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SOUS LE SIGNE DU LION NECKLACE AND RING IN WHITE GOLD AND DIAMONDS

173 NEW BOND STREET - LONDON W1 SELFRIDGES WONDER ROOM - LONDON W1

HARRODS FINE JEWELLERY & WATCH ROOM - LONDON SW1

FOR ALL ENQUIRIES PLEASE TELEPHONE 020 7499 0005

www.chanel.com


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E s t a b l i s h e d 1 70 9 Vo l . 3 1 1 N o . 5 t a t l e r. c o m

42 PA G E

‘DENIM & DIAMONDS’

PA G E

78 ‘RENAISSANCE WOMAN’

CONTENTS ON THE COVER 42 DENIM & DIAMONDS Girls’ best friends. By Alice Edwards and Luciana Bellini

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, JASON HETHERINGTON

74

148 16 THINGS TO DO WHEN YOU CAN’T SLEEP Bring it on, insomnia...

FEATURES 78 RENAISSANCE

HOW TO PARTY LIKE A QUEEN All you need are lashings of Windsor Fizz, nursery food and a rowdy conga. By Clare Bennett

WOMAN OR DILETTANTE? Charlotte Edwardes on the multifaceted gem that is Dasha Zhukova

84 ‘I CAN’T BE

98 ‘FOR THE PRICE OF

BOUGHT...’ Zac Goldsmith’s battle to become Mayor of London. By Charlotte Edwardes

A THREE-BEDROOM LONDON FLAT... ...you get a marine reserve you can see from space.’ Why philanthropists are hitting the high seas. By Keith Dovkants

88 DOUBLE THE FUN Dreamy couture on heavenly creatures. By Bryan Adams, Gianluca Longo and Luciana Bellini CONTINUED on page 21

102 GOODBYE TO ALL THAT When the Earl of Onslow’s

family stately was destroyed by fire, he thought it was the end for Clandon Park. But the National Trust has other ideas. By David Jenkins

FASHION 29 HERE’S LOOKING AT Noor Fares and her magical jewels put a spell on Luciana Bellini 31 DON’T YOU WISH YOU’D WORN THAT Pleated skirts 32–36 TREND ALERTS Preppy stripes, lemon yellow and bonkers earrings

38 WHAT TURNS ME ON Jimmy Choo chief Sandra Choi on LA and lollies

COVER: HM THE QUEEN PHOTOGR APH: DOROTHY WILDING/ N AT I O N A L P O R T R A I T G A L L E R Y. C O N C E P T : K AT I E T H O M A S & E V E J O N E S

TATLER.COM

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E s t a b l i s h e d 1 70 9 Vo l . 3 1 1 N o . 5 t a t l e r. c o m

106 HOUSE STYLE

BE AUTY

Tuxedo time at Cottesbrooke Hall. By Sophie Goodwin

123 GO ON, LET IT ALL OUT The secret of looking beautiful after a bloody good sob. By Francesca White

TATLER ABOUT TOWN 55 THE SKIER

124 BRINGING MY

Brit giant-slalom poster boy Charlie Raposo. By Sophia Money-Coutts

SISTER BACK TO LIFE How Gavanndra Hodge came to terms with her sister’s death – almost 30 years later

56 POOL PARTY Mr Big Shot Johnny Pigozzi’s piscine portraits, by David Jenkins

60 SHALL I COMPARE THEE... How do today’s dukes stack up against their Shakespearean forebears? By Clare Bennett and Sophia Money-Coutts 63 THE DISRUPTORS

PHOTOGRAPHS: JOHNNY PIGOZZI, BRYAN ADAMS

The trailblazing team behind a one-stop online shop for prep-school parents. By Larushka Ivan-Zadeh

130 MY CLOSE-UP Quentin Jones shares her tips and tricks with Katie Thomas

132 BEAUTY FLASH Mood-lifting make-up

TRAVEL

56

135 LOVE OF A COLD CLIMATE Claudia Winkleman gives chilling a whole new meaning

PA G E

140 WAY OUT NORTH

‘ P O O L PA RT Y ’

64 WHY BE DULL?; & THE GAMES MISTRESS Monogram madness, by Ailsa Miller; and tache trickery with Emma Kennedy

Gavanndra Hodge hits the land of the midnight fun: Finland

69 ART FOR SALE

142 WHERE TO GO

Josh Spero’s lashings of fun

Truly capital hotels

70

66 MEET YOUR

RESTAUR ANTS Piquet’s one hot potato. By Jeremy Wayne

EVERYTHING ELSE 23 TATLER DIARY

NEW NEMESIS How to contend with that wretched creature who’s better than you at, like, everything. By Matthew Bell

67 QUENTIN LETTS Culture Secretary + Iron Maiden fan = the unflappable John Whittingdale

68 BOOKS Barbie gets all dolled up for Sebastian Shakespeare

72 GADGETS

Welcome to our world

Gizmos for Granny and Grandpa (and their cat). By Emma Freud

50 & 120 IT LIST Two for the price of one

HOME 115 PERFECTLY GROOMED The cow byre that was turned into Sèvres heaven. By Sophia Money-Coutts

PA G E

88

‘DOUBLE THE FUN’

S u b s c r i b e t o Ta t l e r a n d w e ’ l l g i v e y o u a p r e s e n t . . . t u r n t o p a g e 1 3 4 F a n c y a £ 1 0 , 0 0 0 h a m p e r ? T h o u g h t s o . J u s t e n t e r o u r p r i z e d r a w a t Ta t l e r. c o m

145 BYSTANDER All the fun that’s fit to print

Back Page WHAT’S IT LIKE TO BE... ...Storm, Ben Fogle’s Labrador? By Clare Bennett

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TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


Tat l er Di a ry

WIN IT! Q: When is a hamper not a hamper? A: When it’s a Special Tatler Royal Hamper! Smythson jewellery box? Check. Wedgwood tea set? Check. Mappin & Webb diamond pendant? Oh, my. Laurent-Perrier Cuvée Rosé? Yes, please. Get your mitts on this incredible giveaway at Tatler.com/prizedraws/ win-a-royal-hamper from 1 April.*

Even more amazing gifts inside...

* Not an April Fool, honest.

F R E E W I L LY Smart type We need to talk about Lionel Shriver. Or rather, she needs to talk to you – about her brilliant new novel, The andibles, and the books that inspired her at The Books that Built Me at the Club at Café Royal on 17 May, at 6.30pm. Tickets are £35 and include a present from Papier, the luxury-stationery company, a glass of Bollinger, Prestat chocolate, a six-month subscription to Tatler and a copy of the book. thebooksthatbuiltlionel.eventbrite.co.uk

Our favourite tittle-tattler, Shakespeare, died 400 years ago this month. To celebrate (you know what we mean), join us for some big Bard larks at Tatler.com.

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, SHUTTERSTOCK. ILLUSTRATION BY EMMA RIOS

THIS MONTH IN TAT L E R W O R L D

Actually, it was TARTAN knickers...

Online. Out and about. Everywhere, really

ROYA L MASTERMIND

View to a thrill Galvin at Windows is 10. We know! So hurry along to the Park Lane Hilton on 19 May at 7pm for a knees-up and a goodie bag. Tickets cost £25, are redeemable against the bar and can be bought on eventbrite.co.uk or by ringing 020 7096 6269. See page 71 for further details.

So you think you know the Royal Family? Test your knowledge with our ‘How well do you REALLY know the royals?’ quiz – only at Tatler.com.

‘You’re not wearing mink knickers, are you?’

HE SAID WHAT? To celebrate our Royal Issue, we bring you the Duke of Edinburgh’s naughtiest quotes at Tatler.com. Oh yes, there’s a few... TATLER.COM

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


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BILLAL TARIGHT

ASH KINGSTON

Billal photographs mystical jeweller Noor Fares (page 29)

Ash photographs our tux-tastic fashion story (page 106)

What’s the phrase or word you overuse the most? ‘You know?’

SCARLETT LACEY Scarlett spills all on the royals, real and fictional (Royal Special)

What’s your signature dance move? The Hip Shaker. What never fails to make you laugh?

What’s your go-to fancy-dress costume?

What’s your go-to fancy-dress costume? Sexy sweetcorn –

Posh pyjamas and slippers.

and my husband goes as the Jolly Green Giant.

What’s your worst habit? Uber. If you could get away with one crime, what would it be?

What’s your worst habit?

Snoop Dogg narrating things on YouTube.

Wearing white trousers after Labour Day.

Ignoring the washing-up.

What’s your worst habit?

What’s the best chat-up line you’ve ever heard? My dad

Eating too much cheese.

was once offered 100 camels in return for my hand in marriage.

What’s your signature dance move?

What’s your go-to fancy-dress costume?

The Limping Penguin.

A Kray twin.

CONTRIBUTORS W h a t ’s o n t h e i r m i n d s t h i s m o n t h ?

HUGO VICKERS

GIANLUCA LONGO

Hugo imagines the reign of King Charles III (Royal Special)

Gianluca styles our couture queens (page 88)

What would be your death-row meal?

TIMOTHY RENNIE

Something very light – unpleasant things happen to people when they are executed.

Tatler’s art director makes every page shine

What’s your signature dance move? An embarrassing

What’s your worst habit? Coffee. What’s your best memory?

version of the Twist.

Arriving in Mumbai to be the art director of the newly launched Vogue India.

If you could get away with one crime, what would it be? Flying first class everywhere and never paying.

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What’s your signature dance move? Any Bollywood dance move.

If you could get away with one crime, what would it be? Dressing like a 25-year-old Hoxton hipster.

What’s the phrase or word you overuse the most? ‘Fabulous.’ What’s your signature dance move? Any move that goes well with cheesy disco music.

What’s your worst habit? Not respecting queues.

If you could get away with one crime, what would it be? Stealing all of the Prince of Wales’s wardrobe.


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EDITOR KATE REARDON Editor’s assistant and events co-ordinator ELLA BALDWIN

Managing editor BEATRIZ CHOI Deputy editor GAVANNDRA HODGE Associate editor GERRI GALLAGHER Editor-at-large ANNABEL RIVKIN Senior editor DAVID JENKINS

ART Art director TIMOTHY RENNIE Deputy art director LEE PEARS Art editor CAROLYN JONES Picture editor HANNAH BRENCHLEY Deputy picture editor EVE JONES

FEATURES Features director SOPHIA MONEYCOUTTS Travel editor FRANCISCA KELLETT Commissioning editor MATTHEW BELL Assistant editor LUCIANA BELLINI Restaurant critic JEREMY WAYNE Books critic SEBASTIAN SHAKESPEARE Art critic JOSH SPERO Gadgets critic EMMA FREUD Fun editor EMMA KENNEDY

COPY Copy chief IAN RAMSEY Deputy copy chief JOHN HANEY Sub-editor KATHARINA HAHN

FASHION Style director SOPHIE GOODWIN Watches and jewellery editor ALICE EDWARDS Executive fashion and retail editor MARIELLA TANDY Acting fashion and retail editor KAREN DEEKS Bookings editor ELLE KORHALILLER Fashion associate AILSA MILLER Fashion assistants POM OGILVY, XUXA MILROSE

BEAUTY Health and beauty editor FRANCESCA WHITE Health and beauty associate KATIE THOMAS

BYSTANDER Social editor TIBBS JENKINS Photographer HUGO BURNAND

TATLER.COM Acting senior editor ANNABELLE SPRANKLEN Picture editor MICHAEL GRAY Acting online editorial assistant EMMA BEAUMONT

SUPPLEMENTS Art director TARDEO AJODHA Assistant editor, supplements CELIA THURSFIELD Editorial co-ordinator, supplements TEDDY WOLSTENHOLME

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Chief contributing editors ANNA SCOTT CARTER, NICOLA FORMBY Explorer CIARA PARKES

RUVEN AFANADOR, CLARE BENNETT, DEBONNAIRE VON BISMARCK, MARK BOLLAND, ANNA BROMILOW, ALICE COCKERELL, CRESSIDA CONNOLLY, GILES COREN, FRAN CUTLER, KEITH DOVKANTS, SUZANNE DUCKETT, CHARLOTTE EDWARDES, BEN ELLIOT, DEBORAH FELDMAN, ASTRID HARBORD, NICKY HASLAM, DAFYDD JONES, MARY KILLEN, EMILIE M CMEEKAN, PHILIP TREACY, CLAUDIA WINKLEMAN, TOM WOLFE, TOBY YOUNG Editorial business manager KITTY MACPHERSON Syndication enquiries syndication@condenast.co.uk Director of editorial administration and rights HARRIET WILSON International permissions manager ELEANOR SHARMAN

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR PATRICIA STEVENSON Assistant to publishing director OLIVIA BENNETT

Associate publisher CLARE SCHIFANO Projects director EMMA SAMUEL Account director EMMA HEUSER Fashion account director ISOBEL M c MAHON Acting fashion account director NICKI SINGH Advertising manager LUCIE BURTON Sales executive VICTORIA BARLEY Sales assistant NATASHA CALLIN Promotions director SOPHIE FAIRCLOUGH Senior promotions executive SOPHIE WILSON Creative director, promotions GAVIN SHAW Art director, promotions SAMANTHA BROWNSTEIN Senior promotions copywriter ANNA TIMONEY Regional sales director KAREN ALLGOOD Regional account director HEATHER MITCHELL Senior sales executive KRYSTINA GARNETT New York SHANNON TOLAR TCHKOTOUA (tel: 001 212 630 4913) US account manager KERYN HOWARTH Milan VALENTINA DONINI (tel: 00 39 02 805 1422) Paris HELENA KAWALEC (tel: 00 33 1 44 11 78 83) Hong Kong MATTHEW FARRAR (tel: 00 852 2581 2991)

CLASSIFIED Classified director SHELAGH CROFTS Classified advertisement manager VANESSA DAWSON Classified sales executives JENNIFER BATTING, ALEXANDRA COX

PROPERTY Group property director FIONA FORSYTH

RESEARCH Marketing director JEAN FAULKNER Deputy marketing and research director GARY READ Associate director, digital marketing SUSIE BROWN Research executive NATALIE LOVELESS Marketing manager KATIE BOWDEN Senior data manager TIM WESTCOTT

CIRCULATION Circulation director RICHARD KINGERLEE Newstrade circulation manager ELLIOTT SPAULDING Newstrade promotions manager ANNA PETTINGER Subscriptions director PATRICK FOILLERET Assistant subscriptions marketing and promotions manager CLAUDIA LONG Acting subscriptions marketing and promotions manager MICHELLE VELAN Creative design manager ANTHEA DENNING

PRODUCTION Production director SARAH JENSON Commercial production manager XENIA DILNOT Production controller ALICE AHLBERG Production coordinator SAPPHO BARKLA Commercial senior production controller LOUISE LAWSON Commercial production coordinator JESSICA BEEBY Commercial and paper production controller MARTIN MACMILLAN Finance director PAM RAYNOR Financial control director PENNY SCOTTBAYFIELD HR director HAZEL M C INTYRE Head of digital WIL HARRIS Condé Nast International director of communications NICKY EATON Deputy publicity director HARRIET ROBERTSON Acting publicity manager RICHARD PICKARD DIRECTORS Jonathan Newhouse, Nicholas Coleridge, Stephen Quinn, Annie Holcroft, Pam Raynor, Jamie Bill, Jean Faulkner, Shelagh Crofts, Albert Read, Patricia Stevenson

Deputy managing director ALBERT READ MANAGING DIRECTOR

NICHOLAS COLERIDGE JONATHAN NEWHOUSE

CHAIRMAN, CONDÉ NAST INTERNATIONAL

Published by Tatler Publishing Company Ltd (a subsidiary of the Condé Nast Publications Ltd) TATLER and BYSTANDER and the Georgian figure with spyglass are registered trademarks belonging to Tatler Publishing Company Limited, Vogue House, Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU. Tel: 020 7499 9080; fax: 020 7493 1962. Printed in the UK

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6

TATLER.COM


Fashion NOOR FARES WEARS SILK-JACQUARD & ORGANZA DRESS, POA, BY DOLCE & GABBANA. ON LEFT EAR, GOLD EARRING WITH COLOURED STONES, £6,250 (FOR PAIR); ON RIGHT HAND, FRO LEFT, GOLD & AMETHYST RING, £5,500; GOLD, DIAMOND, BLUE-SAPPHIRE & MOONSTONE RING, £3,250; ON LEFT HAND, GOLD, DIAMOND & AVENTURINE RING, £5,200, ALL BY NOOR FARES. ALL OTHER PHOTOGRAPHS: TKTKTKTKTK JEWELLERY, NOOR’S OWN. FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR & MAKE-UP BY ANNA GIBSON, USING CAUDALIE. FLOWERS BY BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. STYLED BY SOPHIE GOODWIN

Photographed by BILLAL TARIGHT

HERE’S LOOKING AT...

NOOR FARES For Noor, 29, making jewellery is all about magic. It comes from the crystals she uses and the Middle Eastern ‘evil eye’ charm – believed to have protective powers – she incorporates into many of her pieces. The daughter of a former deputy prime minister of Lebanon, she was raised in Paris, studied design at the Gemological Institute of America and has been making jewellery for six years – her latest collection, Atelier Mystique, is her first foray into high jewellery. And she’s a little bit magic in real life as well. Her favourite fancy-dress costume? ‘The Wicked Witch of the West – with full green face paint.’ LB

TATLER.COM

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


HORTENSIA COLLECTION • VOIE LACTÉE RING

L’ART DE LA JOAILLERIE DEPUIS 1780 174 New Bond Street • Harrods, The Fine Jewellery Room • Selfridges, The Wonder Room For all enquiries: 0207 495 6303


Fa sh ion

CODY HORN IN SALVATORE FERRAGAMO

ALEXA CHUNG IN GUCCI

EMILY BLUNT IN LELA ROSE

LINDY KLIM IN GUCCI

RILEY KEOUGH IN EMANUEL UNGARO

DON’T YOU WISH YOU’D WORN THAT?

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES

PLEATED SKIRTS Pleated skirts do to hips what Wonderbras do to bosoms. Make. Them. Look. Bigger. As long as you know this, and proceed accordingly, then all will be well. Pleats are not the same as a flattering Fifties A-line. Nothing of the sort. Wearing a pleated skirt successfully is basically an act of showing off; showing off boyish hips. If you are so slender that you genuinely have nothing to prove, then on goes a pleated skirt with a big, fat, sloppy jumper. Marvellous. Well done, you. Ideally, this spring you will offset the playful matronliness of your pleated skirt with a sheer top or a splash of bare tummy. Never tights. Never jackets. Never chignons. Never ‘witty’ jewellery, for fear of looking like the charismatic headmistress of a school for creative types. These pleats are for wispy little ingénues. So. If you are one of those, then... don’t you just wish you’d worn that? Otherwise, let’s gently think again. AR

CHARLOTTE GROENEVELD IN TOME

ROSAMUND PIKE IN PROENZA SCHOULER

TATLER.COM

ZENDAYA IN CRISTIANO BURANI

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


Fa sh ion PIN-UP ‘Wow, that hole is a long way away’

WOODEN BAG, £227, BY DIANE VON FURSTENBERG

JUMPSUIT, £895, BY SPORTMAX

LEATHER DRESS, £800, BY HILFIGER COLLECTION

COTTON DRESS, £1,185, BY SALVATORE FERRAGAMO JERSEY TROUSERS, £340, BY MAX MARA COTTON DRESS, £290, BY LONGCHAMP

LEATHER BAG, £2,130, BY GUCCI

RALPH LAUREN S/S 16

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STILL-LIFES: PSC. PHOTOGRAPH: NIKOL BARTZOKA/FOLIO-ID

Stripes have gone all shouty. To make up for their... unexpectedness, they have amplified. They’ve attached themselves to patrician silhouettes (so that the shape doesn’t steal their thunder), taken some steroids for muscle power and maybe a bit of backstreet Ritalin so that they can really concentrate on being noticed, and they are pulling focus. Big, fat stripes in any and every colour. Even, uneven, T-shirts, coats, separates and frocks – you never know what manner of stripe to prepare yourself for. The canvas may be preppy, but the stripes have gone centre-stage renegade. AR

SILK JACKET, £2,100, BY ELIE SAAB

MISSONI S/S 16

Preppy stripes

WOOL & LEATHER HEELS, £480, BY GIORGIO ARMANI

HOUSE OF HOLLAND S/S 16

DOLCE & GABBANA S/S 16

SILK COAT, £3,900, BY DIOR


Fa sh ion PIN-UP ‘Not posing at all, just being totally natural...’

LACE DRESS, £1,995, BY BURBERRY PRORSUM

LEATHER BAG, £1,425, BY MARK CROSS

SILK DRESS, £445, BY ESCADA

LACE SHIRT, £330, BY JUST CAVALLI

TATLER.COM

DEREK LAM S/S 16

Yellow is easier to wear than you think. It’s easier, for example, than beige. Which can make the rosiest of us look cadaverous. Or lavender. Which can thoroughly mother-of-the-bride us up. Lemon yellow is not only relevant, it’s fresh. It’s cheerful without being jolly or gung-ho. It will work at the Serpentine Party, it will also work forever on a summer’s evening by the sea with a cold beer and a warm breeze – so there’s no need to panic about the initial investment. The last word is a lemon-yellow ballgown. Wear it with a tan. And diamonds. And a big, juicy smile. AR

LEATHER JACKET, £1,070, BY KATE SPADE NEW YORK

PHOTOGRAPH: ANDREAS ORTNER. STILL-LIFES: PSC

PATENT SHOES, £495, BY JIMMY CHOO

Lemon yellow

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SILKGEORGETTE DRESS, £1,390, BY TOD’S

JOSEPH S/S 16

ROKSANDA S/S 16

PRABAL GURUNG S/S 16

ORGANZA SKIRT, £550, BY BOSS

HEADBAND, £110, BY BENOIT MISSOLIN, AT MATCHES


Fa sh ion PIN-UP ‘We come in peace’ ROSE-GOLDPLATED, £340, BY AURELIE BIDERMANN, AT MATCHES

PEARL & BRASS, £945, BY ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

ACRYLIC & SWAROVSKICRYSTAL, £810, BY GIORGIO ARMANI

SEQUIN, £200, BY PRADA

SILK, £498, BY OSCAR DE LA RENTA

PEARL, CRYSTAL & BRASS, £1,140, BY GUCCI

BRASS & CRYSTAL, £300, BY MARNI, AT MATCHES

BRASS & ALUMINIUM, £395, BY PROENZA SCHOULER

Bonkers earrings How easy is this? And how democratic. All you need to do, for immediate relevance, is find a vast and weird pair of earrings (they must be both big AND strange, mind) and whack them on your shell-likes. Monkeys, curtain baubles, overblown baroque chandeliers. Go Carmen Miranda and wear them with a turban if you have it in you, but they’ll work just as well (almost certainly better, in terms of that elusive effortless mood) with a shirt and jeans, or any kind of frock and a newly invigorated platform, and the haute way indicates that specs are their happiest fashion partner. The only rule seems to be this: wear two – the landscape where only one was cool has flown. Which is really rather excellent news. AR

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WOOD, POA, BY DOLCE & GABBANA

STILL-LIFES: PSC. PHOTOGRAPH: MARTIN SWEERS/FOLIO-ID

PEARL, £400, BY CHANEL


Moodboa r d

Los Angeles was the backdrop for the collection – I identify with the vibrant and carefree attitude of the city. The sunshine, the palm trees, the ocean... you can’t help but feel happy and upbeat when you’re there.

T

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N

W

O

H

A

TURNS M

SNAKESKIN BAG, £1,695

S/S 16

ND

RA

M I OF JIM

Y

O

Jimmy Choo has a longstanding relationship with LA – it feels like a second home. We opened our Beverly Hills store in 1999 and then hosted our first Oscar Suite in 2000, marking the start of our affiliation with the red carpet.

ACCESSORISE WITH...

Rocket ice

lolly

SNAKESKIN HEELS, £895

CHO

CH

Collection

SUEDE & LEATHER HEELS, £695

SATIN BAG, £995

FA N TA SY C AT WA L K I love architect Frank Gehry’s futuristic vision – I translated it into the construction of some of the shoes.

Tina Chow

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Jodie Foster in Taxi Driver

Chloë Sevigny

COMPILED BY LUCIANA BELLINI & AILSA MILLER. PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, SHUTTERSTOCK

SA

The palm tree is a key symbol – when I think of LA, I think of looking up and seeing those tall palms silhouetted against the blue, cloudless sky.

O

Sandra Choi has been at the Jimmy Choo helm since 2013 – but she’s been working for the brand since 1989, when, as a 17-year-old intern, she did the tea rounds for her uncle Jimmy (yes, that Jimmy) and his tiny team in their Hackney studio. Now she’s in charge of all their designs and oversees more than 180 shops in 32 countries.

The colour palette we used reflects the LA landscape – we had exuberant, fun colours like ‘Maliblu’ and coral pink, mixed in with desert neutrals like khaki and canyon.


yvesdelormeparis.com 1 Ellis St, London SW1X - 168-170 Walton St, London SW3 - 13 Hinde St, London W1U - 11 Milsom Pl, Bath BA1 - 6 Royal Parade, Chislehurst BR7


E VA N G E L I N E L I N G

Evangeline, 20, used to fence for England – she was ranked third in the country. Get her to show you her medals.

GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, £7,000, BY JESSICA MCCORMACK. PLATINUM & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY BOODLES. PLATINUM & DIAMOND BROOCH, POA, BY CARTIER. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND CUFF, POA, BY BOUCHERON DENIM DUNGAREES, £240, BY CURRENT/ ELLIOTT

DENIM & DIAMONDS And not much else... Photographed by JASON HETHERINGTON Styled by ALICE EDWARDS Words by LUCIANA BELLINI

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Je w e l l e ry M AY D O U G L A S

Twenty-year-old May’s go-to fancy-dress costume is Patsy from Ab Fab. And the love of her life? Her portly cat, Smudge. ]

WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA, BY DAVID MORRIS. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND CHOKER, POA, BY MESSIKA. WHITE-GOLD, GOLD & DIAMOND RING, £25,000, BY JESSICA McCORMACK. ON WRIST, FR TOP, PLATINUM & DIAMOND BRACELET, POA, BY HARRY WINSTON. PLATINUM & DIAMOND BRACELET, £30,800, BY TIFFANY & CO DENIM SHIRT, £100, BY ONE TEASPOON. JEANS, £168, BY VELVET BY GRAHAM & SPENCER

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L I LY J E A N

If modelling doesn’t work out for Lily, 19, she can always take to the sea – she races in the national catamaran championships every year.

WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA, BY JESSICA MCCORMACK. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY PIAGET DENIM JACKET, £280, BY FRAME DENIM

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Je w e l l e ry SOPHIE PUMFRETT

Sophie, 23, lives in London, but escapes to Gloucestershire whenever she can to be reunited with her five horses. She likes to ride them bareback. ]

PLATINUM & DIAMOND EARRINGS, £12,600, BY TIFFANY & CO. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY DIOR JOAILLERIE. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND RING, £18,700, BY PIAGET. PLATINUM & DIAMOND BRACELET, POA, BY HARRY WINSTON DENIM DUNGAREES, £295, BY M.I.H JEANS

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TESS WHELDON

Tess, 16, is a black belt in karate. She also knows her away around a Latin phrasebook – she uses it for flirting. ]

WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY DE BEERS. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BROOCH, POA; WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BRACELET, POA, BOTH BY GRAFF DIAMONDS. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND RING, ON RING FINGER, POA, BY JESSICA MCCORMACK. PLATINUM & DIAMOND RING, POA, BY BOODLES DENIM BOILER SUIT, £180, BY G-STAR RAW

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Je w e l l e ry REBEKKA SANDOK

Rebekka, 20, is freakishly bendy – if you give her a minute to warm up, she can get both legs behind her head. Golly. (

WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA, BY MESSIKA. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY CHANEL HIGH JEWELLERY. ON LEFT HAND, PLATINUM & DIAMOND BRACELET, POA, BY CARTIER. ON RIGHT HAND, WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BANGLE, POA, BY DAVID MORRIS. PLATINUM & DIAMOND RING, POA, BY CARTIER DENIM JACKET, £90, BY LEVI’S. JEANS, £226, BY FRAME DENIM

FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. MODELS: MAY DOUGLAS, TESS WHELDON AND SOPHIE PUMFRETT AT THE HIVE MANAGEMENT; LILY JEAN AND REBEKKA SANDOK AT PREMIER MODEL MANAGEMENT; EVANGELINE LING AT STORM MODELS. HAIR BY BEN JONES, USING BUMBLE AND BUMBLE. MAKE-UP BY ANITA KEELING AT JED ROOT, USING CHANEL S/S 2016 AND NO. 5 BODY CREAM. NAILS BY AMA QUASHIE AT CLM HAIR & MAKE-UP, USING MAC COSMETICS. PRODUCTION, ELLE KORHALILLER. FASHION ASSISTANT, XUXA MILROSE

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TATLER • PROMOTION

‘URBAN ARTEMIS’ SILK CHIFFON ELYSIANPOPPY-PRINT TOP. SILK CREPE LIGHT-YELLOW OMBRE PLEATED SKIRT

EVERYDAY GODDESS Zaeem Jamal’s 2016 collection puts Greek-inspired ruffles and drapes on a pedestal. Dare to dream... Hurrah! Fashion is bringing femininity back. Catwalks were a fresh parade of frills, pleats and ruches – all in sugary-sweet pastel shades. Swoon. Because, let’s face it, who doesn’t want to dress like a princess? To take the goddess vibe up a notch, look no further than Zaeem Jamal. The King’s Road-based designer is continuously inspired by myth and legend and strives to bring old-world glamour to the modern, urban-dwelling woman. Here, he delves deep into the realm of fairy tale to bring us one seriously covetable collection. There are long, cascading gowns which pool in rich silk on the ground. From luscious landscapes to the palest of blushes, these dresses come in a variety of scene-stealing shades. All feature intricate cut-out detailing on the arms, for added coquettish appeal. Heading to a super-formal summer wedding this year? Throw some curls in your hair, a spring in your step and dance your inner Aphrodite awake! ‘OMBRE The collection can be dressed down PINK-TO-WHITE’ too. Voluminous-sleeved, asymmetrically SILK CHIFFON DRAPED KAFTAN cut kaftans are bang on-trend. Pare with TOP kick-flare denim for the optimum strollingaround-the-city look. And then she lived happily ever after...

‘APHRODITE’S DAUGHTER’ SILK CREPE AND CHIFFON, DRAPED, BLUSH -PINK GOWN

For more information, please visit zaeemjamal.com Zaeem Jamal 309 King’s Rd, London SW3


Karen Deeks rounds up the month’s most splendid stuff

THE I T LIST POA, BY OSCAR HEYMAN

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e’re besotted with the Olympia International Art & Antiques Fair, which will be serving up delights such as this Oscar Heyman platinum, sapphire and diamond ring from Anthea AG Antiques Ltd between 27 June and 3 July. There will be plenty to lose your mind over, so don’t miss out. olympia-art-antiques.com

SHOWSTOPPER

ACE OF SPADE

It makes sense that Missoni should be exhibiting Missoni, Art, Colour at the Fashion and Textile Museum from 6 May. Go and marvel at the European artists who have influenced this giant of fashion. ftmlondon.org

£240 EACH, BY JO MALONE

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e’re always infatuated with Jo Malone, and their new Rare Teas fragrances – which include Silver Needle, Darjeeling and Oolong – are no exception. jomalone.co.uk

£995, BY ASPINAL OF LONDON

COME SLITHER

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f wearing Alexander McQueen designs isn’t enough, you can also wear their new fragrance, McQueen Parfum. The fashion house’s first under Sarah Burton’s direction, it is inspired by the scents of a mysterious garden at night. harrods.com

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id my heart love till now? Forswear it, sight, for I ne’er saw true beauty till this night,’ Romeo would have said had he clapped eyes on this restyled Aspinal of London Mayfair bag in nubuck python. aspinaloflondon.com £285, BY ALEXANDER MCQUEEN

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£418, BY KATE SPADE NEW YORK

David Peters combines Chinese cosmetic acupuncture with LED therapy, massage, cupping and sculpting in his Rejuvenating Facial at the Bulgari Spa. Spring out with clear, toned skin. £190 for 75 minutes (david peterslondon.com).

ood news, everyone: Kate Spade New York is about to open its fourth UK store, on Regent Street, and it’s the biggest yet – which means you can pick up something fabulous like this classic trenchcoat. You may then need to investigate the handbags. The jewellery and watches are also rather lovely. So are the shoes. And don’t forget the stationery. You’ll need some of that. And the home decor. katespade.co.uk

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he reason you may be feeling frustrated with your life is because you don’t own this 18ct white-gold and diamond Cassiopée cuff by Messika. Just putting it out there. messika.com ]

POA, BY MESSIKA


It Li st

Crete cred POA, BY CHOPARD

STAMEN ALIVE

If you’re a fan of Victoria Hislop’s novel The Island, you must stay at Crete’s Blue Palace Hotel. It has marvellous views of Spinalonga, the island that inspired the book. Check out their amazing new Isola beach club too. bluepalace.gr

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et rid of your rings. You need new ones – like this one from Chopard’s Fleurs d’Opales collection: rhodium on 18ct white gold and titanium, set with diamonds, garnets, sapphires and tsavorites. And LOOK at that 14ct opal. chopard.com

JUST PEACHY

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Time to go au naturel

£39, BY BOBBI BROWN POA, BY GRAFF DIAMONDS

Fendi has opened a hotel in Rome with seven incredibly glamorous, individually styled suites – and a Zuma restaurant. We’re hysterical!!! (fendiprivatesuites.com)

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NAIL THE NATURAL LOOK WITH BOBBI BROWN’S NUDE FINISH ILLUMINATING POWDER. SHEER AND BRIGHTENING, WITH A SOFT PEARL EFFECT FOR FLAWLESS MERMAID SKIN. BOBBIBROWN.CO.UK

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IN THE PINK

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£450, BY GIUSEPPE ZANOTTI

t’s time to solve all your shoe problems. The solution is these Giuseppe Zanotti suede mules in blush pink. We’re struggling to think of a scenario where they wouldn’t be your go-to pair and we’re failing. You need them. Don’t dally, please. giuseppezanottidesign.com

here’s only one way to celebrate spring – and that’s with these flowery Carissa earrings by Graff Diamonds. They’re made of diamonds and sapphires, they won’t wilt and it doesn’t matter if you forget to water them. What could be more cheerful? graffdiamonds.com

£29, BY DOLCE & GABBANA

WE ARE OBSESSED WITH DOLCE & GABBANA’S MATTE LIPSTICK AND ITS VELVETY TEXTURE WITH A TOUCH OF PINK. FIND YOUR PERFECT MATCH AMONG THE EIGHT NEW SHADES. HARRODS.COM.

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AH, YSL TOUCHE ECLAT, THE FOURTHEMERGENCY SERVICE FOR DULL AND TIRED SKIN. IT’S NOW AVAILABLE IN THREE ‘SLOGAN’ LIMITED EDITIONS, FOR YOUR AMUSEMENT AND PLEASURE. YSLBEAUTY.CO.UK £25, BY YSL TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6

TATLER.COM

Add up to three initials to your new trench with Burberry’s monogramming service. You can even do it online and see the results before ordering. We feel an obsession coming on (uk.burberry.com).(


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CHARLIE RAPOSO WEARS WOOL JUMPER, £70, BY FILA. DENIM JEANS, £98, BY ALL SAINTS. GOGGLES BY DAINESE D. FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR & MAKE-UP BY RACHEL JONES AT TERRI MANDUCA, USING GIORGIO ARMANI COSMETICS. STYLED BY AILSA MILLER

THE SKIER The Norwegians and the French make excellent, nimble skiers, whereas we produce clumsy bumblers like Eddie the Eagle. But all that is about to change, because this is Charlie Raposo, who, aged 20, is already Britain’s best-ranked giant-slalom skier. ‘Slalom is with the shortest skis and the shortest, tightest turns,’ he explains. ‘Giant slalom is with bigger, faster, longer skis.’ Charlie – cute, polite, handshake of an East End boxer – grew up in Wiltshire and first went skiing in Verbier aged seven. Speed was in the blood. ‘My father was Formula 1 crazy, and I started go-karting young. He wanted my sister to be the first F1 driver in the family.’ But it was on skis that Charlie excelled, which led to a tricky schooling decision: ‘I was supposed to go to Eton, Marlborough or Radley, but none of those were going to work with skiing.’ So he went to a ski academy in Vermont called Green Mountain Valley, cramming in the odd bit of studying between racing sessions. He graduated two years ago with an American twang, a preppy dress sense and the determination to ski for Britain at the 2018 Winter Olympics, in South Korea. He’s just finished his season schussing down the slopes of Europe and North America for a team called Global Racing, which trains young British skiers. He will summer at his sister’s flat in Fulham, which is handy because it’s near Lomax, his gym, where he strength-trains and tries to force down 3,000 calories a day. Partying is out. ‘There’s a difference between the guy in 15th place and the guy in first, and it’s focus and commitment and knowing there’s no other option,’ he says. Quite right. Let’s show those Continental Europeans. SM-C

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POOL PARTY There is nothing Johnny Pigozzi likes quite so much as famous people in their bikini bottoms frolicking around his Côte d’Azur pool. Which is why he’s devoted a whole book to them. By David Jenkins TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6

TATLER.COM

ALL PHOTOGRAPHS: JEAN PIGOZZI

CLOCKWISE FR ABOVE, ELLE MACPHERSON & FRIEND, 1997; TAKING THE PLUNGE, C. 1970; ANNE BANCROFT & MEL BROOKS, 1988


ABOVE, BONO, THE EDGE & JACK NICHOLSON, 1994. BELOW, ALEXIA NIEDZIELSKI & BIANCA BRANDOLINI D’ADDA, 2015

Sir James Goldsmith, 1993

ook! There’s Elle Macpherson, arms coyly crossed over her breasts, lolling ecstatically in a giant inflatable pool toy. Look! There’s Gianni Agnelli’s helicopter swooping in over the sunseekers. Look! There’s Naomi Campbell, pet dogs at heel. Look! There’s Jack Nicholson, and there’s Zoë Kravitz, and there’s Uma Thurman, and there’s Martin Scorsese, and there’s Carole Bouquet, and there’s Mick Jagger, and there’s Jimmy Goldsmith, and there’s Princess Caroline of Monaco, and there is the kidney-shaped swimming pool – just by the Hôtel du Cap, in Antibes – that Johnny Pigozzi’s parents built in 1953, and in which all of the above-mentioned and many, many more big hitters of stage, screen, song and high finance have splashed and frolicked as guests of the ursine, brightly dressed Pigozzi and his camera. You don’t know who Johnny Pigozzi is? He’s the multilingual, and very clever, man who knows everyone who’s anyone; the 64-year-old heir to a French automobile fortune (Simca) who discovered that his ‘mother’ was merely his father’s wife and that he and his siblings were the children of his father’s mistress. He’s the man who’s lurking on his private island off Panama when we speak, entertaining some ‘very serious ecologists from Santa Fe’, taking them scuba-diving and ‘introducing them to my friends, the howler monkeys’. He’s the very serious collector of African art and African photography. He’s the man whose Cannes Film Festival parties are the funnest of the fortnight. And he’s the dyslexic who ‘started recording my life’ in pictures after his father gave him his first Leica when he was 11. The guy who ]

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CLOCKWISE FR ABOVE, PIGOZZI & PISCINE PAL, 1988; CHARLES SAATCHI, 1989; SIR MICK JAGGER & HELMUT NEWTON, 1990

‘They can do what they want’ – that’s the watchword for Pigozzi’s pool...

CLOCKWISE FR ABOVE, FIREWORKS OVER THE POOL, 2013; MICHAEL DOUGLAS, 1990; UMA THURMAN, 2015

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[used to spend a lot of time with Andy Warhol ‘when I was at Harvard – he taught me to be very free with the way I take pictures, no posing, just snapping away, not trying to make people look beautiful’. The man who’s a very savvy investor, early into hedgefunds and very much, and very profitably, into Silicon Valley (Facebook, Apple, the Diamond Foundry), particularly under the wing of his ‘very good friend’ Steve Jobs – ‘the last photograph I took was of him walking towards the pool holding an iPhone. But it was not at the pool, so it isn’t in the book.’ Because ‘at the pool’ is the key to Pigozzi’s latest book, Pool Party – ‘a bit like a theatre, you know, a theatre with only one set’. The ingredients for the perfect pool party are simple, he says in his gruff, mildly accented English: ‘Fun people, pretty girls, nice food, good drinks and to be very relaxed. The girls can flirt and wear little bikinis and the guys can look at them, people can swim, people can have conversations.’ And what conversations: there’s a photograph of Koo Stark, Prince Andrew’s ex, talking poolside to the novelist Graham Greene, who’s got a big gold Rolex round his wrist. Where had he bought it? Pigozzi asked. Oh, said Greene, Fidel Castro gave it to him – he’d never think of buying one himself. As for the swimwear... well, Pigozzi has noticed two things: men are wearing bigger and ever more colourfully printed trunks – Speedos are so yesteryear. And ‘in the Sixties and Seventies a lot of the women used to wear only the bottom part of the bikini and that is completely finished – very few girls take their tops off now, which is very odd. I don’t care, they can do what they want, but it’s strange how they’ve become more prude [sic] over the years.’ ‘They can do what they want’: that’s the watchword for Pigozzi’s pool. But get in there while you can. It’s already swarming with huge, multi-hued, blow-up animals – Pigozzi’s £10 version of the £36m Jeff Koons shiny animals ‘I really like’. And he enjoys those £10 playthings so much that he’s thinking, ‘This year it might be fun to fill the pool with them completely, so you won’t be able to use it.’ But never mind: round the edges, the Pigozzi pool party will run and run, the food great, the rosé chilled, the men handsome and the women drop-dead gorgeous. With or without bikini tops. ( Pool Party is published by Rizzoli on 19 April at £35.


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SHALL I COMPARE THEE TO A SHAKESPEAREAN DUKE? It’s 400 years since William Shakespeare’s death! To celebrate, we have matched his fictional dukes to their modern-day counterparts. By Clare Bennett and Sophia Money-Coutts

Th e D u k e o f Yo r k SHAKESPEARE’S

TODAY ’S

f rom Henr y VI, Parts 1, 2 & 3

Pretender to the throne and father of the future Richard III, York has his eyes on the prize and will do whatever it takes to get it. † Livid that Henry’s grandfather pretty much stole the crown from his father, Richard II – hence his conviction that he should be ruling the roost. † Persuades Henry IV to give him the Duchy of York but secretly plots to go after the crown. † Stabbed to death by Queen Margaret and Lord Clifford, then has his severed head displayed wearing a paper crown. Ouch.

vs

The Queen’s second son, Andrew, 56, doesn’t mind that he’s not going to inherit the throne, because that will allow him to devote more time to working as a representative for British trade. • Fought in the Falklands. • Likes travelling. • Has two daughters who also quite like travelling – Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie – as does his ex-wife, Sarah, Duchess of York. • Supports Norwich City FC , likes playing golf and is gadget mad. • Signs off all his tweets with the initials ‘AY’.

Th e D u k e o f C o r n wa l l SHAKESPEARE’S

TODAY ’S

from King Lear

Brutal and ruthlessly ambitious, the Duke of Cornwall is a terrifying, power-obsessed psycho who will make sure he keeps a firm grip on power, no matter what. † Married to Regan, Lear’s horrible daughter. † Has a terrible temper. † He and his horrible wife gouge out the eyes of Gloucester to punish him for palling up with Lear. Cornwall even stamps on them. Gross. † Killed by one of Gloucester’s servants. No one is sad (Regan doesn’t count because she ends up dead).

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Charming and actually quite shy, the Duke of Cornwall is the Prince of Wales, 67. As the eldest son of the monarch, he was proclaimed Duke aged 24 at Launceston Castle in Cornwall, in a ceremony that also saw him collect various ‘feudal’ dues. These included 100 silver shillings and a salmon spear. Useful. • Happily married to the lovely Duchess of Cornwall. • Has been known to lose his temper over things like ugly buildings – but has never gouged out any eyes.

Th e D u k e o f N o r f o l k SHAKESPEARE’S

TODAY ’S

from Richard II

Edward, 59, is the 18th Duke, although he doesn’t actually live anywhere near Norfolk – the family seat is Arundel Castle, in Sussex. • Has beef with no one. He’s just a good egg who is unswervingly devoted to the monarchy and, as Earl Marshal, responsible for important things like coronations and state funerals. • Is still head of a very Catholic family. • Has separated from his wife, Georgie, with whom he has five children. • Likes shooting rather than fighting holy wars.

Famous for his loyalty, this Duke of Norfolk remains devoted in the face of unjust treatment. † Has some serious beef with Henry Bolingbroke, Duke of Hereford, who accuses him of treasonable crimes like stealing from the crown and plotting against England. † Banished by the King for killing his uncle in spite of the fact that it was the King who ordered him to do it – and everyone knows it. Some people! † Spends his time in exile fighting in holy wars and then dies in Venice, still resolutely loyal.

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TODAY ’S

from Richard III

‘Deformed, unfinish’d’, Prince Richard, Duke of Gloucester, is the brother of Edward IV and goes on to become Richard III. His was ‘the winter of our discontent’. You know the guy. † Has a hunchback. † Tricks Edward into believing a family member whose name starts with ‘G’ will kill Edward’s heirs. Does away with the third brother, George, even though the ‘G’ refers to the Gloucester of his title. Thoroughly tricky customer. † Marries Anne Neville but then murders her and marries his niece. Naughty. † Has his nephews killed to secure the crown. † Ends up getting bludgeoned to death at the Battle of Bosworth and is eventually found under a car park.

vs

This is quite spooky – the current Duke of Gloucester is ALSO a prince called Richard. Doesn’t have a hunchback. He’s the Queen’s 71-year-old cousin and a conscientious Old Etonian who qualified as an architect but assumed royal duties following the death of his older brother, Prince William, in 1972. • Is patron, obvs, of the Richard III Society, a determined group who insist that Richard was a misunderstood chap and were behind the exhumation (from that car park) and reburial of his remains last year. • Lives with his wife, a blonde Danish lady called Birgitte, in Kensington Palace. They have three grown-up children. • He’s devoted to charity, not into doing in family members.

PHOTOGRAPHS: BRIDGEMAN, ALLAN WARREN, GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, KOBAL COLLECTION, MOVIESTORE COLLECTION, DOMINIC O’NEILL

T h a n e /E a r l C aw d o r SHAKESPEARE’S

TODAY ’S

from Macbeth

OK – technically, he’s called Earl Cawdor these days, but handsome Colin Campbell, 53, and his family still live on the Cawdor Castle estate in Scotland. • Has no trouble with his wife, Isabella, a former fashion editor turned interior designer. The couple have four children: Lady Jean (a model), 18; Viscount Emlyn, 17; Lady Eleanor, 15; and Lady Beatrice, 11. • Does have trouble with his stepmother, the Dowager Countess Cawdor, who lives in Cawdor Castle, while Colin and his family live in a separate house on the 60,000-acre estate. He’d like the castle himself but hasn’t had much luck. • Is also haunted by ghosts, including that of the 1st Earl Cawdor.

A leading light in the field of paranoia, the Thane of Cawdor is a human masterclass in what happens when you haven’t got the balls to tell your wife to shut up but you do have crown mania. † Awarded his title after it had been prophesied by three witches. † Kills King Duncan when he comes to stay. Not your average host. † Kills his friend Banquo (who comes back as a ghost) just in case he fathers future Scottish kings. And Macduff’s family have to go too. You can’t be too careful, you know. † His wife dies of guilt and he ends up getting beheaded by Macduff, who disguises himself as a tree. Didn’t see that coming, did you?

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P r i n c e H e n ry SHAKESPEARE’S

TODAY ’S

from Henry V

(kind of )

Former wild-child Prince Hal, who proved himself to his father on the battlefield, is the wayward son come good. Possibly a bit warmongery, if we’re being honest. † Ditches his carousing past rampaging round bars with his ‘unlettered, rude, and shallow’ friends and steps up to becomes a serious king. † Gets given a chest of tennis balls by the Dauphin instead of the dukedoms he’d asked for. Pas d’accord. † Not satisfied with England’s crown, he goes after France’s too. Loves a good fight. † Probably the best person of all time at giving rallying speeches.

vs

Good old Prince Harry, 31, might have a ginger beard instead of a puddingbowl haircut, but he does in fact share a few other characteristics with his Shakespearian counterpart. • Has a band of pals like Guy Pelly and Tom ‘Skippy’ Inskip, who are devoted to him. • Isn’t averse to a bit of action. Stop it – we mean in the Army. Has done two tours as an attack-helicopter pilot in Afghanistan and looks good in uniform. • Loves a good knees-up in Chelsea pubs like the Cross Keys. Has been known to take things too far. (

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SC H O O L S L I V E ! M O N D AY 1 0 O C T O B E R 2 0 1 6 J U M E I R A H C A R LT O N T O W E R KNIGHTSBRIDGE , LONDON Book NOW for this year’s Tatler Schools Live! event – the ultimate answer to all your educational dilemmas. This unmissable day is perfect for parents contemplating private education for their children. There’s no smoke and mirrors – we bring together the top headmasters and headmistresses from the leading prep and public schools in the land to tackle all the tricky issues. With a brimming timetable of lectures, Q&As and debates, we guarantee that by the end of the day you’ll leave thoroughly clued up. me decide on aspects that I was unclear on, such as single sex vs co-ed, London day vs boarding. I am so glad I signed up

SCHOOLS LIVE! 2015 ATTENDEE

TO BOOK EARLY-BIRD TICKETS, VISIT TATLERSCHOOLSLIVE.EVENTBRITE.CO.UK

ILLUSTRATIONS: BOB WILSON

“ The event really helped


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THE DISRUPTORS They look so charming and innocent, but these three go-getters have come up with a devilishly ingenious way of harnessing the huge power of prep-school parents. By Larushka Ivan-Zadeh

KATIE WEARS SILK BLOUSE, £135, BY RELATED. DENIM JEANS, £150, BY IDA BY DONNA IDA. GORDON & CLARE WEAR THEIR OWN CLOTHES. FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR & MAKE-UP BY CELINE NONON AT TERRI MANDUCA, USING URBAN DECAY COSMETICS & KERASTASE. STYLED BY AILSA MILLER

Photographed by IMMO KLINK e all know now how powerful internet-industry insider, Gordon powers the social networks can be – they business development and Katie handles can topple regimes and make the marketing). She says what draws parents billionaires overnight. But to School Notices is the fundraising angle. what if you created a network that connected The sums raised may not buy a new science some of the richest, most influential people in block, but they are ‘significant’. Typically, they the land, via the thing that is most important go directly to the schools’ chosen charities, to them, their children? That was the genius, all without parents having to bake a single and ingeniously simple, idea that came to sodding fairy cake. Gordon Dawson and Clare Reid as they were Getting heads on board wasn’t hard once standing pitchside at the final fixture of the they’d converted their own. To quote Tatler’s Under 10B rugby season. Both parents at Schools Guide: ‘If schools were films, Cheam Cheam School, Berkshire, they have huge would be a Hollywood blockbuster, with head digital experience between them – Gordon Mark Johnson as its million-dollar megastar.’ had just sold his sports-app business, P1 He instantly gave the site his endorsement. Sports, to a Swedish company, and Clare has a ‘It is an amazing idea,’ says Johnson. ‘It seems to tap into the energy of the independent-school track record of founding successful dotcoms. parent body in a way never done before.’ ‘There was a bloke on one side of me who wanted to rent a villa in Portugal,’ says Dawson, a father-of-three. ‘And on the other someone was selling puppies,’ finishes Reid. ‘And that’s the need we wanted to fill.’ The result, a year later, after meeting hundreds of bursars, teachers and parents, was School Notices. The site takes the notion of the old-school noticeboard pinned with concert posters, lunch menus, old PE kit and second-hand flutes, and puts it online. ‘It’s a place where well-to-do, very busy people can buy stuff, sell stuff, find a nanny and safely advertise for holiday work for their older children,’ says Dawson. The most popular items? ‘Puppies – there are a LOT of puppies!’ says Reid, a dynamic mother-of-four. ‘And villas. Maybe you have a chalet in Switzerland that you wouldn’t rent via OwnersDirect, but you would consider renting to a fellow parent.’ One of the reasons it has become such a raging success – to date, 30 schools have enrolled and there are 20,500 parents using it – is that the schools themselves are totally behind the site, in part because they receive a quarter of advertising KATIE WIGGIN, revenue. ‘No one else is doing that,’ GORDON explains another Cheam parent, DAWSON & CLARE REID OF mother-of-three Katie Wiggin, who SCHOOL has a background in PR (Clare is the NOTICES

The Oxford Group preps soon eagerly signed up, as did fiercely sought-after London nurseries like Miss Daisy’s and Pippa Pop-ins. Latest recruit is Summer Fields, and the plan is to get 100 on the books this year alone. Schools pay to enrol, but it’s free for parents to use. Which means it’s cheaper than eBay, with the added bonus that you don’t have to faff about at the post office because you simply hand over goods (well, maybe not a recently sold baby grand piano) at the school gates or at your child’s next weekend match. ‘We don’t take any commission on anything that’s sold,’ confirms Gordon. ‘Then one day someone stuck a £4 million house in the Cotswolds on and I said, “Maybe we should rethink that!”’ ( schoolnotices.co.uk

‘Puppies! There are a LOT of puppies for sale’

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Why be dull? It’s all about the initial impression... By Ailsa Miller onogramming is power play. It’s the smartest way to assert your a) name (duh), b) impeccable attention to detail and c) ownership of anyone, anything and everything. Worried your boyfriend’s cheating on you? Slap your initials on all of his shirts. Flatmate pinching your linen napkins for her own dinner parties? Not if they have your name all over them. Horse trotting off into the neighbour’s field? Monogram him*. Should this appeal, look no further than Initially London. Their catchphrase is ‘If we can sew on it, we’ll monogram it’, and there’s NOTHING they can’t do. They’ll stitch on as many different letters as you like (for the quadruple-barrelled surnames among us). They’ll jazz up your dressing gown so it’s like you live permanently in Claridge’s. They’ll even recreate an old family crest in a modern-day monogram, entirely to your specifications. So stick that on your pants and call it a day – even your bottom will rule supreme. *Well, his blanket at the very least.

