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F O R T U F T S U N I V E R S I T Y | S P R I N G 2011

The Bacow Years: A Transformative Era

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eople of accomplishment rarely sit back and let things happen to them, Leonardo da Vinci observed; rather, they go out and happen to things. Lawrence S. Bacow and Adele Fleet Bacow have happened to lots of things at Tufts over the past 10 years. As their time at Gifford House draws to a close, it is fitting to reflect on the impact the Bacows—the faces of Tufts to a generation—have had. Coinciding with the Bacow years has been Tufts’ first billiondollar capital campaign. Beyond Boundaries nears its end. It, too, has reshaped the university. This special issue of Blueprint celebrates the achievements and imagination that have marked this remarkable era at Tufts. For this edition, President Bacow described accomplishments, both of the campaign and his presidency, that in his view are transformative. He spoke of the great effort to guarantee that bright and deserving young people have the opportunity of a Tufts education. He talked of brilliant teachers and researchers who have joined the faculty, and ambitious building projects that have improved the experience of going to school here. And he credited the philan­ thropy that has made all this possible. We have set out to spotlight people and places and programs that bring to life the achievements President Bacow described— achievements enabled by the imagination and generosity of Blueprint’s readers, and which for everyone at Tufts are a source of great pride.


From the Leadership… “As a university we have done great things and are in a position to achieve even greater accomplishments.“ JAMES A. STERN, E72, A07P Chairman, Tufts University Board of Trustees About a year and half into his presidency, Larry Bacow gave a presentation to our board entitled, “A University Poised.” He described the great promise of Tufts, the challenges to be faced in the coming years, and his vision of what he hoped Tufts would become. Eight years later, I think Larry would tell you we’ve moved the needle. As a university we have done great things and are in a position to achieve even greater accomplishments. It says something about Larry that he chose the term “a university poised.” He’d be the first to tell you this isn’t about him or what he’s done: rather, it’s about what a lot of people around the country and around the world have accomplished who share his vision for Tufts.

Larry tends to downplay his contributions. Let’s talk, for example, about the President’s Marathon Challenge. I don’t know of another college president who would have created that opportunity. We’re now the largest university contingent running in the Boston Marathon. We’ve raised nearly $3 million for the Friedman School and spectacular initiatives in nutrition and fitness around the university. A good deal of the spirit of active citizenship that is so strong at Tufts has been fanned by Larry’s running the marathon. You hear so many great stories about the President’s Marathon Challenge: about the people on campus brought together; about families running together; about students who have run who before had never run a mile. The President’s Marathon Challenge has been unique not only for the fundraising opportunities it has afforded and the great visibility it has brought Tufts, but for the wonders it has done for university spirit. The Marathon Challenge is a wonderful achievement and it has been led by Larry,

who would say he has had very little to do with it other than running in it a couple of times. Tufts is the product of great students, great faculty, and extraordinary leadership. It is a great school getting greater. This is thanks, in no small part, to Larry Bacow and—as I would emphatically note—to his wife, Adele. They have done so much to create a welcoming environment on campus. They have been extraordinary role models for thousands of students. Their hospitality at Gifford House has become legendary. We have all learned so much from the graciousness and generosity of Larry and Adele. The privilege of working with them every day has been a joy, and, perhaps more importantly, a lot of fun.

“Tufts today is an example of the power of partnerships.” JONATHAN M. TISCH, A76 Co-chair, Beyond Boundaries: The Campaign for Tufts; Naming benefactor, Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service; University Trustee That Tufts has raised more than a billion dollars is not just a good story—it’s a fantastic story. In doing so, Tufts has arrived as one of the finest teaching institutions in the country and indeed the world—more able to finance the real achievements of its faculty and students. Tufts today is an example of the power of partnerships: of putting aside individual concerns and working together towards a greater good.

We need to make sure the next generation shares this sense of responsibility. To be a citizen means you are part of a community. Everyone has a unique set of skills that enables him or her to make a difference. You have to activate in yourself the idea that it’s vital to get out and do something, to better what we have today in order to increase opportunities for our children and our grandchildren. This spirit of “active and engaged citizenship” is what has animated Beyond Boundaries, as it has come to animate the entire university. People care about this place. They show it in so many ways—by writing a check, by supporting alumni events at chapters around the country, by spreading the mes-

sage of what we stand for. People are proud of their connection to Tufts; they see good things happening at this university and want to be part of Tufts’ very bright future in the decades to come. You don’t raise $1.2 billion just by big gifts. When you look at the breadth and scope of this campaign you come to understand that every contribution has helped us reach our goal; that every committed alumnus and alumna and parent and friend of Tufts University has clearly understood our mission. And that mission at its core is quite simple: to take a good university and make it a great university.


FOR T UF T S UNIVERSIT Y | SPRING 2011

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Students First and Foremost Kassoum Ouattara, N11; Laura Dinn, E11; Mohammed Islam, A12

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Seeds of Innovation Water: Systems, Science, and Society; Summer Scholars; Master of International Business

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Recruit, Retain, Renew Joshua Kritzer, Ph.D.; Matthias Scheutz, Ph.D.; Jamie Maguire, Ph.D.

Chair, Board of Trustees James A. Stern, E72, A07P President Lawrence S. Bacow, Ph.D. Provost Jamshed J. Bharucha, Ph.D.

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Campaign Chairs Pamela K. Omidyar, J89 Pierre M. Omidyar, A88 Jonathan M. Tisch, A76 Honorary Chairs William S. Cummings, A58, M97P, J97P Dr. Bernard M. Gordon, H92 Daniel F. Pritzker, A81, A12P Karen M. Pritzker, J83, A12P Executive Committee Kathryn C. Chenault, Esq., J77 Steven B. Epstein, Esq., A65, A96P, A01P, A07P, AG04P Nathan Gantcher, A62, H04 Martin J. Granoff, A91P Daniel A. Kraft, A87 Joseph E. Neubauer, E63, J90P Agnes Varis, H03 In the Winter 2011 edition of Blueprint, Mary Wren Swain’s name was misspelled. The editors sincerely regret the error. University Advancement Tufts University, 80 George Street, 200-3 Medford, MA 02155 USA 617.627.3200 • giving@tufts.edu

Belief Brought to Life Tisch Scholars; Lerner Spay/Neuter Clinic; Gus Crothers, M11

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The Stage Is Set Distler Performance Hall; Simulation Learning Center; Agnes Varis Campus Center

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Honoring the Bacow Era Enabling Excellence; The Bacow Sailing Pavilion


