. Competent 1.2 DIG-T 115 113 111 10.8 48.7-49.6 128-132 to drive, too. LxWxH 4641x1844x1640 Kerb weight 1511kg Mégane 5dr hatch £17,795–£28,035 AAABC 1.6 117PS Xtronic 115 106 11.5 46.3-47.1 139-142 1.2 PureTech 130 126 117 10.4-10.9 54.3-55.4 117-120 Stylish and refined but bland. Nothing exceptional. LxWxH 4359x1814x1447 Kerb weight 1340kg 1.5 dCi 110 108 109 11.2 68.9-70.6 104-107 1.6 THP 165 EAT6 159 128 9.2 48.7 133 1.6 DIG-T 190 187 134 8.0 47.1 139 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 108 13.6 68.9 106 1.2 TCe 130 128 122-124 10.3-10.6 50.4-52.3 120-125 1.6 DIG-T 190 4WD Xtronic 187 124 8.4 43.5 153 1.2 BlueHDi 120 116 113-115 11.4-11.9 65.7-67.3 108 1.6 TCe 205 199 143 7.1 47.1 134 1.6 DIG-T Nismo RS 215 137 7.0 39.2 168 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 129 9.6 61.4 118 1.5 dCi 110 107 116 11.3-12.3 72.4-76.4 96-101 1.6 DIG-T Nismo RS Xtronic 211 124 8.0 38.7 172 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT6 175 131 9.1 58.9 124 1.6 dCi 130 126 123 10.0 70.6 104 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 175 NA NA NA NA 1.6 dCi 165 158 133 8.8 61.4 120 Qashqai 5dr SUV £19,295–£32,575 AAAAB PORSCHE Mégane Sport Tourer 5dr estate £19,095–£29,335 AAABC The defining modern crossover. The Mk2 is better in all areas, hence its popularity. LxWxH 4394x1806x1590 Kerb weight 1331kg 718 Boxster 2dr open £44,758–£64,030 AAAAB Stylish and refined estate car is still bland like the hatch. Smaller 1.2 DIG-T 115 113 108-115 10.6-12.9 50.4 129 Our idea of drop-top heaven. Exceptional to drive, whether cruising than its predecessor. LxWxH 4626x1814x1457 Kerb weight 1409kg or hurrying. LxWxH 4379x1801x1280 Kerb weight 1335kg 1.6 DIG-T 163PS 160 124 8.9 48.7 134 1.2 TCe 130 128 122 11.0-11.7 50.4-52.3 120-125 1.5 dCi 110 108 113 11.9 74.3 99 2.0 290 170 4.9-5.1 38.2-40.9 158-168 1.6 TCe 205 199 143 7.4 47.1 134 1.6 dCi 130 128 114-118 9.9-11.1 60.1-64.2 116-122 2.5 S 339 177 4.4-4.6 34.9-38.7 167-184 1.5 dCi 110 107 116 11.6-12.7 72.4-76.4 96-101 1.6 dCi 130 4WD 128 118 10.5 57.6 129 2.5 GTS 355 180 4.3-4.6 31.4-34.4 186-205 1.6 dCi 130 126 123 10.6 70.6 104 1.6 dCi 165 158 133 8.9 61.4 120 X-Trail 5dr SUV £25,990–£37,740 AAABC 718 Cayman 2dr coupé £42,897–£62,169 AAAAA There aren’t many cheaper ways of owning an SUV. Has a better Scalpel-blade incisiveness, supreme balance and outstanding Scenic 5dr MPV £22,010–£30,850 AAABC

Morgan’s flagship is a modern take on a classic look, although the old charm remains. LxWxH 4147x1751x1248 Kerb weight 1180kg

Efficient and well-mannered but facelift still leaves it short on space and style. LxWxH 4159x1829x1556 Kerb weight 1045kg

range of engines, too. LxWxH 4640x1820x1710 Kerb weight 1505kg driver involvement. LxWxH 4379x1801x1295 Kerb weight 1335kg 1.6 dCi 130 1.6 dCi 130 4WD 1.6 DIG-T 163 2.0 dCi 177 2.0 dCi 177 4WD

128 128 160 174 174

111-116 115 124 123 121-126

10.5-11.4 11.0 9.7 9.6 9.4-10.0

53.3-57.6 52.3-53.3 44.1-45.6 48.7-50.4 46.3-50.4

129-139 139-143 145-149 148-152 149-162

2.0 2.5 S 2.5 GTS

290 339 355

170 177 180

4.9-5.1 4.4-4.6 4.3-4.6

38.2-40.9 158-168 34.9-38.7 167-184 31.4-34.4 186-205

Good-looking MPV riding on 20in wheels, but overall a bland car to drive. LxWxH 4406x1866x1653 Kerb weight 1428kg

1.2 TCe 115 112 115 12.3 48.7 129 1.2 TCe 130 128 118 11.4 48.7 129 1.5 dCi 110 107 114 12.4 70.6-72.4 100-104 911 2dr coupé £77,891–£207,506 AAAAB 1.5 dCi 110 Hybrid Assist 107 NA NA 80.7 94 Still as brilliant and distinctive as any before it. More than worthy 1.6 dCi 130 126 118 11.4 62.8 116 370Z 2dr coupé £29,495–£39,995 AAABC of its iconic status. LxWxH 4499x1808x1294 Kerb weight 1413kg 1.6 dCi 160 156 124 10.7 62.8 118 Old-school and profoundly mechanical coupé. The Healey 3000 of 3.0 Carrera 359 180-183 4.3-4.6 32.5-38.2 169-201 today – but meaner. LxWxH 4265x1845x1315 Kerb weight 1496kg 3.0 Carrera T 359 180-182 4.2-4.5 29.7-33.2 193-215 Grand Scenic 5dr MPV £23,810–£32,650 AAABC 3.7 V6 323 155 5.3 26.6-26.9 245-248 3.0 Carrera S 408 188-191 4.0-4.3 31.8-36.7 174-204 Good-looking seven-seat MPV is bland to drive and the third row MITSUBISHI 3.7 V6 Nismo 339 155 5.2 26.6 248 3.0 Carrera GTS 437 191-193 3.6-4.1 29.7-34.0 188-216 seats are tight. LxWxH 4634x1866x1655 Kerb weight 1495kg Mirage 5dr hatch £12,180–£14,180 AAACC 3.8 Turbo 524 198 3.0 31.0 212 1.2 TCe 115 112 115 12.3 48.7 129 A straightforward hatchback – but not for the likes of us. GT-R 2dr coupé £81,995–£151,995 AAAAC 3.8 Turbo S 564 205 2.9 31.0 212 1.2 TCe 130 128 118 11.4 48.7 129 LxWxH 3795x1665x1505 Kerb weight 845kg Monstrously fast Nissan has been tweaked and sharpened. Still a 4.0 GT3 486 197-198 3.4-3.9 21.9-22.2 288-290 1.5 dCi 110 107 114 12.4 70.6-72.4 100-104 1.1 Mi-VEC 79 107 11.7-12.8 65.7 99-100 blunt object, though. LxWxH 4710x1895x1370 Kerb weight 1725kg 3.8 GT2 RS 680 211 2.8 23.9 269 1.5 dCi 110 Hybrid Assist 107 NA NA 80.7 94 3.8 V6 562 196 NA 23.9 275 1.6 dCi 130 126 118 11.4 62.8 116 ASX 5dr SUV £16,260–£29,235 AAACC 3.8 V6 Nismo 591 196 NA 23.9 275 911 Cabriolet 2dr open £86,732–£156,381 AAAAB 1.6 dCi 160 156 124 10.7 62.8 118

Decent engines, but otherwise an unexceptional crossover. LxWxH 4355x1770x1640 Kerb weight 1260kg

Cutting the top off enhances the aural drama. For visual impact choose the Targa. LxWxH 4499x1808x1289 Kerb weight 1500kg

NOBLE

M600 2dr coupé £248,000–£287,600

AAABC 3.0 Carrera 359 178-181 4.5-4.8 Deliciously natural and involving; a bit ergonomically flawed. 3.0 Carrera S 408 187-188 4.2-4.5 LxWxH NA Kerb weight 1198kg 3.0 Carrera GTS 437 190-192 3.7-4.2 4.4 V8 662 225 NA 20.1 333 3.8 Turbo 524 198 3.1 3.8 Turbo S 564 205 3.0 PEUGEOT Eclipse Cross 5dr SUV £21,290–£29,765 AAACC 3.0 Targa 4 359 178-179 4.5-4.7 Stylish, future-looking mid-sized SUV shows where Mitsubishi’s iOn 5dr hatch £20,495 AABCC 3.0 Targa 4S 408 187-188 4.2-4.4 destiny lies. LxWxH 4695x1810x1710 Kerb weight 1425kg Good electric powertrain; looks extremely old hat against better 3.0 Targa 4 GTS 437 190-191 3.7-4.1 1.5 Mi-VEC 2WD 160 124-127 9.3-10.3 42.2-42.8 151-154 EV rivals. LxWxH 3474x1475x1608 Kerb weight 1120kg 1.5 Mi-VEC 4WD 160 124 9.8 40.4 159 47kW 62 81 15.9 NA 0 Panamera 4dr saloon £67,898–£146,545 1.6 Mi-VEC 1.6 DI-D 2WD 1.6 DI-D 4WD 2.2 DI-D 4WD

115 112 112 148

114 113 111 118

11.5 11.2 11.5 10.8

47.9-48.7 61.4 56.5 48.7

Outlander 5dr SUV £25,670–£46,055

135-136 119 132 152

AAABC

Creditable effort, but still cheap in places: PHEV a boon for fleet users. LxWxH 4695x1810x1710 Kerb weight 1565kg 2.2 DI-D 4WD 2.0 Mi-VEC PHEV

148 200

118-124 10.2-11.6 48.7-53.3 139-154 106 11.0 116.1 41

Shogun 5dr SUV £33,015–£43,675

AABCC

Has its appeal. Needs more chassis finesse but still charming. LxWxH 4385x1875x1870 Kerb weight 2185kg 3.2 DI-DC 4WD

187

111

10.4-11.1 30.4-31.4 238-245

MORGAN

3 Wheeler 0dr open £40,075

AAAAA

The eccentric, characterful and brilliant Morgan is a testament to English creativity. LxWxH 3225x1720x1000 Kerb weight 525kg 2.0 V-twin 68 2.0 V-twin 82

68 82

115 115

7.0 6.0

34.9 30.3

4/4 2dr open £40,205

187 215 AACCC

Has its appeal but not as rewarding to drive as it could be. LxWxH 4010x1630x1220 Kerb weight 795kg 1.6 i4 Sigma