ALL BY INITIALLY LONDON*

Facial hair is fun, says Emma Kennedy ang on. Moustache Smash? What is this? An inevitable yet hairy slide into the perimenopause where your only hope is any passing fool with a top-of-the-range IPL hair remover? No, idiot. As if I’d bring you a board game that’s all about the chinny whisks. That said, you WILL have a

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moustache. Think of it less as a glimpse into your own horrible future and more living the hipster dream. This is it! You’ve got a moustache! Now all you have to do is open a pop-up brown-rice sushi bar in an upturned tumble dryer and your life will be complete. So. For this game you will need: one hand

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and an upper lip with lightning reflexes. The object of the game is to collect as many moustache cards as you can.‘But how do we do that?’ you wail. Hush

your beaks, I’m getting to that bit. Everyone has their own excellently tailored moustache that’s attached to the end of what can only be described as a smashy grappling stick. Your moustache is unique, so stay frosty, people, you’re going to need the eyes of an eagle. Every time a card is turned,

you’ll see a differentshaped moustache. If it’s YOUR moustache, slam your smashy moustachy stick on it before anyone else does and then crow about it endlessly. Player with the most moustache cards at the end wins. Hairy, hairy fun. Moustache Smash, £14.99, at amazon.co.uk

*SHOWER CAP, £25. OVEN GLOVE, £25. TEA TOWEL, £20. BRA, £50 (BESPOKE MONOGRAM ON AN ITEM OF YOUR OWN CHOICE). PHOTOGRAPHS: PIXELEYES

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TATLER • PROMOTION

JACK WILLS WANTS YOU Want the best summer job in America? Throwing legendary sun-soaked parties? Of course you do. Jack Wills launches its search for the next USA-based Seasonnaires...

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ummers were made for beach-chilling and surfcatching, bar-hopping and table-top dancing. And if you can get paid for having this much fun? Well, then you’ve nabbed the best summer job going – Seasonnaire for Jack Wills in America. A Seasonnaire is a party-hosting, travel-loving, people magnet who embodies everything this quintessentially British lifestyle brand is about. They bring classic Britishness to all-American kids – acting as ambassador and host – for the ultimate party-filled summer season. Intrigued? Well luckily for you, Jack Wills is on the hunt for its 2016 Seasonnaires right now. If successful, you’ll embark on the trip of a lifetime and jet off to the postcard-perfect islands of Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket on America’s East Coast. It’s an allexpenses-paid opportunity to go wild and make friends across the pond. You’ll navigate beaches, dance floors and surfer hangouts, fully immersing yourself in the American way of life. You’ll make your friends back home seriously jealous on Insta – if you have time, that is. This is one high-energy adventure in sun-drenched paradise. Think you have what it takes? Convince Jack Wills you’re a go-getter by answering the questions below. Good luck!

WANT THE SUMMER OF A LIFETIME? EMAIL SEASONNAIRES@JACKWILLS.COM BEFORE 14 APRIL 2016

WITH THIS INFO: Your name and date of birth (you’ll need to be over 21 years old) Instagram, Twitter, and any other social media usernames (must be public) Your CV Answers to the following: 1. Your Tinder tagline? 2. Your guilty pleasure(s)? 3. Your proudest achievement? One which may not be suitable for your CV... *ENTRY WILL BE CAPPED AT 3,000 APPLICANTS. ONLY A LIMITED NUMBER OF PLACES AVAILABLE. SO HURRY! TERMS AND CONDITIONS APPLY.


MEET YOUR NEW NEMESIS

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here are three names. Three. Three too many, if you ask me. I have written them down and I’m staring at them now in the knowledge that I am not a completely nice person. They are the names of three perfectly pleasant young men of approximately my age (bit younger?), intelligence (bit cleverer?), standard of looks (hotter) and general status (yes, all right, richer) whom I have known at various stages of my life. I should probably be best friends with all three. But I can’t, because I hate them. Well, maybe not hate. I don’t really wish them any actual, irreversible harm. I just wish they’d somehow disappear. They are my nemeses; people just like me, but better. The Oxford English Dictionary defines a nemesis as ‘the inescapable agent

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of someone’s downfall’ or ‘a longstanding rival’. In general life terms – rather than in Harry Potter, ‘Will I ever defeat Voldemort?’ terms – your nemesis is whoever makes you feel rubbish about your position, potency and prospects. They are the agent of your ego’s downfall. Life is A-OK till a bastard nemesis swans into view. And they’re usually nice, damn their eyes. Or, at least, no less nice than you. Which, at this moment, I accept is not that nice. One of the defining features of nemeses is that they’re always popping up just when you least want them. So you arrive at a super-swanks party you’re feeling pretty smug you’ve been asked to, and who should be there with a better placement? Or you make friends with someone exciting and powerful and add them on Facebook, only to stumble across pictures of a nemesis all cosy on

their yacht. Their house is bigger. Their fiancée’s ring is bigger. And, no doubt, so is their... oh, dear Lord, this is a NIGHTMARE. Your nemesis is you, plus a bit. One of my nemeses has actually written a book, instead of just talking about writing one. Once you have identified the fact that you have a nemesis, things only get worse. You start to feed your fixation, seizing on any nugget of information that will fan the flames of your neurosis and resentment. Somehow they exist only in terms of me. So instead of laughing at their jokes, and marvelling at their original thoughts, I find myself seething that I didn’t come up with those gags, or have that idea. This makes them all the more superior,

of course, and me the wormier. Even worse, my nemeses have no idea I feel like this, which, again, makes them the bigger people. One of my mentors, a Gloucestershire luminary, recalls his nemesis thus: ‘He was my exact contemporary. He Ampleforth, me Stonyhurst. Everything he touched turned to gold. I once commented that the Ampleforth fixture was the highlight of our rugby calendar. He replied: “Do we play Stonyhurst at rugby?”’ To have a professional rival is quite normal. In sport it’s inevitable, and likewise in showbiz. In politics it’s practically mandatory. Tony Blair was Gordon Brown’s nemesis, and it nearly ruined Brown’s professional

You seize on any nugget of information that fans the flames of your neurosis

PHOTOGRAPH: GETTY IMAGES

We are not talking about your arch-enemy – just those annoying people who are like you, but that much cleverer/richer/cooler. No wonder you hate them. By Matthew Bell


A bou t Tow n life. David Cameron is turning out to be Boris Johnson’s. But when it’s purely social, it’s simply pathetic. If you’re a spare man, so is he. If you’re the busty blonde, so is she. If you’re the goofy fat one known for your blinding one-liners, so is he. The world is theoretically big enough for both of you, but it’s annoying to have a rival who isn’t really a rival because there isn’t an open competition. A nemesis is a dirty secret. Shameful proof that you are petty. That you notice. That you care. That you measure yourself up against others. That you don’t float through life on the wings of your own personal zen. You can’t tell your friends about them, because chances are your friends are friends with your nemesis. And they probably like them just a little bit more than they like you. I know this can’t continue, that it is rotting my soul in small increments. I must learn to neutralise my nemesistic nature; I must learn to love my frenemies. So next time I see them, I shall practise saying the following words. And, if you are like me, if there is someone you curse as you go to sleep simply for having better hair than you, I would advise you to do the same. On seeing them at a party that you just knew they would be at but were desperate for them not to be at: ‘I was hoping you would be here!’ On seeing them at a literary event, most likely theirs: ‘I can’t wait to read your book, it’s at the very top of my pile.’ On spotting that their placement is better then yours: ‘I’m over there in Siberia, but let’s catch up for a gossip afterwards. There is something I really need to ask your advice about.’ And finally: ‘I’m always bumping into you socially – it would be lovely to spend some proper time with you. How about lunch. My treat.’ Because I feel certain that if I say nice words, eventually I might start to think nice thoughts, and one day might become a nicer me. (

J O H N W H I T T I N G DA L E Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport and card-carrying headbanger

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ne morning in early May 2015, veteran Tory backbencher John Whittingdale’s mobile rang at seven o’clock. Whittingdale, not one of life’s early birds, blearily saw that the incoming number belonged to David Cameron’s chief of staff, Ed Llewellyn. In a voice deep as the Krubera Cave, Whittingdale groaned: ‘Bit bloody early. What do you want?’ The efficient Llewellyn, already at his desk, chirruped: ‘It is not what I want. The Prime Minister wants you to join the Government.’ Whittingdale supposed some dreary junior ministry was in the offing and was about to say ‘get stuffed’ when Llewellyn explained that the job was Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport. Ping! ‘Whitto’, most call him. He has walrus chops, hunched shoulders and stares at the ground when walking. Yet it is a busy, short-stepped gait and there is a twinkling quickness behind those mournful eyes. On the day of that call, he had been scheduled to meet a couple of organisations to discuss joining them. His long political career had surely peaked after a decade chairing the culture select committee. Now, to his amazement, he was in the Cabinet. Cameron needed an older hand, an antidote to fashion, a steady, seen-it-all matelot for the likely storms ahead. And Whitto has seen some heavy weather in his time. He was Margaret Thatcher’s political secretary in her last two years as PM. When you have endured that sort of blitzkrieg, you are hard to faze. His father, a doctor-surgeon, was 66 when baby John arrived in 1959. The old man had worked in St Petersburg in pre-revolutionary Russia. Although he died when John was 14, he instilled in the lad a 19th-century sense of duty and application. School was Sandroyd and Winchester, where John joined the headmaster in a protest against a road scheme and they were forcibly

Illustrated by GERALD SCARFE

ejected from a public-inquiry hearing. Of scientific bent, Whittingdale applied to University College, London, to read astronomy but soon realised he liked politics. He returned a year later to study economics. By this point, he had been taken on at the Tory research department by Chris Patten. ‘Are you a YC?’ asked Patten. ‘Young Christian? No!’ said Whitto. ‘Idiot, I meant a Young Conservative,’ said Patten. The Monday after the Brighton bomb, in 1984, Whittingdale started work as special adviser to Norman Tebbit, who had been badly hurt in that blast. For weeks they ran trade-secretary Tebbit’s office from his bed at Stoke Mandeville. Later, Whitto worked for Leon Brittan during the Westland crisis, and for Paul Channon. He also did a City stint at Rothschild, where he shared an office with Oliver Letwin. When, in 1992, he became MP for Maldon, in Essex, he soon abstained on Maastricht, against John Major. His office is adorned with an Iron Maiden poster. He likes punk too, and spent many a night in his youth pogoing to bands promoting spiky-haired rebellion. And, though outwardly stolid, this divorced dad-of-two (and fan of Fleet Street) remains a rebel. Some clutch their throats at the mention of his name, recalling that he was anti-gay marriage and voted against the Equal Pay (Transparency) Bill. Managers at the BBC knit their eyebrows, alleging that he has the spoor of Dracula, or something like that. Yet in office, he has so far not given vent to the anti-Beeb instincts with which he is said to surge. He is sceptical of the BBC, sceptical of Brussels – and sceptical of that scarlet siren called Success. For if it all comes to an end, with Cameron finally infuriated by Whitto’s independence of mind, he knows he can just go back to bed and turn off his mobile, finally able to enjoy a decent lie-in. Quentin Letts writes for the Dail

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Books It’s Barbie’s world – we just live in it. By Sebastian Shakespeare BARBIE THE ICON, BY MASSIMILIANO CAPELLA (Glitterati, £45)

SURFING BY JIM HEIMANN

(Taschen, £135) Heimann’s book chronicles two centuries of surfing as sport, lifestyle and philosophy. It’s all here – the clothes, the boards, the music, the contests, the rivalries, the surfer dudes. But does the ability to hang onto a floating piece of polyurethane warrant such a paean? It does, and this tome has over 900 amazing images to prove it. The author knows his subject – he grew up near the beach in Southern California.

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BEHIND THE RUNWAY BY MATT LEVER

ROLLING THUNDER BY KEN REGAN (Ormond Yard

ENGLAND UNCENSORED BY PETER DENCH

(Roads Publishing, £30) Lever has spent 17 years charting the organised chaos of the world behind the runway, and his images catch all its drama. On the catwalk, the models are cool, composed. But it’s another story backstage – helter-skelter action, frenzied dressing-up, last-minute styling. Accompanied by essays from Katie Grand and Suzy Menkes, Lever’s visual love letter offers a treasury of hidden fashion moments.

Press, £295) Regan took almost 14,000 photos during his time with Bob Dylan’s 57-gig Rolling Thunder Revue tour in 1975, with unrestricted access to the man, his retinue and his backing musicians. ‘I could walk into his dressing room at any point and photograph anything he was doing,’ Regan once said. The result is an unforgettably vivid portrait of Mr Tambourine Man at work and play.

(Emphas.is Press, £29.95) Far from presenting an idealised green and pleasant land, Peter Dench’s work shows England at its vibrant, bawdy best. Taken from 1998 to 2010, his pictures document our food, clothes, raucous diversity and weather – and the eccentrics who make up our sceptr’d isle. Alcohol seems to play a large part in our national life, be it at Blackpool or at the Henley Royal Regatta. (

PHOTOGRAPHS: PIXEL EYES

Barbie has been a muse to everyone from Aqua, the Danish-Norwegian pop group (‘I’m a Barbie girl, in the Barbie world/Life in plastic, it’s fantastic!’), to Andy Warhol, the pop artist who painted her in 1985. This lavishly illustrated book chronicles the evolution of the modern style icon from her birth in 1959 right into the new millennium. Barbara Millicent Roberts (her ‘real’ name) was launched by the American toy company Mattel in New York. With her fanciful body shape and tiny waist, the 11.5-inch doll proved an instant success, though some parents disapproved of her pronounced breasts. Why did girls love Barbie? Because not only was she a chick who just wanted to have fun (her motto being, ‘If you can dream it, you can be it’), she was also a glamorous grown-up quite unlike their dowdy post-war mums. Barbie’s first boyfriend, Ken, appeared two years later. There followed endless incarnations as Barbie morphed into a working girl with multiple careers such as Astronaut Barbie, Doctor Barbie and Palaeontologist Barbie. Age has not withered her, nor custom staled her infinite variety. Just this year, three new body types were introduced – Curvy Barbie (size 10!), Tall Barbie and Petite Barbie. Capella’s glorious book is full of fun factoids and landmark moments: more than a billion Barbies have been sold in 150 countries, and when she turned 50, a fashion show was held in her honour, with designs from Diane von Furstenberg and Calvin Klein. Never has a bit of plastic tat been venerated by so many.


Art for sale Lashings of libido, red-hot Hendrix and a chronic cover-up. By Josh Spero W H I P H A N D (£90K) MAITRESSE VIII (2015) BY ALLEN JONES WHY BUY Opinion is divided on Allen Jones: feminist or misogynist,

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY MICHAEL WERNER GALLERY, LONDON; COURTESY SHAPERO MODERN; © MOUNA KARRAY, COURTESY TYBURN GALLERY

take your pick. He is most famous for his 1969 sculpture Chair, featuring a woman in leather knickers – and not much else – on her back, folded in half, knees on breasts, under a sofa cushion. Some see this as a critique of female oppression, others as embodying it. The dominatrix type is also a theme with Jones, as in this painting, which was inspired by a poster he designed for the 1974 film Maîtresse. Here he plays with the picture’s flatness, giving us 3D letters but also a kitten with a whip whose body fades into space. Nothing’s ever plain (plane?) with Jones... WHEN Until 23 April. WHERE Michael Werner, 22 Upper Brook Street, W1 (michaelwerner.com).

M I N D. B LOW N . (£800) EXPLODING HENDRIX (1968) BY MARTIN SHARP WHY BUY I am not what you might

call a member of the counterculture; the only time I’m even remotely subversive is when I wear black high-tops with my dinner suit. But with a poster like this – based on Sharp’s painting, itself based on a photo of Hendrix live in Central Park – I definitely get the appeal of an electric-guitar-screeching freak-out. Part of a show of posters owned by the late magazine magnate Felix Dennis, this one explodes like an acid trip, its fiery colours bursting and burning with the spirit of the Sixties. WHEN 4–28 May. WHERE Shapero Modern, 32 St George Street, W1S (shaperomodern.com).

T H AT ’ S A W R A P (£5K–£10K) NOBODY WILL TALK ABOUT US (SERIES, 2012–2015) BY MOUNA KARR AY WHY BUY Karray could scarcely be more

of a contrast to Allen Jones – there is simply no mistaking her work’s urgent call for female emancipation. In her native Tunisia’s desert landscape, she gives in to the ultimate fantasy of fundamentalist men, wrapping a female friend so that not even her eyes can be seen. The subject sits by the roadside like some unusual rock, suggesting both the absurdity of female oppression and its persistence through history and geography. It’s a novel kind of political protest, making yourself visible and invisible at the same time – but we certainly see her. WHEN 8 April–21 May. WHERE Tyburn Gallery, 26 Barrett Street, W1 (tyburngallery.com).

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Restaurants

FRIED CHICKEN AT FOXLOW BALHAM

London’s best roast potatoes mean Piquet is paradise, says Jeremy Wayne

SIDE ORDERS F OX L O W B A L H A M 15–19 Bedford Hill, SW12 (020 7680 2700)

The very nice fellows behind Foxlow have been busy, with a new opening in Chiswick and now another in Balham. You’ll find all your Foxlow faves here, including their Islington-made charcuterie and 10-hour short rib with kimchi. The look is a tad contrived, but in an area where restaurants come and go, this one seems like a stayer.

M R B AO 293 Rye Lane, SE15 (020 7635 0325) Three cheers for Mr Bao, whose gorgeously soft steamed buns – the jewel in the crown of Taiwanese food – are finally getting the wider audience they deserve. Fillings here include free-range pulled chicken with wasabi mayo and 24-hour braised pork with a hoisin-style sauce. And if you think that sounds good, just wait until you taste it.

PECKHAM BAZAAR 119 Consort Road, SE15 (020 7732 2525) Food from the Balkans is the thing at this popular Peckhamite, where the menu includes cuttlefish with Greek orzo pasta, venison adanas (kebabs) and marinated quail. With delights from Romania and Albania, one suspects it could all go horribly wrong – but someone in the kitchen knows what they’re doing. It may not be fancy but it’s very good fun.

THE BARFLY The Gibson Even before two of London’s most respected bartenders, Marian Blake (from Nightjar) and Rusty Craven (ex-Connaught) opened Clerkenwell’s hottest new bar, it seemed that the Gibson – a dry martini with a pearl onion added, supposedly created for the American illustrator Charles

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Dana Gibson at New York’s Players Club in the Forties – was set to become the cocktail of 2016. But take it from Barfly that no one does it better than these guys, who serve theirs in a silver martini glass. So beautiful you could cry! At 44 Old Street, EC1 (020 7608 2774).

PHOTOGRAPHS: SHUTTERSTOCK

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s Julie Andrews would probably Don’t let that basement put you off, by the way. not have sung, let’s start at the very It’s a bright space, and the back wall is open to end – with an île flottante so the restaurant kitchen, adding a gentle hum to the sublime you could down a bucketful already animated room. Just as welcome is the and still find room for more. With the soot-black sight of Alain Morice, the jovial manager, who also espresso, delivered piping-hot exactly halfway looks after Piquet’s self-assured wine list. through pudding as requested, it’s the finish to The two-course menu du jour, a snip at £16.50, a near-perfect lunch in NoHo, where a developing might include a properly delicious tarte fine of restaurant scene (Bonnie Gull, Portland, violet artichokes with Comté and lemon confit, Dickie Fitz) is turning this once followed by roast cod with braised prosaic quartier north-east of cabbage. From the carte, meanwhile, HOW MUCH Oxford Circus into a newly cool there are rich pâtés and a pithivier About £110 for two restaurant neighbourhood. of snails, as hard to pronounce as it (without wine) And that’s where you will find is to get right (but, boy, they WHAT TO EAT Piquet, the first solo venture for succeed). As for mains, you might Country pâté, scallops, Allan Pickett, who has worked in be torn between creamy veal anything on the trolley many of London’s best kitchens, sweetbreads or seabass with sautéed WHAT TO DRINK Clos Basté Esprit de including Le Gavroche and baby gem. And to make decisions Basté 2012, a bargain Galvin Bistrot de Luxe. This man even harder to reach, here comes Madiran by the bottle knows his ragouts from his daubes, the carving trolley. Today being or the glass and the humour of the Wednesday, it’s carrying a glorious basement restaurant’s roast sirloin of beef, carved in name gives more than medium-thick, juicy slices, along with superbly a clue as to what you puffed-up Yorkshire pudding and what have to be the world’s very best roast potatoes (or at least can expect – a franglais the world’s very best restaurant roast potatoes). menu from a British In a room that exudes bonhomie, and from Francophile who a menu that’s packed with scrumptious treats, doesn’t take himself these are undoubtedly among my favourite things. too seriously. A very DUCK RILLETTES AT PIQUET At 92–94 Newman Street, W1 (020 3826 4500). good place to start.

PICK ME!


TATLER • EVENT

C O M E PA R T Y W I T H U S T O C E L E B R AT E

G A LV I N AT W I N D O W S ’ 1 0 T H B I R T H D AY AT G A LV I N AT W I N D O W S , L O N D O N H I LT O N O N PA R K L A N E

O N T H U R S D AY 1 9 M AY 2 0 1 6 FROM 6.30PM R AISING THE BAR What’s the best accompaniment to Michelin-starred French cuisine? Why 360-degree panoramic views, of course. Perched on the 28th floor of the London Hilton on stylish Park Lane, Galvin at Windows certainly takes fine dining to new heights. And then there’s the bar, which truly is a destination in itself – all plush couches and gleaming surfaces set against the backdrop of London’s glittering skyline. Here, you’ll find heady cocktails inspired by exotic destinations. Want to check out the swanky surroundings for yourself? Then why not pop along to a special edition of LA NUIT – the bar’s weekly soirée – in celebration of the restaurant’s 10th birthday on Thursday, 19 May. You’ll be welcomed with a scrummy champagne cocktail to get you in the party mood. Delicious canapés will be served until 9pm and a special birthday menu of classic cocktails and dirty burgers will be available for purchase. Tickets cost £25 and can be redeemed at the bar. Plus, when you eventually tear yourself away from the fun, you’ll leave with a goodie bag under your arm.

MORE REASONS T O C E L E B R AT E . . . General manager Fred Sirieix (who you’ll recognise as the suave maître d’ from First Dates) will be bashing out a DJ set on the night – and setting hearts aflutter. There will be guaranteed tunes until late so bring your dancing shoes! Oh and you’ll find an amazing giveaway on the night too – prizes include a Galvin’s champagne hamper, a £200 bar tab and an overnight stay at London Hilton on Park Lane in a suite. This restaurant really knows how to party!

TO BOOK Visit tatlergalvin.eventbrite.co.uk Tickets cost £25 and are redeemable against any purchase at the bar. Tickets are non-refundable and issued on a first-come, first-served basis. Limited places are available so book now!