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Students, First and Foremost Opportunity has gone hand in hand with excellence. And the generosity of alumni, parents, and friends increasingly has enabled deserving students to attend Tufts, not based on ability to pay, but on ability, pure and simple. James Cagney, Thelonious Monk, and four Nobel laureates are among its alumni. Stuyvesant High School in New York City began as a manual training school for boys and evolved into a competitive exam school specializing in math and science that is considered one of the nation’s finest public schools. “Kids who go to Stuyvesant are in many cases the children of immigrants, the first generation of their families to go to college,” says Tufts President Lawrence S. Bacow. “They’re brilliant, yet at the same time often have a very high need for financial aid. We’ve been able to meet that need.” One year not long ago Stuyvesant High sent more students to Tufts than any other high school in the country, Bacow said. Expanding opportunities for talented young people to attend Tufts has been the top ­prior-

ity of Beyond Boundaries and the Bacow presidency. “There are tons of stories of young men and women who have come here who never would have had access to a Tufts education in the past,” Bacow says. “You know, we’ve had students come to Tufts who literally have no family, who have had no support from the outside whatsoever, and who are thriving here.” He cites some noteworthy figures: Under­ grad­uate financial aid at Tufts has more than doubled. The number of federal Pell Grant recipients enrolled at Tufts—from families with less than $40,000 in total income—has increased from 432 to 670. Students from underrepresented minorities accounted for 27 percent of this past year’s entering freshman class, up from 20 percent the year before. Meantime, average SAT scores increased 111 points to 1420 in math and verbal. Early admissions programs like one already in existence at the School of Medicine have been added at the dental and the veterinary schools, enabling students at the end of sophomore year to apply and be accepted to these schools. With the creation of the Summer Scholars program, 43 percent of undergraduates are engaged in research.


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assoum Ouattara epitomizes what Tufts is trying to achieve with its Master of Arts in Humanitarian Assistance degree,” says Peter Walker, Irwin H. Rosenberg Professor of Nutrition and human security director at the Friedman School’s Feinstein International Center. “Kassoum is typical of many humanitarian field workers. He started at the bottom and worked his way up, has a lot of gutsy field experience, and is at a point in his career where he realizes he needs to better understand the big picture into which his work fits, and be better equipped to carry out the political, social, and economic analysis that is needed to plan big humanitarian operations. “Kassoum brings with him to Tufts not just his field experience, but his personal experience of being a citizen of a country, Burkina Faso, which has experienced many major crises in the past. So for Kassoum, this is personal, not just academic. This personal experience

is incredibly valuable in the classroom, where discussions of famine and civil war can seem all too academic. Injecting the experience of people like Kassoum into the teaching environment totally enriches it for everyone.” “The knowledge I am getting at the Friedman School is beyond my expectations,” Ouattara says. “After graduation, I will return to Catholic Relief Services in West Africa and continue working in the area of humanitarian assistance. I hope to use the knowledge I have gained at the Friedman School to advise and mentor other colleagues, to positively influence the agency’s humanitarian policy, and to design high-quality emergency projects to more efficiently assist people affected by conflict and natural disaster. “Coming from a country where almost 30 percent of children do not have the chance to go school, I see my participation in this program as a dream come true, thanks to the generosity of those whose donations have made my education possible.”

“I see my participation…as a dream come true.”

Kassoum Ouattara, N11 Before beginning his graduate studies at the Friedman School, Kassoum was head of general relief for the Emergency Response and Peace-Building Unit of the Catholic Relief Services in Burkina Faso. He is the recipient of a Leir Foundation Scholarship.

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“What drew me to Tufts was the combination  of the liberal arts and engineering experience.”

“What drew me to Tufts was the combination of the liberal arts and engineering experience,” she says. “I’ve got a lot of friends in liberal arts, not just engineers. I’m taking psychology classes and Italian.” For her senior capstone project she is he has been not only one of involved in a project with David the academically strongest Vinson, professor of the practice in students among my advisees, chemical and biological engineering, but perhaps the most fun perto make an extended-release coatson to interact with in my five ing for a drug. “You take all these years at Tufts,” says academic adviclasses and this is a chance to put it sor Hyunmin Yi, assistant profestogether and do something with it,” sor of chemical engineering. “She she says. “Learning to think like an landed and performed very well in engineer really helps you to probA chemical engineering major, Laura hails from Woburn, Mass. She is the recipient of a summer internship at Millipore, a lem-solve.” After college she aspires Dr. James Laurence Golden and Helen well-established biotechnology firm, the to graduate study after working for a Murphy Golden Scholarship. through a highly competitive twotime in the pharmaceutical industry. year program established to recruit top-tier students. Tufts laid the foundation, she says. “My advisor and With her academic excellence, positive attitude, and professors at Tufts have been very helpful. They really high spirit, I’m sure she’ll do well.” take an interest.” Laura is co-president of the Irish Dance Club. Meantime, she dances. “At Tufts you can join anyShe began step dancing in second grade and performed thing you want if you have the time. When I started in national competitions with the O’Shea-Chaplin with the Irish Dance Club, I thought I’d do a few shows Academy of Irish Dance. “Irish step dancing has been a here and there. It turns out we have shows all the time. big high point for me,” she says. “I started doing ballet We perform with the Tufts Dance Collective, which is and jazz and found Irish step dancing to be better exer- the largest club on campus and really brings the comcise. It was exciting. There was more jumping around. munity together. Anyone who wants to be in a dance At Tufts I was on the track team for three years, mostly can be in a dance. The last show had 400 dancers in it! as a triple-jumper. I think the Irish step dancing helped People are from all sorts of different backgrounds and if with that!” you’re interested in an activity you can do it.”

“Brings the community together”

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hen I first met Mo Islam he told me that futebol had driven him to learn Portu­ guese,” says Cristiane Soares, lecturer in Romance Languages. “‘I want to go to Brazil for the next World Cup,’ he confessed. Since then, Mo has proved to be one of the brightest and most dedicated students I have ever had. Not only is he mastering the language, his reflections on culture, economics, and politics are remarkably acute. His determination and commitment have made him one of the most successful students in our program.” Born in Bangladesh, he came to New York City with his mother at the age of one, after his father saved up enough money waiting tables in New York to send for his family. His father, who attended but did not finish college in Bangladesh, also drove a cab to support the family, who settled in the East Village in Manhattan. His mother hadn’t finished high school. Yet his parents encouraged him to try for a place at Stuyvesant High School, a competitive exam school in New York. “I give all credit to my parents,” he says. “If not for them I probably wouldn’t have gone to Stuyvesant. Twenty-five thousand kids in New York City took the exam-school test my year, and 680 got into Stuyvesant.” His younger sister now attends the high school. “I am the first person in my family to go to college in the United States,” he says. “It’s exciting; scary, too.” An economics major, he aspires to go into banking. Last summer, as a sophomore, he had an internship at UBS Financial Services in New York City where he gained experience under senior wealth manager Richard Abrams, E80. He is a member of the Tufts Financial Group, a student-run fund that manages investments of $50,000. “There is another side of me,” he adds. “I am an assistant teacher at the Tufts Day Care Center. I can’t imagine having a better job: the amount of fun I have! It’s a great break from studying Econ: you go into day care and you’re playing Candy Land.” And he and a group of friends from the Houston Hall dorm have restarted the Delta Tau Delta fraternity on campus. The fraternity next year will move into the largest fraternity house on campus at 98 Professors Row, national alumni of the fraternity having raised $500,000 for the upcoming renovation of the house. “The Tufts experience has been so wonderful. I have tried to make the most of it. At Matriculation, I heard President Bacow speak about how diverse the school was. He mentioned the various backgrounds of the incoming freshmen, and I remember thinking, I’m going to meet all these people. And I think I’ve got them all down! I remember thinking, I’m definitely in the right place—I’m going to be happy here.”