110

115

8.0

44.1

Plus 4 2dr open £44,105

143 AABCC

Needs more chassis finesse, but the Plus 4 still charms nonetheless. LxWxH 4010x1720x1220 Kerb weight 927kg 2.0 GDi

154

118

7.5

40.0

Roadster 2dr open £55,075

164 AACCC

More advanced, but pricey and needs better brakes. LxWxH 4010x1720x1220 Kerb weight 950kg 3.7 V6 Cyclone

140

5.5

28.8

Estate bodystyle enjoys the classy appeal of the hatchback. LxWxH 4585x1563x1472 Kerb weight 1190kg 230

172-206 184-204 190-220 216 216 182-206 184-204 196-220

Captur 5dr SUV £15,620–£24,430

AAAAC

Jacked-up Clio is among the better downsized options. Stylish and fluent-riding. LxWxH 4122x1778x1566 Kerb weight 1184kg 0.9 TCe 90 1.2 TCe 120 1.5 dCi 90 1.5 dCi 110

87 115 87 107

106 113-119 106 112

13.2 9.9-10.6 13.1 11.4

55.4 51.4 78.5 76.4

Kadjar 5dr SUV £19,790–£29,860

114 125 95 98 AAAAC

Fine value, practical, decent to drive and good-looking, but the

AAAAA Qashqai is classier. LxWxH 4449x1836x1607 Kerb weight 1306kg Revamped big saloon is an absolute belter, making it almost the 1.2 TCe 130 128 119 10.1-10.7 50.4-51.4 123-126 108 3dr/5dr hatch £9125–£14,590 AAABC perfect grand tourer. LxWxH 5049x1937x1423 Kerb weight 1815kg 1.6 TCe 165 158 127 9.2 47.1 134 Sister car to the Aygo – and a distant second to most city car 3.0 V6 321 164 5.7 37.7 173 1.5 dCi 110 107 112-113 11.7-11.9 74.3 99 rivals. LxWxH 3475x1615x1460 Kerb weight 840kg 3.0 V6 4 321 162 5.5-5.6 35.8-36.2 177-180 1.6 dCi 130 128 118 9.9 65.7 113 1.0 68 67 99 13.0-15.9 67.3-68.9 95-97 2.9 V6 4S 428 179 4.4-4.5 34.0-34.9 184-189 1.2 PureTech 82 79 106 10.9 65.7 99 2.9 V6 E-Hybrid 449 172 4.6-4.7 113.0 56 Koleos 5dr SUV £28,045–£37,030 AAABC 4.0 V8 4S Diesel 416 177 4.5 42.2 176 Koleos name returns and is a vast improvement on before, but no 208 3dr/5dr hatch £14,635–£23,555 AAABC 4.0 V8 Turbo 533 190 3.8-3.9 29.7-30.4 212-217 class leader. LxWxH 4672x2063x1678 Kerb weight 1540kg A big improvement for Peugeot, if not for the supermini class. 4.0 V8 Turbo S E-Hybrid 660 192 3.4-3.5 97.4 66 1.6 dCi 130 128 115 11.4 57.6 128 LxWxH 3475x1615x1460 Kerb weight 1065kg 2.0 dCi 175 169 126 10.7 50.4 148 1.2 PureTech 68 66 103 13.8 60.1 108 Panamera Sport Turismo 5dr estate £73,071–£139,287 AAAAA 2.0 dCi 175 4WD X-Tronic 169 125 9.5 47.9 156 1.2 PureTech 82 79 109-111 12.2-14.5 62.8-67.3 97-104 The Panamera in a more practical form, and now it’s a good-looking R O L L S - R OYC E 1.2 PureTech 110 107 118 9.8-9.6 62.8-65.7 99-104 beast. LxWxH 5049x1937x1428 Kerb weight 1880kg 1.6 THP 165 159 135 7.4 50.4 129 3.0 V6 4 321 160 5.5 36.2 180 Wraith 2dr coupé £224,823–£280,223 AAAAB 1.6 THP 208 GTi 202 143 6.5 52.3 125 2.9 V6 4S 428 177 4.4 34.9 189 An intimate and involving Rolls. Not as grand as some, but other traits make it great. LxWxH 5285x1947x1507 Kerb weight 2360kg 2.9 V6 E-Hybrid 449 170 4.6 108.6 59 308 5dr hatch £18,725–£28,595 AAAAB 4.0 V8 4S Diesel 416 175 4.5 42.2 176 6.6 V12 624 155 4.6 19.8 327 Classy all-round appeal makes it a serious contender, but rear 4.0 V8 Turbo 533 188 3.8 30.1 217 space is a little tight. LxWxH 4253x1804x1457 Kerb weight 1190kg Dawn 2dr open £266,055–£302,655 AAAAB 1.2 PureTech 110 107 117 11.1 70.6 95 Macan 5dr SUV £45,915–£86,267 AAAAB Essentially as above, except with a detuned engine and in elegant convertible form. LxWxH 5295x1947x1502 Kerb weight 2560kg 1.2 PureTech 130 126 128-129 9.1-9.6 62.8 104-106 Spookily good handling makes this a sports utility vehicle in the purest sense. LxWxH 4692x1923x1624 Kerb weight 1770kg 1.6 THP 205 199 146 7.5 50.4 130 6.6 V12 563 155 5.0 19.6 330 1.6 THP 270 264 155 6.0 47.1 139 2.0 244 142 6.7 39.2 172 1.5 BlueHDi 130 126 127 9.8 80.7 93 3.0 V6 S 330 157 5.4 32.1 212 Ghost 4dr saloon £227,423–£262,823 AAAAC 1.6 BlueHDi 100 96 112 12.2 76.3 96 3.0 V6 GTS 350 159 5.2 31.7 215 ‘A ffordable’ Rolls is a more driver-focused car than the Phantom. Still hugely special. LxWxH 5399x1948x1550 Kerb weight 2360kg 1.6 BlueHDi 120 116 117-118 10.2-10.3 72.4-74.3 98-101 3.0 V6 S Diesel 251 142 6.3 46.3 164 2.0 BlueHDi 150 145 131-132 8.6-8.9 68.9-72.4 102-108 3.6 V6 Turbo 388 165 4.8 31.4 216 6.6 V12 563 155 4.9-5.0 19.8-20.0 327-329 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 175 140 8.2 64.2 116 3.6 Turbo P’formance P’kge 428 169 4.4 29.7 224 Phantom 4dr saloon NA AAAAA AAAAB Cayenne 5dr SUV £55,965–£99,291 AAAAB Phantom takes opulent luxury to a whole level. 308 SW 5dr estate £19,675–£28,285

1.2 PureTech 110 1.2 PureTech 130 Plus 8 2dr open £83,405 AAACC 1.5 BlueHDi 130 Old V8 charm lives on, but there’s no ignoring the high price. 1.6 BlueHDi 120 LxWxH 4010x1751x1220 Kerb weight 1100kg 2.0 BlueHDi 150 4.4 V8 367 155 4.5 23.0 282 2.0 BlueHDi 180 EAT8 280

31.7-37.7 31.4-36.2 29.1-33.6 30.4 30.4 31.7-35.8 35.3-31.4 29.1-32.5

107 126 126 116 145 175

117 127 126 121 130 139

11.6 9.5-10.0 10.0 9.9-10.1 8.9-9.2 8.4

67.3 61.4-62.8 76.3 74.3-88.3 65.7-72.4 61.4

99 106 111-112 85-99 102-112 120

LxWxH 5762x2018x1646 Kerb weight 2560kg

Refreshed look, improved engines, interior and a better SUV overall. LxWxH 4918x1983x1696 Kerb weight 1985kg 3.0 V6 2.9 V6 S 4.0 V8 Turbo

330 428 533

152 164 177

6.2 5.2 4.1

30.7 31.4 24.1

6.75 TV12

563

155

5.3-5.4

20.3

318-319

213 209 272

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 85


Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

(m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

(m

pg

)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

AAABC

Not as desirable or plush as the Up but nearly as good to drive. LxWxH 3557x1643x1474 Kerb weight 929kg 59 74

99 106

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

Tivoli XLV 5dr SUV £17,045–£21,995

S E AT

Mii 5dr hatch £10,560–£11,835 1.0 60 1.0 75

Po

r we

14.4 13.2

64.2 64.2

Ibiza 5dr hatch £14,255–£19,575

102 102

Leon SC 3dr hatch £20,000–£29,615

112 106 108 112 99 99 AAAAC

1.4 TDI 90 1.6 TDI 115

88 113

115 125

11.3-11.4 62.8-70.6 105-106 9.7 60.1 109

Rapid Spaceback 5dr hatch £14,540–£19,720

With the Rapid’s skinny body, a hatchback shape makes the most sense. LxWxH 4304x1706x1459 Kerb weight 1090kg

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 EcoTSI 150 1.8 TSI 180 2.0 TSI 300 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184

1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TDI 90 1.6 TDI 115

123 148 177 295 148 181

126 8.9 134 7.9 139-140 7.1-7.4 155 5.6-5.7 134 8.3 140-142 7.4

57.6 57.6 47.1-48.7 40.9-42.2 64.2 61.4-62.8

114 115 134-138 153-158 112 118-120

As above but swaps three-door sleekness for five-door practicality. LxWxH 4282x1816x1459 Kerb weight 1202kg 113 108 123 148 177 295 113 148 181

114 123 114 123

10.6 9.5 11.2-11.3 9.6

52.3 51.4 62.8-64.2 60.1

103 106 105-106 109

AAAAC

123-126 9.6-10.0 121 9.9 126 9.1 134 8.0 139-140 7.2-7.5 155 5.7-5.8 122 9.8 134 8.4 140-142 7.5

64.2 56.5 54.3 57.6 47.1-48.7 40.9-41.5 68.9-70.6 64.2 61.4-62.8

102 116 120 114-115 134-138 156-158 105-109 112 118-120

1.0 TSI 115 1.4 TSI 150 1.5 TSI ACT 150 2.0 TSI 230 vRS 2.0 TSI 245 vRS 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184 vRS 2.0 TDI 184 4x4 vRS

113 148 148 226 241 113 148 181 181

126 9.6-9.7 136 7.8-7.9 136 7.9-8.0 155 6.5-6.6 155 6.4 126 9.8 135 8.1 143-144 7.6 142 7.3