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Gadgets Gadgets to buy for your granny or grandpa. Really helpful (not really helpful) ones. By Emma Freud GRAND GIZMOS

Beam shoes

BEAM SHOES These shoes aren’t marketed at the elderly, but they seem to be a perfect gadget for grandparents. They don’t flash or do anything tacky – they just have useful LED lights all the way around the bottom that your grandparents can colour-coordinate with their clothes by setting to one of eight hues. Useful in so many situations... for spotting your grandpa in a crowd, for helping you see your granny’s fancy footwork on the dancefloor, for hi-vis assistance during late-night dog-walks or, most usefully, to provide additional mood lighting if you’re trying to create a romantic vibe and don’t mind your grandparent standing in the corner of the room all night. £49.99 at beamshoes.com

WHEELCHAIR SCOOTER Genny scooter

Pop-up tent

At last, a wheelchair/scooter for grandparents who want to look fly. This model is so innovative it makes old-school disability vehicles look like Reliant Robins – suddenly, we have Tesla-style progress. The Genny has two wheels, electronic sensors and five gyroscopes, so you can steer by balance as you do on a Segway. There’s a single central stick for acceleration and brakes, meaning a grandpa can finally have access to a few basic human rights, like holding hands with a granny while moving along, or walking a small cat on a lead. The wheels can cope with sand, snow and gravel, and, most importantly, it looks really sexy. Can’t quite understand why it’s taken the disabilityvehicle industry so long to get its act together – but finally we have disability-mobility equality. *gets off soapbox* £13,500 at gennymobility.com

POP-UP TENT Twinkle Tush

TabCat GPS

Grandparents are the best humans to ask to watch your children’s sports matches when you can’t face it any more, because 1) they often have quite a lot of free time, 2) they often quite like your children and 3) when they do the cheering loudly thing, they won’t be intimidated by your child saying, ‘YOU’RE SO EMBARRASSING.’ But those sidelines can be nippy, and grandparents get chilly, so say hello to the single-person pop-up shelter. Would look weird with a younger person inside, but with a senior citizen tucked within, it’s got swagger. £69 at under-the-weather.com

BOTTOM JEWEL FOR CATS Robot cat

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The next three gadgets are for your grandparents’ cat. This simple design puts a jewel over the pet’s bottom hole. Someone actually thought of this and

then went through with the whole manufacturing/ marketing thing. I know. It’s made for that discomfiting moment when your granny’s cat walks across the table with its tail held high, displaying the full glory of its booty up against your head. In an instant, this tiny, bottom-enhancing, facesaving Twinkle Tush discreetly covers the offending area. No need to thank me – you bought this magazine, which is payment enough. Unless you are reading someone else’s copy, or viewing it online, in which case you can thank me, thank you. £4 at twinkletush.com

GPS FOR CATS Grannies love cats. Cats like going for wanders. Grannies lose cats. Grannies get sad. BUT cats have collars. The TabCat GPS disc sits nicely around cat’s neck. When cat goes for a wander, Granny presses the TabCat remote control and a series of lights leads her to cat. Granny finds cat. Granny is happy. Cat gets cat-treat (probably – I’m riffing here now). Cat is happy. Granny remembers that she only has the GPS because her granddaughter read about it in Tatler. Granny takes out life subscription to Tatler. Sadly, Granny dies that year, so subscription is cancelled and cat ends up in the Battersea cats home, where nobody claims it. Weren’t expecting a sad ending to this one, were you? Neither was cat, as you can tell by the tragic look on its face in the final close-up frame. The end. Roll credits. *buys dress for awards ceremony* £69.99 at mytabcat.com

CAT FOR GRANNY WITH NO CAT If you think your grandparent should have a cat, but whenever you show them web pages of adorable Instagram-ready kittens, they say it would be too much trouble – get them one of these instead: a life-like robot cat that purrs, miaows, licks its paw and blinks. TBH, that’s its entire repertoire, so admittedly it isn’t going to make a ‘Twenty Greatest Cat Videos’ compilation. BUT it doesn’t poo, wee, shed hair, sit on your head to wake you up, bite your toes when it’s hungry, scratch your furniture so badly you need to reupholster every year, walk across your computer for attention and delete the article you’ve just been writing, try to trip you up on the staircase while you’re coming down or chase your heels with its claws while you’re going up, fart, get ill, get gammy eyes, patchy fur, ticks, fleas, bald patches, cankerous ears, dodgy teeth or bad breath. *glares at cat* *cat glares back* *cat wins* £70 at joyforall.hasbro.com

N E X T M O N T H S E R IO U S LY, PRO PE R LY W E I R D G A D G E T S

T h i s i s m e o n Tw i t t e r – @ e m m a f r e u d


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(35-43)


How to

PARTY LIK E A QUEEN rom the lavish and formal state banquets to intimate family gatherings, the Queen is without doubt the world’s ultimate hostess. A stickler for detail, she insists that all the t’s are crossed and the i’s dotted – this applies just as much when she is throwing a party as it does when she is scanning policy papers and Cabinet documents. A thoroughly informed sense of what people will want when they are a guest of hers – coupled with some pretty impressive royal traditions – makes the formal affairs unforgettable. A huge sense of fun and sometimes surprising informality makes the private ones unmissable. Lady Elizabeth Anson, a cousin of the Queen’s, has organised many parties for Her Majesty. The code name ‘Shirley Temple’ is always used for her top client and briefs have included running the Queen’s guest tents at Royal Ascot and her private birthday parties – her 60th and 80th were held at the Ritz, where salmon fishcakes and the Windsor Fizz cocktail (elderflower, champagne and raspberry liqueur) were served. The Queen, she says, oversees every aspect, from the dining-room

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settings to the flowers (she’s particularly fond of yellow freesias) and what’s on the menu. At the Queen’s request, Lady Elizabeth organised the party she hosted at Claridge’s for Charles and Diana’s wedding breakfast. It started at 6.30pm, after the newlyweds had left to go on honeymoon, and the guest list of 500 brimmed with international royalty, from the Queen of Romania to Princess Grace of Monaco to the Crown Prince of Japan. Nicky Haslam, who was present on the evening, heard someone saying, ‘Lilibet does things so well’ and ‘Only Louise Sweden could carry off purple lace.’ The Queen had the idea of playing video footage of the day on screens – Nancy Reagan was overcome with tears watching the day’s events being played back, while Her Majesty, perching on the arm of a sofa, martini in hand, exclaimed to the Duke of Edinburgh, ‘Oh Philip, do look! I’ve got my Miss Piggy face on!’ The Queen announced ‘supper’ herself and the guests were led into the ballroom to the romantic accompaniment of an orchestra playing Irving Berlin’s ‘They Say It’s Wonderful’. The band then handed out sailor hats with the guests’ names on them, which everyone put on. In fact, the mischievous Duke of Edinburgh took such a shine to his that he refused to take it off, despite the Queen’s objections that it wasn’t ‘proper’. The room was decorated with apples hung on ribbons (one of which clocked the Duke of

Edinburgh in the eye), baskets of bread, marmalades and condiments like ketchup and mustard. The wedding breakfast itself included simple favourites like sausages, baked beans, kedgeree, scrambled eggs (which Princess Margaret ate sitting on the floor) and smoked salmon. Plus masses of champagne. Apart from the Queen’s table, there was no placement. Nancy Reagan, the American ambassador John Louis Jr and Princess Grace were amongst the chosen few invited to sit with her. The dancing started pretty quickly after that, with people throwing their hats about and getting down to cha-cha-chas and that party classic, the conga. The Queen danced with the American ambassador, who was hugely tall and towered over her, and it wasn’t until 1.30am that she and the Duke left. ‘I’d love to stay and dance all night!’ was her parting shot. There was also the famous occasion when the Queen threw a party for Prince Andrew’s 21st at Windsor in June 1981, transforming the castle into a laser-lit, smoke-machinefilled disco for around 650 guests. Among those doing a set that night was Sir Elton John, who told of how he and Diana – one month before her wedding to Prince Charles – wrestled with a Charleston before giving up and heading for the buffet. Afterwards, Princess Anne suggested they hit the dancefloor again, where they were then ]

PHOTOGRAPH: IAN BERRY/MAGNUM PHOTOS

Martinis, fishcakes, masses of champagne, a jolly conga and then bed by midnight. When it comes to having a good time, Her Majesty rules. By Clare Bennett


The Queen dancing with Prime Minister Kwame Nkrumah of Ghana, 1961

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The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh in Australia, 1954

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PHOTOGRAPHS: HULTON ARCHIVE/GETTY IMAGES, GETTY IMAGES

[approached by the Queen. She asked if she could join them. In what he later described as ‘one of the most surreal moments of my life’, Elton found himself dancing in a circle with Her Majesty to ‘Rock Around the Clock’. It may be a private family gathering, but Christmas parties at Sandringham are said to be an absolute hoot. The main event happens on Christmas Eve, following the German tradition, with the adults in the family exchanging cheap, gimmicky presents (Harry allegedly once gave his grandmother a shower cap with ‘Ain’t Life a Bitch’ emblazoned on it). Dinner at 8pm is a black-tie affair and usually consists of locally sourced food like Norfolk shrimp or game from the estate. The family’s crackers are made especially for them, and the Queen is said to love a rubbish joke as much as the next person – and while she tends to be in bed by midnight, she leaves the small-hours partying in the more than capable hands of the younger members of the family. On Christmas Day itself, the party games begin after a light supper (turkey is served at lunchtime) and is rumoured to include such classics as charades and passinga-balloon-under-the-chin races. One would hope they sometimes allow talking during the former, as the Queen is a phenomenal mimic (she’s particularly good at accents). The Queen discontinued the practice of debutantes being presented at court in 1958

and throws garden parties instead to include guests from all walks of life, with one held at Holyrood Palace in Scotland and three at Buckingham Palace during the year. The atmosphere is intended to be relaxed, but the events run like clockwork. The Queen and other members of the Royal Family make an entrance, announced by the National Anthem, at 4pm and then disperse among the 8,000 or so guests. If it’s raining, the Queen will have a transparent umbrella with a trim to match the colour of her outfit – usually something bright. She and the family go through designated ‘lanes’ in order to meet as many different people as possible, eventually ending up at the royal tea tent. On average, the waitstaff of 400 will serve around 27,000 cups of tea, 20,000 sandwiches and 20,000 pieces of cake to the Queen’s guests. When the Queen leaves at 6pm, the party finishes. Naturally. Her most thrilling night of partying was, undoubtedly, the day victory was declared in Europe. When Churchill made the announcement, at 3pm on 8 May 1945, that the war with Germany was finally over, the streets began to fill spontaneously in joyful response to the news. Soon London was packed with half a million revellers – secretly among them the 19-year-old Princess Elizabeth, dressed in her Auxiliary Territorial Service uniform. The Queen described years later how she and her family had made several balcony appearances that day to an ecstatic

throng in the Mall: ‘Then, when the excitement of the floodlights being switched on got through to us, all of a sudden I realised I couldn’t see what the crowds were enjoying.’ To their great surprise, she and the 14-yearold Margaret were given permission to join the party, albeit in a group of 16. Anxious not to be recognised, the Queen described how she pulled her officer’s cap down over her eyes to keep a low profile. However, the officer chaperoning them scolded her for it, saying ‘he wouldn’t be seen in the company of another officer improperly dressed,’ so she pulled it back up again. The party headed down the Mall to Horse Guards Parade, and then on to Whitehall, Trafalgar Square, St James’s and Piccadilly, where they conga’d all the way through the Ritz, whooping and shouting in front of the startled guests before coming back across Green Park. ‘I remember lines of unknown people linking arms, walking down Whitehall, and all of us were swept along by tides of happiness and relief,’ the Queen recalled later, before they joined the crowds baying for another appearance by the King and Queen. ‘We were successful in seeing my parents come out on the balcony,’ the Queen said, ‘but we had cheated slightly, as we had sent a message inside the house saying we were waiting outside.’ No surprise that it was, as she described, ‘one of the most memorable nights of my life’. (

The Duke of Edinburgh and the Queen at a Royal Garden Party at Buckingham Palace, 2005

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DILETTANTE? Gallerist, magazine editor, fashion designer, billionaire’s wife… And unexpectedly charming. Charlotte Edwardes on Dasha Zhukova TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6

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PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, GOFF PHOTOS

Renaissance Woman or


Opposite page, Dasha Zhukova. Above, with Wendi Deng and Kate Moss in Hong Kong, 2013. Top right, with Anna Wintour and Lauren Santo Domingo, Paris, 2015. Right, New Year’s Eve fireworks near the Abramoviches’ house on St Barth’s. Below right, Dasha with her husband Roman Abramovich and Michael Bloomberg, London, 2013. Below, with Larry Gagosian, New York, 2015

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f all the anecdotes about Dasha Zhukova, art collector, magazine editor and wife of oligarch Roman Abramovich, there’s one from the launch of Garage, her art foundation in Moscow, which sums her up most neatly. The invitation-only event drew guests from art, fashion and society to her Centre for Contemporary Culture in a revamped bus garage. It was a warm June day in 2008. Damien Hirsts studded the walls. Long white-clothed trestle tables stretched the length of the 91,000 sq ft space, decorated with red, gold and orange flowers. Candles guttered. The event may have been partfunded by her husband (a man worth £5.5bn and ranked the 151st richest in the world by Forbes), but it was Dasha’s statement: I am here. I am serious about art. Take note.

‘She’s unbelievably down-to-earth and calm... warm and tactile’ Such was her determination for the evening to go smoothly that she barely touched a drink (except one glass, because she was sitting next to Jeff Koons and he insisted). Around her, others enjoyed vodka, food flown in from London (including roast sirloin and cherry trifle) and lively conversation. Guests included Andrea Casiraghi, Lord Edward Spencer-Churchill and artists Marco Perego and Todd Eberle. And then, according to a guest, something untoward got Dasha’s attention. The husband of an English friend of Dasha’s was hollowing out loaves from the table. Laughing, he removed his shoes, slipped the bread carcasses on his feet, and flopped around in a clownish fashion. ‘Dasha turned to me and said, “You know, it is quite wrong to do that,”’ says the guest. ‘She was cool but annoyed. She explained that, in Russia, bread is symbolic of social sharing and he was trashing that in a country where there has been a lot of poverty and a lot of war. She was aware of how the staff might perceive a group of wealthy Westerners behaving in this way, belittling their culture. That one incident stuck in my

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Basel, Venice and Miami. But unlike her compatriots, Dasha, 34, is not known just for high fashion and parties. ‘She loves fashion, sure,’ says a curator who has known her for a decade, ‘but her heart really is with art. Her foundation, her magazine, her friendships with lots of artists – it is all genuine.’ So who is this girl, this ‘Prima Gallerina’, this dynamic young princess, who has so captivated the worlds of money, of high art, of fashion – and who keeps the famously taciturn Roman Abramovich on his toes? Ask her English friends and they say she is ‘not the cliché. She’s no-make-up, hair undone or in plaits, and in cut-offs.’ Another adds that she is ‘unbelievably down-to-earth and calm. She doesn’t have that Russian froideur. She’s warm – always says hello – and she’s tactile.’ One longstanding friend says: ‘It’s hard to reconcile this but, considering the life she leads, and considering the other examples of her type – other wives or girlfriends of similar men – she is absolutely as far removed from that as you can imagine. She is chic, she

Top, Dasha with her friend Olympia Scarry, Basel, 2012. Above, with Charlotte Casiraghi, Paris, 2009. Right, with Jeff Koons, LA, 2010. Below right, Cara Delevingne on the cover of Dasha’s Garage magazine, 2015. Below, with Mollie Dent-Brocklehurst, Moscow, 2010

PHOTOGRAPHS: PHIL POYNTER/GARAGE MAGAZINE, GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, WIRE IMAGES

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mind. Dasha is not someone to just laugh at antics. She is sophisticated. She is aware. She has morals.’ Moments later, Amy Winehouse took to the stage, worn and dishevelled in a yellow floral minidress, and sang ‘Hey, Little Rich Girl’ – ‘and that wasn’t lost on Dasha either,’ adds the guest. ‘She said it “provoked conversation”.’ And so does Dasha, wherever she goes. She’s often in the front rows of fashion shows in the company of Anna Wintour or Stella McCartney. Like other Russian ‘tsarinas’ such as Natalia Vodianova, Elena Perminova (wife of Alexander Lebedev), the designer Ulyana Sergeenko and the fashion writer Miroslava Duma, much is written about her style. Her every outfit is blogged and disassembled. Her beauty (‘she’s even prettier in the flesh: all eyes and lips,’ says an art-world friend), her glossy hair and her flawless skin (‘honestly it’s like a teenager’s, she does not look like a mother of two,’ says another friend) are commented on everywhere from Vogue to online Russian gossip sites. She’s Instagrammed partying with Margherita Missoni in Venice, in Paris with Derek Blasberg, with Karlie Kloss at Chelsea FC (owned, of course, by Abramovich), with her friend Jen Meyer watching Prince perform at her New Year’s party in St Barth’s, in New York with Mariah Carey, at art fairs in


Above, Katya, Elena and Dasha Zhukova at the 2011 Venice Biennale. Below, with Abramovich on St Barth’s, 2011. Bottom, the new Rem Koolhaasdesigned building for Dasha’s Garage Museum of Contemporary Art, Moscow

is bright, she is funny, she’s self-deprecating, she’s well educated. She’s like the most popular girl at school. She doesn’t show off – she’s not covered in jewellery. I’ve always slightly marvelled at how she’s done it.’ She was born in Moscow, in June 1981, and her upbringing was materially comfortable. Her father Alexander was an oil trader (and a business associate of Abramovich) and something of a mini oligarch in his own right. Any exposure she had to the cold and concrete of Russia was over by the age of 10, when her mother, Elena, a molecular biologist specialising in diabetes, relocated to Houston, and then Los Angeles – a long way from bread queues and hardship. In fact, aside from the fact they are both Russian-Jewish, the contrast between the childhoods of Dasha and her husband is stark. Abramovich – who, at 49, is 15 years her senior – was born in 1966, during the Brezhnev era, to a family with no money. His mother Irina died before he reached one (some say ‘medical procedure’, others ‘botched abortion’), and his father Arkady died in 1969 in an industrial accident, leaving Roman orphaned aged three. Dasha’s parents split when she was three, but she recounts many happy childhood memories. Her first American meal was Froot Loops and for the first few weeks at school she sat at the back of the class reading Pippi Longstocking in Russian. ‘When you are in a situation that is foreign to you,’ she has said, ‘you have to pull yourself together and adapt.’ This childhood, the difference between America and Russia, the need to fit in, is key to understanding Dasha. ‘She has a more evolved sense of sophistication,’ says another fashion friend. ‘She’s well mannered – she won’t speak if she realises it’s best not to. She’s careful and clever.’ asha has put it like this: ‘I grew up in LA, so I had this unique opportunity to live in both communist Russia and see that life and then move to America as a young girl and experience a completely different life. I don’t feel like I’m part of that category of new Russians.’ At school, her appeal was so potent it’s still joked about. One fellow student claims to have willingly surrendered his homework for her to copy because she was so beautiful. Another similarly smitten contemporary claims: ‘She always smelled good.’ Classmates have said she wasn’t obviously academic and that she took Russian to lift her overall grades. When a schoolfriend asked why she was learning Italian, she replied that it was to communicate with staff when on holiday in Sardinia. Both her parents went on to have more children (a set of twins each), and by all ]

D

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...with Alex Dellal

...with Karlie Kloss

...with Vito Schnabel

...with Elisa Sednaoui

...and with Camilla Al Fayed

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[accounts Elena is ‘a very fascinating and intelligent woman – Dasha gets a lot from her.’ Someone who has been a guest on Abramovich’s boat says that of all the company there, Elena was ‘by far the most interesting. She’s wonderful. She looks younger than her years. I would argue that Dasha is psychologically sound precisely because of her mother.’ Dasha went to the University of California, Santa Barbara, where she took pre-med classes and read Slavic studies and literature (which she has described as ‘a lot of science classes with a bit of Russian’), and – with typical versatility – started a fashion label, Kova & T (since closed), with her friend from middle school Christina Tang. Her father Alexander, friends say, indulged her, and funded her move to London to study homeopathy because she argued that ‘England has a long history of supporting alternative medicine.’ By then, Alexander Zhukov had returned to Moscow, and for the first time since she left Russia, Dasha began making regular trips to the motherland from London. Those who knew her at the time remember her ‘rather lovely penthouse’ off High Street Kensington, which she shared with Olympia Scarry, the daughter of the children’s books illustrator Richard Scarry Jr. ‘They were two pretty girls-about-town,’ says someone who knows them. ‘But not super-glamorous like now. Olympia was very into her art, and quite often [would be] in paint-splattered overalls.’

launch of her own biannual high-fashion and contemporary-art magazine, also called Garage, and a further art project mooted in St Petersburg. Patron of the arts, fashion designer, magazine editor, museum founder – society couldn’t decide if she was the best kind of Renaissance woman or the worst kind of rich dilettante. Certainly, her appeal encompasses both Vogue and the Wall Street Journal. Which doesn’t come without its difficulties. ‘Like all those über-rich first-generation people, they have many hangers-on, all clawing at the cash,’ says a friend from the art world.

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he Abramoviches own beautiful properties like Chateau de la Croë, once owned by the Duke of Windsor, in Cap d’Antibes, and the 70-acre Gouverneur Bay Estate in St Barth’s (bought for £47m), formerly owned by David Rockefeller and, later, software tycoon Jeet Singh, and said to have an ‘anti-paparazzi shield with infra-red lasers’. There are two homes in Colorado, three boats – including the £270m, 162m superyacht Eclipse (with its two swimming pools, two helicopter pads, a mini submarine and a missile defence system) – and a customised Boeing 767. All of this is policed by a £1.2m a year security operation, run mostly by former soldiers. And Roman himself is an attraction. One art friend says, ‘Dasha is the hostess, he is the quiet charm.’ Another friend says, ‘He is

She has ‘amazing taste’, achieved by ‘ hiring the people that old money hire – they live a bit like Lord Rothschild’ Dasha began dating the Russian tennis player Marat Safin, but shortly afterwards she met Abramovich, who was still married to his second wife, Irina, a former Aeroflot stewardess, now 42, with whom he had five children – Anna, 23, Arkady, 22, Sofia, 18, Arina, 13 and Ilya, 11. (He’d had no children with Olga, his first wife, with whom he split after three years in his 20s.) Dasha and Roman were introduced at a New Year’s party hosted by her father in 2005. By 2007, she was officially linked with Abramovich, who was by then divorced, and the couple were married in secret in 2008 (Dasha only revealed this in 2015). Her life took off – there was the launch of the Garage art foundation in 2008, followed by her surprise takeover of Pop magazine (previously edited by Katie Grand) in 2009, and then the

very discreet – quite reserved and quiet. He’s handsome in the flesh, well dressed – she dresses him, clearly.’ Are they affectionate? ‘They are very sweet, very comfortable together. Something that I wonder a lot is, where are the cracks? Because it’s not obvious. Abramovich doesn’t even fall out with people – nothing is that explicit.’ One thing that’s stressed by all those around her is her ‘amazing taste’. This is achieved by ‘hiring the people that old money hire. They live a bit like Jacob Rothschild,’ explains one friend. Peregrine Armstrong-Jones, half-brother of the Earl of Snowdon, organises their New Year party in St Barth’s through his company Bentley’s. This year Prince performed; in previous years they’ve had Gwen Stefani, The Black Eyed Peas, Kings of Leon and Red Hot Chili Peppers. ‘The

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, GETTY IMAGES, PHOTOSHOT, REUTERS

MATES IN MANHATTAN


party was always at their house,’ says a regular guest, ‘but just recently they’ve been holding it at a venue nearby. Only about 80 people were invited this year – it’s much more intimate.’ Among the guests were Wendi Deng, the property dealer Aby Rosen and his wife Samantha Boardman, art dealer Larry Gagosian and his girlfriend Chrissie Erpf, George Lucas, Marc Jacobs, Salma Hayek, Harvey Weinstein, producer Brian Grazer and Revlon chairman Ron Perelman – whose annual New Year’s party on St Barth’s was superseded by the Abramoviches’. ‘And there’s always a smattering of models like Constance Jablonski and Anna Selezneva,’ continues the party guest. ‘But it’s a changing cast. For example, Nat Rothschild used to go a lot and doesn’t any more. It’s not the cheesy nightclub scene of New York, or the Tramp-going London scene. It’s very art-world-centric. It’s very billionaire-centric.’ Most relationships on this level are ‘transactional: I’ve got a big boat, you’ve got a big boat, I’ll give you a ride on my plane, you come to my party. I buy art from you; I sell art. It’s very much the power players who want to be seen that go there. I know Dasha found all that quite hard to begin with.’ The party itself is like ‘getting into the Vanity Fair party at the Oscars’ – endless security. The venue is decorated ‘like a fancy English wedding: vast vases of flowers, buffets with food, lots of sofas’. Dasha’s art-world scene is similarly top-notch – not least because she’s in business with Larry Gagosian as the co-founder and creative director of Artsy, an online art sales and reference site. ‘Sandy Heller is her private art dealer, but she is also really good friends with a lot of artists. I’ve been to her houses in London, Moscow and St Barth’s, and everywhere there is great art on the walls,’ says a friend from the fashion world. Gallery director Mollie Dent-Brocklehurst helped curate her collection, and went to auctions (which Dasha has said she hates) for her. ‘The Garage exhibition programme is by and large very serious,’ says a major-league art buyer who knows the family. ‘They’ve shown Rirkrit Tiravanija and Louise Bourgeois – both important artists.’ The couple have also bought Gerhard Richter, Cy Twombly and Richard Prince, and around the time of

Above, with Abramovich at Stamford Bridge, home to Chelsea FC, 2014. Left, with Sir Antony Gormley at Garage, 2009

Dasha’s 27th birthday, in 2008, it was widely reported that Abramovich had paid £43m for a 1976 triptych by Francis Bacon and £17m for Lucian Freud’s Benefits Supervisor Sleeping. Their houses are described as ‘chic, unfancy’. ‘She uses good architects,’ says the same fashion friend. Among those who worked on her £120m London house next to Kensington Gardens was Ilse Crawford, best known for her Scandi-meetsManhattan-meets-rambling-country-house feel of the Soho House group. Dasha’s journey to flawlessness hasn’t been without hiccups. Indeed, there are hints of a wilder side – suggestions that she is a risk-taker with nerves of steel. When her mother told her they were moving from Texas to California when she was 12, ‘I even threatened to divorce her,’ she has said, ‘to be

an emancipated minor, if she tried to move.’ And there was the controversial photograph of Dasha that appeared last year on an online Russian fashion website, in which she is sitting on a chair by Norwegian artist Bjarne Melgaard made from a mannequin of a topless black woman, tied up and folded in half, with her upturned legs and spike-heeled boots acting as a backrest. Dasha was accused of being at best naive, at worst a racist. She responded by saying the photograph ‘is of an artwork intended specifically as a commentary on gender and racial politics. I utterly abhor racism and would like to apologise to anyone who has been offended by this image.’ In Manhattan, Dasha has her tightest group of friends – among them Olympia Scarry, Jen Meyer, Karlie Kloss, Camilla Al Fayed, Lauren Santo Domingo, Vito Schnabel, Derek Blasberg and Alex Dellal and his wife Elisa Sednaoui. ‘It’s hipper and it feels a lot more powerful than anything that we have here,’ says her friend in British fashion. But now that her son, Aaron, six (she also has a daughter, Leah, three), goes to school in west London, Dasha is mostly in London – for term-time, at least. ‘But she’s not one of those extremely thin or over-exercised school mothers,’ says a friend. ‘She was amusing and self-deprecating about how hard it was to shed baby weight. But she doesn’t try to be stick thin or hollowed-out. She has a good appetite. She’s normal.’ As normal as you can be when you are Dasha Zhukova. (

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‘I C A N’ T BE BOUGHT. I DON’ T NE E D TO BE BOUGHT ’ Zac Goldsmith is as committed as he is charming – and he is mustering all his talents, his fortune and his contacts in his bid to become mayor. But will Londoners vote for him? Charlotte Edwardes investigates

H

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PHOTOGRAPH: PHIL POYNTER/ TRUNK ARCHIVE

e is the most committed of all of us,’ the late Sir James Goldsmith once said of his son Zac, the fifth of his eight children. ‘He is the angriest. He feels passionately, and is devoting his life [to environmentalism].’ Twenty years on and aged 41, Zac – still a dedicated environmentalist – is devoting his life to politics too. He’s been the Tory MP for Richmond Park and North Kingston since 2010, and is now the Conservative candidate for London mayor. While his billionaire father was a savagely anti-Establishment figure (despite his knighthood, which was from Labour), Zac’s politics are more tempered, more ‘independent-minded, but working on the inside’, as one of his BackZac2016 team puts it. Still, ‘angry’ is not a description that immediately comes to mind with mild-mannered Zac Goldsmith. Smouldering, possibly. Combustible, occasionally. But don’t be fooled by the languid handshake, the patched-up tweed suits and the shy smile. He’s a ‘focused crusader’, say colleagues; a man with ‘manic energy’ and ‘extraordinary sagacity’ (especially when it comes to betting on election results). ‘And if you want to see how competitive he is,’ adds his life-long friend Ben Elliot, ‘just play him at cards or backgammon.’ Goldsmith, whose mother is Lady Annabel and whose sister is Jemima, may be more Establishment than his father, but he’s ‘no machine politician’, says a Westminster colleague. And, judging from experience, that’s not what Londoners want. They vote personality over politics, preferring a maverick – someone to stand up for the capital against interference from central government. It is an enormous job, overseeing a budget (in 2015–16) of £16.7bn. The first mayor was ‘Red’ Ken Livingstone (the post was created in 2000 after a referendum), a hardline left-winger with green sensibilities, who won as an independent, hated Tony Blair, but went back to the fold out of some atavistic sense of loyalty and won a second term as a New Labour candidate. Then there’s Boris, the incumbent, a centrist Tory whose relationship with his leader, David Cameron, has been marked by spats and flounces, not least on Europe (Goldsmith has also come out in favour of leaving the EU) and his opposition to the expansion of Heathrow airport (another position Goldsmith holds). Politics is messier than ever. In general elections, London tends towards Labour, but only 38 per cent of Londoners turned out for the last mayoral vote and the Conservatives won. Add to that the fact that, with Jeremy Corbyn as Labour leader, no one is sure whether London will be enthused or bored by Labour candidate Sadiq Khan. But Khan, the son of a bus driver, worked hard as a lawyer before entering politics and demonstrates the sort of ]


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[aspirational drive championed in traditional Conservatism. Equally, Goldsmith plays to the left on two big issues – green policies and Heathrow. Plus, he increased his margin in the general election, seeing the biggest swing in votes in the country. All of which goes to suggest normal electoral statistics won’t apply. So what kind of politician is Zac Goldsmith? Who is in his core team and what can we expect from a London with Goldsmith’s hand on the tiller? ‘A small car with a powerful engine’ is how Goldsmith’s campaign is described among the Westminster elite. It’s also said to be full of surprises and secret weapons. On closer inspection, it’s a mixed bag: friends, family, some serious political heavyweights and, yes, secret weapons. Friends are led by Ben Elliot, 40, who, in addition to running the members-only concierge service Quintessentially, is treasurer of Goldsmith’s campaign. He has known him ‘since he was born’, although he does admit that ‘we’ve had arguments all our life. Usually he blows up and then it’s over. He doesn’t harbour grudges.’ ‘Loyal but not tribal’ is how political colleagues describe Goldsmith, and that’s certainly the case with Elliot, nephew of the Duchess of Cornwall. ‘Our lives are intertwined,’ Elliot says. ‘My parents are best friends with [Lady Annabel]. We went to prep school on the same day, Eton on the same day. We’re godfathers to each other’s eldest. We go on holiday. I’ve known him always and I love him very much, and if you ask my mum, my sisters, the cleaning lady at our house in Dorset – that guy has been the same all his life: polite, sweet, charming, thoughtful. And he wants to get stuff done. And, thank God, people like him want to do those kinds of jobs – he’d be bloody good at it.’ He pauses for breath. ‘And I’m not just saying that as a friend.’