“I’m definitely in the right place.”

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Mohammed Islam, A12

“I am the first person in my family to go to college in the United States. It’s exciting; scary, too.”

Mo Islam is an economics major and the recipient of the Bendheim Family Scholarship, the Paige Term Scholarship, and the Class of 2012 Scholarship.


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In his inaugural address 10 years ago, President Bacow urged a free and robust exchange of ideas among schools, depart­ments, and disciplines at Tufts. “I’m convinced there is no better way to enhance our rare position as the home of an elite liberal arts college in the heart of a great university,” he said. “And in a time marked by massively complex problems that know no boundaries of geography or discipline…our ability to contribute will depend on our capacity to pool our knowledge.”

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Seeds of Innovation Imagine a medical school campus stretching from Boston to Portland and beyond to rural Maine. That’s the idea behind a special partnership between Maine Medical Center and Tufts University School of Medicine. A unique curriculum, the “Maine Track,” emphasizes rural and small-town practice, with the aim of encouraging graduates to establish medical practices in Maine. Students spend their first two years at Tufts and then move to Maine Medical Center for the clerkship period in year three and portions of the monthly rotations in year four. Twenty seats in each class are reserved for Maine students at subsidized tuition levels. On graduation each student receives a combined diploma from Maine Medical Center and Tufts. “This is not the usual affiliation between a medical center and a medical school,” says Vincent S. Conti, president and chief executive officer of Maine Medical Center. “This is a true partnership, co-developed and equally

governed and managed by the two organizations. It is a unique approach to find a solution for what is becoming a national crisis: a lack of physicians, specifically primary care physicians, and especially in rural areas.” Academic innovation of this sort has been a goal of Beyond Boundaries and a defining ­characteristic of the Bacow presidency at Tufts. Again at the School of Medicine, the renovation of the Arthur M. Sackler Student Center made possible by a $15 million gift from the Jaharis family has as a centerpiece the creation of “learning communities,” four of which offer quiet study corners, lounges, and small-group classrooms. The aim is to boost team-based learning while enhancing the student educational experience on the health ­sciences campus. Elsewhere across the university, interdisciplinary collaboration has been a watchword. Take, for example, the work being done on water.

A planned new graduate program in “water diplomacy” supported by a recent $4.2 million grant from the National Science Foundation aims to educate a new generation of professionals who can negotiate solutions to complex water problems crossing geographic and political boundaries. Seventeen faculty members from the School of Engineering, the School of Arts and Sciences, and The Fletcher School were among the group submitting the successful grant proposal. The new program will strengthen Tufts’ existing graduate certificate program in Water: Systems, Science, and Society, which provides students across the university with interdisciplinary perspectives and tools to manage water-related problems around the world. These are innovations that, at the dawn of a new millenium, a new president anticipated. A decade later, Tufts is proving it can meet such interdisciplinary challenges.


WSSS Fellows John Parker, F12, N12, left, and Jeffrey Cegan, EG12, at the mouth of the Mystic River in Chelsea, Mass.

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he challenge: create opportunities between Middle East nations for cooperative water management that will not only save hundreds of millions of dollars per year, but will also set an example for the entire world. The answer: “It takes a university,” says Professor Richard Vogel, Faculty Committee chair for the Water: Systems, Science, and Society (WSSS) program. Challenges like this excite the WSSS faculty and students, because the answers and the collaborations are unlimited. Water itself is a complex issue that moves beyond political, environmental, and healthcare issues, which is why WSSS encompasses participants from five of Tufts’ graduate schools. From coastal flooding to naturaldisaster prevention to the spread of infectious disease, WSSS is tackling an endless spread of global complexities as students from designated schools are able to achieve a

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“It takes a university.”

Water: Systems, Science, and Society certificate and research experience in water-related issues. John Parker, F12, N12, says his research topic of integrated land and water manage­ ment came to fruition through weekly WSSS research meetings. “They allowed me to brainstorm my ideas with a diverse group of faculty members and students representing different disciplines,” says Parker, who was able to carry out his fieldwork in Honduras thanks to funding from a WSSS research fellowship. “It provided a one-of-a-kind opportunity to carry out international water research.”

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“WSSS is a fantastic program,” adds Jeffrey Cegan, EG12, another WSSS fellowship recipient, whose research explores efforts to mitigate the adverse effects of climateinduced surprises. “Coming from an economics background and now being an engineer, I really appreciate the inclusiveness of this program—every background and perspective is accepted and valued.” 7


“To be on the front line of discovery…”

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niversity-wide, the Summer Scholars Program initiative offers research apprenticeships with faculty and clinical mentors to motivated Tufts undergraduates. The program gives students a chance to be on the front line of discovery and

Jordyn Wolfand, E11, from Bethesda, Md., majors in environmental engineering and is the recipient of the John A. Cataldo Scholarship, and the Howard H. Sample Prize Fund.

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scholarship at Tufts today. Each student receives a living stipend of $3,500 for full-time research that will ideally lead to a senior honors thesis. In addition, a $1,000 grant to defray research expenses is made available to each recipient up until the time of graduation. As a Summer Scholar in the lab of Kurt Pennell, professor and chair of civil and environmental engineering, Jordyn Wolfand explored possible links between PCB exposure and Parkinson’s disease. Her senior thesis will focus on the way nanoparticles of a carbon configuration called C-60, increasingly used in industry, move through soil. Meantime, she is active in

STOMP—a program that sends Tufts students to local elementary schools to teach youngsters about engineering—and is a coxswain on the women’s crew team. “Jordyn is very responsible and motivated, and best of all, she works well with others,” says Professor Pennell. “The latter attribute is critical to a successful research experience in an active, multi-user lab.” “It is believed certain chemical contaminants potentially are associated with the development of Parkinson’s, a neurodegenerative disorder accompanied by tremors and shaking,” says Wolfand. “As a Summer Scholar I looked at the possible effects of exposure to PCBs, chemical compounds once used in coolants and carbon copy paper, for example, which don’t break down in the environment. We examined brain tissue from people with Parkinson’s to check for elevated levels of PCBs. It was a great experience getting into the lab and learning the lab techniques. “I am doing my senior thesis on the transport of a particular nanoparticle, called C-60 or fullerene, sometimes called a ‘buckyball’ [for its resemblance to the geodesic dome created by Buckminster Fuller]. The C-60 configuration of carbon has been found to have incredible properties, with uses in biopharmaceuticals, solar cells, and superconductors. However, little study has been made of how these carbon compounds, once manufactured and disposed of, move in the environment, or of any potential environmental contamination associated with them. “Without my Summer Scholar experience I wouldn’t have been able to do—or even start—my thesis.”