58.9 54.3-57.7 57.7 42.8-43.5 42.8-44.1 68.9-72.4 65.7 57.7-62.8 55.4

Octavia Estate 5dr estate £18,395–£30,185

108-110 114-121 113-114 149 146-150 103-106 113 119-129 134

Makes practical senses but otherwise leaves no long-lasting impression. LxWxH 4482x1706x1461 Kerb weight 1190kg

not on price. LxWxH 4861x1864x1468 Kerb weight 1340kg

1.4 TSI 125 123 129 9.6 39.8 130 1.4 TSI 150 148 137 8.3-8.5 44.8-45.6 119-121 2.0 TSI 220 217 152 6.8 34.9 147 2.0 TSI 280 4X4 276 155 5.6 31.7 160 Arona 5dr SUV £16,750–£24,260 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 120 118 128 10.5-10.6 57.7-60.1 110-111 Seat’s second SUV doesn’t disappoint, with it taking charge of the 2.0 TDI 150 148 135-137 8.5-8.6 52.3-56.5 113-116 class dynamically. LxWxH 4138x1780x1543 Kerb weight 1165kg 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 148 134 8.7 49.6 124 1.0 TSI 95 93 107 11.2 57.6 111 2.0 TDI 190 187 146 7.4 50.4 123 1.0 TSI 115 113 113 9.8-10.0 56.5-57.6 113-114 2.0 TDI 190 4X4 187 143 7.3 44.8 138 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 127 8.3 55.4 115 1.6 TDI 95 93 107 11.9 70.6 105 Superb Estate 5dr estate £23,440–£37,625 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 115 113 NA NA NA NA Even more commendable than above, primarily thanks to its 108 113

124 125

9.8 10.0

61.4 67.3

106 109

enormous boot. LxWxH 4856x1864x1477 Kerb weight 1365kg

Ateca 5dr SUV £18,675–£31,905

AAAAB 1.4 TSI 125

Seat’s first SUV is very good. So good, in fact, it’s a Qashqai beater. 1.4 TSI 150 LxWxH 4363x1841x1601 Kerb weight 1280kg 2.0 TSI 220 1.0 TSI Ecomotive 115 1.4 EcoTSI 150 2.0 TSI 190 4Drive 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 4Drive 2.0 TDI 190 4Drive

113 148 187 113 148 187

114 123-125 132 114 122 132

11.0 8.5-8.6 7.9 11.5 9.0 7.5

53.3-54.3 51.4-53.3 40.4 62.8 55.4-56.5 53.3

Alhambra 5dr MPV £25,695–£36,635

119-120 122-125 159 118-119 128-129 135

AAAAC

2.0 TSI 280 4X4 1.6 TDI 120 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 2.0 TDI 190 2.0 TDI 190 4X4

123 148 217 276 118 148 148 187 187

128 9.7 135 8.4-8.6 151 6.9 155 5.6 127-128 10.6-10.7 132-135 8.6-8.8 132 8.8 145-146 7.5-7.8 142 7.4

39.8 44.1-44.8 34.9 31.4 56.5-62.8 52.3-56.5 48.7 50.4-54.3 44.8

129 121-122 148 164 102-114 114-117 125 115-124 139

Yeti replacement may not have its forebear’s quirkiness, but it’s brilliant otherwise. LxWxH 4382x1841x1603 Kerb weight 1265kg

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI Ecomotive 150 2.0 TDI 184

1.0 TSI 115 1.5 TSI EVO 150 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 4x4

124 9.9 43.5 150 123-124 10.2-10.3 54.3-55.4 130-137 132-134 8.9.9.4 53.3 139-141

113 148 113 148

115-116 126 116 121

10.3-10.4 8.1-8.3 10.4-10.5 8.4-9.0

53.3-54.3 51.4-52.3 61.4-64.2 54.3-56.5

AAABC

Kodiaq 5dr SUV £22,630–£37,450

A Czech take on the city car is more fun to drive than its plain-Jane Skoda’s first seven-seat SUV is a viable alternative to a traditional exterior suggests. LxWxH 3597x1641x1478 Kerb weight 854kg MPV. LxWxH 4697x1882x1676 Kerb weight 1430kg 1.0 MPI 60 1.0 MPI 60 ASG 1.0 MPI 60 GreenTech 1.0 MPI 75 GreenTech 1.0 MPI 75 ASG

59 59 59 74 74

100 100 100 107 107

13.9 16.2 13.9 13.1 14.4

51.4 53.3 57.7 57.7 53.3

Fabia 5dr hatch £10,500–£18,720

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 TSI 150 1.4 TSI 150 4x4 2.0 TSI 180 4x4 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 AAAAC 2.0 TDI 190 4x4 101 100 96 96 103

Dull design, and no class leader on handling or cabin space, but strong otherwise. LxWxH 3992x1732x1467 Kerb weight 1005kg 1.0 MPI 60 1.0 MPI 75 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TDI 75 1.4 TDI 90 1.4 TDI 105

59 74 93 108 74 88 103

99 107 115 122 107 113 120

15.2 14.2 10.3 9.2-9.5 12.7 10.7 9.8

47.9 47.9 54.3 52.3 64.2 64.2 60.1

Fabia Estate 5dr estate £13,275–£19,605

123 148 148 177 148 148 187

118-123 123 120-122 128 123 120-122 130

9.3-10.2 9.3 9.5-9.6 7.7 9.8 9.4-9.6 8.3

44.8-46.3 44.8 39.8-40.9 38.2 56.5 49.6-52.3 49.6

139-143 143 155-163 170 131 141-149 150

Far more practical, majoring on boot space while doing what a good Skoda should. LxWxH 4257x1732x1488 Kerb weight 1029kg

Four doors give the Smart more mainstream practicality. Still expensive, though. LxWxH 3495x1665x1555 Kerb weight 975kg 1.0 71 0.9 90 0.9 109 Brabus Electric Drive

109 116 123 109 114 122

14.4 10.3 9.3-9.6 12.7 10.9 9.9

47.9 54.3 52.3 64.2 64.2 60.1

Rapid 4dr saloon £15,475–£20,285

111 101 103-106 104 104-105 112

93 108 123

116 124 129

94 102 96 80

15.9-16.9 11.2-11.9 10.5 12.7

67.3 65.7-67.3 61.4 NA

96-97 98-99 104 0

S S A N G YO N G

Tivoli 5dr SUV £13,495–£21,245

10.6 9.5 8.7

86 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

53.3 51.4 45.6

37.7 175 53.3 139-152 40.9-48.7 152-179

much. LxWxH 4195x1795x1590 Kerb weight 1270kg 103 106 115

1.6 128 1.6d 115 1.6d 115 4x4

126 113 113

To

p ps

ee

d(

mp

h)

0

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

Model X 5dr SUV £70,500–£128,250

my

(m

pg

) (g/

178

323 602 602

130 155 155

115

AAAAB 4.9 4.7 2.9

NA NA NA

0 0 0

T OYO TA

AAABC

1.0

67

99

14.2-15.5 74.3-78.5 95-97

Yaris 5dr hatch £13,300–£26,295

Toyotas. LxWxH 3495x1695x1510 Kerb weight 975kg

1.0 1.5 1.5 Hybrid AAACC 1.8 VVT-I GRMN

67 108 71 206

96 108 102 143

15.3 11.0-11.2 11.8 6.3

65.7 58.5-60.1 85.6 37.0

99 105-112 82 170

Incredibly ungainly but offers huge real estate for the money. LxWxH 5130x1915x1850 Kerb weight 2115kg

Auris 5dr hatch £20,160–£25,810

2.2d 178

Disappointingly average. There are many better rivals out there. LxWxH 4330x1760x1475 Kerb weight 1235kg

108-116 NA

Impreza 5dr hatch £24,000–£25,010

36.2-39.2 189-205

1.33 VVT-i AAACC 1.2 Turbo VVT-i 1.4 D-4D 1.6 D-4D 44.1 145 1.8 VVT-I Hybrid 42.8 152

Appealing hatchback has been steadily improved but still feels old-fashioned. LxWxH 4415x1740x1465 Kerb weight 1374kg 1.6i 2.0i

112 153

112 127

12.4 9.8

130

8.9

109 124 112 121 112

12.6 10.1-10.5 12.5 10.5 10.9

51.4 58.9-61.4 80.7 67.3 80.7

128 106-112 92 108 79

exceptional either. LxWxH 4595x1760x1485 Kerb weight 1285kg

1.33 VVT-i 1.2 Turbo VVT-i 1.4 D-4D XV 5dr SUV £5,000–£28,510 AAACC 1.6 D-4D No-nonsense crossover doesn’t quite make enough sense. 1.8 VVT-I Hybrid 167

96 112 87 108 134

AAABC

Auris Touring Sports 5dr estate £21,260–£26,910 AAABC AAACC Nothing wrong with this estate, but then there’s nothing

Levorg 5dr estate £30,010

Impressively practical but only offered with an automatic gearbox and one trim. LxWxH 4690x1780x1490 Kerb weight 1568kg

1.6i

)

Impactful styling does a lot to recommend it, but not as refined nor as practical as some. LxWxH 3455x1615x1460 Kerb weight 840kg

11.3-11.9 34.0-36.2 204-218

Turismo 5dr MPV £19,995–£26,745 175

km

CO 2

AAABC AAABC Stylish interior but ultimately a scaled-down version of bigger

A vast improvement. Better on the road but without ditching its argicultural roots. LxWxH 4850x1960x1825 Kerb weight 2102kg

39.8

164

44.1 40.9

145 155

Forester 5dr estate £26,510–£32,825

96 112 87 108 134

109 124 112 121 112

13.2 10.4-10.8 13.0 10.7 11.2

50.4 58.9 72.4 68.9 80.7

Verso 5dr MPV £22,835–£25,455

130 110-112 100 108 81 AAABC

One of Toyota’s better niche models and one unburdened by a hybrid powertrain. LxWxH 4460x1790x1620 Kerb weight 1430kg

AAACC 1.6 Valvematic 128 114 11.7 42.8 154 1.8 Valvematic 142 114 11.1 42.8 153 1.6 D-4D 108 111 12.7 62.8 119 118-119 10.6-11.8 40.9-43.5 150-160 137 7.5 33.2 197 Avensis 4dr saloon £19,715–£27,540 AAACC 117-118 9.9 46.3-49.6 148-158 Nothing wrong with the mid-sized saloon but hard to recommend

Solid, spacious and wilfully unsexy. A capable 4x4 nonetheless. LxWxH 4610x1795x1735 Kerb weight 1488kg 2.0i 150 2.0i 241 2.0d

148 237 148

over rivals. LxWxH 4750x1810x1480 Kerb weight 1360kg

Outback 5dr estate £33,010–£35,325 Acceptable in isolation but no class leader. LxWxH 4815x1840x1605 Kerb weight 1612kg 2.5i 2.0d

172 148

130 10.2 119-124 9.7-9.9

AABCC 1.6 D-4D 108 115 11.4 62.8-67.3 108-116 2.0 D-4D 138 124 9.5 58.9-62.8 119-124 1.8 Valvematic 142 124 9.4-10.4 43.5-47.9 138-149 40.4 161 46.3-50.4 145-159 Avensis Touring Sports 5dr estate £20,895–£29,345 AAACC

Estate comes with a good spec but is otherwise unexceptional.