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PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, DOMINIC O’NEILL

LEFT, ZAC GOLDSMITH, FAR LEFT (FRONT ROW), WITH HIS MOTHER, LADY ANNABEL, SIBLINGS JEMIMA, CENTRE, BEN & HALF-SISTER INDIA JANE, RIGHT, 1981. RIGHT, ZAC’S BROTHER BEN WITH HIS WIFE, JEMIMA, 2015. BELOW LEFT, ZAC & BEN ELLIOT, 2012. BELOW RIGHT, WITH HIS WIFE, ALICE, 2013

Family is also crucial to Goldsmith (and there is enough of it – two full siblings, five half-siblings from his father and three from his mother). Lady Annabel donated £50,000 to his mayoral campaign and canvasses for him. His former sister-in-law, Kate Rothschild, although a Green Party donor, is equally effusive: ‘I’ve never known a more dedicated and conscientious MP. He never stops working. He’s morally incorruptible. And very green.’ In the press, there are whispers that the campaign was slow to launch, allowing Sadiq to get ahead in the polls. The opposition claims Cameron scrambled a political SWAT team: ‘Basically, he had to give it a kick up the arse.’ Whether this is true is moot. Certainly, the campaign has been bolstered in the last month by the secondment of a number of prized advisers from other departments, with both Cameron and Boris Johnson throwing in their weight as buttresses. Tim Smith, a Conservative Central Office ‘attack dog’, has been sent in from the Department for Transport to Goldsmith’s media operation, currently led by Katy Eustice, former lobby reporter for the Daily Express, who, by all accounts, is a thoroughly amiable character. On policy, Goldsmith’s main adviser is Tara Singh, a former energy adviser to Cameron. She has a track record on green issues as head of environment in the Conservative Research Department and led the Responsibility Department at Portland PR. Her deputy is Sam Wilson, an Oxford graduate who has been working for Boris Johnson for three years. Welcome support has also come from Helen Bailey, the Mayoral Office’s chief operating officer for policing and crime. Nick de Bois, MP for Enfield North, is the campaign chairman – and the author of gushing tweets such as ‘Zac is the political Judi Dench – good on film, breathtaking on stage.’ Capitalising on the Tories’ success with grassroots activism during the general election, one ‘outstanding’ part of the campaign, according to Eustice, are the volunteers on the BackZac2016 team. ‘That’s one of the main components,’ she says, ‘really fantastic young people who go out campaigning. It’s a good mix, with diverse backgrounds.’ In the grassroots is one of Goldsmith’s secret weapons: Sulaiman Khan, 19, the ‘very clever, very serious’ eldest son of Jemima and Imran. ‘He’s part of the volunteer team,’ says Eustice. ‘This is important, because Sadiq is strong in the Pakistani community and on the Muslim vote,’ explains a campaign source. ‘But Imran Khan, who campaigns on an anti-corruption ticket in Pakistan – really, something you can be assassinated for – is a hugely emotive figure in the Pakistani community in London. The fact that his son is campaigning for Zac is significant.’ Another secret weapon is Jim Messina, the former White House deputy chief of staff for operations who ran Barack Obama’s presidential election campaign in 2012. There’s also Craig Elder of Edmonds Elder, the company responsible for the Conservatives’ formidable digital campaign last year – a trick missed by Labour. Although Goldsmith is known to have had ‘talks’ with Sir Lynton Crosby, the Australian political strategist recently knighted for his work on the Conservative election campaign, it’s Crosby’s number two and former business partner, Mark Fullbrook, who is ‘officially’ on board, along with Isaac Levido, one of Crosby’s poll analysts, who worked for the Tories on the general election. Crosby’s ‘hoofprints’ are all over Goldsmith’s campaign, says one observer: ‘There are two techniques associated with him: dog whistles and dead cats. The dog whistle is a slightly unpleasant, below-the-radar appeal to certain groups of voters. An example is references to Sadiq, the Muslim candidate, as “radical and divisive”. If challenged, Goldsmith will say this is a reference to Corbyn being radical and divisive. But it doesn’t appear on leaflets in the bit about Corbyn, it appears in the bit about Sadiq, so voters think, “Is Sadiq radical and divisive? And therefore dangerous?” Dead cats are used when the


opposition are having a good stretch, so you need to distract by metaphorically throwing a dead cat onto the table. The object of this is not to elevate or influence the debate, but just so everyone recoils and says, “Urgh! There’s a dead cat on the table!” For example, when Labour was making political mileage over non-doms, Michael Fallon came out and said, “Ed Miliband is a threat to the national security of this country.” And everyone said, “Oh my God, you can’t say that!” The Tories took a minor hit, but they’d changed the conversation.’ Is any of this very ‘Zac’? Some say no, that he abhors political games. ‘He’s very straightforward,’ says Elliot. ‘He says what he believes. That’s probably what gets him into trouble.’ Does he get into trouble? Goldsmith himself thinks so – he often jokes that he’s been banished to the bad-boy broom-cupboard office in the House of Commons for voting against his government. But then it’s his belief that an MP’s job description is ‘to hold government to account, and that is what I am paid to do, on behalf of my constituents. Everything else is bonus and ancillary – irrelevant, even.’ Independent MPs are crucial, he says – ‘and anyway make for a more lively Parliament’. The two main issues for the London mayor are housing and transport. Eustice argues that Goldsmith is in the best position ‘to unlock land and get London building’ because, as it’s a Conservative government, ‘he’s the one who’ll lobby them and deliver.’ He has pledged to double the building of homes to 50,000 a year by 2020 (new-builds will be in keeping with local areas) and says Londoners will have first refusal. In addition, a significant proportion of new homes will only be for rent. As well as ‘building on the legacy of Boris’, Goldsmith will tackle green issues, says Eustice, ‘such as the fact that Londoners need a cleaner living environment.’ He supports the Garden Bridge (London’s answer to New York’s High Line), on which Khan has equivocated. On family and privilege Goldsmith is rehearsed, and who can blame him? His father was worth £1.2bn when he died in 1997, and he is said to have inherited £200–£300m. When he published his tax returns recently, it was revealed that last year he got £1.5m from his trust fund, and since 2011 he has paid £4.5m in tax, after receiving more than £6m in income and £4m from selling assets. Goldsmith has always played this advantage by arguing that it means he can fight tough and that ‘I can’t be bought. I don’t need to be bought. I’m not a careerist. I don’t need to have a career in politics.’ It’s also contentious that so many Etonians populate government – but Goldsmith was slung out of school for weed, although he says he took the rap for someone else. His four A-levels he sat elsewhere. Sir James was anti-university, especially Oxford, and both Zac and Ben got stuck straight into life. Elliot says that while people are busy scrutinising Goldsmith’s privileged background, they forget his family has a political history. Both his grandfathers were Conservative MPs – his father’s father, Frank Goldsmith, in Suffolk, his mother’s father, Viscount Castlereagh, as a Unionist MP in County Down (history relates this was a man who once decorated the Christmas tree with condoms in order to shock a cleric). His father’s brother, Teddy Goldsmith, founded the Green Party (and The Ecologist magazine, which Zac edited in his early 20s), and Sir James, a financier, founded the Eurosceptic, single-issue Referendum Party, which aimed to force the government to hold a referendum on the UK’s relationship with the European Union. As a young man, Zac Goldsmith wanted nothing to do with the Conservatives – and was quoted as saying the only way he’d vote Tory was if he was ‘drugged first’. (Later he said he couldn’t remember saying that, ‘but it is not a million miles from how I felt’.) Nor was he ‘New Labour’, although he enjoys the company of Harriet Harman and calls Ed Miliband ‘interesting to talk to, and thoughtful’. He disliked Tony

Blair, once describing him as ‘very slippery – I would not trust him with my dog.’ And actually that’s a proper insult from Goldsmith, who has countless rescue animals in both his London and Dorset homes. ‘At school he was responsible for taking the dogs for a walk,’ remembers Elliot. ‘He was the kid reading Gerald Durrell and watching David Attenborough. When he stayed at my parents’ house in Dorset, he would let my pet mice out.’ Party politics may have been uninteresting, ‘but he was passionate about causes and campaigns and inequalities,’ says Elliot. ‘Zac said the best advice his father gave him was, “If you’re not angry about something, you’re not involved.’” With Cameron’s ascent to power, Goldsmith didn’t seem such an anomaly. He was part of a new generation of Conservatives, compassionate, with a social and environmental conscience – shorthanded ‘Cameroons’ – and the Prime Minister was thrilled to add him to his A-list of prospective parliamentary candidates in 2005. He definitely fitted the Cameroon profile. Not because he went to Eton like Cameron, but because he went to Eton like those unafraid to rebel on matters of principle, like Boris Johnson or Rory Stewart or Jacob Rees-Mogg. He’s close to Michael Gove too. ‘He’s one of the most intelligent people I’ve ever met,’ Goldsmith told me in an interview in September 2014. ‘He’s a doer. Most ministers – you could swap them and no one would even notice. Gove gets stuff done.’ It’s a frustration for Goldsmith that ‘politics lacks people with passion. It should be the first reason to get involved, to get into politics, and yet it is amazingly lacking among so many of my colleagues.’ He conceded there are ‘very good people here who sign up for the right reasons’, but still ‘everyone needs an issue to get them out of bed in the morning. It’s hard to do that if you are also ambitious for office.’ He believes in democracy, loves referenda and thinks Russell Brand is an idiot for suggesting people shouldn’t vote.

‘He wouldn’t be standing for mayor if he didn’t think he could win it’ He prefers political tracts to cocktail parties and says he hasn’t got the constitution for alcohol: ‘I get very drunk on two glasses of wine and have an immediate hangover, and it kills me for three days.’ He turns his phone off to spend time with his children (he has five – three from his first marriage and two from his second – ranging from 16 years to a few months) and compensates by staying up late to answer emails. What might have counted against him is his complicated love life – he had an affair with Alice Rothschild (sister of his brother Ben’s ex-wife Kate) while still married to Sheherazade Goldsmith, his first wife. But in 2013 he married Alice, a formidably bright, tough woman who, by all accounts, ‘takes no nonsense from Zac’, and he remains on good terms with Sheherazade, who is now in a relationship with the film director Alfonso Cuarón. Goldsmith’s youngest children are two and a half and three months, so he’ll likely face a few sleepless nights in the run-up to the May election. One other thing about Goldsmith: he likes a punt. He’s ‘bloody good’ at predicting an election outcome. He bet on Barack Obama being the next American president after hearing him speak in 2004 – long before some of his contemporaries had even heard of him. And then, eight months before the general election in 2015, he reversed the bookies’ odds and punted (verbally, as far as I know) for a Tory majority. Lord knows how much he’s won betting on politics in his life. ‘But one thing’s for sure,’ says Elliot, ‘Zac Goldsmith wouldn’t be standing for mayor of London if he didn’t think he could win it.’ (

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I R E N E FO RT E Irene, 26, has it all. Skin the colour of a molten Crunchie bar that stays exactly the same shade all year round? Tick. A wardrobe full of her mother Aliai’s Roberto Capucci couture gowns? Tick. A cool job at her father’s Rocco Forte Hotels, training staff and revamping the spas? Tick. A degree in French and Italian from Oxford University? Bien sûr. And to top it all off, she’s the sweetest girl in London. C H A N E L H AU T E C OU T U R E THIS PAGE, IRENE WEARS PLEATED SILK-ORGANZA DRESS WITH EMBROIDERED BODICE AND WOODEFFECT TRIM, POA WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & YELLOW-DIAMOND BROOCH, POA, BY CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY OPPOSITE PAGE, LYDIA WEARS SILK-ORGANZA BUSTIER SHEATH DRESS WITH FEATHEREFFECT EMBROIDERY & EMBELLISHED TRIM; SILK-GEORGETTE & LAME CAPE WITH JEWEL-EMBROIDERED TRIM, BOTH POA

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LY D I A FO RT E If you’re after a bit of filthy food porn, head to Lydia’s Instagram page immediately – she’s the master when it comes to melted cheese, prosciutto and pasta. When the 28-year-old is not eating her way around Italy in the name of research as bar and restaurant manager for her father’s hotels, she’s busy planning her Tuscan September wedding to Dimitri Chandris, which is going to have a Sleeping Beauty vibe. But strictly no fancy dress. ]

DOUBLE THE FUN

Heavenly creatures, celestial couture Photographed by BRYAN ADAMS Styled by GIANLUCA LONGO Words by LUCIANA BELLINI

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SA B I N E G ET T Y Sabine, 31, understands the power of big hair – it’s something the jewellery designer discovered the night before her wedding to Joseph Getty last summer, when she was getting ready for their Les Liaisons Dangereusesthemed party. ‘It took four hours to do my hair that night – the hairdresser went crazy and I let him,’ she says. ‘But then all the women arrived with these huge hairdos, and I was so glad I had that extra 10cm.’

S C H I A PA R E L L I H AU T E C OU T U R E EMBELLISHED SILK-JACQUARD GOWN; EMBROIDERED SILK JACKET, BOTH POA WHITE-GOLD, TSAVORITE & AMETHYST RING, POA, BY CHOPARD

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G E O RG I NA B EVA N Georgina, 25, is obsessed with The Rolling Stones and has a whole portfolio of illustrations she has done of Sir Mick Jagger: ‘He’s my idol.’ She’s been modelling since she was 18, but now it’s all about acting – catch her in the next season of the bonkers E! Entertainment show The Royals, alongside Elizabeth Hurley and Dame Joan Collins, where she plays the mysterious Dominique, who’s hell-bent on blowing open the family’s deepest, darkest secrets. VA L E N T I N O H AU T E C OU T U R E EMBROIDERED PATCHWORK SILK KIMONO, POA WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & EMERALD CUFF, POA; WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & RUBY RING, POA, BOTH BY BOUCHERON. EARRINGS, HER OWN ]

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LARA DEARDEN UCL student Lara, 19, is so attached to her beloved pet rabbit Pusheen that she finds it almost impossible to sit through her screenwriter father James’s most famous film, Fatal Attraction. Because we all know how that ended... G I A M BAT T I S TA VA L L I H AU T E C OU T U R E SILK-BROCADE CAPE DRESS WITH EMBROIDERED ROSES & RUFFLES, POA WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS; ON LEFT HAND, WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND RING; ON RIGHT HAND, WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & SAPPHIRE RING, ALL POA, BY DIOR JOAILLERIE

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CHANEL H AU T E C OU T U R E IRENE FORTE WEARS SILK-ORGANZA EMBROIDERED BASKET-WEAVE TOP; EMBROIDERED BASKET-WEAVE SILK-JACQUARD SKIRT WITH POCKETS, BOTH POA WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA, BY CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY ]

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RALPH & RUS S O SABINE GETTY WEARS SILK-ORGANZA GOWN EMBROIDERED WITH ORGANZA-RIBBON RUFFLES, POA GOLD & PINK-TOPAZ NECKLACE, POA, BY SABINE GETTY. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & EMERALD RING, POA, BY BULGARI

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L E A H D E WAV R I N Leah, 26, is famous for losing things. Like her favourite vintage leather jacket (it used to belong to Kate Moss), which got nicked in a nightclub. Or the black Balenciaga hat that disappeared somewhere during her move back to London from Hong Kong last year. She’s so forgetful she’s even got tattoos of her best friends’ names – just in case. GAU LT I E R PA R I S EMBROIDERED SMOKING JACKET, POA WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS. WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BRACELET, POA, BY DE BEERS. EARRING, HER OWN ]

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G I O RG I O ARMANI PRIVE LARA DEARDEN WEARS SILK-GAZAR PLISSE BUSTIER DRESS, POA WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND RING (JUST SEEN), POA, BY VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

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E L I E SA A B C OU T U R E GEORGINA BEVAN WEARS EMBROIDERED TULLE & ORGANZA DRESS WITH RESIN FLOWERS, PEARLS & CRYSTALS, POA WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA, BY DE BEERS. OTHER EARRINGS, HER OWN

FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. MODELS: GEORGINA BEVAN AT TESS MANAGEMENT & LEAH DE WAVRIN AT IMG. HAIR BY TYLER JOHNSTON AT ONE REPRESENTS, USING KIEHL’S. MAKE-UP BY KARINA CONSTANTINE, USING CHANEL S/S 2016 AND NO. 5 BODY EXCELLENCE. NAILS BY EMMA WELSH AT AUGUST MANAGEMENT, USING LEIGHTON DENNY NAILS. PRODUCTION, ELLE KORHALILLER. FASHION ASSISTANT, POM OGILVY

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‘ FO R THE P R IC E OF A T HREE- BEDROOM LO NDO N F L AT, YOU GE T A MA R IN E RESERV E YOU CAN S EE FROM S PACE ’

An island in the Indian Ocean’s Chagos Archipelago, an area now protected from commercial fishing by a partnership between the British government and Swiss philanthropist Ernesto Bertarelli

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PHOTOGRAPHS: GEORGE DUFFIELD, REX FEATURES, REUTERS

From hedgefund kings to Hollywood heavy hitters, a new wave of marine philanthropists is sailing to our oceans’ rescue. Keith Dovkants charts the big money safeguarding the big blue


illionaires love the oceans. Calm, beautiful places across which they can plough a foamy furrow with their grandiose superyachts. And, of late, they have been expressing this love in a very extravagant way, pouring billions into creating marine eco-reserves. Forget saving the rainforests – a clean sea is the new frontier when it comes to mega-philanthropy. This global trend has been led by a small and plucky band of British charity workers and the British government, which has in its care a clutch of islands that have recently become highly attractive to wealthy benefactors. Places like Ascension Island, a tiny British Overseas Territory in the Atlantic. The American hedgefund king, Louis Bacon, has put up £300,000 to allow work to begin there on what will be the Atlantic’s biggest marine reserve, a safe haven for fish and endangered species that will cover an area only slightly smaller than the entire United Kingdom. Bacon, who has a long record of supporting large conservation projects through his Moore Foundation, has formed a partnership with the UK to make the Ascension reserve a reality. ‘I grew up bluewater-fishing off the coast of North Carolina,’ he says. ‘During university summer breaks, I skippered a sportfishing boat looking for marlin off the Hamptons in New York. The boat’s owner was a Wall Street trader who pushed me into the investment world. When I had the resources to start a foundation, it was important to me to devote significant funding to protect fisheries.’ The Ascension Island scheme will produce ‘both immediate and long-lasting results’, he adds. Crucial to the deal was a London-based charity, the Blue Marine Foundation, which will administer the scheme with the Ascension Island authorities. Blue, as the charity is called, operates with five staff from an attic in Somerset House, yet its reach is truly global. It began with a book, The End of the Line, by Charles Clover, the veteran journalist and conservationist. He revealed apocalyptic facts about overfishing and forecast that, at the current rate of decline, stocks would be exhausted by mid-century. Clover is chairman of Blue, which was founded by entrepreneur Chris Gorell Barnes and George Duffield, a film producer and wildlife photographer. ‘I was making a documentary in Tonga when the director handed me a copy of the book,’ Duffield says. ‘As soon as I read it, I knew my life had changed. It was the first time anyone had made an unassailable case that we are simply going to run out of fish. One of the planet’s greatest resources was being squandered.’ Duffield, 43, produced a documentary based on the book, also called The End of the Line, with Clover, Gorell Barnes and others, including Ted Waitt, a billionaire American philanthropist. The film has been shown at the United Nations and at 10 Downing Street. And it was crucial at one of the most significant moments in recent moves to protect the oceans. Duffield’s mother is Dame Vivien Duffield, daughter of the late Sir Charles Clore, the retail and property tycoon who owned Selfridges. Sir Charles was a man of dazzling generosity – some of his employees called him Santa Clore – and Dame Vivien continues the family tradition of philanthropy. She is estimated to have given away close to £200m, mainly to educational and cultural causes, including the Royal Opera House. ]

B

ABOVE, BILLIONAIRE ERNESTO BERTARELLI AT A REGATTA IN ZURICH, 2010. LEFT, HIS SUPERYACHT VAVA II

Film producer and wildlife photographer George Duffield diving near Cocos Island, in the eastern Pacific, 2007

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[ Dame Vivien has a home in Switzerland, where George grew up, and he took The End of the Line to Gstaad for a private screening. Among those who attended were Ernesto and Kirsty Bertarelli. Ernesto, a biotech tycoon with a fortune estimated at £5.6bn by Forbes, has a well-known love of the ocean. His father, Fabio, was a passionate sailor, and Ernesto and his sister Dona were given sailing dinghies almost as soon as they could walk. Today, their boats are rather bigger. Ernesto, 50, a skilled helmsman, put together the Team Alinghi challenge for the America’s Cup and in 2003 brought the trophy back to Europe for the first time since it was lost to America in 1851. Alinghi successfully defended the trophy in 2007, then lost it to an American syndicate. Kirsty, a former Miss UK, is often described as ‘Britain’s richest woman’ on account of her marriage. A singer-songwriter who wrote the No. 1 hit ‘Black Coffee’ for All Saints in 2000, she married Ernesto that same year, and they went on to have three children: Chiara, Falco and Alceo. The family has a 318ft superyacht, Vava II, which, at its launch, was hailed a masterpiece for its elegance and lavish appointments, including a fold-down beach club and a variable-depth swimming pool. For all its luxury, Vava II is a serious ship and has a new role in the current drive to save the seas. George Duffield had only an inkling of this the night he showed his film to around 150 people in Gstaad. The Bertarellis were friends of a friend: ‘They came up to me at the end of the film and said, “What can we do? We want to help.’’’ That exchange was the point of departure for one of the biggest marine-conservation projects so far – the Chagos Islands Reserve. It covers some 210,000 square miles of the Indian Ocean in the Chagos Archipelago, a British Overseas Territory. In 2010 the Bertarellis, through their family foundation, entered into a partnership with the British government to protect the area from commercial fishing. That same year, the Bertarellis’ foundation worked with Blue to create a marine reserve around the Turneffe Atoll in Belize, safeguarding 600 square miles of ocean containing an ecologically important coral reef. The family is also currently involved in proposed projects in the Pacific, including ventures for Pitcairn – the remote island that is home to descendants of the mutineers of HMS Bounty – and Easter Island. ‘I was raised around boats and the ocean has always been a passion,’ says Ernesto Bertarelli. ‘We were doing some conservation work and I was already sensitive to the problems. But the meeting with George opened an opportunity to do something unique. Chagos provides humanity with a standard reference to what a pristine ocean can look like. What we are doing now is to try to understand the place more profoundly.’ Scientists, including researchers from Stanford and Oxford, were brought into the project. A patrol vessel took on the task of deterring illegal fishing and work began to monitor the sea and its inhabitants. Vava II became an expedition ship, crammed with scientific instruments, gear for tagging fish and special buoys to gather data. The yacht returns to Chagos this year for another round of research with the Bertarellis aboard. ‘The children really get it,’ says Ernesto. ‘It is not just about giving money – we get involved. We give our time and our passion. The children help tag fish and collect samples, but our 14-year-old daughter grumbles a little – she calls it “Daddy’s vacation in isolation”!’ The Bertarellis’ various conservation projects have probably cost over £10m, but Ernesto declines to give a figure. ‘I just don’t like to talk about numbers,’ he says. He is currently looking at some new technology – floating surveillance drones, powered by the waves and controlled by satellite. A fleet of these could allow a conservation zone to be monitored more closely than ever before. Drones are also cheaper to run than patrol ships.