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IB is the first program of its kind in the world,” says Bhaskar Chakravorti, senior associate dean of international business and finance at The Fletcher School. “Our students study business as an integral part of international affairs and vice versa. They are comfortable operating across borders of many kinds—national and disciplinary. We prepare not only great analysts— we prepare leaders. “We operate with the axiom that the pursuit of ­private gain must enhance the public good; often it may be the only way of doing so. Moreover, with a more interconnected world and the emergence of business as a complementary force alongside diplomacy, conflict and reconstruction, philanthropy, grassroots action, or development, we ignore the cross-connections at our peril.” Violet Midzi studied finance at the University of Cape Town and has worked in South Africa as a marketing manager for SABMiller in Johannesburg, as a brand manager for Unilever in Durban, and a business analyst for McKinsey & Co. in Johannesburg. She speaks Shona in addition to English. At Fletcher her fields of study are strategic management, international political economy, and international information and communication, and she is involved in the Net Impact Business Club, the Fletcher Christian Forum, the Fletcher Business Club, and the Fletcher Africa Business Group. “Perceptions about Africa need to change,” says Midzi. “A better spread of content in global media about the continent would show not only the stories of war and poverty, but also the success stories. “I wanted to be more hands-on in doing my bit to help ‘save the world.’ After meeting a Fletcher alumnus and hearing his stories about the school, I went onto Fletcher’s website and discovered the MIB program. I found a program where I could work on my business fundamentals but also explore disciplines in the world

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“Across borders of many kinds”

of international affairs that would give me access to a broad range of career opportunities and allow me to play a more active role in Africa’s development. “While most of us come here with a pretty clear idea of what we want to study and do post-Fletcher, the courses offered are all so diverse and fascinating that you find yourself questioning your original study objectives. It is great to know that we will get all the support needed to make the right choices and, by the time we graduate, will be well on our way to ‘saving the world’ in some way.”

A citizen of Zimbabwe, Violet Midzi, F12, is a recipient of the Thomas Schmidheiny Global Business Scholarship.


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Recruit, Retain, Renew Who are the new Sol Gittlemans? Out of many possible candidates, here are three, each of whom has benefited from faculty development funds created during the campaign and whose teaching and research promises to make a difference in the lives of their students and in the world beyond Tufts. History, culture, religion, music—they’re all remarkably integrated in a Sol Gittleman liter­ ature class. Gittleman, the Alice and Nathan Gantcher University Professor, is, of course, a legend at Tufts, the exemplar of the way the best faculty create a thriving and vibrant academic environment that begins freshman year and lasts a lifetime. To honor him, the Sol Gittleman Professorship was established to allow Tufts to recruit the next generations of great teachers. More than a hundred people who have benefited from Professor Gittleman’s special brand of teaching and mentoring have donated to the fund, with more than $2.4 million having been raised to recognize his unwavering commitment to excellence in teaching. This is a commitment the entire university shares. When Times Higher Education recently published its 2010–11 rankings of the world’s top universities, Tufts came in 53rd, up from

160th the year before. The reason for this jump was that the new rankings placed a heavier emphasis on objective measures of scholarship. “We have been recruiting fabulous scholars to the university,” said President Bacow, “truly superb individuals.” Faculty development funds established ­during Beyond Boundaries are providing startup dollars and other critical support to attract and keep outstanding professors. These funds include the Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Presidential Initiatives Fund, the Knez Family Faculty Development Fund, the Neubauer Fund for Faculty Excellence, the Endowed Bernstein Faculty Fellows Fund, the Merrin Fund for Faculty Excellence, and the John A. Cataldo Faculty Endowment in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.


“We seek molecules that can turn cancer off.”

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oshua is a stellar addition to the faculty,” says colleague Krishna Kumar, professor of chemistry. “He brings unbridled enthusiasm, a great research program, and terrific teaching skills to the department.” Kritzer was recently awarded one of the most prestigious grants from the National Institutes of Health: the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, carrying $1.5 million over five years. His research focus is on nontraditional drug discovery. His lab is shedding light on how protein snippets called cyclic peptides can be used to inhibit cancer and other diseases. Since these peptides are formed from amino acids, the building blocks of natural proteins, they are potentially able to target 100 percent of the human genome, in contrast to traditional drugs that can target only 10 to 20 percent. He tricks living organisms—yeast cells, used in making bread and brewing beer—into making the peptides. “These are more than just living test tubes,” he says. “These yeast cells can be engineered to die the same death as human cells in a disease such as Parkinson’s or cancer.

Kritzer is an assistant professor of chemistry and a member of the Tufts Cancer Center, Chemical and Structural Biology Group. His work is supported by the Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Presidential Initiatives Fund.

“We can use our technique to sort through five million yeast cells in a single week. The five million yeast cells are randomly making peptides, and only those making peptides that inhibit the disease will survive. All but a handful of the cells die, and we then look to see which peptide allowed those cells to live. In this way, we not only trick yeast into making these peptides for us, but we have the yeast tell us which ones inhibit proteins related to cancer or Parkinson’s disease. “We are especially interested in master control proteins that turn genes on and off. We seek molecules that can target these proteins and turn cancer off.” “Tufts is on the verge of being a powerhouse in science, and I am thrilled to be part of that coming-of-age. “I cannot imagine starting my career any place else. I love, love, love it here. The small size really is an advantage for a young professor. For instance, I can cold-call a researcher at the School of Medicine to collaborate and he or she will return the call within days, and we can have a collaboration set up within weeks. “I have three undergrads in my lab. I wanted to be at a place that gave me the resources for a world-class research program, but I also wanted to be at a place that cared about teaching. I love teaching here. The students are so into it—they respond with alacrity to everything I give them. They rise to the challenge and ask for more.”

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Scheutz is an associate professor of cognitive and computer science and the director of the Human-Robot Interaction Laboratory. He is supported by grants from the Richard A. and Susan F. Smith Presidential Initiatives Fund, and the Michael and Christina Gordon Fund.

Matthias Scheutz, Ph.D. “We are moving toward a human-robot society.”