BRZ 2dr coupé £26,525–£28,010

AAAAA LxWxH 4820x1810x1480 Kerb weight 1390kg 1.6 D-4D 108 115 11.7 2.0 D-4D 138 124 9.8 36.2-39.8 164-180 1.8 Valvematic 142 124 9.7-10.7

The GT86’s half-brother looks great in Subaru blue. Cheaper, too. LxWxH 4240x1775x1320 Kerb weight 1242kg 2.0i

197

130-140 7.6-8.2

WRX STI 4dr saloon £32.055

AAABC

Appealing and behind the times all at once. LxWxH 4595x1795x1475 Kerb weight 1534kg 2.5i

295

159

5.2

27.2

Celerio 5dr hatch £7999–£11,449

242

66 66

C-HR 5dr SUV £21,600–£28,620 1.2 Turbo 1.2 Turbo AWD 1.8 VVT-I Hybrid

96 96

13.5-16.4 65.7 13.0 78.4

99 84

bereft of asphalt. LxWxH 3700x1660x1595 Kerb weight 855kg 106 106 103

11.8 11.4 11.1

61.4 65.7 60.1

104 97 106

it’s no class leader. LxWxH 3840x1735x1495 Kerb weight 890kg 1.2 Dualjet 1.2 Dualjet SHVS 4x4 1.0 Boosterjet SHVS 1.0 Boosterjet

87 87 108 108

114-118 10.9-11.1 47.1-47.9 117-118 111 11.4 44.8 128 105 11.0 72.4-74.3 92-93

111 105 121 118-121

11.9 12.6 10.6 10.0-10.6

65.7 62.7 65.7 56.5-61.4

98 101 97 104-114

AAACC

A solid option but ultimately outgunned by Korean competition. LxWxH 4605x1845x1675 Kerb weight 1605kg

2.0 D-4D 2.0 AWD AAAAC 2.5 Hybrid Cute and rugged-looking 4x4 city car capable of tackling roads 2.5 Hybrid AWD 87 87 87

112 112 119

RAV4 5dr SUV £27,495–£34,990

Ignis 5dr hatch £11,499–£15,964 1.2 Dualjet 1.2 Dualjet SHVS 1.2 Dualjet SHVS 4x4

AAAAC

AAABC

Pleasing to drive, cheap to buy and decent to sit in. No-nonsense and likeable for it. LxWxH 3600x1600x1540 Kerb weight 835kg 1.0 K10B 1.0 K10C Dualjet

62.8-67.3 109-116 58.9-61.4 120-124 43.5-47.1 139-149

Coupé-shaped crossover certainly turns heads and impresses on the road. LxWxH 4360x1795x1565 Kerb weight 1320kg

SUZUKI

141 149 194 194

121 114 112 112

9.6 10.7 8.4 8.4

60.1 43.5 57.6 55.4

Land Cruiser 5dr SUV £33,435–£52,855

123 152 115 118 AAABC

A real go-anywhere vehicle. Totally rugged and available with seven seats. LxWxH 4335x1885x1875 Kerb weight 2010kg 2.8 D-4D

171

109

12.1-12.7 38.2-39.2 190-194

GT86 2dr coupé £26,885–£30,285

AAAAB

Almost the most fun you can have on a limited budget. Splendid. LxWxH 4240x1775x1320 Kerb weight 1247kg 2.0i

197

130-140 7.6-8.2

36.2-39.8 164-180

Prius 5dr hatch £24,245–£28,350

AAAAC

Better all round compared with its predecessors. Challenging

Baleno 5dr hatch £12,999–£17,379

LxWxH 3995x1745x1470 Kerb weight 920kg 1.0 Boosterjet 1.2 Dualjet SHVS

108 87

118-124 11.0-11.4 57.6-62.7 105-115 105 12.6 70.6 94

Jimny 3dr SUV £12,999–£15,784

Prius Plug-in Hybrid 5dr hatch £29,195–£31,395

AAAAC

Plug-in version is clever and appealing. Seems more comfortable in its skin. LxWxH 4645x1760x1470 Kerb weight 1530kg

AAACC 1.8 VVT-i Hybrid

120

101

11.1

283.0

22

The smallest four-wheel-drive Suzuki is capable off-road but looks dated now. LxWxH 3675x1600x1705 Kerb weight 1090kg

Prius+ 5dr MPV £27,830–£30,175

1.3 M13A

Expensive, old and ugly variant of the Prius, but can carry seven. LxWxH 4645x1775x1575 Kerb weight 1500kg

83

84-87 14.1-17.2 38.7-39.8 162-167

Vitara 5dr SUV £15,999–£25,099

AAABC 1.8 VVT-i Hybrid

lease of life. LxWxH 4300x1785x1585 Kerb weight 1160kg 1.0 Boosterjet 1.0 Boosterjet Allgrip 1.4 Boosterjet Allgrip 1.6 DDiS 1.6 DDiS Allgrip

108 108 136 116 116

106-112 109 124 112 109 TESLA

AAABC

AAABC Trails the Duster as the best-value small crossover – but not by

Essentially a Fabia in saloon form, so likeable, if slightly dull. LxWxH 4483x1706x1461 Kerb weight 1095kg 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TSI 125

68 87 105 79

p)

132

AAACC 103

11.3

64.2-68.9 96-101

Utterly worthy addition to the class drives better than most.

SMART

Fortwo 3dr hatch/open £10,000–£27,135

1.0 MPI 75 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 110 1.4 TDI 75 1.4 TDI 90 1.4 TDI 105

74 93 108 74 88 103

12.5 9.9 9.9

AAACC LxWxH 4175x1775x1610 Kerb weight 1075kg Pricey two-seater has urban appeal but is short on performance 1.6 M16A 116 112 11.5-12.5 51.3-53.3 123-127 and handling. LxWxH 2695x1663x1555 Kerb weight 890kg 1.6 M16A Allgrip 116 112 12.0-13.0 49.5-50.4 130-131 1.0 71 68 94 14.4-15.5 65.7-68.9 93-99 1.6 DDiS 116 112 11.5 70.6 106 0.9 90 87 96 10.4-11.7 65.7-68.9 96-99 1.6 DDiS Allgrip 116 112 12.4 62.7-67.2 111-118 0.9 109 Brabus 105 102 9.5 61.4-62.8 102-104 1.4 Boosterjet S Allgrip 136 124 10.2 51.3-52.3 127-128 Electric Drive 79 80 11.5-11.8 NA 0 S-Cross 5dr SUV £17,499–£26,249 AAABC AAAAC Forfour 5dr hatch £10,495–£22,285 AAACC A worthy crossover if not a class leader. Refreshed looks give a 110 111 101 103-106 104 104-105 112

(bh

AAABC looks, though. LxWxH 4540x1760x1470 Kerb weight 1375kg AAAAC Suzuki’s family-sized hatchback makes use of clever little engines. 1.8 VVT-i Hybrid 120 112 10.6 85.6-94.1 70-76

S KO DA

Citigo 3dr hatch £8785–£11,740

118-119 123-125 117-120 131-137

Po

r we

Aygo 3dr hatch £9260–£14,900

Swift 5dr hatch £11,999–£17,334 AAABC AAAAC Given mature looks, more equipment and a hybrid powertrain, but

Karoq 5dr SUV £20,880–£32,005

This cheaper version of the VW Sharan is spacious, versatile and good to drive. LxWxH 4854x1904x1730 Kerb weight 1755kg 148 148 181

101 115 115

AAAAC LxWxH 4450x1780x1615 Kerb weight 1355kg 1.6i 112 109 13.9 2.0i 154 120 10.4

AAAAC LxWxH 4667x1814x1465 Kerb weight 1247kg Good-looking and responsive hatchback-turned-estate. 1.0 TSI 115 113 124-125 9.8 58.9 108-110 LxWxH 4549x1816x1454 Kerb weight 1236kg 1.4 TSI 150 148 134 7.9-8.0 53.3-56.5 117-124 1.0 TSI Ecomotive 115 113 126 9.8-10.2 64.2 102 1.5 TSI ACT 150 148 135-136 8.0-8.1 56.5-57.7 114-115 1.2 TSI 110 108 121 10.1 57.6 116 2.0 TSI 230 vRS 226 152-153 6.6-6.8 42.8-43.5 149 1.4 TSI 125 123 126 9.4 54.3 120 2.0 TSI 245 vRS 241 155 6.5 42.8-44.1 146-150 1.4 EcoTSI 150 148 134 8.2 56.5-57.6 114-117 1.6 TDI 115 113 124-125 9.8-9.9 68.9-72.4 103-106 1.8 TSI 180 177 134-138 7.7-7.8 47.1-48.7 134-138 2.0 TDI 150 148 132-134 8.2-8.3 58.9-65.7 113-119 2.0 TSI 300 295 155 4.9-6.0 39.2-40.4 161-164 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 148 130 8.1 60.1 124 1.6 TDI 115 113 122 9.9 67.3-68.9 108-112 2.0 TDI 150 4x4 Scout 148 129 8.8 56.5 130 2.0 TDI 150 148 134 8.6 67.3-68.9 112 2.0 TDI 184 vRS 181 142-143 8.0-8.1 57.7-62.8 119-129 2.0 TDI 150 4Drive 148 129 8.7 58.9 125 2.0 TDI 184 4x4 vRS 181 139 7.4 55.4 134 2.0 TDI 184 181 140-142 7.8 58.9-61.4 121-125 2.0 TDI 184 4x4 Scout 181 136 7.5 55.4 133 2.0 TDI 184 4Drive 181 139 7.1 52.3 139 Superb 5dr hatch £22,120–£36,245 AAAAC Toledo 4dr saloon £16,675–£22,135 AAACC Another great Czech value option that’s big on quality and space if

1.0 TSI 110 1.6 TDI 115

144 175 175

Class-leading amount of space and practicality. Comfortable, too.