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ABOVE, GEORGE DUFFIELD WITH HIS MOTHER, DAME VIVIEN DUFFIELD, AT A BLUE MARINE ANNIVERSARY PARTY, 2015. ABOVE RIGHT, CHARLES CLOVER’S THE END OF THE LINE. RIGHT, BLUE MARINE YACHT CLUB BURGEES FLYING FROM A MAST. BELOW, A SCENE FROM GEORGE DUFFIELD’S FILM OF THE END OF THE LINE

LEFT, SIMON LE BON AT AN ARTEMIS CHALLENGE YACHT RACE, 2014. RIGHT, SIR RICHARD BRANSON AT A YACHT CLUB IN NEWPORT, CALIFORNIA, 2011


ritain has a special place in marine conservation because it has 14 Overseas Territories dotted around the world. This legacy of empire – of which Chagos, Ascension, Pitcairn and others form part – covers vast expanses of sea and the government has said it wants to create a ‘Blue Belt’ of marine protection around them to stop illegal fishing. The problem is cost. Patrolling and monitoring huge swathes of ocean is expensive, and environmentalists say the only way progress will be made is with money from private sources – like billionaires. ‘Many people think ocean conservation is something governments do,’ says Charles Clover. ‘But the reality is that this is a new cost at a difficult time. There are people out there with more money than some countries’ GDP and their help can make it easier for governments to do the right thing.’ Chris Gorell Barnes, partner of Baroness Lane-Fox, is candid about targeting the rich. ‘We focus on wealthy individuals,’ he says. ‘People who have yachts and spend a lot of time on the ocean are receptive to our ideas and also have the money needed to pay for them.’ The charity has launched its own association, the Blue Marine Yacht Club, with Prince Albert II of Monaco as founding patron. The club’s burgee (identifying flag), designed by Ralph Lauren, is a ‘badge of honour’, says Gorell Barnes – it shows that a yacht owner ‘really cares about the sea he sails on’. Among those currently flying the BMYC burgee are Sir Charles Dunstone, the Bertarellis, Matthew Freud, Simon Le Bon and Princess Zahra Aga Khan. Many marine philanthropists have their own yachts – Paul Allen, the co-founder of Microsoft has two; Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of the parent company of Google, has a research institute with its own vessel, which he lends to marine scientists. Ted Waitt, who put up a lot of the money for The End of the Line, has the 240ft superyacht Plan B. Leonardo DiCaprio, a poster boy for ocean conservation, usually borrows a friend’s boat – like the 482ft Topaz, owned by Sheikh Mansour of the United Arab Emirates. DiCaprio, a keen scuba diver, is a serious player in the new drive to save the seas, not least because of his celebrity status and the fact he has pledged £5m to the cause. DiCaprio is part of Oceans 5, a US-based group set up specifically to help rich individuals find the most effective way to put their money to work for the seas. Its director, J Charles ‘Chuck’ Fox, tells Tatler that there has been ‘an explosion in activity’ in the past few years. ‘Our job is to identify conservation opportunities for our funders,’ he says. ‘There is much more awareness now that if we are to provide resiliency for the planet, we must protect the oceans.’ Oceans 5 numbers among its funders former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg, Ted Waitt, British investor Alan Parker’s Oak Foundation, the Moore Foundation and Tiffany and Co.’s charitable trust. Other billionaires currently funding marine-preservation schemes include Sir Richard Branson, the American James Harris Simons and Ray Dalio, founder of the Bridgewater Associates hedgefund. The research group and website Inside Philanthropy has joked that it’s as if the world’s billionaires have all been sent a ‘secret memo’ telling them to get behind saving the seas. ‘Marine conservation is very fashionable right now,’ says David Callahan, IP’s founder. ‘There is more understanding of just how much in peril the oceans are.’ There is also, he notes, a competitiveness among big givers. ‘A lot of these donors want to be at the cutting edge,’ he says. ‘They want to be doing things others are not doing.’ ‘People increasingly want to spend the money in their lifetime and see the results,’ adds philanthropy expert Theresa Lloyd, author of Why Rich People Give. George Duffield says putting money into the oceans brings swift results; protected areas begin to recover in a few years and donors can see their money working to good effect. ‘It’s probably the best-value conservation you can get,’ he says. ‘For the price of a three-bedroom London flat, you get a marine reserve you can see from space. And your children can swim in it!’ (

B Prince Albert II of Monaco, 2015. Below, billionaire conservationist Louis Bacon, 2015

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, GOFF PHOTOS, GEORGE DUFFIELD, YANN DANDOIS, FILM MAGIC/GETTY IMAGES

‘THE CHILDREN HELP TAG FISH AND COLLECT SAMPLES, BUT OUR 14-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER GRUMBLES A LIT TLE’ – ERNESTO BERTARELLI

ABOVE, SHEIKH MANSOUR’S TOPAZ, FREQUENTLY BORROWED BY LEONARDO DICAPRIO. BELOW, DICAPRIO WITH US SECRETARY OF STATE JOHN KERRY AT AN ‘OUR OCEANS’ CONFERENCE IN WASHINGTON, DC, 2015

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The Earl of Onslow with a painting of Clandon Park by James Seymour (1702–1752)

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GOODBYE TO ALL THAT Lord Onslow wept when he was lowered into the burnt-out shell of his family stately, Clandon Park. Yet this normally unsentimental dandy is adamant that the place should not be rebuilt... whatever the National Trust says. By David Jenkins Photographed by PHILIP SINDEN TATLER.COM

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he 8th Earl of Onslow cuts a splendidly dashing figure. Tall, slim and commanding, he’s wearing a dark-blue, purple-lined jacket with six buttons at the cuff, chisel-toed cowboy boots, raffishly long hair tumbling over the collar of his shirt, narrow-leg black jeans, scimitar-shaped sideburns and, to top it all off, a magenta belt. It’s a rakish look, and one that’s easy to transform in the mind to that of, say, a daredevil dragoon riding alongside Flashman in the Crimea or joining Sir Francis Dashwood at the Hellfire Club in the 1750s – just 20 years after his forebear, the 2nd Baron Onslow (in his time both Speaker of the House of Commons and Chancellor of the Exchequer) knocked down an Elizabethan house at Clandon Park, in Surrey, and replaced it with 40,000 square feet of Georgian splendour, austere on the outside but magnificent within, the Marble Hall being, says Rupert Onslow, ‘one of the great rooms in Britain’. But 95 per cent of that glorious interior is, he says, no more. On 29 April last year, the 48-year-old Rupert was at Ascot ‘when my mother rang to say they had a fire’ – ‘they’ being Clandon Park, then and currently a National Trust property, given to that body by Rupert’s family in 1956, together with ‘£1 million in today’s money’. Rupert’s mother lives nearby, in Temple Court, surrounded by parkland, and she’d seen the fire, which broke out in a fuse board on the lower ground floor at around 4.30pm, from her bedroom window. At 5.30pm, Rupert ‘walked onto the lawn and watched the house slowly but surely disintegrate’. There were flames leaping and huge jets of water from the fire brigade’s hoses, ‘and then the most poignant moment: when all 44 windows on the east side of the house were alight with orange. It’s amazing how alive a house becomes with the movement of the fire and the popping of the windows as the glass blows out.’ He shakes his head, wonderingly, as he gazes at the shell that is Clandon now, shrouded ‘like a Christo sculpture’ in all-enveloping tarpaulins. ‘The movement, the flicker of the flames, give a house life in death.’ It was, he adds, ‘very, very emotional’. An emotion tapped again when, weeks later, he was dangled, in a cage, from a crane into the burnt-out shell of the building. ‘Unbelievable. I got lowered to within feet of the walls. Very poignant indeed.’ Did he cry? ‘Yes, I did a bit, actually.’ Gosh. You wouldn’t have expected that, for there’s a haughtiness and arrogance – a splendid arrogance – about the 8th Earl that speaks of staring down difficulties and treating obstacles with scorn. He’s not, he says, a sentimental man, but on one thing he’s clear: ‘Don’t watch your house burn down – even if it isn’t your house.’ Not his own house, no, but the house in which he, his sister and his father had a joint 21st-, 18th- and 50th-birthday party – there’d been a jazz band upstairs and a disco in the basement. He had his stag do there too, before his marriage to Leigh Jones-Fenleigh in 1999 – a ‘blonde bombshell’, one friend said, who ‘flew aeroplanes, was tremendously bright’ and is a director of Invicta, a firm that developed the Mastermind board game and produced millions of red noses for Comic Relief. The couple have a 12-year-old daughter, Lady Olympia, and live near

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Leicester, where Invicta is based. They have 15 acres there, with ‘three goats and some horses’. Onslow works at Lloyd’s, in a syndicate specialising in fine-art insurance, so when he’s in London, he stays with friends: ‘All I need is a bed and a bath, because the chances are I’m with clients [in the evening]. I don’t sit and watch television when I’m in London.’ That was probably also the case when he was a young blade around London in the Eighties and Nineties. He’d been to Eton, done A-levels (chemistry, biology and design) and then decided not to do what everyone else was doing. Instead, he headed off to Western Kentucky University to read philosophy and psychology: ‘Great subjects to make you produce sensible, logical arguments with a beginning, a middle and an end.’ He smiles. ‘I’m not sure my friends would agree.’ He had plenty of those when he came back to London ‘in the dizzy days of 25 years ago’. A pal – ‘Rupert’s a lovely man’ – says Onslow was ‘very social, very popular, always had lovely girlfriends’. At one point, he used to stride round SW3 in a cape and even then sported his dandyish sideburns. ‘Did he spend most weekends in the country?’ muses the chum. ‘Probably. But he’d often be going off abroad to parties in chateaux.’ A Brinkley’s sort rather than a San Lorenzo type, he was very much a good egg, having a good time. He was, though, ‘always interested in design. And he had a love of heritage.’ That’s a love he shares with the National Trust’s 4.2m members. And it’s what’s propelled him into the public eye. He was, he says, his tone brisk and brooking little argument, ‘flabbergasted’ when Dame Helen Ghosh, the NT’s director general, said of Clandon that ‘we’re committed to rebuilding it in some shape or form’. That was ridiculous, he told the Times: ‘Clandon is lost,’ he said. ‘It’s a ruin now. This sad site should be left in peace and tranquillity.’ Those short, sharp sentences were terrific sound bites, but they were deeply felt – 95 per cent of the interior was gone, he reiterated to me. To produce a ‘replica’, however skilled the artisans, would not be a ‘genuine’ house. Indeed, he continues, if you were to do that to a house you owned and offer it to the National Trust, they’d turn it down as inauthentic. It would be a ‘pastiche’. Sure, Uppark, in Sussex, was restored after a fire in 1989, but there the vast majority of the contents had been saved and could be put back in the house, giving it some sense of continuity. Whereas Clandon, pre-fire, had had barely any of its own furniture – that had been sold off to pay death duties – and had been little visited anyway. Why spend... well, how much? Onslow has produced a majestic document titled ‘The Options For Clandon Park Post The Ruination By The Fire’; in it he – and he is, remember, an insurer – estimates that ‘a conservative cost for a restoration would be £65 million’. The result, he says, would be a ‘vanity project’ for the ‘heritage industry’, just as the Onslows’ 1732 Clandon Park had been a vanity project, a great fuck-off, state-of-the-art house designed to shout out the political and landed importance of the family. (They’re the only family to have produced three speakers of the House of Commons, including Arthur Onslow, the ‘Great Speaker’, and up until Rupert, there had been Onslows in Parliament for 400 years. He’d like to prolong that tradition – ‘it’s bizarre how it’s [politics] in the blood’ – and stands for election as a Conservative peer every time there’s a Tory vacancy among the 92 hereditary peers in the House of Lords. He’s yet to get the nod.) That £65m would, he believes, be better spent on gussying up the fire-risk provisions in National Trust buildings or in buying and restoring an ‘original Great House that is in danger’. His favourite idea, though, is for the Trust to spend the money on Wentworth Woodhouse, the gargantuan stately near Rotherham that’s 606 feet long and has 250,000 square feet of floor space, 300 rooms and 180 acres of grounds: ‘You could make it the most wonderful business and pleasure park.’ All of which is fine, dandy and stirringly Onslovian. Except that the National Trust is having none of it. The insurance, it says, cannot – for legal reasons – be used on anything other than Clandon; what’s more,


PHOTOGRAPHS: NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/ANGELO HORNAK, NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/ANTHONY PARKINSON, NATIONAL TRUST IMAGES/CHRIS LACEY, GETTY IMAGES

Have I Got News For You, he once pursued a bullock down the A3 on the soaring Rysbrack fireplaces in the Marble Hall have survived and the horseback and used to put an authentic Roman stone testicle under glorious room will be restored to what it was when first the house was his wife’s pillow. When he died, Quentin Letts said that Parliament built to Giacomo Leoni’s plans; and the less important upper floors can had ‘lost a good ’un’. For Rupert, ‘he was fantastic, one of the funniest, be turned into modern exhibition space to ‘create heritage for the 21st cleverest men’. He laughs. ‘I might start snivelling again.’ century’. (Though Dame Helen tells me: ‘Personally, I feel it would be And, like his father’s, Rupert Onslow’s feelings about Clandon are, good if you have some evidence you’re in a ruin, a house that suffered I sense, more complicated than he admits. His father had been 18 when a trauma in the 21st century.’) the house was handed over to the National Trust; according to Rupert, Harrumph is, essentially, Rupert’s response to me: ‘It’s a hybrid. They ‘he sat, he said, in the Marble Hall, crying, knowing that the Onslows are replicating half the house and building a modern house on top would never be back in that house. Did he miss living there? Enormously of it.’ The decision didn’t, he adds, address the concerns of the Trust’s – and then not at all. It was quite cold and draughty.’ Indeed, his father millions of members. And, he goes on, ‘I believe the National Trust are used to tell people he was glad Clandon had been given to the National in the preservation profession, not the building trade.’ As far as Clandon Trust; before they did that, the family had been ‘slaves to the servants’. is concerned, he is a fan of ‘romantic ruins’, and a ruined Clandon, he thinks, would still be ‘very magnificent, very tragic and very stark’. But to (Which is ironic, as the house had been built on the back of a fortune made out of the slave trade.) unleash a trillion artisans to mimic what once was there... ‘I would ask Similarly, the current earl speaks tartly about Clandon as ‘absolutely you a question: if you had a passion for cars, would you go and buy a kit impractical’ for the 21st century; a pointless place unless it were car, or would you buy the original Ferrari?’ the political and business – ie, estate – centre it had been in its prime; the He’s big on questions, the earl. ‘Was [the fire] avoidable? Probably. upper floors were undistinguished; and so on. ‘Learn from the past,’ he Could the compartmentalisation have been better? Probably. Do I think says, unsentimental to the marrow, ‘but always look forward.’ Yee-ees. Yet they [the NT] can learn from this? Yes, of course.’ It is, I suppose, the you can’t help but feel his sorrow as he speaks of the incineration of ‘the logician in him, but his contrarian stance is also, surely, an echo of his place where all Onslows for 200 years had been measured, where I was father, the 7th Earl, a splendidly independent-minded peer who always measured, in this cupboard and the date written against it – gone, all supported the reform of the House of Lords ‘because any House gone’. He looks once more at the shroud that envelops the burnt-out husk that has me in it really needs to have its head examined’. In fact, he and sighs. ‘It’s the personal relevance that’s been destroyed.’ ( didn’t like Tony Blair’s proposed reforms and vowed to ‘behave like a football hooligan’ in opposing them. Still, he was one of the hereditary peers elected to remain in the house after the reforms were enacted. Clandon Park ablaze, 2015 A Conservative, the 7th Earl was fiercely anti-apartheid, a firm supporter of human rights and compassionate towards the victims of stress in battle – his father, the 6th Earl, he told the House of Lords, served for three years in the Second World War and ‘had 13 tanks blown up beneath him in that time. I do not think he ever went to bed sober. He died extremely young, at the age of 57. Sometimes I worry and ask myself whether I began to understand him and the answer is no, I did not.’ (Rupert’s grandmother, he tells me, was a morphine addict, so Clandon must then have been a pretty hazy sort of place.) But Rupert’s father was indeed conservative: of the Church of England he once said, ‘One hundred years ago, the Church was in favour of foxhunting and against buggery. Now it is in favour of buggery and against foxhunting.’ A popular guest on The Marble Hall at Clandon Park, as it was before the fire

ABOVE LEFT, LORD ONSLOW’S GRANDPARENTS, THE 6TH EARL & COUNTESS OF ONSLOW, AT CLANDON PARK IN 1951. ABOVE RIGHT, THE 2ND BARON ONSLOW (1679–1740). TOP RIGHT, THE 6TH EARL WITH HIS WIFE & THEIR DAUGHTER, LADY TERESA ONSLOW, AT CLANDON PARK IN 1952

The Marble Hall after the inferno

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HOUSE STYLE Dressing for dinner with Ted, James and Rose Macdonald-Buchanan at home at Cottesbrooke Hall

TED, LEFT, & JAMES WEAR MOHAIR & SATIN PEAK-LAPEL JACKET, £ 2,330; COTTON SHIRT, £730; SILK BOW TIE, £155, ALL BY TOM FORD

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Photographed by ASH KINGSTON Styled by SOPHIE GOODWIN


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win brothers Ted, left, and James Macdonald-Buchanan, 19, are both keen golfers and tennis players. Ted went straight up to Oxford to read classics after Eton. James, currently enjoying a gap year, is going to Oxford this October to read chemistry. Once reunited, the pair will undoubtedly resume their old tricks – swapping places at dinner and introducing themselves as one another. heir sister, 21-year-old Rose, despite spending her childhood roaming the green hillocks of Cottesbrooke Hall’s parklands, always pined for more exotic flora and fauna. Blame Sir David Attenborough and a childhood obsession with his nature documentaries. She went to South America after taking her A-levels and now, though pursuing a career in fashion, itches to go to India and see a tiger or two. TJ

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THIS PAGE & OPPOSITE PAGE, FAR LEFT, JAMES & TED WEAR WHITE-TIE TAILCOAT, £395; WHITE-TIE TROUSERS, £225; WHITE-TIE WAISTCOAT, £135; COTTON DRESS SHIRT, £75; COTTON BOW TIE, £35, ALL BY OLIVER BROWN. PATENT SHOES, £770, BY TOM FORD. ROSE WEARS WOOL JACKET, £1,370, BY MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION. VINTAGE SHIRT, FROM A SELECTION, AT WILLIAM VINTAGE. WOOL TROUSERS, £580, BY STELLA MCCARTNEY, AT HARVEY NICHOLS. ON RIGHT HAND, ROSE-GOLD & DIAMOND RING, £2,570, BY SYDNEY EVAN

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THIS PAGE, TOP, TED WEARS MOHAIR SATIN-TRIM TROUSERS, £960; SHIRT & SILK BOW TIE, BOTH AS BEFORE, ALL BY TOM FORD. JAMES WEARS JACKET & SHIRT, AS BEFORE; MOHAIR SATIN-TRIM TROUSERS, £960, ALL BY TOM FORD MIDDLE, ROSE WEARS EMBROIDERED WOOL JACKET, £1,695, BY STELLA MCCARTNEY, AT HARVEY NICHOLS. GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, £7,500; GOLD & WHITE-QUARTZ NECKLACE, £2,750, BOTH BY NOOR FARES BOTTOM, JAMES WEARS CASHMERE TUXEDO (JACKET NOT SEEN), £4,200; COTTON SHIRT, £510; PATENT SHOES, £470, ALL BY DIOR HOMME

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TED & JAMES WEAR TAILCOAT, TROUSERS, WAISTCOAT, SHIRT & BOW TIE, ALL BY OLIVER BROWN, AS BEFORE. PATENT SHOES BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE ROSE WEARS WOOL TROUSERS, £580, BY STELLA MCCARTNEY, AT HARVEY NICHOLS. VINTAGE SHIRT, AS BEFORE. SUEDE HEELS, £425, BY CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN. GOLD & CRYSTAL-QUARTZ NECKLACE, £3,000, BY NOOR FARES. RING, AS BEFORE

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THIS PAGE, ABOVE, ROSE WEARS WOOL JACKET, £1,370; WOOL TROUSERS, £785, BOTH BY MICHAEL KORS COLLECTION. WOOL KNIT (JUST SEEN), £330, BY TOD’S. GOLD & DIAMOND NECKLACE, £2,740, BY SUSAN FOSTER. RING, AS BEFORE RIGHT, TED WEARS WOOL & CASHMERE TUXEDO, £4,090; COTTON DRESS SHIRT, £360, BOTH BY BRUNELLO CUCINELLI. BOW TIE & SHOES, BOTH BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE. JAMES WEARS TUXEDO, SHIRT & PATENT SHOES, ALL BY DIOR HOMME, AS BEFORE. BOW TIE BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP, TED WEARS WOOL & MOHAIR TUXEDO, £1,500, BY KILGOUR. COTTON SHIRT, £230, BY PAUL SMITH. SILK TIE, £69, BY THOMAS PINK. SHOES BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE. JAMES WEARS WOOL JACKET WITH SATIN LAPEL, £1,350; WOOL TROUSERS WITH PLEATED WAIST, £650, BOTH BY EMPORIO ARMANI. COTTON SHIRT, £325, BY GIORGIO ARMANI. SILK TIE, £69, BY THOMAS PINK. SHOES BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE

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JAMES WEARS TUXEDO, SHIRT & PATENT SHOES, ALL BY DIOR HOMME, AS BEFORE LEFT, JAMES WEARS JACKET & SHIRT, BOTH BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE. TED WEARS SHIRT & BOW TIE, BOTH BY TOM FORD, AS BEFORE FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK. HAIR BY ADAM SZABO AT ATOMO MANAGEMENT, USING L’OREAL. MAKE-UP BY ANGELA DAVIS DEACON, USING CHANEL S/S 2016 AND NO. 5 BODY CREAM. PRODUCTION, ELLE KORHALILLER. FASHION ASSISTANT, POM OGILVY

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Home Edited by GERRI GALLAGHER

Photographed by SIMON UPTON

PERFECTLY GROOMED

PHOTOGRAPH: CONDE NAST ARCHIVE

Dogs, vintage cars, humans... nothing escapes the exacting standards of Edmund Burke and Adrian Sassoon, not least their immaculate, porcelain-stuffed Devon bolthole. By Sophia Money-Coutts

Adrian Sassoon, left, and Edmund Burke with their Morris Minor Traveller and buhund dogs, Mavis, Minnie, Pepper and Pixie TATLER.COM

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One of the 19th-century former farm buildings that make up the estate

LEFT, THE DRAWING ROOM, WITH A FABRIC PANEL FROM TURKMENISTAN ON THE WALL & A BAMBOO COFFEE TABLE. BELOW RIGHT, A GEORGIAN TIERED MAHOGANY TABLE WITH, FR OP, A JAPANESE LACQUERED PLANT HOLDER, BLUE & WHITE JAPANESE PORCELAIN CUPS & CHANTILLY BOTTLES

Savonnerie carpet screens and a cocktail table by Nina Campbell in Sassoon’s study

PHOTOGRAPHS: CONDE NAST ARCHIVE

RIGHT, 18TH-CENTURY CARVED WOODEN URNS FLANK A 19TH-CENTURY CARVED BIRD IN FRONT OF A MEISSEN PLATE. BELOW, SEVRES & VINCENNES PORCELAIN IS DISPLAYED ON A REGENCY BOOKCASE IN SASSOON’S STUDY

The Norwegian buhunds guard the entrance

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Sassoon and Burke in the drawing room, which features oil paintings and Turkish-style carpets by Robert Kime

magine a Victorian farm steading, all haylofts and stables, bleating sheep and mud, Thomas Hardy and animal dung. Picturesque, yes, but not particularly grand. Unless the steading in question belongs to Edmund Burke and his partner, Adrian Sassoon, who have transformed what was once a home for horses and cows in Devon into a magnificent seven-bedroom country bolthole stuffed with Sèvres porcelain, George II oak chairs, Regency bookcases and Edmund de Waal jars. It was in the Eighties that the place was originally turned into a building fit for human beings, as opposed to livestock, but when Burke and Sassoon bought the place in 2008, they still felt there was work to be done – walls to be knocked down and rooms to expand and redecorate. So they embarked on an ambitious four-year renovation of the house. Burke, 43, is a self-deprecating Italian property broker (and a descendant of his namesake, the prophetic philosopher Edmund Burke), whose shipping family moved from Ireland to Genoa in the 19th

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century to be closer to the trading hub. Sassoon, 55 (his father was Siegfried’s cousin), is one of the world’s most respected art dealers, his specialities including Sèvres and contemporary ceramics. Very smart clients have to book appointments to come and see him at the couple’s London home opposite Hyde Park. So it is no surprise that their country retreat, renovated with the help of friends Robert Kime and Nina Campbell, is spectacular. What was once a series of barns sitting squarely around a farmyard has been transformed into an airy, cosmopolitan house surrounding a grassy garden of quince trees. It’s ideal for their Norwegian buhunds (think small huskies), Mavis, Minnie, Pepper and Pixie, who are allowed to roam inside at will, despite all the Sèvres. Sassoon and Burke – a charming, immaculate pair in collared shirts and muted cashmere jerseys – aren’t ones to let the little details slide. ‘I’m a bit OCD,’ admits Burke. So every single piece, inside and out, has been considered. It’s a careful fusion of their art and furniture. In Sassoon’s study are his 18th-century Savonnerie carpet screens, and just outside you find two big wood and marble side tables that Burke inherited from his Genoan grandparents. ]

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The reading room with an artwork by Junko Mori on the table

[‘I can’t bear shiny things, so this was put in acid for a week to age it,’ Burke says, pointing at a metal curtain bracket holding up a stripy, fawn-coloured fabric imported from Cappadocia. The five steel double doors lining the hallway (once byres through which cows roamed) were based on an arched Italian design and have been painted in Farrow & Ball’s Carriage Green, just like the couple’s doors and windows in London. On two 18th-century cabinets in the dining room sit several porcelain plates and bowls. ‘Edmund, I don’t like those there,’ says Sassoon, pointing to a pair of pretty floral vases on one of the cabinets. ‘They shouldn’t be there.’ They’re Sceaux porcelain, he explains, which means they’re from 18th-century France. ‘Sceaux, Sèvres and Vincennes,’ says Burke, pointing to the various other bits on top of the cabinet. ‘No. There’s no Vincennes here – it’s Chantilly,’ says Sassoon, picking up a bowl and looking at its bottom. ‘He should know his stuff,’ he says to me. ‘I was telling Sophia the best things are yours,’ says Burke, who adds – out of earshot – that he generally lets Sassoon keep pieces where he wants them for a week before moving them to where he thinks they should be. ‘He won’t notice.’ The red Louis XV dining-room chairs, all 19 of them, were bought from the collection of the late, art-mad philanthropist Dolly Goulandris, a member of the Greek shipping family. They’re handy when Burke and Sassoon have the house full of friends, family and neighbours on summer weekends and James, their palace-trained butler, puts on full uniform and serves dinner. The couple spend the whole of August here when it’s sunny, lying around the pool – which is lined in a tasteful grey instead of turquoise.

The Norwegian buhunds are allowed to roam inside at will – despite all the Sèvres

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A copy of a Velázquez painting hangs above a 19th-century bench flanked by Casa Pupo lamps

PHOTOGRAPHS: CONDE NAST ARCHIVE

In the winter, meanwhile, they prefer to come here on their own and enjoy the peace. ‘When I get on the train from London, just knowing I have a weekend of silence is wonderful. Because it is completely silent,’ says Burke. Give or take the odd bark from a buhund. The house is a seductive mixture of antique and contemporary. Upstairs, above the five arched doors, runs a 60ft drawing room. Oil paintings hang on the walls opposite two fabric panels from Turkmenistan. ‘This is by Junko Mori – one of Adrian’s star artists,’ says Burke, pointing out a spiked metal sculpture on a table. In the centre of the room sits a low coffee table made from stained bamboo and commissioned from Italy, and on it are big JAR jewellery catalogues and photo books from past holidays. One, of a trip to Antarctica, shows the couple sitting in front of a huddle of penguins. Burke and Sassoon are great travellers. Every bed has a throw from Jaipur; four bronze urns in the garden come from Udaipur. The decorative wooden bannisters in the second drawing room (everyone needs one) are from an 18th-century house in Egypt. No space has been ignored. There are two covered outdoor areas overlooking the grass courtyard: one is called the Swiss Chalet, with wicker furniture and cushions covered with Indonesian fabric found on another trip; the other is the orangery, which has creeper growing up the walls and a small ornate table and chairs on a cobbled stone floor. ‘I’m very Euro. I want to be more English than an Englishman,’ says Burke, walking through the woods just north of the house and pointing out the camellias. This part of the garden overlooks the garage, where the couple’s 1971 Morris Minor Traveller is parked. ‘It goes quite slowly up the hills of Dartmoor,’ he says. ‘But the dogs like it because they can see out of the back.’ That sounds pretty English to me. (


LEFT, PUMPKIN CERAMICS BY KATE MALONE & A VASE BY PIPPIN DRYSDALE ON A MAHOGANY TABLE IN FRONT OF A PAINTING AFTER WATTEAU. RIGHT, THE MASTER BEDROOM, WITH 18TH-CENTURY WATERCOLOURS & A WOODEN CHEST FROM ITALY. BELOW, WICKER FURNITURE IN THE ‘SWISS CHALET’

The reading room, with Egyptian alabaster vases displayed on top of bookshelves

ABOVE LEFT, QUINCE TREES IN THE COURTYARD. BELOW, BURKE & SASSOON WITH THE DOGS IN THE HALL

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Hom e Karen Deeks finds the hottest happy-makers for your house

THE I T LIST

KITCHEN, FROM £60,000, BY PLAIN ENGLISH

TEATIME TREAT

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e take tea very seriously at Tatler. Which is why you need something serious and grown-up to drink it from. None of this chipped-mug business. Instead, look to Wedgwood’s new Tea Garden collection and sip it from this pretty Blackberry & Apple cup, £45 (for cup and saucer). wedgwood.co.uk

LABOUR OF LOVE Do not underestimate the power and joy of a bespoke cupboard. Plain English are well acquainted with this fact and use traditional joinery from the 18th and 19th centuries. Visit their revamped Marylebone showroom and fall hard. plainenglishdesign.co.uk

SOFA, £2,735, BY MATTHEW WILLIAMSON X DURESTA

PRET-A-MEUBLER

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antasy furniture alert: Matthew Williamson has collaborated with Duresta to launch his first-ever bespoke furniture collection, exclusively at Harrods. It’s brilliantly bohemian and bright. harrods.com

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ime to start baking cakes because Farrow & Ball are 70 years old. To celebrate, they’ve launched nine new paint colours (soft neutrals, muted pastels, strong brights and rich dark tones), including Vardo No. 288, £39.50 for 2.5l. You’ll love. farrow-ball.com

SWEET DREAMS

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f you don’t have enough sleep, you’re tired and grumpy. And if you’re tired and grumpy, life is a struggle. So, for heaven’s sake, make sure you have proper bed linen, like the new Yves Delorme Pergola range, from £45. Softer than baby bunnies. yvesdelorme.com

The Woodland Walk collection by Sanderson means you can redecorate with hand-drawn prints, embroideries and wallpapers inspired by the Great British Outdoors. Like A Midsummer Night’s Dream in your house (sanderson-uk.com).