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cheutz holds two Ph.D.s and prior faculty positions in computer science and engineering, cognitive science, and philosophy of science. Currently he is working with other Tufts faculty to develop a joint Ph.D. program in cognitive science. “He challenges students to implement their ideas of what it takes to make robots smart, while asking them to reflect on the ethical and societal implications of technology,” says Carla Brodley, professor and chair of computer science. Scheutz’s research is focused on enabling robots to interact with people using natural language. “Conversations, sentence fragments, the kind of spontaneous speech we use: how do we incorporate this language processing into artificial intelligence? It’s very easy for people, but hard for machines,” he says. “We are moving toward a human-robot society. We already have lots of simple robots like robot vacuum cleaners, robot toys, and

rescue robots, but this is only the beginning. For future, more complex robots, the goal is to give them instructions in natural language— so your household robot will be able to prepare dinner for you when you come home at eight. This degree of naturalness won’t be realized any time soon. But what we are learning now sheds light on cognitive processes in humans, on how people talk and interact and understand each other. “Tufts is small, and people are talking to each other. I was attracted by the prospect of building a graduate program in cognitive science that will bring together expertise in language, philosophy, psychology, biology, and engineering. “It’s important for undergrads to become involved early on in research, to ask questions and then work on them. I encourage my students in computer science, If you think you have a way to get robots to recognize objects or navigate through the building, then go do it!”

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Jamie Maguire, Ph.D.

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aguire is a young, energetic scientist studying the signaling of a brain receptor called the gamma-aminobutyric acid or GABA receptor and its relevance to depression and epilepsy,” says Philip Haydon, Annetta and Gustav Grisard Professor and chair of neuroscience. “Her ability to integrate cell and molecular approaches to studying mechanisms underlying neurological disorders and psychiatric states promises to provide entirely new insights into these conditions. She has come to us with rigorous training and is a highly interactive scientist who we are certain will provide today’s discoveries for tomorrow’s cures. “Philanthropy has played a significant role in getting people like Jamie here. Generous support received from individuals and foundations is enabling the School of Medicine to recruit talent of her caliber and commitment.” “My lab looks at how stress triggers different neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders ranging from epilepsy to depression,” Maguire says. “For example, patients who have epilepsy don’t have seizures all the time—seizures are triggered, most commonly by stress. We are trying to find out how stress triggers epilepsy, by looking at the neurons that control the body’s physiological response to stress. “Finding a piece of the puzzle that explains something unknown is exhilarating. Since my background is in epilepsy I hope my work will make a difference in the lives of people who suffer from this disorder. There still are patients who are given lobotomies—a medieval practice! I hope that can be eliminated. “I’m delighted to be at Tufts,” she says. “The department has been incredibly supportive. The startup funds allowed me to hit the ground running and be really productive early. This is a tight-knit community full of people who are working together toward common goals.

“Today’s discoveries for tomorrow’s cures”

Maguire is an assistant professor of neuroscience at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences. University funds for recruitment and lab setup expedited her preparations to commence research and teaching in the neuroscience department.

“The close relationship between the students and faculty is very enjoyable. When I took my first neuroscience course I was hooked. I wouldn’t have been unless I’d had that experience of being taught. That’s what excites me about teaching.”


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Belief Brought

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Tisch College is a role model for other universities on how to engage not just students, but the entire university community in the important task of repairing the world,” says President Bacow. “And of course Tisch has had an enormous impact on Tufts. You see it in the students and the faculty we recruit. Tisch College is now absolutely central, not only to our admissions strategy, but to our identity as a university.” Six years ago at Tufts’ campus on the site of an 11th-century Benedictine monastery in France, President Lawrence S. Bacow convened the Talloires Conference, the first international gathering of the heads of universities devoted to strengthening the civic roles and social responsibilities of higher education.

ment as a core value of its mission. At the vanguard is Tufts’ Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, which celebrated its 10th anniversary this year as a leader in civic education whose model and research are setting the standard for higher education’s role in civic engagement.

The meeting of 29 university presidents, rectors, and vice chancellors from 23 countries gave rise to the Talloires Declaration on the Civic Roles and Social Responsibilities of Higher Education, in which signatories committed their institutions to educating for civic engagement while applying greater resources to the needs of their communities.

Tisch is the flagship for active citizenship at Tufts. What was then called the University College of Citizenship and Public Service was launched in 2000 with seed money from thenTrustee (now Trustee Emeritus) Pierre Omidyar, A88, and Pam Omidyar, J89, both co-chairs of Beyond Boundaries. In 2006, Trustee and fellow campaign co-chair Jon Tisch, A76, chairman and CEO of Loews Hotels and co-chairman of Loews Corp., made the $40 million naming gift that secured the future of the college.

The Talloires Network born at that conference now has grown to nearly 200 universities worldwide, each committed to civic engage-

Rather than offer its own degree, Tisch College partners with every school at Tufts to provide active citizenship opportunities for every student, with the aim of building a culture of active citizenship throughout the university. And so you have the Citizenship and Public Service Scholars; the Tisch Active Citizenship Summer Program; the Tisch Scholarships; the Presidential Awards for Citizenship and Public Service; the Civic Engagement Fund; and more—dozens of programs that infuse the university with a spirit of civic engagement and social responsibility. What started as an experiment has become an integral part of Tufts. “Active and engaged citizenship” has become a university hallmark.


to Life Tisch Scholars

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“This is a very powerful experience.”

or 15 senior Tisch Scholars, a recent trip to Treasure Beach, Jamaica, served as part of the culmination of their four years in the Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service Scholars program. Senior scholars volunteered 10 days of their winter break learning firsthand about social responsibility, sustainable development, and empow­ erment through education—the commu­ nity’s and their own. Mindy Nierenberg, Tisch College senior program manager, says, “In their first year, scholars take a course called Education for Active Citizenship, which lays the foundation for engaging responsibly in new communities.” From there, scholars work individually on civic engagement projects in Tufts’ local host communities, and finally—in the newest component of the program—travel abroad to gain a common international perspective on active citizenship.

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Matthew Kincaid, A11, academically—and literally—showed Treasure Beach students how to soar during his service trip.

“What’s amazing is that some scholars are first-generation college students, or students who would never have been able to afford something like this,” says Nierenberg. “Funds from Tisch College equalize access and provide students with an opportunity that is truly transformational. They come back to local projects and view them in a larger context—this is a very powerful experience, especially for those who don’t have the means to study abroad.”

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The service trip was organized in partnership with Breds Treasure Beach Foundation, a grassroots organization led by a cross-section of Treasure Beach community leaders. Adam Evans, A11, had the opportunity to work one-on-one with special needs students. “What was really interesting and a little bit scary was that we were put right into positions of great responsibility,” says Evans. “The difference from sitting in a class and reading about issues in a textbook is witnessing the challenges these children face. Even more important than my learning experience is the fact that we were then able to document their needs and get services for those children, which would never have happened otherwise. I consider this experience to be one of the most important things I’ve done at Tufts, and one of the most fulfilling things I’ve ever done—it has changed the way I view myself, service, and education as a whole.”