Leon ST 5dr estate £18,970–£32,595

)

AAACC

SUBARU

Octavia 5dr hatch £17,195–£28,985

Does comfort and practicality like no other. Good, frugal engines AAAAC too. LxWxH 4670x1814x1461 Kerb weight 1225kg

Leon 5dr hatch £17,975–£29,915 1.0 TSI Ecomotive 115 1.2 TSI 110 1.4 TSI 125 1.4 EcoTSI 150 1.8 TSI 180 2.0 TSI 300 1.6 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184

93 108 88 113

km

99-106 11.0-12.0 37.2-39.8 165-176 107-109 12.0 47.9-62.8 117-154 107-109 12.0 44.8-57.6 127-164

Rexton 5dr SUV £28,495–£38,495

AAABC 2.2d 181

A cut-price Golf with Spanish styling, crisper handling and an alluring coupé shape. LxWxH 4246x1810x1431 Kerb weight 1213kg

C

(g/ O2

75D 100D P100D

126 113 113

2.0 146 2.2d 178 2.2d 178 4x4

57.6 60.1 60.1 57.6 74.3 74.3

)

1.6 128 1.6d 115 1.6d 115 4x4

1.0 MPI 75 1.0 TSI 95 1.0 TSI 115 1.5 TSI EVO 150 1.6 TDI 80 1.6 TDI 95

14.7 10.9 9.3 7.9 8.6 7.5

pg

A genuine luxury seven-seat electric SUV which also has a large range. LxWxH 5036x2070x1684 Kerb weight 2459kg

Good for a Ssangyong but poor by class standards. LxWxH 4410x1830x1710 Kerb weight 1725kg

104 113 121 134 107 113

(m

AAABC

Reinvigorated Ibiza is more mature and takes the class honours from the Fiesta. LxWxH 4059x1780x1444 Kerb weight 1091kg 74 93 113 148 79 93

my

Now grown in size for more practicality but that doesn’t increase the Tivoli’s appeal. LxWxH 4440x1798x1635 Kerb weight 1405kg

Korando 5dr SUV £16,295–£23,995

AAAAB

o on

99-106 11.0-12.0 39.2-44.1 149-167 107-109 12.0 51.4-65.7 113-146 107-109 12.0 47.9-60.1 123-156

Model S 5dr hatch £64,700–£122,200

11.0-12.4 12.0 10.2 12.0 13.0

54.3-56.4 53.3 49.5-50.4 68.8 64.2

113-119 119 127-128 106 114

VA U X H A L L

Viva 5dr hatch £10,050–£11,815

AAABC

Plenty of space but lacks its rivals’ equipment, joie de vivre and refinement. LxWxH 3675x1595x1485 Kerb weight 939kg 1.0i

74

106

13.1-14.0 60.1-62.8 103-106

Adam 3dr hatch £13,300–£20,145

AAACC

Certainly looks the part, but there are better superminis ahead of it. LxWxH 3698x1720x1484 Kerb weight 1101kg 1.2i 70 1.4i 87 1.4i 100 1.0i Turbo 115 1.4i Turbo 150

69 85 98 113 148

103 109-111 115 121 130

14.9 12.5-13.9 11.5 9.9 8.5

53.3 52.3-56.5 52.3 57.6 47.9

Corsa 3dr/5dr hatch £11,050–£20,370

125 118-125 125 112 139

AAABC

Refined, stylish and practical, but its engines aren’t so good.

AAAAB LxWxH 4021x1736x1479 Kerb weight 1141kg Large range makes it not only a standout EV but also the future of 1.4i 75 74 101 15.5 luxury motoring. LxWxH 4978x1963x1445 Kerb weight 2108kg 1.4i 90 88 109 13.2 75D 323 140 4.2 NA 0 1.4i Turbo 100 98 115 11.0 100D 602 155 4.1 NA 0 1.0i Turbo 90 88 112 11.9 P100D 602 155 2.5 NA 0 1.0i Turbo 115 113 121 10.3 1.4i Turbo 150 148 129 8.9 1.6i Turbo VXR 205 202 143 6.5

54.3 54.3 55.4 62.8 58.9 49.6 37.7

120 120 119 104 111 132 174


N E W CAR PR I CES Po

1.3 CDTi 75 1.3 CDTi 95

r we

74 93

(bh

p)

To

p ps

102 113

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

14.8 11.9

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

72.4 78.5

Astra 5dr hatch £17,120–£27,440

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

104 94

Po

r we

(bh

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

Polo 5dr hatch £13,860- £22,645

my

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

km

)

Po

AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 190

A thorough going-over makes it more mature, but the Polo is still a bit boring. LxWxH 4053x1946x1461 Kerb weight 1105kg

AAAAC 1.0 65 64 102 15.5 58.9-60.1 108-110 1.0 75 74 106 14.9 58.9-60.1 108-110 1.0 TSI 95 93 116 10.8 60.1-64.2 101-107 102 1.0 TSI 115 113 NA NA NA NA 124 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 NA NA NA NA 124 2.0 TSI GTI 200 197 NA NA NA NA 128 1.6 TDI 80 79 NA NA NA NA 142 1.6 TDI 95 93 NA NA NA NA 88 99 Golf 3dr/5dr hatch £18,235–£34,805 AAAAB 109 Does exactly what everyone expects. Still the king of the family

r we

(bh

148 187

p)

To

p ps

ee

d(

h mp

0

)

/6 -60

2m

128-129 9.3 137 8.2

ph Ec

61.4 58.9

Sharan 5dr MPV £27,905–£38,445

o on

my

(m

p

g)

C

(g/ O2

1.0i Turbo 105 1.4i 100 1.4i Turbo 125 1.4i Turbo 150 1.6i Turbo 200 1.6 CDTi 110 1.6 CDTi 136 1.6 CDTi BiTurbo 160

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 184

10.5 12.6 8.6 7.8 6.6 10.2 9.0 8.1

64.2 52.3 52.3 51.4 45.6 85.6 74.3 68.9

car. LXWXH 4258x1790x1492 Kerb weight 1206kg

Astra Sports Tourer 5dr estate £18,470–£25,990

AAAAC 1.0 TSI 85 83 112 11.9 1.0 TSI 110 108 122 9.9 1.4 TSI 125 123 127 9.1 1.0i Turbo 105 103 121 11.0 62.8 103 1.5 TSI EVO 130 128 NA NA 1.4i 100 98 115 13.1 51.4 127 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 134 8.3 1.4i Turbo 125 123 127 9.0 51.4 127 2.0 TSI 230 GTI 226 154-155 6.4 1.4i Turbo 150 148 134 8.2 50.4 130 2.0 TSI 245 GTI Performance 241 154-155 6.2 1.6i Turbo 200 197 146 7.2 45.6 143 2.0 TSI 310 4Motion R 305 155 4.6-5.1 1.6 CDTi 110 108 121 10.7 78.5 96 1.4 TSI GTE 148 138 7.6 1.6 CDTi 136 134 127 9.5 74.3 101 1.6 TDI 115 113 123 10.2-10.5 1.6 CDTi BiTurbo 160 157 137 8.4 68.9 109 2.0 TDI 150 148 133-134 8.6 2.0 TDI 184 GTD 181 143-144 7.4-7.5 GTC 3dr hatch £22,335–£30,830 AAABC Sleek-shaped hatchback matched with good handling and decent Golf Estate 5dr estate £21,000–£35,855

More composed and practical than the hatchback. LxWxH 4702x1809x1510 Kerb weight 1273kg

118 138 197 276 108 134

119 125 143 155 113 123

10.1 8.9 7.3 5.9 11.6 9.5

108 107-109 119-120 NA 114-116 145 144 160-180 38 102-109 109-117 116-124

46.3 46.3 42.2 34.9 67.3 65.7

144 144 154 189 111 115

package. LxWxH 4567x1799x1515 Kerb weight 1295kg

1.0 TSI 85 83 112 12.6 58.9 109 1.0 TSI 110 108 122 10.4 57.6 110-112 1.4 TSI 125 123 127 9.5 53.3 118-123 1.5 TSI EVO 130 128 NA NA NA NA 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 135 8.7 55.4 114-116 2.0 TSI 310 4Motion R 305 155 4.8 39.2 164 Cascada 2dr open £28,010–£34,105 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 90 88 116 12.9 68.9 106 Good-looking proper four-seat convertible that rivals premium 1.6 TDI 115 113 124 10.7 68.9 103-106 versions. LxWxH 4696x1839x1443 Kerb weight 1714kg 2.0 TDI 150 148 134-135 8.9 65.7 111-114 1.4i Turbo 140 138 129 10.2 43.5 149 2.0 TDI 184 GTD 181 143-144 7.8-7.9 60.1 124-125 1.6i Turbo 170 167 146 8.2 40.9 158 1.6i Turbo 200 197 136 9.2 37.2 176 Golf Alltrack 5dr estate £29,555–£31,840 AAAAB 2.0 CDTi 170 167 135 9.6 57.6 129 And to complete the Golf line-up is a rugged version of the estate.

LxWxH 4567x1799x1515 Kerb weight 1541kg

Insignia Grand Sport 5dr hatch £18,780–£33,415

AAAAC 1.8 TSI 180 4Motion 178 NA NA 42.2 156 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion 148 129 8.9 55.4 133 The good-looking and tech-filled Insignia makes an attractive proposition. LxWxH 4897x1863x1455 Kerb weight 1714kg 2.0 TDI 184 4Motion 181 136 7.8 54.3 137 1.5 Turbo 140 138 130 9.3 47.6 133 Golf SV 5dr MPV £20,480–£28,640 1.5 Turbo 165 162 138 8.4 47.1 136 AAAAC 2.0 Turbo 260 4x4 256 155 6.9 32.8 197 Probably the least appealing member of the Golf family but still resolute. LxWxH 4338x2050x1578 Kerb weight 1335kg 1.6 Turbo D 110 108 127 10.9 70.6 105 1.6 Turbo D 136 134 126-131 9.9-10.2 55.4-65.7 114-134 1.0 TSI 85 83 110 13.0 57.6 112 2.0 Turbo D 170 167 139-140 8.2-8.4 51.4-54.3 136-145 1.0 TSI 110 109 119 10.7 56.5 113 2.0 BiTurbo D 210 4x4 207 144 7.4-7.5 40.4-40.9 183-186 1.5 TSI EVO 130 128 126 9.6 55.4 116 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 132 8.8 54.3 118 Insignia Sports Tourer 5dr estate £20,300–£34,915 AAAAC 1.6 TDI 115 113 119 11.0 67.3-68.9 107-110 The practical version of the Insignia that aims to take the fight to 2.0 TDI 150 148 130 9.2 61.4 119

premium rivals. LxWxH 4986x1863x1514 Kerb weight 1487kg 1.5 Turbo 140 1.5 Turbo 165 2.0 Turbo 260 4x4 1.6 Turbo D 136 2.0 Turbo D 170 2.0 BiTurbo D 210 4x4

138 162 256 134 167 207

129 135 152 127-132 137-139 144

9.6 8.6 7.1 10.1-10.5 8.4-8.6 7.4-7.5

47.1 46.3 32.5 54.3-62.8 49.6-53.3 39.8-40.4

136 139 199 119-137 139-150 186-187

Insignia Country Tourer 5dr estate £25,950–£28,875 AAAAC Spacious estate gets a rugged makeover – and it doesn’t spoil the fine formula. LxWxH 4986x1863x1514 Kerb weight 1666kg 2.0 Turbo D 170 2.0 Turbo D 170 4x4 2.0 BiTurbo D 210 4x4