SITTING PRETTY

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dore Rubelli’s Venetian fabrics and wallcoverings? Start hyperventilating: they’re now doing furniture too – you can create one-off pieces using their enormous Rubelli Casa fabric portfolio. rubelli.com CHAIRS, POA, ALL BY RUBELLI CASA

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®

‘HOW MANY?’

PHOTOGRAPH: PAUL SLADE/PARIS MATCH/GETTY IMAGES

THE 300 BEST RESTAURANTS IN THE UK

Restaurant Guide 2016 FREE WITH THE JUNE ISSUE OF TATLER, ON SALE 2 MAY


Beau t y Edited by FR ANCESCA WHITE

GO ON, LET IT ALL OUT

PHOTOGRAPH: CLASSIC STOCK/ALAMY

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ome of us love a good bawl. We cry when we are frustrated, when we are sad, when we are so happy that we feel we might burst. We don’t always bother to hide it. It’s cathartic. Some of us would rather bottle it up. A solitary tear might get squeezed out, but it’s usually wiped away as quickly as it sprang out. Heaven forbid anyone should see. But while research suggests that crying makes nearly 89 per cent of us feel better (the average woman cries between 30 and 64 times per year, whereas men come in at around six – generous, perhaps), there’s no denying that all that sobbing takes its toll on your eyes. If you’re an occasional weeper, Sarah Chapman’s new Eye Bright treatment, £140, provides good damage control. It starts with her signature massage, to drain and de-puff, and there’s a light peel to improve skin texture, while a lash tint and brow tidy mean that you’ll still look human – even after you’ve cried your make-up off. If you’re prone to full-on waterworks, you might like her new Eye Tight treatment, £350. It uses EndyMed radio frequency to lift heavy eyelids, fractional skin resurfacing to soften lines and red-light therapy to take down inflammation (a course of three is recommended). Need a more immediate fix? Chapman has also created a range of sunglasses with designer Tom Davies. Instant composure. FW

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GAVANNDRA HODGE, LEFT, WITH HER SISTER CANDY, C. 1983

BR INGING M Y SISTER BACK TO L IFE After 26 years of suppressing her grief over the sudden death of her sister, Gavanndra Hodge realised she had no memories of her sibling at all and so began to unblock the sadness in order to rediscover the joy hen I was 14 years old, on holiday in Tunisia with my family, my sister died. She was nine years old and called Candy. She had been sharing a hotel room with my parents (she often shared their room – she didn’t like the loneliness of sleeping in her own bed) and woke in the middle of the night, unable to breathe. My mother hurtled into my room to tell me that Candy was ill, so I rushed to their room and found my father trying to calm my sister while my mother went to find help. I will never forget that moment. I stood in the corner, fixed to the carpet, as my sister ran around the bed in obvious distress. It was so sudden, so unexpected, there had been no warning, she had been fine that evening, but before the night was out she would be dead, killed by an airborne virus so rare that, according to the coroner, only one or two children in Europe die of it every year. The Tunisian death report simply said: ‘Stopped breathing.’ I can replay the scene in my head whenever I want, I can see Candy in that place. But I can’t remember what she looked like or said that evening at dinner, I cannot picture her at the beach or eating a chocolate pancake from the pancake man who set up a stall every day by the pool. In fact, I have hardly any other memories of her. I can’t remember any games we played, her birthday parties, how it felt to hug her, how she smelt, how she spoke. I was four

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years old when she was born. I remember being in our flat in Battersea, excited that my new baby sister was coming home from hospital. But, after that, nothing. We had each other for nine years, and for many of those years we shared a bedroom. I now have two daughters, aged four and seven, and when I watch them together, so intertwined physically and mentally, it makes me feel shocked and sad to think that I must have had that once, but I cannot remember it. Candy is completely lost to me. We will all experience grief, to a greater or lesser extent, at some point in our lives. And yet it is something we don’t like to talk about or witness. My mother recalls that, when we came back home after Candy’s death, friends crossed the road to avoid having to speak to her. They were probably scared that, if they did talk to her, she would start to cry. The English have traditionally had a peculiarly unhelpful approach to grief – chin up, don’t mope, do get over it, he/she wouldn’t have wanted us to be sad, forget about it and move on, life is for the living... And, at first, this might feel like the easiest route – to suppress the sadness and the pain, to just get on with life. It certainly felt that way to me. At 14, I couldn’t begin to process what I had just experienced, and so I was the only person not to cry at my sister’s funeral, on a sunny day at St Mary The Boltons, where I hugged and comforted others as they sobbed, while my eyes remained resolutely dry.


Be au t y It became clear that most people preferred my stalwart approach. At school, where an announcement had been made about my sister in an assembly (which I didn’t attend), not once did anyone mention her death to me – not a teacher, not a friend. No one asked me how I was, no one gave me a hug and said, ‘I am so sorry.’ Most people wanted to pretend nothing had happened, and I colluded in this. I was 14, just trying to establish who I was as a young adult. I didn’t want to be the girl with the dead sister, the weirdo crying in the corner. But pretending nothing had happened meant I had to sort of pretend I had never had a sister, that she had never existed, that I had always been what I had become, an only child. The forgetting had begun. Grief is the natural response to the physical loss of someone we love. ‘Pain is the agent of change, pain is what forces you to adjust to this new reality. And it is also through pain that you heal,’ explains Julia Samuel MBE, a psychotherapist and founder patron of the charity Child Bereavement UK, which helps children who have experienced a bereavement, as well as adults who have lost a child. When we do not allow our grief to surface, when we suppress it, there can be long-term implications for our mental health. ‘If you cut out pain, you also cut out your capacity to feel joy,’ says Julia. ‘So your whole capacity to feel can be shortened, and your openness to engage with all aspects of life can be diminished.’ This was a message I heard from all the grief specialists and therapists I spoke to, including Christine Jensen, who deals specifically with unblocking past trauma. ‘Feeling grief makes it more possible to feel other emotions such as love, joy and excitement. It deepens our relationships and connections with others.’ And this certainly feels true to me – I have always felt a sense of being separate from other people, of being alone, of being detached, so that should the worst thing happen (as my life experience has taught me it surely will), I will not be destroyed by it. I will be able to dust down my armour, get up and keep going. There are physical consequences too. I suffered from years of panic attacks, unable to breathe, positive that I was dying, insisting my parents take me to the A&E department at Chelsea and Westminster at least once a week. I was put on beta blockers to calm my constantly racing heart. I used alcohol and drugs to make me even more numb. Panic attacks and substance abuse are both very common responses to suppressed grief. Then, in my 20s, I developed the skin condition psoriasis. ‘In Chinese medicine, the skin is connected to the lungs,’ explains Ross Barr, a marvellous acupuncturist who trained following the death of his father. ‘And the lungs are connected to grief.’ Not allowing yourself to grieve can have implications for your skin, your lungs, your heart, your immune system and your head. These consequences can persist for an entire lifetime, or until you have a nervous breakdown and they burst out of their own accord – or, more manageably, until you choose to open the box where you have hidden your sadness and your trauma. Unblocking grief feels like a terrifying thing to do. It certainly did to me, which was why I did not do it, becoming more and more scared, as the years passed, of the black thing I had hidden within me. By the time I reached 39, I realised I had barely thought about my sister, barely spoken about her, for years. I did not mark her birthday or her death day. I had good friends, people I went for fun, drunken dinners with, people I had known for 15 years, people who did not know I had a dead sister. I had been to university, I had a job, I had a husband, a flat, children. I was a successful human being. And yet even the most minor problems – at work, at home, running late – made my arms go numb with fear. And I was always, always expecting the phone to ring with terrible news, about my children, about my

husband. Those closest to me knew that the first thing they had to say on calling me was ‘nothing is wrong...’ But the rather wonderful thing is that it doesn’t matter how long you wait, you can still unblock your grief – at no point does it get locked away forever and become unreachable. ‘It is never too late for you to dare to feel the pain,’ says Julia Samuel. So, one year ago, I started by finding myself a good therapist – chartered psychologist Fiona McKinney. My parents had sent me to a therapist when I was 16, taking a lot of drugs and about to flunk my GCSEs, but I mostly spent the sessions trying to outsmart him and we didn’t get very far. It was different with Fiona – I was ready to talk, and she is gentle and clever and empathetic. One of the first things I realised I had to get over was the idea that sibling loss is a minor sort of loss, not as important or fundamental as other sorts of loss. ‘Nothing is worse than the loss of a child’ was something I heard again and again after my sister died. My parents’ grief was paramount; mine was nothing compared to theirs. Sibling loss is not something that is talked about a great deal. It doesn’t appear in the grief manuals, and yet – especially when you are one of only two, when you become an enforced only child – the sense of loneliness can be extreme. ‘When you lose a sibling, you are losing that person that you are most intertwined with, the person who has shared your experiences, who understands your family in a way that no one else can,’ says Cathy Rentzenbrink, whose brother, Matthew, suffered a head injury when he was knocked down by a car at 16 and remained in a persistent vegetative state for eight years, until she and her family applied to the courts to have all his life-sustaining treatments withdrawn so that he could die. She has written a startlingly beautiful and moving memoir, The Last Act of Love, about her brother. ‘I no longer had my comrade, my partner in crime. You lose all of that. You also often

I had to sort of pretend that I had never had a sister, that she had never existed. The forgetting had begun see your parents in terrible distress,’ she says. Our tragedies were very different – everyone’s experience of grief is unique – and yet there were shared experiences, like not knowing what to say when new people ask if you have any brothers and sisters (‘It’s complicated’ was my response, so they went away thinking it was some boring multi-stepsibling situation), the survivor’s guilt, the crippling fear you continue to live with, the detachment from other people, even those you love. I also read Justine Picardie’s equally beautiful memoir, If the Spirit Moves You, an elegant and honest book about the death of her sister Ruth from breast cancer. I got a lot from both of these books, not least a feeling of a shared experience – other people had seen their siblings die, other people had been brave enough to navigate these waters, to write wonderful books and tell the world. But there was also a sadness. These books were filled with anecdotes about Matthew and Ruth, memories of closeness and fun, affirmations of the essential nature of the sibling relationship. ‘My sister, whose name is carved upon my bones, whose spirit runs through my blood...’ writes Justine. And yet I still had nothing of Candy. It began to feel like a double loss. I had once had the beautiful thing that they wrote about, but I couldn’t remember it, I couldn’t remember her. I began to see Ross Barr for acupuncture to work specifically on unblocking grief. I felt that if I could do this, if I could cry the tears I had held back for so long, I might find Candy again on the other side. ‘Acupuncture can help you through the different ]

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Be au t y [stages of trauma and grief,’ explains Ross. ‘It can keep you centred, help you not get stuck on one emotion, like anger or sadness. It can restore joy, help you cry.’ ot long after I started seeing Ross, I had a very strange dream. I was in a house, on the ground floor. A friend walked through the door and looked at me in surprise. ‘What are you doing down here?’ she asked. ‘You’re upstairs.’ Confused, I walked up the stairs, opened a door and saw a child lying on a bed. I felt I knew this child, but I wasn’t sure who it was. She looked like one of my daughters. She looked like me. ‘Who are you?’ I asked. ‘I am Candy,’ the child replied, and I felt myself go cold. ‘But you’re dead,’ I said. ‘I’m dead, I’m dead, I’m dead,’ she replied, in a silly, high-pitched voice, like she was trying to annoy me or take the piss out of me. I was scared. I wanted to stuff the words back in her mouth, to make her shut up. I even thought about strangling her, so that no one else would ever find out about what I had seen. When I told my therapist Fiona about the dream, we decided that it meant Candy was very much alive, inside me, but just behind a door, in a place I didn’t visit very much. We agreed that I should bring in some photographs of Candy. I spent the night before my next session going through albums that I hadn’t looked at for years – I cried and cried, heaving sobs that I couldn’t control, so that when I woke the next morning, my eyes felt heavy but my body felt lighter. I took the photographs to the session and cried some more, and felt lighter again. But still the memories did not come. I knew it was not just the loss of Candy that I had to face, but also the way I had lost her. There is a theory that suggests that humans do not always process trauma effectively because our rational brain stops us from doing it. We feel trauma in our bodies – but we suppress that feeling. ‘A good example of this is a minor traffic accident,’ explains Christine Jensen. ‘We override the shock as our higher brain kicks into action – “What about the damage to my car? I’m going to be late for the meeting, I must look a state” – and we don’t allow ourselves to feel the panic and vulnerability and cry, we don’t allow ourselves to tremble or slump. If we don’t feel these things, they get held in the body and show up as symptoms.’ I spent an hour with Christine, one in which she asked me to recount, very slowly, what had happened that night in Tunisia, to describe what I saw and every so often to stop and talk through how I felt physically – feelings that included numbness in my limbs, a tightness in my throat, butterflies in my stomach. In fact, I felt exactly as I had when I watched my sister die 26 years earlier – full of fear, frozen to the spot. Christine told me to wiggle my toes, feel the sensation of my feet being on the floor, my back being against the chair, to look around the room, at the paintings on the wall, at the colour of the carpet. Apparently, this is what an animal will do only when it feels safe, when it is OK for it to stop and check out its surroundings – that way, the numbness and tightness are able to spread and move out of the body. It was a very

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intense hour. But it felt helpful. And I have continued to use the techniques. Just typing those words at the very beginning of this piece made me start to feel physically scared, so I wiggled my toes, looked around the office and out into Hanover Square, and the feelings dissipated. I am OK. That trauma is done. That doesn’t have to be inside me any more. The irony of all this is that I know what good grief feels like. My father died six years ago (suddenly, in the night, no warning – that’s how the people I love seem to go). I cried and I cried some more, I cried next to his dead body, I got lost in my grief, I let myself feel it all, I sat in his flat and looked through his photographs, I made albums, I wrote him letters, I organised dinners where all we did was reminisce about him. I brought some of his things back to my flat so I could think of him. I arranged his funeral, read a poem, got in touch with his old friends. As a result, I can bring him to life, inside me, whenever I need to. I remember how he felt, how he looked. I know what he would say to anything I might ask him, I can have conversations with him, and his loss doesn’t feel devastating any more – in fact it feels kind of lovely. Without knowing it, I had instinctively gone about grieving the right way. ‘The memories that you build and create from someone’s death to their funeral are the memories that have to last the rest of your life,’ says Julia Samuel. It is important to see a dead body; and it is important for a child to see a dead body, as it allows us to accept that someone is really gone. It is important to cry, to talk, to look at pictures. ‘Make memory books, have conversations, write journals,’ advises Julia. We used to think about grief as a process with a beginning, a middle and an end (or five stages – denial, anger, bargaining, depression, acceptance), but now we know it is an open-ended thing. ‘What we talk about now is continuing bonds,’ says Julia. ‘The relationship continues internally. You take them with you. You hold onto them. It’s a lifelong adaptation.’ And grief is not linear. ‘If you could plot it on a graph, you wouldn’t see a continuous upward gradient from tragedy to recovery, but a sharp set of zigzags,’ writes Cathy Rentzenbrink in her memoir. ‘Grief is the price of love,’ she says. It is transformative, it can give you better insight, it can add glitter to your life. Knowing great sadness can help you know great joy. Grief is a gift – we just need to learn how to accept it. I have tried to apply all this thinking to Candy. I have cried about her, I have put up photographs of her around the house, I have spoken to my children about her, I have asked her friends for memories of her (‘bossy’, ‘incredibly sweet’, ‘rather shy’), my mother has given me a painting by her of a daffodil to hang on my kitchen wall. And I do feel happier, more connected, less panicked every time the nanny calls. It is working. I still find I have no real memories of Candy, but I do feel closer to her – she is nearby, if that makes sense. Finally, I feel like I did once have a sister. (


TATLER • PROMOTION

BODY BEAUTIFUL Once again, Dr Rakus is at the forefront of innovative cosmetic technology. She brings you the latest Hollywood contouring laser treatment – SculpSure – for non-invasive definition

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h, how we dread that limbo between festive over-indulgence and summery near-nakedness. By now, of course, New Year resolutions of being the fittest and firmest have all but fallen by the wayside. And with holiday plans in place and the beach looming, it’s only a number of weeks before peeling-off-chunky-winter-layers time. Sigh. If, like us, you need a little help springing into action, some added incentive to regain your gym-bunny mojo, look no further than Dr Rita Rakus. While she is best known as the London Lip Queen, pout-perfecting is just one of the amazing treatments she offers. In fact, Dr Rita Rakus also reigns supreme in all aspects of non-surgical facial rejuvenation and body contouring. Her extensive portfolio includes CoolSculpting, Vanquish, Ultracel, Cellulaze, Exilis, VelaShape and Body-Jet. With over 25 years’ experience in clinical practice, Dr Rakus is an international award winner with a huge celebrity following. She is a founder member and Fellow of the British College of Aesthetic Medicine and has recently been inscribed onto the Wall of Honour at the Royal Society of Medicine. So when Dr Rakus introduces a

new treatment to her extensive portfolio, we just know it’s going to be good. SculpSure is the latest fat-busting, curve-shaping wonder gaining momentum in the USA – and it’s now available at the Rita Rakus clinic. What makes SculpSure so different from other contouring technology? Well, it’s doubly good. This state-of-the art laser takes half the time of regular lasers (just 25 minutes) while removing twice the amount of fat. We like the sound of that! SculpSure is designed to target stubborn fatty deposits at the flanks and abdomen. Passing the laser over these troublesome areas disrupts the fat cells, which are then naturally eliminated from the body. The treatment is completely comfortable too, with no damage caused to dermal tissue – so no need to worry. Results can be seen as soon as six weeks after the treatment. You’ll notice continued improvement to your figure in the following weeks. A little leaner, a little lighter, more toned and more definition. Let Dr Rita Rakus give you your body confidence back with ScuplSure. With a new-found pep in your step, you’ll hop into your gym Lycra – ready to be the happiest, healthiest you for holiday season. Hurrah!

Q& A DR R S MUL HOLL AND, M D S PA M E D I C A I N T E R N AT I O N A L Dr Mulholland is one of Canada’s leading cosmetic plastic surgeons. He is a key opinion leader on SculpSure for Cynosure (the manufacturers) and lectures internationally about the treatment. Dr Mulholland and Dr Rakus have set up a collaboration to share the latest advances and techniques in this area.

WHAT’S SO SPECIAL ABOUT SCULPSURE? ‘SculpSure is the most innovative technology I have seen in years for the non-invasive treatment of fat reduction.’

SO IT’S PRETTY REVOLUTIONARY THEN? ‘Patients are amazed that they can permanently remove fat in only 25-minutes so comfortably. The treatment is safe and effective, eliminating up to 24% of treated fat, with no downtime. SculpSure is the next generation in body contouring – it will change how we manage non-invasive destruction of fat.’

HOW LONG HAS IT BEEN AROUND? ‘Since launching in September 2015, SculpSure

The clinic is conveniently located in Knightsbridge, opposite Harrods. 34 Hans Road, London SW3. For more information, visit drritarakus.com or call 020 7460 7324.

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has taken Canada and the USA by storm. It arrived in the UK in December 2015.’

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Be au t y CONKING OUT What The Bulgari The lowdown Sleep Well, they call it, which is a brave claim. The newest treatment at the huge, so-peaceful-youcould-hear-a-pin-drop spa at the Bulgari is by Mauli – organic, oily, divine-smelling, and with much emphasis on doshas and whatnot. It starts with your hands and arms as you lie on your back – which jars with your average massage – but once it’s begun, you won’t give a jot about spa norms. The therapist uses hot compresses crammed with herbs (kaffir, turmeric, camphor, menthol) to stretch out muscles before finishing with some headspinningly good cranio work. Our verdict All that oil and the scratchy compresses make you feel like a bear rubbing its back on a tree trunk. You’ll flop into bed and sleep – very well. Details £270 for 90 minutes. At 171 Knightsbridge, SW1 (bulgarihotels.com; 020 7151 1055).

BEING ALONE What The Beaumont The lowdown Make no mistake – the spa at the Beaumont is gorgeous (art-deco tiling, flashes of chrome and sexy, strokable white leather). But it’s also quiet. That’s because, in spite of the spaciousness, there are only two treatment rooms. So you can happily saunter about in a robe before discarding it at the sauna, or shriek as you slither atop a marble slab in the hammam while being scrubbed silly. Because it’s just you and Eliezer Costa. He is a real find: a genius masseur who chuckles when you make awkward jokes about your semi-nudity, but refrains from chit-chat. It’s a winning combo. Our verdict Costa steamrollers muscles using his forearms before switching to trigger-point therapy. You should probably marry him. Details Massage, £90 for 60 minutes. At 8 Balderton Street, W1 (thebeaumont.com; 020 7499 1001).

SCRUBBING UP

Treatments CITY SPAS

BLOWING AWAY THE COBWEBS

For staying supple and serene PICK ME!

PHOTOGRAPH: MARK HORN/GETTY IMAGES

WALLOWING What Rosewood The lowdown It’s a grand place is Rosewood, with its cobbled courtyards, chirruping songbirds in gilded cages and snug bars stuffed with glamorous folk. But the Sense Spa downstairs is quite different. Here you’ll find smooth walls of natural stone and little wooden walkways over trickling water that lead to dark treatment rooms lit by candles. You can have all manner of anti-ageing facials and body treatments, but what you really ought to try is the intuitive reflexology – administered on pristine, linen-sheeted beds – or the head massages, using organic oils. Leave time to convalesce in the low-lit ‘dormitory’ afterwards, where you can rest, read or pass out. Our verdict A seriously good spa that, refreshingly, doesn’t take itself too seriously (check out the lockers with their foxhead doorknobs). And the therapists? They’re damn good too – non-judgemental, with a sense of humour. Details Reflexology, £110 for 60 minutes. At 252 High Holborn, WC1 (rosewoodhotels.com; 020 3747 8830).

What The Corinthia The lowdown Cavernous, subterranean, acres of polished marble... ESPA Life at the Corinthia fits the spa bill. And although you could doze on a warm stone bed in front of a flickering fire or hide away in a ‘sleep pod’, you can also come here to reboot – perhaps in the hydropool, where you can be buffeted by jets of water, or in the amphitheatre-like sauna, where you can lie, lizard-like, and sizzle in the heat. Otherwise, book in for a personalised massage: a proper, full-body jobbie, which puts the stuffing back into you by means of some ferocious kneading, pulling of arms and legs, and attention paid to scapulas. If that doesn’t sort you out, the peppy clove oil will. Our verdict Roll off the treatment bed feeling perky, then bounce into the rainfall shower, where you’ll dance with loose-limbed joy. Details ESPA Life Personalised Massage, £140 for 60 minutes. At Whitehall Place, SW1 (espalifeatcorinthia.com; 020 7321 3050).

What COMO Shambhala The lowdown Bloated, dog-tired, irritable? Chances are your skin is feeling the same. So take it to COMO Shambhala, which not only wins the award for the most minimal spa in London – but also for the most zen. The Signature Skin Detoxifying Treatment (all-over scrub, buffing, quick shower, lotion, HEAPS of massage) takes the skin on your body back to its former glory, while a Perricone facial feeds the stuff on your face with omega-rich oils and a delicious massage (plus some bracing extractions – grit your teeth and bear it). Our verdict Emerge in a daze, absent-mindedly stroking your newly smooth bod and feeling completely reborn. Details Skin Detoxifying Treatment, £99 for 60 minutes; Perricone Nutrient Facial, £110 for 60 minutes. At 19 Old Park Lane, W1 (como hotels.com; 020 7447 5750).

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Quentin Jones The multimedia artist on dodgy dates and party tricks. By Katie Thomas I prefer a strong, black graphic line on my lids, rather than a smudged one, and I like a block of colour on my lips, rather than a tinted balm.

My party trick is that I can do a handstand into a crab – I only bring it out when the party is going really well.

The naughtiest thing I ever did when I was little was ride my sled into my next-door neighbour’s new BMW. I broke the windscreen and scratched the bonnet. He cried when he saw the damage.

Dot your concealer, then leave for a second before blending.

I cycle to work, do yoga at Triyoga with Nadia Narain and go running. When I was pregnant, it didn’t feel right to be running and cycling with a bump, so I took up swimming.

The best outfit I’ve ever worn was to my sister’s wedding. It was a turquoise Emilio Pucci gown with see-through panels.

Make sure you use good sun protection on your face. STRESS BUSTERS

It’s important not to put heat on your hair too often.

Need to de-stress at DNA level? The three-, five- or seven-day De-stress BodyScience programme does just that, identifying stress at a physiological level and pinpointing strategies to recalibrate your adrenalin. Pre-trip, DNA tests are sent off to a lab to determine which conditions are hereditary and which are down to lifestyle. Caribbean-side, you’ll have a battery of checks by the resident ayurvedic and Western doctor, who draws up a programme of exercise, nutrition and treatments. Throw in a medicinal sun, sea and sand scenario and your cortisol levels will be positively peachy again. De-stress DNA BodyScience, from £1,990 per person (thebodyholiday.com).

TATLER.COM

Everybody should use Sisley’s Black Rose Precious Face Oil as a moisturiser, an overnight treatment or even as a primer.

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MY TOP TAKEAWAYS

PURIST VS TOURIST T H E B O DY H O L I DAY, ST LUCIA

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The worst date I ever went on involved me getting a little too drunk beforehand with my sister. I can’t actually remember getting to the bar to meet the guy, but I remember the text message the next day, telling me it was all too much for him.