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“I can’t overstate the impact as a teaching experience.”

Lerner Spay/Neuter Clinic

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he Luke and Lily Lerner Spay/Neuter Clinic at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine provides students surgical training while serving pets in need. The mission is to instruct veterinary students in the best practices of smallanimal sterilization surgeries, to collaborate with shelters to meet community needs for low-cost services, and to provide the surgical training component for the Tufts Shelter Medicine Program. “The clinic offers our students valuable opportunities to interact with pet owners, to palpate an abdomen, to give an injection,” says Dr. Emily McCobb, V00, VG02, director of the Shelter Medicine Program. “You can see the light bulb go off over their heads. I can’t

overstate the impact as a teaching experience. It gives them a chance to put into practice all they have been learning in their coursework. “We offer spaying and neutering at either no cost or very little cost, and while we make back revenue from the fees charged, it’s not enough to cover the added costs of a teaching program. So philanthropy has been huge and we depend heavily on grant funding. Our vaccines and other medications are donated by corporate sponsors. We’re truly grateful for the ongoing support from both big and small donors.” Jessica Brown, V13, and KimKhanh Tran, V14, work on the tech crew at the clinic, cleaning instruments, preparing surgical packs, giving vaccines, and implanting microchips in dogs and cats. As second- and first-year students, respectively, they do not yet perform surgery, but they provide valuable assistance when procedures are done on animals from area shelters and pets belonging to low-income owners. The students also help at the oncea-month Feral Cat Spay/Neuter Clinic for felines trapped in Worcester, to be spayed or neutered, innoculated, then released again. “It can be a very high-stress environment, but I find work to be very cathartic,” says Brown, a Rhode Island native who thought about getting a Ph.D. in socio-linguistics, but then took a job at a Providence veterinary clinic for cats and loved it. The owner of two cats and a dog, all adopted shelter animals, she hopes to go into feline practice. “I really enjoy when I’m checking a patient out to an actual owner,” Brown says. “I get to go over medication and aftercare, and you can tell people are really appreciative.” Tran, originally from Los Angeles, an aspiring wildlife veterinarian, says she values her interactions with the animals at the clinic. “It does touch a heartstring,” she says. “With the feral cats, I wonder sometimes if we are making a difference. But we are making a difference.”

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“The family business of aiding others”

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he doctor-patient relationship is about trust, building a strong foundation, and most importantly, dignity. “When someone’s in a hospital room and a ­hospital gown, they’re not really themselves,” says Gus Crothers, M11, a fourth-generation physician. “In the outpatient clinic, patients come in under their own power and you get a better sense of who they are and, hopefully, are able to build a close relationship with them.” Those doctor-patient bonds are also at the crux of the deire of Kathryn Zioto, M12, MPH12, to become a primary care physician—and the first doctor in her family. “There’s so much more to medicine than pathophysiology,” says Zioto, whose travel to Bolivia as a teenager to treat childhood burn victims planted the first seed of a career in medicine. “I believe that socioeconomic status, cultural identity, support networks, and other aspects of the biopsychosocial model are enormously influential on a person’s health.” “One of the things that drew me to primary care is the continuity of care,” says Crothers. “You see your patients over and

over again for years.” Medicine is all in the family for Crothers; he admits that nothing else inspired him as much as the family business of aiding others—and no other school rivaled Tufts’ reputation. “The Tufts family medicine department has a strong mentoring program set up in that they have really enthusiastic physicians who encourage primary care to everyone. And for those students who take an interest, they really take them under their wing and just push the strength of the profession: all of the rewarding aspects, all of the challenges, all of the reasons why smart, young, enthusiastic people need to go into it.” “We are fortunate at Tufts to have had philanthropy that played a significant role in the development and support of our growing family medicine department,” says Dr. Randy Wertheimer, chair of the Department of Family Medicine. “The Jaharis family understood the importance of family medicine and primary care long before it became a national focus. They have supported our efforts in teaching and now in research, allowing us to hire talented faculty who are magnets for student interest.”

“The Jaharis family understood the importance of family medicine and primary care long before it became a national focus. They have supported our efforts in teaching and now in research.”


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Spring 2011

From fitness and athletic venues, to residence halls, student centers, classrooms, and research labs, Tufts has added the spaces and places that enable the individual to thrive. With renewed and enhanced facilities, each campus has adapted to meet the growing and shifting needs of its community.

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The Stage Is Set “Assembling a Swiss watch, in a ship, in a bottle.” That is how President Lawrence S. Bacow described the work done by construction workers and architects in adding five stories to the School of Dental Medicine in the middle of one of Boston’s most densely populated neighborhoods without stopping work or classes in the building. The remarkable $68 million Vertical Expansion Initiative that added 95,000 square feet to One Kneeland Street while raising the building from 10 to 15 stories has transformed teaching, research, and clinical care at the dental school. “They see the space and say ‘wow!’” says Mark Gonthier, associate dean of admissions and student affairs. Adds Seth Paparian, D86, “It makes me want to go back to school.” The Vertical Expansion Initiative has enabled the dental school to transcend physical limitations that resulted from its growth and success

as an institution. As such the project provides a most eloquent expression of Beyond Boundaries, Tufts’ university-wide campaign. Similar projects made possible by the generosity of alumni, parents, and friends of the university have remade the face of Tufts on all three of its campuses in Massachusetts. In Medford, Sophia Gordon Hall is the university’s newest and “greenest” dormitory; the Perry and Marty Granoff Music Center gives the Boston area one of its finest new venues for the performing arts; The Fletcher School’s Cabot Intercultural Center, Mugar Hall, and Ginn Library have undergone a striking renovation; and the Steve Tisch Sports and Fitness Center, currently under construction, will underscore the university’s commitment to healthy living. A café and rooftop garden at Tisch Library make the intellectual center of the university a social

center as well. Historic Cousens Gym has been renovated; a national champion men’s lacrosse team calls Bello Field home; and oarsmen and -women row from a striking new boathouse on the Malden River. At the Health Sciences campus in Boston, a new simulation lab offers state-of-the-art technology to hone medical students’ clinical skills, while a major renovation of the campus center has provided new space for learning communities as well as an inviting cafeteria and fitness center. And at the Cummings School in Grafton, a new isolation unit enables better care for horses and other large animals, while the Agnes Varis Campus Center and Auditorium form a hub of activity for the veterinary school community. This is a story of more than bricks and mortar. It is a story of how philanthropy has transformed the student experience across the university.


Distler Performance Hall “…to explore, change things, and go further.”