167 167 207

135-137 8.6-8.8 135 9.3 142 7.7

47.1-51.4 145-157 43.5 172 39.8 188

Jetta 4dr saloon £19,740–£25,670

AAABC

123-124 114 123-124 132-136

9.9 12.6 10.3 8.9

43.5 56.5 55.4-56.5 53.3

150-156 130 130-137 138-141

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI 110 2.0 TDI 150

123 148 108 148

128 137 122 135-137

9.6 8.6 11.0 8.9

53.3 53.3-54.3 68.9 65.7-68.9

Passat 4dr saloon £22,030–£38,585

122 115-122 107-112 108-120

148 177 217 153 118 148 187 236

137 144 153 140 128-130 135-137 146-147 149

8.4 7.7-7.9 6.7 7.4 10.8 8.7 7.5-7.9 6.1

56.5-57.6 47.9 44.8 156.9 67.3-70.6 65.7-67.3 67.3 49.6

115-118 130-136 146 40 95-107 109-121 109-119 150

Passat Estate 5dr estate £23,630–£40,185

6.2i V8

All the Passat’s redeeming features in spacious, practical estate form. LxWxH 4767x2083x1516 Kerb weight 1395kg

187 148

134 124

7.2 8.7

41.5 56.5

Tiguan 5dr SUV £23,255–£39,840

An improvement on the previous model and will continue to sell by the bucket load. LxWxH 4486x1839x1654 Kerb weight 1490kg 123 148 177 113 148 148 187 236

118 124-125 129 115 125-127 124-125 131 142

10.5 9.2 7.7 10.9 9.3 9.3 7.9 6.5

46.3-47.1 48.7-49.6 38.2 60.1 58.9-60.1 52.3-53.3 49.6 44.1

137-139 130-140 170 123 123-129 139-149 149 167

1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TSI 180 4Motion 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion

148 177 148 148 187 238

123-124 129 124-126 123-124 130 142

9.5 8.2 9.8 9.9 8.6 6.7

43.5-46.3 36.7 55.4-56.5 47.9-49.6 47.9 43.5

137-148 175 131-132 150-153 153 170

1.0 60 1.0 75 1.0 90 e-Up

59 74 88 81

100 106 114 80

14.4 13.2-13.5 9.9 12.4

64.2-68.9 64.2-68.9 60.1 NA

96-101 96-103 108 0

0

6.5 9.8 7.5 7.9

/6 -60

2m

ph Ec

o on

my

(m

pg

39.2-39.8 55.4-58.9 51.4-55.4 56.5-57.6

) (g/

km

)

CO 2

162-164 127-136 136-146 131-133

AAABC

185 228 247 310

127 137 137 140

8.4 7.2 6.8 5.3

54.3-55.4 51.4 38.7-39.2 134.5

228 250 310 310

137 134 143 140

7.8 7.9 6.5 5.6

45.6-47.3 34.9-35.8 34.1-35.8 108.6

133-136 144 164-167 49

3.0 V6 TDI 204 3.0 V6 TDI 262

201 258

128 140

8.7 7.3

42.2 41.5

V O LV O

176 180

AAAAC

Mexican track-day special has a pleasingly pragmatic and forgiving chassis. LxWxH 3718x1876x1120 Kerb weight 725kg 2.0 DOHC Turbo 2.3 DOHC Turbo RR

285 385

152 158

3.7 2.7

NA NA

NA NA

WESTFIELD

Sport 2dr coupé £19,950–£35,800

2.0 Duratec 2.0 Ecoboost

200 252

AAAAC

NA NA

NA NA

NA NA

Mega 2dr coupé £14,999–£15,595

NA NA NA NA

AAABC

Mega engines make it rapid, but not as fun as Caterham’s R range. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA 177 240

136 NA

3.0 NA

NA NA

NA NA

ZENOS

E10 0dr coupé £26,995–£39,995

AAAAB

The latest in a long line of mid-engined British marvels. Expect a dedicated following. LxWxH 3800x1870x1130 Kerb weight 700kg

2.0 Ecoboost S AAAAC 2.3 Ecoboost R

V40 5dr hatch £21,410–£30,485

158-162 184-189 187-192 59-63

VUHL

05 0dr open £59,995- £89,995

1.3 Suzuki Hyabusa AAAAC 2.0 VTEC S2000

Touareg 5dr SUV £45,970–£51,930

Only five seats but it remains a comfy, capable and obedienthandling SUV. LxWxH 4801x2208x1732 Kerb weight 2185kg

250 350

145 155

4.0 3.0

NA NA

NA NA

Not perfect, but handsome, well-packaged, pragmatic and likeable. LxWxH 4370x2041x1470 Kerb weight 1417kg 2.0 D2 2.0 D3 2.0 D4 2.0 T2 1.5 T2 Auto 2.0 T3 1.5 T3 Auto

116 145 185 119 119 148 148

118 130 143 118 118 130 130

10.5 8.4 7.2-7.4 9.8 9.8 8.3 8.3

72.4-78.5 68.9-74.3 67.3-74.3 50.4 51.4 50.4 51.4

V40 Cross Country 5dr hatch £25,110–£30,695

94-104 101-108 99-109 127 129 127 129

W H AT ’ S C O M I N G W H E N

AAAAC

2.0 D2 2.0 D3 2.0 D4 2.0 T3 1.5 T3 Auto

116 145 185 148 148

118 118 130 130 130

10.6 8.5 7.5-7.7 8.5 8.5

72.4-74.3 68.9-72.4 65.7-70.6 50.4 50.4

99-104 102-109 104-112 128 131

2.0 T4 2.0 D2 2.0 D3 2.0 D4

185 116 145 185

143 121 130-134 143

7.2 11.2-11.4 9.0 7.6

48.7-50.4 65.7-72.4 65.7-70.6 65.7-72.8

V60 5dr estate £24,145–£53,325

131-134 102-113 105-113 102-113

AAAAC

Mature and appealing cabin, nice looks and smooth to drive. Too small, however. LxWxH 4635x2097x1484 Kerb weight 1572kg

Volvo’s large comfy estate given a jacked-up, rugged makeover. LxWxH 4936x2019x1543 Kerb weight 1826kg

It’s no revolution, but VW’s hallmarks are in abundance. LxWxH 3600x1428x1504 Kerb weight 926kg

h)

Sport Turbo is very quick and fun but not a patch on the Tiguan Allspace 5dr SUV £29,375–£40,375 AAAAC Caterhams. LxWxH NA Kerb weight NA Has all the Tiguan’s sensibility and refinement, now with the bonus 1.6 Sigma 135 NA NA NA of seven seats. LxWxH 4486x1839x1654 Kerb weight 1490kg 1.6 Sigma 155 NA NA NA

V90 Cross Country 5dr estate £42,520–£57,435

1.2 TSI 105 Dune 1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TDI 110 2.0 TDI 150 AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 Dune

117 10.9-11.1 51.4-55.4 117-127 115-117 11.8-12.2 61.4-70.6 104-118

Up 3dr/5dr hatch £9325–£25,640

mp

Looks like a small XC90 and carries on where the old one left off. A good, capable cruiser. LxWxH 4688x1999x1658 Kerb weight 1781kg

2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 2.0 T5 AWD 2.0 T6 AWD AAAAC 2.0 T8 Twin Engine

1.2 Turbo 1.6 Turbo D

VO L K S WAG E N

140 124 124 130

d(

XC60 5dr SUV £37,770–£59,770

155 132

Does well to disguise its 3008 roots but too bland to stand out in a car. LxWxH 4288x1825x1488 Kerb weight 1395kg congested segment. LxWxH 4477x1811x1630 Kerb weight 1350kg 1.2 TSI 105 103 111-112 10.9-11.7 51.4-54.3 121-127 128 118

ee

VW’s junior SUV is beguiling and sophisticated. It drives rather well, too. LxWxH 4234x1992x1573 Kerb weight 1270kg XC90 5dr SUV £50,985–£71,370 AAAAC 113 116 10.1 55.4 117 Clever packaging, smart styling, good to drive: Volvo’s closest thing 148 127 8.3 52.3-53.3 120-121 to a class-leader. LxWxH 4950x2008x1776 Kerb weight 1961kg