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ast and present stand side by side for Tufts Opera Ensemble: it was only a few years ago that the potted plants and fireplace of Alumnae Lounge were makeshift mainstays of each performance “set.” Nowadays the ensemble has not only graduated from the Alumnae Lounge to its neighbor, the Perry and Marty Granoff Music Center, members are also graduating with impressive musical resumes—thanks in large part to the opening of the Distler Performance Hall. “The Granoff building has made a huge difference in the performance life at Tufts,” says Tufts Opera Ensemble Director Carol Mastrodomenico. “I have watched students sing full opera roles with orchestra because of this space. The growth both musically and dramatically has been tremendous.” This spring, Tufts Opera Ensemble performed Kurt Weill’s the Threepenny Opera, its third full opera in Distler Hall. Members of the Threepenny cast appreciate that performing in a state-of-the-art acoustically innovative space for an audience of 300 is no ordinary opportunity. “I’ve only ever known Distler as a recital hall, but now we have the lights and the sets—it’s exciting,” says Suzanne Lis, A13. “This role was a true introduction to being on stage a lot, and I loved being constantly challenged to explore, change things, and go further.”

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“The electricity of stepping on stage, of connecting with an audience in that moment, is unique.”

Long-time ensemble member Doug Helman, A11, agrees. “The electricity of stepping on stage, of connecting with an audience in that moment, is unique. You can’t get it anywhere else.” Also unavailable anywhere else: veteran guest-stars President Lawrence S. Bacow and Adele Fleet Bacow. “That was fun,” says Helman, “and they were very comfortable on stage!” As for the final bow: “It feels like months and months of worry and stress and hard work were completely, totally, and absolutely worth it. Music is

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what I’ve chosen to do at Tufts,” he adds, “and this space has really allowed a lot more to happen than might have—we’re beyond lucky.” Department of Music Chair Joseph Auner says that while the Granoff Music Center opened four years ago, “I know that for all the thousands of students, faculty, staff, and members of the community who walk through its doors, the transformative impact of this facility and all its musical resources is just beginning.”

In Distler, Tufts Opera Ensemble has found a space to encompass fullscale productions and give students like Lis and Helman the roles of a lifetime.

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Fourth-year students and teaching assistants (in green scrubs, from top) Andrew Zwers, Muddassar Ahmed Tukdi, and Steven Nguyen (also at left) work in the center with first-year students during a pre-exam practice session.

Simulation Learning Center “Structured for easier access to answers” 20

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few nights a week as One Kneeland Street closes up shop, the new Simulation Learning Center on the 14th floor is still buzzing: To help prepare first- and secondyear students for their practical exams, fourth-year students and teaching assistants like Shauna Basil, D11, Diana Esshaki, D11, and Steven Nguyen, D11, are not only providing peer tutoring, but also honing their teaching skills and continuing the dental school’s tradition of giving back. “It’s a really wonderful system,” says Dean Lonnie Norris. “I’m so impressed when I see the TAs—they look like junior faculty members. I can see them maturing and becoming more knowledgeable themselves through teaching.” Esshaki adds, “I want to teach—and this is a great learning environment for that.”

At roughly 10 to 15 students per TA, first- and second-years are not only benefitting from a hightech clinic that eases the transition from practice to reality, they’re able to break down their problems in a more intimate setting with folks who know the routine. “Our sessions are more structured for easier access to answers, versus a lecture where there are 180 students in the room,” says Nguyen. Students are able to work on more than one project at a time while interacting with successful fourthyears. “They can see that although this is a difficult period for them in their curriculum, there is a light at the end of the tunnel,” adds Basil, proof positive of the system. Dean Norris adds, “Annual fund dollars and financial support are so important because they give us that extra boost to keep our facilities like the Simulation Learning Center technologically advanced. And while the lab is an impressive sight to see on its own, when the activity is in there, that’s when the real life and significance of what we’re doing shines through.”

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Agnes Varis Campus Center and Auditorium

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“To gather, study, eat, exercise, work, and play”

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he sounds of music—and an occasional dog howl—filled the Agnes Varis Campus Center Auditorium as talented veterinary students presented a tuneful thank you to the volunteers of Tufts Paws for People, a program that sends pets on visits to elder-care facilities, the Grafton and Shrewsbury public library reading programs, and a residential program for at-risk adolescents. “The Concert for the Animals” in 2010 debuted the veterinary school’s new C3 Yamaha Concert Grand Piano, with pianist Melissa Doolin, V13, playing Debussy’s Children’s Corner suite, and Emily Roye, V13, performing a medley of songs about animals by the American composer Samuel Barber. Agnes Varis, H03, a member of the Cummings School’s Board of Overseers and a Tufts trustee emerita, and a lover of animals and of music, provided major gifts for the campus center and auditorium and the piano. The concert was just one of a full schedule of events and activities that have helped make the Varis Campus Center and Auditorium the heart of the campus community in Grafton. For example, in recent months, the Varis Center has played host to

a weekend-long symposium on animal behavior; jazz concerts as part of a campus performing arts series; and once-a-month “Tuesdays at Tufts” lectures as part of a continuing-education program for area veterinarians. Students pack the center’s Elms Café, bookstore, and fitness center and attend lectures in the 173-seat auditorium. Student meeting and study spaces—as well as a lounge with pool and foosball tables—add to the student experience.

“To have one area for our campus community to gather, study, eat, exercise, work, and play has been a dream for the Cummings School throughout our 30-year history,” says Dean Deborah T. Kochevar, D.V.M., Ph.D. “The Agnes Varis Campus Center is the new hub of campus life here, and we are deeply appreciative of the support from Dr. Varis and the school’s friends that allowed this renovation to take place.”


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Spring 2011

Honoring the Bacow Era When Lawrence S. Bacow announced he would be stepping down as Tufts’ president, friends wanted to honor the indelible impact he and Adele Fleet Bacow have had on the university community over the past 10 years. Scholarship funds will further the Bacows’ efforts to make a Tufts education accessible to exceptional students. And a beautiful new sailing pavilion on the Mystic Lakes will recall the Bacows’ venturesome spirit while enabling future generations to enjoy their favorite pastime. In this section, Blueprint looks at just a few of the many generous gifts that have been made in ­recognition of a couple who themselves have given so much to Tufts.

Enabling Excellence No achievement is more dear to the Bacows than the fact that Tufts has become more accessible to deserving students, regardless of financial means. Increasing the resources to sustain and enhance this capability–for decades and generations to come–motivates forward-thinking alumni and will continue to be among the university’s highest priorities.

Bacow/Gordon Endowed Scholarship A new scholarship named in honor of President Lawrence S. Bacow and Adele Fleet Bacow will enable deserving students to gain a college education, in the hope they’ll help others who follow in their footsteps. The Bacow/Gordon Endowed Scholarship established by Michael, A87, and Christina Gordon will be awarded each year to a student with strong academic credentials and leadership potential who otherwise would not be able to attend Tufts. “We share with the Bacows the hope that this scholarship will help generations of students change the trajectory of their lives—and that these students in turn will do the same for future generations,” the Gordons said.


The Gordons are longtime benefactors of Tufts, having given generously toward scholarship aid, faculty development, Hillel, and the President’s Marathon Challenge, among other things. Mr. Gordon is a partner and cofounder of Vinik Asset Management and a member of the ownership group of the Boston Red Sox.

Merrin-Bacow Fellows Scholarship Fund Trustee emeritus Edward Merrin, A50, and his wife, Vivian, have committed $30 million to support financial aid at the university. The gift, made on the occasion of Mr. Merrin’s 60th reunion, will come to Tufts from the Merrins’ estate and create the Merrin-Bacow Fellows Scholarship Fund in honor of Tufts President Lawrence S. Bacow. Spring 2011

“I am moved beyond words that Ed and Vivian would make such a gift in my honor,” President Bacow says. “That their gift supports financial aid, my highest priority as president, makes it that much more meaningful. Countless future students will have the opportunity to study at Tufts because of the Merrins’ generosity.” Mr. Merrin, founder of the Merrin Gallery in New York, says, “My wife and I have always wanted to make gifts that could change the world in some way, even save lives. “President Bacow has said that great universities are made up of great people. If we are to be a truly great university, then we should support the very best students. There may be someone out there now with a child who would never go to college without this aid.”

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The Merrins, parents of three Tufts graduates, Jeremy, A80, University Trustee Seth, A82, and Samuel, A85, are longtime benefactors whose past gifts in support of students and faculty total nearly $9 million. Edward Merrin served on Tufts’ Board of Trustees from 1980 to 1991. He also served as chair of the Board of Overseers for the Arts, playing an instrumental role in securing funding for the Aidekman Arts Center on the Medford/ Somerville campus. The Merrins not only are Tufts parents, but Tufts grandparents. Mr. Merrin’s late brother, Seymour, A52, and cousin, Michael, A64, also are alumni.

The President’s Lawn, with Gifford House in the background, is a perennial favorite among Tufts students for gathering, recreation, and study.

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“Improving the health of individuals and communities across the country” Friedman School Bacow Scholarship

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Fitness and nutrition are causes close to the heart of Lawrence S. Bacow, whose President’s Marathon Challenge has raised nearly $3 million toward teaching and research at Tufts that support healthy living. That’s why the creation of an endowed scholarship fund in President Bacow’s name at the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy is seen as especially fitting. The Friedman School Bacow Scholarship has been made possi­ ble through the generous gifts of members of the school’s Board of Overseers. The Bacow Scholarship will provide support to train the next generation of leaders focused on improving the health of individuals and communities across the country: the outstanding doctoral students studying with faculty at the school’s John Hancock Research Center on Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Prevention. “I am touched to have this scholarship created in my name,” Bacow says. “Research and education at the Friedman School are focused on encouraging everyone to lead healthier lifestyles. I am delighted that, through the generosity of the overseers, another terrific student will have a chance to pursue such a noble and important agenda.” Elizabeth Cochary Gross, N82, NG88, a Friedman overseer and vice chair of Beyond Boundaries at the school, says the scholar-

ship acknowledges the “incredible support” Bacow has given the Friedman School during his tenure. “I got to know Larry well through the Friedman School naming festivities, and through the President’s Marathon Challenge, which went from 25 runners in 2003 to 200 runners every year since,” says Cochary Gross, whose own ties to the school include graduating from its Ph.D. program, founding its alumni association, and creating the admissions office for the school while also a member of the faculty. “His dedication of funds from each marathon challenge to the programs at Friedman, his work to help secure funds for the Hancock Center, and his personal passion for a healthy lifestyle are all instrumental in his engagement at Friedman,” she says. “We’re so excited—you have no idea,” says Miriam Nelson, director of the John Hancock Research Center. “From the moment Larry Bacow came to Tufts, he has been such a champion of our work. We started out with two people, and now we have a thriving international research center with more than 30 faculty, staff, and students. Larry has had a lasting impact on our work and on our trajectory. “I’ve been fortunate to spend many hours running with him, and have seen his personal commitment to student mentoring and teaching. I can’t think of a more fitting tribute to Larry than to have a student at the center who is a Bacow Scholar. It’s the absolute perfect tribute to his legacy.”

At the finish line of the 115th Boston Marathon on April 18, 2011, President Bacow congratulates Tess Guttadauro, A11. A competitive marathoner himself, Bacow established the annual President’s Marathon Challenge, now the largest known collegiate marathon program in the United States, to raise funds for Tufts ­programs in nutrition, medical research, and education.

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The Bacow Sailing Pavilion

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The three-floor pavilion on Upper Mystic Lake in Medford will be home to Tufts’ nationally renowned, competitive sailing program.

“Bacow has championed a universitywide effort to improve student fitness and strengthen athletics.”

hen President Bacow was told there was a desire to honor him in some way as he prepared to leave office, the marathon runner and one-time collegiate sailor said he would be most pleased by the completion of two signature projects that speak to his vision for a healthy campus. Ground was broken April 12 on one of them—the Steve Tisch Sports and Fitness Center that will form the hub for campus athletics and student fitness. Key support for this project has come from a naming gift from New York Giants Chairman Steve Tisch, A71, and pledges from members of the Athletics Board of Overseers. Meantime, the planned Lawrence S. Bacow and Adele Fleet Bacow Sailing Pavilion will match the tremendous strength and spirit of Tufts’ premier collegiate sailing program. The proposed three-floor pavilion on Upper Mystic Lake will offer storage for Tufts’ fleet of 44 boats, a modern carpenter’s shop, locker rooms for home and visiting teams, a large function room for team meetings, and an observation deck for viewing practices and regattas. The pavilion named in honor of President and Mrs. Bacow will ensure that sailing remains a vital part of the university for generations to come. Permits currently are being sought for the sailing pavilion project. It is hoped that, once necessary approvals are secured, ground may be broken on the project by late 2011. Over the past decade, President Bacow has championed a university-wide effort to improve student fitness and strengthen athletics at Tufts. In the Bacow era, Tufts’ William A. Shoemaker Boathouse, home to the Jumbo crew teams, was constructed; Bello Field, the first artificial turf field on campus, was opened; and venerable Cousens Gymnasium was renovated into a vibrant venue for hosting NCAA tournaments.

From top: women’s volleyball competes in renovated Cousens Gym; Tufts championship men’s lacrosse team in action on Bello Field; the Shoemaker Boathouse graces the banks of the Mystic River basin.

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News of the Beyond Boundaries Campaign

University Advancement 80 George Street, Suite 200-3, Medford, MA 02155

“We care.”

Spring 2011

Tufts Blueprint Spring 2011  

The Bacow Years: A Transformative Era FOR TUFTS UNIVERSITY | SPRING 2011

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