1.0 TSI 115 1.5 TSI EVO 150 2.0 TSI 190 4Motion 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion

2.0 T4 185 140 7.3 48.7 135-136 AAAAC 2.0 Polestar 356 155 4.8 34.9 186 2.0 D2 116 121 11.5-11.7 65.7-72.4 104-114 2.0 D3 145 130 9.1 65.7-68.9 108-114 Zafira Tourer 5dr MPV £20,215–£31,495 AAABC 1.4 TSI 125 123 128 9.9 51.4-53.3 117-127 2.0 D4 185 140 7.7 64.2-70.6 104-116 Looks upmarket and some clever packaging inside but feels 1.4 TSI ACT 150 148 135 8.6 54.3-55.4 119-120 2.4 D4 AWD 185 127 8.9 49.6 149 mundane overall. LxWxH 4666x1884x1685 Kerb weight 1628kg 1.8 TSI 180 177 143 7.9-8.1 46.3 131-137 2.4 D5 Twin Engine 158 130 6.9 155.2 48 1.4i Turbo 138 124 9.9 44.1 156 2.0 TSI 220 217 152 6.9 44.1 149 2.4 D6 Twin Engine 214 143 6.0 155.2 48 1.6 CDTi 134 120 10.4 60.1-62.8 119-125 1.4 TSI GTE 153 140 7.6 156.9 40 2.0 CDTi 167 129 9.1 54.3-57.7 129-137 1.6 TDI 120 118 127-129 11.0 67.3-74.3 96-110 V60 Cross Country 5dr estate £32,405–£39,080 AAAAC 2.0 TDI 150 148 135 8.9 65.7-67.3 110-124 Mature and smooth-driving estate given a rugged makeover. LxWxH 4635x2097x1545 Kerb weight 1634kg Crossland X 5dr SUV £16,840–£23,835 AAABC 2.0 TDI 190 187 145-146 7.9-8.1 65.7 111-120 Vauxhall’s small SUV is competent enough but lacks any real 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion 236 148 6.3 48.7 152 2.0 D3 145 127 9.1 61.4-67.3 111-120 character. LxWxH 4212x1765x1605 Kerb weight 1245kg 2.0 D4 185 130 7.8 61.4-67.3 111-120 1.2i 81 80 105 14.0 54.3 116 Passat Alltrack 5dr estate £36,090 AAAAC 1.2i 110 108 117 10.6 57.6-58.9 109-111 A rugged-looking Passat wagon with its distinguishing features S90 4dr saloon £35,620–£58,055 AAAAC left intact. LxWxH 4777x2083x1530 Kerb weight 1674kg 1.2i Turbo 130 128 128 9.1 55.4 116 Volvo’s mid-sized exec majors on comfort, style and cruising ability. LxWxH 4963x2019x1443 Kerb weight 1665kg 1.6 Turbo D 99 97 112 12.0 76.3-78.5 93-95 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion 187 142 7.7 54.3 137 1.6 Turbo D 120 118 116 9.9 70.6 105 2.0 T4 185 130 8.7 42.2 153 Arteon 4dr saloon £31,100–£40,635 AAABC 2.0 T5 248 140 6.8 43 154 Mokka X 5dr SUV £21,815–£30,960 AAABC VW’s flagship saloon is well-made and luxurious but rather bland to 2.0 D4 185 140 8.2 64.2 116 drive. LxWxH 4862x1871x1450 Kerb weight 1505kg Compact and competent but lacks any persuasive qualities. 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 228 145 7.0 58.9 127 LxWxH 4275x1780x1658 Kerb weight 1394kg 1.5 TSI EVO 150 148 NA NA NA NA 2.0 T8 Twin Engine AWD 310 155 4.8 141.2 46 1.6i 115 113 106 11.8 42.2 155 2.0 TSI 190 187 149 7.7 47.1 135 1.4 Turbo 140 138 119-122 9.3-10.1 43.5-47.1 140-149 2.0 TSI 280 4Motion 276 155 5.6 38.7 164 V90 5dr estate £37,620–£60,055 AAAAC 1.4 Turbo 140 4x4 138 116 9.3 43.5 152 2.0 TDI 150 148 137 9.1 62.8 116 luxury estate takes on the 5 Series and the E-Class. Comfy and a 1.4i Turbo 152PS 4x4 150 120 9.4 43.5 150 2.0 TDI 190 187 148 8.0 60.1-61.4 119-122 good cruiser. LxWxH 4936x2019x1475 Kerb weight 1679kg 1.6 CDTi 110 108 112 11.5 70.6-72.4 103-105 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion 187 145 7.8 55.4 134 2.0 T4 185 130 8.9 40.9 156 1.6 CDTi 136 134 117-118 9.3-10.3 56.5-68.9 106-132 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion 236 152 6.5 47.9 152 2.0 T5 248 140 6.7 41.5 159 1.6 CDTi 136 4x4 134 116 9.7 60.1 124 2.0 D4 185 140 8.5 62.8 119 Beetle 3dr hatch/2dr open £17,750–£26,610 AAABC 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 228 145 7.2 57.6 129 Grandland X 5dr SUV £22,890–£34,040 AAACC A huge improvement, but the Golf hiding underneath is the better 2.0 T8 Twin Engine AWD 310 155 4.8 141.2 46 15.3-15.8 363

To

p ps

AAAAC

What’s not to like? This whacking great V8-engined pick-up is a brute to drive. LxWxH 5121x1899x1465 Kerb weight 1825kg 4.5

p)

Lands blows on rivals with its smart looks, civilised refinement, S60 4dr saloon £22,950–£35,460 AAAAC quality and usability. LxWxH 4767x2083x1476 Kerb weight 1367kg Ageing saloon soon to be replaced. Understated, mature and laid1.4 TSI 125 123 129 9.7 52.3-53.3 114-126 back. LxWxH 4635x2097x1484 Kerb weight 1512kg

1.4 TSI ACT 150 1.8 TSI 180 AAABC 2.0 TSI 220 Charismatic, brutish and unsophisticated but hugely compelling. It 1.4 TSI GTE will be missed. LxWxH NA Kerb weight 1858kg 1.6 TDI 120 6.2i V8 590 155 4.2 18.0-18.5 363-373 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 190 VXR8 Maloo 2dr pick-up £66,500 AAABC 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion 155

(bh

Big boot, pleasant driving dynamics and well-priced, but overall it’s Handsome hatchback gets a rugged makeover but loses some of dull. LxWxH 4659x2020x1482 Kerb weight 1341kg its likeable nature. LxWxH 4369x2041x1439 Kerb weight 1428kg

VXR8 GTS-R 4dr saloon £74,500–£76,200

549

r we

243 145 145 185

2.0 D4 AWD 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 2.0 T5 AWD AAAAC 2.0 T8 Twin Engine

T-Roc 5dr SUV £18,955–£33,660

1.4 TSI 125 1.4 TSI 150 2.0 TSI 180 4Motion 2.0 TDI 115 2.0 TDI 150 2.0 TDI 150 4Motion AAAAB 2.0 TDI 190 4Motion Practical load-lugging estate doesn’t erode the well-rounded Golf 2.0 BiTDI 240 4Motion

engines. LxWxH 4466x1840x1482 Kerb weight 1459kg 1.4i Turbo 120 1.4i Turbo 140 1.6i Turbo 200 2.0i Turbo 280 1.6 CDTi 110 1.6 CDTi 136

58.9 58.9 54.3 NA 55.4 44.1 43.5 37.7 166.2 67.3-68.9 65.7-67.3 61.4-64.2

148 113 148 181

Po

T5 AWD D3 D3 AWD AAAAB D4 AWD

Full-sized seven-seater offers versatility, space, VW desirability and tidy handling. LxWxH 4854x1904x1720 Kerb weight 1703kg

121 115 127 134 146 124 127 137

)

119-122 125

Good handling and nice engines, but its working-class roots still show through. LxWxH 4370x1809x1485 Kerb weight 1244kg 103 98 123 148 197 108 134 157

km

103 148 108 148 148

109-110 125-126 112-113 123-125 122-124

11.3-12.1 8.7-9.1 11.0-11.7 8.9-9.3 9.2-9.6

50.4-54.3 47.9-49.6 61.4-65.7 57.6-61.4 56.5-62.4

Touran 5dr MPV £23,400–£32,955

122-129 132-136 113-121 119-129 119-130

108 148 113

185 228 250 310

130 140 140 140

8.8 7.5 7.4 6.3

54.3 53.3 38.2 36.7

138 139 172 176

AAAAC

Dull overall, but it’s a capable MPV, well-made and hugely refined. LxWxH 4527x1829x1659 Kerb weight 1436kg 1.2 TSI 110 1.4 TSI 150 1.6 TDI 115

2.0 D4 AWD 2.0 D5 PowerPulse AWD 2.0 T5 AWD 2.0 T6 AWD

AAAAC

117 130 118

11.3 8.9 11.4

51.4 49.6 61.4

128 126-133 112-119

XC40 5dr SUV £27,610–£37,620

AAAAC

Volvo’s take on the crossover aims to rival BMW, Mercedes and Audi. LxWxH 4425x1910x1658 Kerb weight 1626kg T3 T4 AWD

152 185

124 130

9.4 8.5

44.1-45.6 144-148 39.8-40.9 161-165

Tesla Model 3 On sale early 2019, price £30,000 (est) The first ‘affordable’ Tesla is due on this side of the pond next year if the company can resolve its production line bottlenecks. The standard variant is equipped with a 50kWh battery that gives it a claimed driving range of 220 miles. The more expensive Long Range version of the Model 3 has a 75kWh battery and should be able to manage an additional 90 miles from a full charge. M AY

Alpine A110, Aston Martin DB11 Volante, BMW 2 Series Active update, 2 Series Gran Tourer update, M3 CS, M4 Convertible 30 Jahre, Mercedes-Benz A-Class, Mitsubishi Shogun Sport, Suzuki Swift Sport, Volkswagen Polo GTI JUNE

Aston Martin Vantage, Bentley Bentayga PHEV, BMW i8 update, i8 Roadster, Jaguar F-Pace SVR, Mercedes-Maybach S-Class update, Renault Zoe R110 J U LY

Audi Q3, A6, A6 Avant, BMW M2 Competition, Dacia Duster, Ford Focus, Hyundai Kona Electric, Jaguar XE SV Project 8, F-Pace SVR, I-Pace, Mercedes-AMG G-Class, CLS 53, E53, Mercedes-Benz C-Class update, Vauxhall Corsa GSi AUGUST

BMW X4, Honda CR-V, Kia Ceed, Maserati Levante Trofeo, Mercedes-Benz CLS, Subaru Outback update SEPTEMBER

Aston Martin Vanquish, BMW X3 M, Honda CR-V, Hyundai i20 update, Isuzu D-Max update, Land Rover Range Rover SV Coupé, Mazda 6 update, Mercedes-AMG GT 4dr Coupé, Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV update, Peugeot 508, Porsche Macan update, Volkswagen Touareg, Volvo V60 L AT E 2 0 1 8

Audi A1, e-tron, Q8, RS5 Sportback, BMW 8 Series, X7, Z4, Brabham BT62, Citroën C5 Aircross, Cupra Ateca, Hyundai i30 N Fastback, Nexo, Santa Fe, Infiniti QX50, Jeep Wrangler, Kia Niro Electric, Land Rover Discovery Sport update, Range Rover Velar SVR, McLaren Senna, MG 3 update, 6, Morgan EV3, Porsche 911 GT3 RS, Rimac C_Two, Seat Tarraco, Skoda Kodiaq vRS, Subaru Forester, TVR Griffith, Volkswagen Passat update, T-Cross, Volvo S60, Wiesmann new model

9 MAY 2018 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 87


What Car? New Car Buying Find your perfect deal today at whatcar.com/new-car-deals Buy your next car from home. What Car? now has more than 100,000 discounted new car deals online â&#x20AC;&#x201C; so you can get your perfect car from a trusted dealer without the hassle of haggling.

New Car Buying


Matt Prior

E S TA B L I S H E D 1 8 95

TESTER’S NOTES What kind of engine is going in there, mate? A diesel?

Behold the antihorse 1 July 1899

s a ninth Volkswagen employee has been charged in the US over VW’s use of a diesel cheat device for emissions tests, new VW boss Herbert Diess – because they’re getting through them – has said, with mastery of understatement: “It’s due in part to us that diesel has wrongfully fallen into disrepute.” Ja. No kidding, Herbert. It’s something they might be particularly ruing in Solihull and Sunderland, where the downturn in diesel sales (demand in March was down by more than a third on the same month last year) has hit Land Rover and Nissan so hard that 1000 contract staff will be laid off at the former, and ‘hundreds’ are expected to go at the latter. Nissan has the consolation that, in the Juke and Qashqai, it is making cars on Wearside that can “transition to a new range of powertrains”. The natural life cycle of its models is part of its downturn, the next Leaf will be built there, and Nissan expects

A

Warning: Prior can cause drowsiness 90 AUTOCAR.CO.UK 9 MAY 2018

`

Electricity can do what short-range petrols do. It can’t do what a long-range diesel can

AS HORSELESS CARRIAGES grew in number, commentators scrabbled for the most suitable designation for this new invention. A New York-based publication, the Electrical Review, held a competition for readers to propose the most apt word to describe electrically propelled vehicles. Autocar later reported that it generated over 400 suggestions. The winning submission was ‘electromobile’, but there was a wide range of other possibilities. Among them were accelawatt, autopropelectric, electragon, trolley-ha, locomobile, telecar, autogo, elecar, cheveless, moby, electrola and voltcar. Plus ‘antihorse’, which summarised the impact the car was already having on equine-based transportation.

a

FIND OUT MORE AT

production volumes to recover. But none of these things will be of consolation if you end up jobless. Land Rover, meanwhile, is not alone in making cars for which ‘powertrain transitioning’ is not so straightforward. It makes cars that diesels suit best. Hauling, towing, long-range commuting. It doesn’t matter if you’re in an SUV or a family estate car: sitting on a motorway burning small amounts of fuel is the kind of thing that diesels are best at. Electricity can do what a short-range petrol can do. It can’t do what a long-range diesel can. And a lot of us who need the latter don’t have the luxury of two vehicles. Many people don’t have a complete understanding about the respective advantages and disadvantages of different powertrains, and some of them are in charge of cities and can make policy on a whim about what you can and can’t drive in and out of their towns. This is the backdrop, the mindset, to which VW has fostered and exposed car owners – and car makers – by painting manufacturers as hooky and diesel as the enemy.

driving somebody somewhere, and they fall asleep. Then they wake up and say “Oh, sorry, I totally dozed off”, as if sleeping is something to apologise for. Perhaps it’s rude to do it in a car. Who knows? Anyway, I don’t mind, I say, because I figure that if somebody is relaxed enough to fall asleep while you’re driving, they must trust it and you must be pretty smooth, and be making easy, graceful progress. Until, that is, last week, when I found myself as a passenger with somebody who was not a brilliant driver. Not bad, certainly not dangerous, just a bit clumsy; reactive rather than proactive, poor lane choice, you know the thing. It was like watching someone trying to work out a puzzle that you know the answer to. The sort of thing some people turn into a game show. It was generally painful to sit and watch. Anyway, I thought: ‘I know. I’ll close my eyes. Perhaps I can make this into a snooze.’ And then thought: ah. Maybe I shouldn’t be so pleased when people doze off while I’m driving.

■ You know when you give someone a lift and they fall asleep in the passenger seat? Well, maybe you don’t, but it goes like this: you’re

matt.prior@haymarket.com @matty_prior

GET IN TOUCH

@autocarclassic M O R E AU T O C A R AT

X

Watch the new McLaren Senna in action on track youtube.com/autocar autocar.co.uk/facebook twitter.com/autocar autocar_official SUBSCRIBE

autocar.co.uk/subscribe For all our latest print and digital subscription offers


THE ULTIMATE IN PERFORMANCE UPGRADES AT DMS AUTOMOTIVE WE’VE BEEN UNLEASHING AUTOMOTIVE PERFORMANCE FOR OVER 20 YEARS

DMS F10 M5 (EVO DEC ‘15) “730BHP, 200MPH+ TYRE-SHREDDING MONSTER” DMS MCLAREN 650S (EVO OCT ’15) “REAL MUSCULARITY AND THE STRENGTH OF THE MID-RANGE IS STAGGERING” DMS M2 (EVO SEPT ’15) “MORE POWER DOES MEAN MORE FUN” DMS 1M (EVO MARCH ‘12) “THERE’S A REAL RIP TO THE WAY THE REVS PILE ON ABOVE 4000RPM” DMS 997 TURBO 3.8 PDK (EVO JUNE ‘11) “DELIVERY IS ALMOST UNCOMFORTABLY FORCEFUL” DMS SL65 BLACK SERIES (EVO OCT‘10) “IT FEELS LIKE THE LOVE CHILD OF AN SL65 AND A PORSCHE GT2” DMS 135i (BMW CAR MAY ‘09) THE STANDARD CAR IS GREAT BUT DMS HAVE SOMEHOW MANAGED TO TAKE IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL” DMS 997 TURBO 3.6 (EVO SEPT ‘08) “IT’S EPIC, HILARIOUS AND ADDICTIVE IN EVERY GEAR, YET DOCILE WHEN CRUISING”

BELOW IS A SMALL SELECTION OF OUR MORE POPULAR UPGRADES: AUDI RS6 4.0 T V8 » 700+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) RS6 V10 » 680+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) 2017 R8 V10 » 650BHP (+DE-LIMIT) R8 V10 » 592+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) RS4/RS5 » 488+ BHP (+DE-LIMIT) RS3/TTRS » 420+ BHP (+DE-LIMIT) RS3/TTRS (NEW) » 480+ BHP (+DE-LIMIT) S3 / GOLF R » 375+ BHP (+DE-LIMIT) 3.0TDI (ALL MODELS) » 315+ BHP 3.0 BI-TDI (ALL MODELS) » 380+ BHP Q7/A8 4.2 TDI » 400+ BHP BMW M2 » 435BHP (+DE-LIMIT) M3/M4 » 540+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) M5/M6 » 730+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) X5M/X6M » 730+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) X5M50D/X6M50D » 450BHP M135I/M235I » 410+BHP i8 » 415BHP 120I/220I/320I/420I » 275+BHP 116D/216D/316D » 160BHP 118D/218D/318D » 225BHP 120D/220D/320D/420D » 240BHP 328I/428I » 295BHP 335I/435I » 410+BHP 330D/430D/530D/730D » 360BHP 335D/435D/535D » 395+BHP 550I/650I » 555+BHP (+DE-LIMIT) 640D/740D » 395BHP (+DE-LIMIT) X530D/X630D » 360BHP X540D/X640D » 395BHP

MERCEDES-BENZ A45/CLA45 AMG » 420+BHP AMG GT/GTS » 560BHP (+DE-LIMIT) C43/E43/GLC43 AMG » 455BHP C63/63S 4.0T AMG » 620+BHP C63 6.3 AMG » 530+BHP 500 4.7 BITURBO (ALL MODELS) » 498+BHP 63 AMG 5.5 BITURBO (ALL MODELS) » 700+BHP 55 AMG KOMPRESSOR » 600+BHP (+DE-LIMIT & SUSPENSION LOWERING) S65 » 780BHP (+DE-LIMIT) SL65 AMG » 690BHP (+DE-LIMIT) SL65 BLACK » 720BHP (+DE-LIMIT) SLK 55 AMG » 420BHP 200 CDI (ALL MODELS) » 173BHP 220 CDI (ALL MODELS) » 230BHP 250 CDI (ALL MODELS) » 260BHP C300 HYBRID » 285BHP C300E » 350BHP C400/E400 » 400BHP 350 CDI (ALL MODELS) » 315BHP 420/450 CDI (ALL MODELS) » 358BHP ALL 2017 RANGE ROVERS AVAILABLE RR 50SC/SVO/SVR STAGE1 » 600+BHP RR 50SC/SVO/SVR STAGE2 » 650+BHP 2.0/2.2 DIESEL (ALL MODELS) » 220+BHP RR 4.4 TDV8 » 395 BHP RR TDV6 3.0D » 305+ BHP RR SDV6 3.0D » 350+BHP DEFENDER 2.2 » 180BHP

PORSCHE 996 TURBO/GT2 » 600+ BHP 997 TURBO 3.6 » 625+ BHP 997 GT2 RS » 670+ BHP 997 TURBO/S 3.8 INC PDK » 611 BHP 997 GT3 RS » 480 BHP 991.2 GT2 RS » CALL 991 TURBO/S (ALL MODELS) » 750+BHP 991 GT3 3.8 (ALL MODELS) » 490+BHP 991 GT3 RS 4.0 (ALL MODELS) » 525+BHP 997 CARRERA S » 376+ BHP 997 CARRERA PDK » 368 BHP 997 CARRERA S PDK » 400+ BHP 997 CARRERA GTS » 435 BHP 991 CARRERA (ALL MODELS) » 500+BHP 991 CARRERA S (ALL MODELS) » 500+BHP 991 CARRERA GTS (ALL MODELS) » 540+BHP BOXSTER/CAYMAN 718 GTS » 420+BHP BOXSTER/CAYMAN 718 S » 420+BHP BOXSTER/CAYMAN 718 » 380+BHP BOXSTER/CAYMAN 981 GT4 » 430+BHP BOXSTER/CAYMAN 981 GTS » 375+BHP BOXSTER/CAYMAN 981 S » 345+BHP CAYENNE GTS » 450 BHP CAYENNE TURBO 4.5 » 565+ BHP CAYENNE TURBO 4.8 (ALL MODELS) » 650+ BHP CAYENNE TURBO S 4.8 (ALL MODELS) » 650+ BHP CAYENNE 4.2 DIESEL » 450+ BHP CAYENNE 3.0 DIESEL » 318+ BHP MACAN S » 420+BHP MACAN GTS » 440+BHP

MACAN TURBO (ALL MODELS) » 480+BHP MACAN S DIESEL » 318+BHP PANAMERA TURBO » 600+ BHP PANAMERA DIESEL » 305+ BHP EXOTIC / MISC FERRARI CALI T » 660BHP FERRARI F12 » 780+BHP FERRARI 599 » 647 BHP FERRARI 488 » 750+BHP FERRARI 430 » 525 BHP MCLAREN MP4-12C » 700 BHP MCLAREN 650S » 720 BHP MCLAREN 675LT » 750BHP MCLAREN 570/S » 680+BHP AVENTADOR » 750+BHP HURACAN LP610 » 650BHP GALLARDO LP560 » 600+BHP BENTLEY 4.0 T V8 » 700BHP BENTLEY GT/F-SPUR » 680BHP GT SPEED / SUPERSPORT » 690+BHP BENTAYGA W12 » 700+BHP MASERATI GHIBLI 3.0S PETROL » 470 BHP MASERATI GHIBLI 3.0 PETROL » 400 BHP MASERATI GHIBLI 3.0 DIESEL » 312 BHP MASERATI GT/QPORT » 438 BHP MASERATI GT S / MC » 479+ BHP

/DMSAUTOMOTIVE

WWW.DMSAUTOMOTIVE.COM

UK & WORLDWIDE INSTALLATION CENTRES

UK: 0800 030 5555 INT: +44 800 030 5555 SALES@DMSAUTOMOTIVE


Autocar uk 09 may 2018  

F ord is pressing ahead with its first all-new battery electric vehicle, a front-drive crossover – and it is committed to the Mondeo in Euro...

Autocar uk 09 may 2018  

F ord is pressing ahead with its first all-new battery electric vehicle, a front-drive crossover – and it is committed to the Mondeo in Euro...

Advertisement