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The drive along the rugged coastline to Galgorm is soulful in itself. Once there, grab your one-piece and head for the Thermal Village and Spa, a watery little wonderland with warm pools and log-fire hot tubs dotted along the riverside. No booking, no fuss – just a good old soaking in the great outdoors. Muscles and mind nicely poached, try the Voya Inner Strength treatment: frankincense is waved under your nose before a calming rose, clary-sage and cardamomoil massage; finally, a warm stone is placed on your solar plexus – strangely, deeply reassuring. B&B, from £205, including access to the Thermal Village and Spa (galgorm.com).

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, SHUTTERSTOCK, ISTOCK. PENULTIMATE EYE LINER, £18; LIPSTICK, £15.50, BOTH BY MAC. EYELINER STYLO, £20.50, BY NARS. BLACK ROSE PRECIOUS FACE OIL, £136, BY SISLEY. PURIST VS TOURIST BY SUZANNE DUCKETT

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Blemish, what blemish? Discover a powerful breakout treatment like no other. An expert, award-winning treatment for breakout-prone skin, Dr Sebagh Breakout Cream & Antibacterial Powder work together to stop spots and blemishes in their tracks, reduce redness and calm the complexion. Created by international cosmetic doctor Dr Jean-Louis Sebagh, this hi-tech, trouble-shooting duo also has the power to prevent future breakouts in oily or combination skin, whilst effectively deterring spots and blemishes often caused by fluctuating hormone levels, working out or playing sports, dietary changes, stress and other lifestyle factors.

Simply tip a small amount of the pale pink, antibacterial powder into the palm of your hand, mix with the anti-inflammatory Breakout Cream and apply to the affected areas. The treatment can be applied directly to blemishes, too, for the ultimate, fast-acting spot treatment which mattifies the skin. Breakout Cream can be used on its own as part of a daily skin care ritual for oily/combination skin types or when normal skin breaks out. Find out more at drsebagh.com/breakouts


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Beauty f lash OH HAPPY DAY Mood-lifting marvels. By Katie Thomas CLARINS YSL Beauté Face Palette Collector in Gypsy Opale, £42 They say ‘Corrects uneven skin tones.’ We say Let this perky palette turn your discolouration-induced frown upside down. Use the shades separately or blend for a dash of brightness.

Fix’ Make-Up, £24 They say ‘Forms an invisible fixing veil over the face.’ We say Because few things are more tedious than having to reapply your make-up throughout the day.

MAC Versicolour in Last Minute, £18 They say ‘Melts onto lips for a full-on glassy shine.’ We say Happiness and light actually reflect off your mouth. Try it and see.

CHANEL Rouge Coco Shine in Mighty, £25 They say ‘An exalting pink that lights up your look in a single stroke.’ We say There’s no denying that a lip colour like this has the power to produce the sunniest of smiles.

MARC JACOBS Kiss Pop Lip Color Stick in Pop Arazzi, £20 They say ‘Transforming you into the person you want to be.’ We say And who doesn’t want to be someone who wears a Marc Jacobs lipstick? Especially when it’s as pigmented as this.

DIOR Diorblush Glowing Gardens in Floral Pink, £32.50 They say ‘Brings an outdoorsy flush to the cheeks.’ We say So even if you haven’t been cheerfully frolicking about in a meadow, you’ll look like you have.

GIVENCHY Mister Radiant Primer, £29 They say ‘Beige and pink beads make the face appear fresh.’ We say But the best bit? When the pigments burst upon contact with your skin. Just joyful.

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TOM FORD Patent Finish Lip Color in Infamy, £38 They say ‘Combines a lip stain with an ultra-glossy finish.’ We say And that applicator is inspired – like a jumbo felt-tip. Plus, once the gloss has faded, your lips remain crimson.

STIL-LIFES: PSC

‘Hello Kitty’ Nail Lacquer in 5 Apples Tall, £12.50 They say ‘She’s a symbol of fun.’ We say Yes, we know Hello Kitty isn’t terribly grown-up, but this shade of polish is.


TATLER • PROMOTION

SAVE YOUR NECK You can plump up sagging cheeks and iron out forehead wrinkles but if you neglect your neck, the game is up. Hurry to Dr Prager to regain a swan-like profile

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r Michael Prager has been delivering KLVYHU\VSHFLDOEUDQGRIFRVPHWLF ¿QHVVHIRURYHU\HDUV+HEHOLHYHV that a little bit of enhancement here and there can keep one’s natural radiance ticking over – like an MOT. The German-born, London-based specialist prides himself on making subtle, PLQLPDOO\LQYDVLYHWZHDNVFUHDWLQJDORRN WKDWLVQHYHUWRRRYHUO\GRQHQHYHUJODULQJO\ IDX[EXWUDWKHUIUHVKDQGVSUXFHGXS/R\DO devotees head to his Wimpole Street practice to have their silhouettes tapered, complexions boosted and lips plumped. 1RZ'U3UDJHUZDQWVZRPHQWRSD\VRPH DWWHQWLRQWRWKDWPXFKQHJOHFWHGRIERG\SDUWV – the neck. It falls victim to the same perils RIDJHLQJRIWHQDWDVWDUWOLQJO\IDVWHUUDWH Collagen diminishes, muscles slacken and WKHGUHDGHGWXUNH\MRZOVIRUP6KXGGHU'U Prager’s advice? Don’t hide in polo necks and scarves – address the problem head on.

‘Virtually anybody who has jowls is a clencher, grinder, neck tenser. Injecting the lower face with Botox is therefore a medical treatment with the added side effect of a neat and clean jaw’ Dr Prager The idea of how to treat this particular effect RIDJHLQJFDPHWR'U3UDJHUZKLOHDWWKHJ\P QROHVV$OZD\VVWLFNLQJKLVQHFNRXWIRUKLV patients, he found himself in front of the mirror, FOHQFKLQJJULQGLQJDQGWHQVLQJKLVQHFN+H did not like what he saw. Dr Prager resolved WRFRUUHFWWKHSUREOHP SURYLQJKHLVDOZD\V ZLOOLQJWRGRDQ\WKLQJKHDVNVRIKLVSDWLHQWV  +HEHJDQE\LQMHFWLQJVPDOOGRVHVRI%RWR[ into his neck – pioneering a new use for it. The results were astounding. Dr Prager realised WKDWLIGRQHHDUO\HQRXJK%RWR[LQWKHQHFN LVWKHLGHDOZD\WRERRVWVODFNHQLQJPXVFOH VWUXFWXUH0RUHHIIHFWLYHHYHQWKDQVXUJHU\ 6RKRZGRHV'U3UDJHUUHYDPS\RXU SURÂżOH"+HDGGUHVVHVWKHWKUHHFXOSULWVRI ageing: weakening muscle, loss of volume and GLPLQLVKLQJFROODJHQ7KHQHFNLVERQ\DQG

VLQHZ\ZLWKOHVVVFDIIROGLQJWRVXSSRUWLWWKDQ other parts of the face. Loss in muscle tone FDQTXLFNO\WXUQLQWRVDJJLQJDQGGURRSLQJ 8VLQJ%RWR[WKHPXVFOHVFDQEHVHOHFWLYHO\ trained and weakened to alter the shape of the QHFN7KHQHFNLVSXOOHGWDXWDQGWKHMDZOLQH UHGHÂżQHG)LOOHUVDUHWKHQXVHGWRSDGRXWWKH upper face and prevent deposits from sliding DQGJDWKHULQJXQGHUQHDWKWKHMDZOLQH)LQDOO\D ERXWRIVNLQVXUIDFLQJRUUDGLRIUHTXHQF\KHOSV WRUHGUHVVWKHVNLQÂśVORVWFROODJHQÂąWKHNH\WR HODVWLFLW\%RWR[LVDOUHDG\DPHGLFDOWUHDWPHQW used to correct grinding and neck tensing. The VSLQRII"$GHÂżQHGMDZOLQH,QWKHUDFHDJDLQVW DJHLQJ'U3UDJHULVDOZD\VQHFNDQGQHFN

HOW AGEING WORKS:

1.Dynamic This relates to posture, muscle movement and alignment – a weakening of structure.

2.Surface This is visible loss of skin collagen, pigmentation or change in pore size.

3 .Vo l u m e $GHĂ€DWLQJORVVRIWLVVXHGHQVLW\

To book an appointment at Dr Prager’s clinic at 25 Wimpole Street, London W1, call 020 7323 3660 or visit drmichaelprager.com


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Tr av el Edited by FRANCISCA KELLETT

L OV E OF A C O L D CL I M AT E Who needs a beach filled with girls who look like they are on holiday with their ‘uncles’ when you can have mountains, outdoor museums and gangs of friendly puffins? Claudia Winkleman on swapping the Med for something a bit more mad

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arling, you going to Ibiza? No? Amalfi Coast? Oh, right, well... Mykonos then? St Tropez? WAIT – I know your plan, you’re doing the Hamptons! What? None of them? Are you INSANE? You must be going to the bloody moon.’ I’ve had this a lot at the school gates. The pre-summer ‘Let’s meet for rosé on the beach’ chat. The ‘Hey, you MUST be going to Antibes – everyone’s going to Antibes’ conversation.

Um, is it OK to say I need a year off from Nice airport? A summer without bumping into people I know? Maybe a place with different views, a menu that doesn’t include bouillabaisse or a beach that’s overpriced and littered with girls who look like they’re on holiday with their ‘uncles’? I want adventure, space and just a tiny bit weird. So here are the five greatest weekends you MUST book if you don’t want a place awash with Vilebrequins and people called Rufus. ] Gstaad in summer

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f all the cities in all the world, there are some that are just ‘Well, they’ve sorted this whole living thing out, haven’t they?’ And this, boys and girls, is what Copenhagen is. It’s consistently ranked the happiest place to live, and you feel it the second you arrive at the airport. People are just HAPPY. Everyone smiles, nothing is too much trouble, the women are gobsmacking and the men are twinkly. I met one who was wearing a fisherman’s sweater, had paint on his hands (he was an artist when he wasn’t a cab driver) AND he was called Sven. I mean, please. And Nimb might just be the sexiest hotel in the world. It has one massive, huge bar dotted with bottle-green velvet sofas and roaring fires and full of the best nut assortments and passion-fruit martinis. The 14 rooms are remarkable – wooden four-posters, baby fireplaces, huge armchairs and oversized bathrooms crammed with Aesop products. The food is outstanding, and you’re actually in the grounds of Tivoli amusement park, so you can go for a hot dog and a quick turn on the antique cars whenever you feel like it. BOOK IT Double, from £480 (nimb.dk).

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The pool at the Alpina Gstaad. Above left, one of its balconies

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’m not going to mess around, and I’m not going to lie. Just because they were adorable at check-in and gave our kids ’       endless tours of the kitchen so that   they could ice their own puddings, THE I’m not going to jazz it up. BUT the HOTEL Alpina Gstaad is singularly one of the ONE greatest hotels I’ve ever stayed in. You can ignore me on the others (apart from one), but THIS ONE YOU HAVE TO BOOK. I’m going to talk you through it, step by step. The entrance is a bit ‘If Joan Collins was given an unlimited budget’: dark brown, with waterfalls and marble and a swooping staircase – but don’t panic. Because THEN they’ll show you your room (book Room 305 and if you don’t shout out, ‘YES YES, JESUS, YES’, I’ll be amazed) and the terrace (I was genuinely speechless), and you’ll openly weep and sell your house, kids and engagement ring just so you can visit for a month a year. The friendly staff are off-the-scale kind; not obsequious, just bloody brilliant. They’ve worked out that your four-year-old likes a lukewarm hot chocolate because he keeps burning his tongue (I know, a little bit slow, that one), and they know you like a turndown at 6pm rather than 7pm. They seem to know EVERYTHING. The food is nuts – so delicious you’ll actually order something with an elasticated waist from Net ’       at the same time as looking at the menu. The   Swiss delights (cheese, melted cheese, some THE chocolate, maybe some more cheese...) are all SEXY there, and just when you feel a bit like John ONE Goodman after Thanksgiving, you can turn to the spa menu, or order from the Japanese restaurant, and feel like a supermodel. Lots of people are there to walk in the mountains and have fun and eat fondue, but others are serious spa-goers. The spa is not a regular ‘Do you fancy a scrub and a massage, love?’ – it’s MAJOR. There are nutritionists, colonic-cleansing experts and very grown-up body trainers. You can even choose to wear a pin that means, ‘Don’t talk to me, I’m in a spiritual healthy world and all I want is some broccoli and a robe.’ Happily, the two worlds live beautifully together. I was steamed and scrubbed and hummed at, and had grilled courgette, while my husband ate chocolate croissants and tickled the kids. All was good. Gstaad itself is so picture-perfect you’ll have to keep pinching yourself. There is something amazing about the mountains in the summer. From top, the I’m used to snow and layers and dealing with Nyhavn district thermals and boots. Much better to ‘cope’ with in Copenhagen; Lancaster sun lotion, tank tops and cut-off denims. a room at the The Alpina. If you find a better hotel (you Nimb with a won’t), call me. I mean it. Tatler has my number. four-poster; cycling BOOK IT Double, from £395, incl breakfast past Amalienborg and spa access (thealpinagstaad.ch). Palace


Tr av e l ow then. This you must not miss out on. I WON’T have it. If it means I need to bring you all individually myself, then that’s just what we’ll have to do. You fly from Gatwick to somewhere called Alesund in Norway and it all feels a bit Bear Grylls, and you’ll certainly turn to your husband/wife/mum/offspring/friend the night before you fly and say, ‘Bugger it, shall we train it to Paris and get some macarons?’ Here’s the thing, it’s SO easy. Flying Norwegian is totally fine, and then you land and the airport is miniature. There’s one Toblerone stand and three comfy chairs and your luggage comes out immediately and a nice man brings you to the Storfjord Hotel and it’s only 35 minutes away. The view from this hotel is like nothing I’ve ever seen. You might be a Fjord Expert. I’m afraid all I thought was, ‘Yeah, some ice’ or, ‘I like his new bags but his shoes are a bit wrong, what’s with the buckle thing?’ Back to the view – mountains, clear bright sea, the odd whale spray, whole gangs of Atlantic puffins. There are 23 spacious rooms spread out over several large wooden barns, with enormous windows, so all you’ll want to do is sit and stare outside. The chefs are insanely good, and a huge open kitchen can be seen from the beautiful candlelit oak dining table. The gorgeous sitting rooms have fur-covered sofas and lovely chess corners. There are no TVs and there is no gym and no spa. You simply wake up and have the breakfast of dreams (I strongly recommend the Scandinavian crispbreads and handmade salted butter), then you hike or fish and come back and crumple into the comfiest bed on Earth before heading to a four-course supper that will involve the fish you caught that day. This hotel is the bloody business and the landscape is the greatest I’ve ever seen (and I’m seriously spoilt). Make best friends with Captain Tom, who will take you fishing and adventuring. And then make an appointment with the local estate ’        agent, because you’ll want to own  something here forever. THE BOOK IT Double, from £160, VIEWS incl breakfast (storfjordhotel.com). ]

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The Storfjord Hotel overlooks mountains and a fjord. Far left, one of the wooden barns. Left, the dining room


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f you’re a serious hiker, Verbier is for you. Gstaad has beautiful walks and the trails in Norway are outstanding, but Verbier is the daddy of the mountains. The town might not have the charm or chocolate-box feel of the other two – it’s a bit yards of ale and neon fleece – but the walks are proper. You have to hang on to rocks (wowzers) and walking poles are obligatory. If you want to take it easy, there’s the beautiful Gruffalo walk, littered with baby pine cones along a stream. Do that one if you have small people. Stay at Richard Branson’s place, The Lodge – you can take the whole thing, or just a couple of rooms. The master suites at the top of the building are beautiful, and the pool and hot tub in the basement are all black slate and not to be ignored. Vanessa runs the place and she’ll collect you when you get lost (we called her, um, twice) and talk to you about gluten-free pasta and spotting ’       fluffy cows with bells round their necks.   It’s also good value as everything is THE thrown in – we were dull and ate NATURE apples and drank tea, but if you want ONE pints of Patrón and delicious fivecourse meals, you’ll absolutely love it. I assumed at the end of our weird and wonderful weekends we’d be back to holidays with friends in the ‘usual’ places. But we’ve already booked the Alpina and I think we’re ready for Finland. It’s madness, but it’s good. BOOK IT Double, from £650 (full board); exclusive use (up to 18 people), from £6,505 per night (thelodge.virgin.com). (

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Stockholm at sunset. Below, the Vasa. Below left, the dining room at the Grand Hôtel

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ometimes (don’t worry, not often) my family and I want to learn something. I’m talking more than ‘Oh, Shirley Temples are tastier when made with ginger ale.’ We want to go to museums and galleries and feel our brains grow. Well, the kids aren’t in agreement. They want a Disney parade and Pringles, but let’s not listen to them. The best place for brain expansion is a city. A different, unusual city break makes us all feel a little worthy and ever so slightly superior. Stockholm is a good one: the museums are terrific and not too scary-big, plus it only takes about nine minutes to get there. Visit the magnificent Vasa Museum, home to an enormous 17thcentury wooden warship that was dragged from the bottom of the ocean 55 years ago and is made from timber and covered in hundreds of wooden sculptures – knights, owls, scary lions, etc. The guides are fantastic (ours looked like Hagrid and was kinder than a puppy). Even the fouryear-old thought it was more exciting than Octonauts. This is a miracle. Then go to Skansen (a great outdoor museum and zoo) to look ’        at wolf pups and brown bears. This is where the kids can feed  baby pigs and dress up in traditional costume – and you THE can all eat extraordinary meatballs. Not quite a CULTUR E Disney parade, but close. ONE Stay at the Grand Hôtel. Get a suite (rooms are a little dinky) and don’t miss the mindblowing smorgasbord in the Veranda restaurant. Also, ask for Raphael in the bar; he’ll get you anything you need. The cream tea is spectacular too – like at Claridge’s, but with more herring. BOOK IT Double, from £175 (grandhotel.se).

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Hiking (with poles) in Verbier. Right, the Lodge

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VERBIER IS THE DADDY OF THE MOUNTAINS


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A boathouse on an island in the Archipelago Sea

WAY O U T N O R T H Jumping into cold lakes naked at midnight, feeding lichen to reindeer, hanging out with Moomins… for extreme fun, Finland is the way to go. By Gavanndra Hodge hen I was growing up, holidays were about sunbathing. Days on the beach were spent applying the lowest factor sunscreen we dared. Evenings were devoted to aftersun and the comparison of forearms. And then I met a man of Celtic origins with skin so pale and sensitive that on our first holiday together – in Sicily – he got horribly sunburnt, even though he was wearing SPF 50 and lying in the shade. We went on to have children who were similarly afflicted. So that was kind of it for me and sunloungers. Which is how we ended up having a summer holiday in Finland. People laughed when I told them. ‘You weirdo,’ they said. And there is something a bit weird about Finland, something weirdly wonderful. It is a lightly populated nation of forests and islands, with bright, wild summers and dark, melancholy winters. When we were there, the sun did not set until after 11.30pm, barely dipping beneath the horizon, and there was a celebratory atmosphere in Helsinki, as if the whole place were about to erupt into a midsummer party. There were stalls on street corners selling fresh blueberries, raspberries and the podded peas that the

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Finns crack open and pop into their mouths as they walk the streets. It is not the most beautiful of cities, built of brown and grey stone carved into ponderous art-nouveau forms. But the sky is wide and the air is crisp and it is right on the edge of the Baltic. The waterside Hakaniemi Market Hall is stuffed with quaint wooden stalls selling salmon in every incarnation imaginable, as well as cakes, bread, cheese and chocolates. Food is a serious business here, and on our second night we went to a fashionable Scando-foraging joint called Olo, which offered a 13-course tasting menu – called the Journey – that they insisted our children try too. There was mushroom porridge, little fish presented on rocks lodged in green jelly, potatoes that had cress growing out of them... much of it delicious, all of it surprising, served by the kindest and most long-suffering of waiters. My daughter Hebe only spat one thing out (a sort of pale truffle filled with sour buckthorn juice). We went to the Sibelius Finland Experience (a megamix of his greatest hits, including the rousing Finlandia) in the beautiful new Helsinki Music Centre, and to the wonderful Ateneum art museum for an exhibition called The Magic North, dedicated to the 20th-century art of northern Scandinavia.

ABOVE, HEBE’S CATCH OF THE DAY. BELOW, THE MARKET SQUARE AT HELSINKI’S SOUTH HARBOUR


Tr av e l Ateneum also boasted the best children’s play zone I have ever seen, where Hebe and Minna dressed up as fairytale characters and had fairytale dinners in fairytale cottages, while my husband snoozed softly in the corner. Afterwards, we ate cake at Café Ekberg, which has been going for over 100 years, and has a slightly brusque Moscow-canteen feel (Finland was annexed by Russia in 1809 and didn’t gain its independence until 1917) but serves decadent cakes, like champagnekork – sponge soaked in sticky, sugary alcohol. We left Helsinki and drove along virtually deserted roads, pine forests looming on either side, to Naantali, a spa resort on the archipelago, with wooden buildings and seafront restaurants serving pickled herring and potato salad. Finland’s president has his summer residence, here, and there are hundreds of little islands, beaches and trails for bike rides and walking. During the midsummer celebrations, bonfires are lit on rafts on the water and there are fireworks and night-long dancing on the local mountain. Naantali is also where you’ll find Moomin World, located on a small island (considerably bigger, though, than the one where Tove Jansson wrote her books) reached by a wooden pontoon. Here, Moomintroll, Little My and the gang sing songs, put on plays and hug delighted children. All the houses and locations from the books have been brilliantly recreated – even the Hemulen’s cottage, with his books of pressed flowers. It is not garish or expensive (unlike some theme parks I needn’t mention) but charming and a little bit strange (like the books). Hattifatteners, anyone? A little further out into the archipelago is Väski Adventure Island, which has all sorts of bonkers activities – mouth darts, gold panning, goat stroking, even a demonstration of boat tarring. We toasted doughnuts over an open fire and our girls got naked and hung out on the beach, which had its own sauna hut.

The Finns are very big on the sauna (pronounced ‘saaoo-na’). There are saunas in most office blocks, should the urge take you. The best way to do it, apparently, is to make sure you have a sauna frankfurter and some sauna beer, hang out in there for as long as you can bear it and then run out and jump into the nearest cold water, which is exactly what my husband and I did on our first night at our next stop, a log cabin overlooking a lake in the Nuuksio National Park. The lake was black and smooth, like an obsidian mirror, and, having absorbed the heat of the day’s sun, was not as cold as you might imagine at 11pm. I swam out to the middle, making ripples in the velvety blackness, the silverbirch forest on the shore opposite reflected in the water, and then back to our little private beach. Nuuksio’s Hawkhill cottages are named after the adjacent granite mountain, where you will find pine and birch trees and many different types of moss, including the delicate bear moss, so soft and comfy the bears fill their dens with it before hibernating. On our walks we picked wild strawberries, blueberries and chanterelle mushrooms; we saw a huge anthill made from pine needles, and we gathered pine cones and sticks for the girls to play with back on the beach. There were no toys at the cabins, which were built by the granddaughters of the man who first bought the land. One of them, Annu, showed the girls how to attach worms to

fishing hooks. Hebe caught a tiny perch, shoved it on a sharpened stick, cooked it over an open fire and ate it. The insides of the cabins are swanky, with Marimekko fabrics and sleek kitchens. But the point of the place is the nature all around – wood, water and rock. Finns seem happiest outside; they are essentially a forest people, and freedom and independence are all-important. They are not the chattiest or most ingratiating of people, but we liked their blunt, to-the-point attitude. There is hardly any CCTV in Finland, and you can walk anywhere, camp anywhere, forage anywhere. There is a saying that all Finns carry a hunting knife, even in the city. And Nuuksio, as wild a wilderness as you could hope to find, is only 45 minutes from the capital. The park has a reindeer sanctuary where we fed Rudolph and co bag after bag of lichen, and at the Haltia nature centre, a beautifully designed modern building, we saw weird/wonderful exhibits like stuffed white rabbits holding hands in a circle while an eagle attacked from above, as well as two stuffed swans playing chess with the letters that make up the DNA chain. ‘It is the game of life,’ explained our guide. ‘Every life is unique and determined by our choices. I find it very moving.’ And as the rain hammered down outside, in the middle of August, I was moved too. Who needs sunshine when you have swans playing chess? ( BOOK IT Villa Maria at Hawkhill (hawkhill.fi/en) costs from £935 a week and sleeps six. Finnair (finnair.com) flies to Helsinki from £150. For more information on Helsinki, see helsinki.com. For more information on Finland, see visitfinland.com.

A lake in Nuuksio National Park

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ABOVE, MOOMINMAMMA WOWS THE CROWDS AT MOOMIN WORLD. LEFT, HEBE FEEDS A REINDEER. RIGHT, MINNA CONTEMPLATES A DIP IN THE LAKE

A Hawkhill cottage in Nuuksio National Park

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Where to go... FOR A CAPITAL SUITE YES

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LOVE A WELL-KEPT SECRET?

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THE LANESBOROUGH

THE RITZ

THE MARYLEBONE

ROSEWOOD LONDON

It’s got many a fine feature, has the Lanesborough: cracking cocktails, a sexy cigar lounge, a gold-star-worthy restaurant. But the feather in its cap are the suites. They’re all done out in thick, chintzy drapes, with dark-wood panelling and floral-swathed four-posters that could sleep a family of four plus the dog. And there’s cornicing and gilt galore (not one for minimalists), and the bathrooms gleam with wall-towall marble and come with proper talc in salt shakers by a tub so deep you’ll likely get lost in it. Tourists are tickled pink by the white-gloved butlers (there’s one to each suite – and nothing makes them happier than unpacking your bags or dealing with a pile of crumpled clothes for pressing). But that’s not to say that this place is old-fashioned: no, no, no. Expect shiny tablets on the linen-covered bedstand to make things warmer, colder, lighter or darker. Just take care to watch the kids with the room-service option.

Visiting the Ritz is always a tiny bit like visiting your granny’s. In the best possible way, of course. It is grand but comforting, swanky but familiar. The clickclack of the marble floors. The swags over the enormous windows. The tinkling piano music and the insanely attentive staff. And now this – the two-bedroom Piccadilly Suite, which, at 1,317 square feet, is the perfectly proportioned granny flat. If your granny happens, shall we say, to be the Queen. The rooms are a dream in oldschool understated lavishness: thick cream carpets, cream-androyal-blue fabrics, elegant walnut furniture, a bathroom so cosseting it feels as if even the taps have been warmed, and lovely sofas you almost don’t want to sink into because you’d only be spoiling their plumpness. But sit you will, while Harry the butler pours a glass of champagne for you and you think that one really ought to do more things just the way Granny did.

The Marylebone is one of those places you walk past a thousand times but somehow never quite notice. It’s clever that way. It keeps its merits on the down-low, making it all the more delicious when you do look up and finally wander in off that quiet (yet, right now, smoking-hot) area between the High Street drag and the Harley Street grid. Inside? A lovely corner restaurant with just the right clubby atmosphere and on-the-nose brasserie fare. There’s a cosy café for morning caffeine and an attractive zinc-clad bar for an afternoon snifter. Upstairs, a splendid Marylebone pad – a one-bed suite with that rare London commodity: outdoor space. A whopping terrace with chim-chim-cher-oo rooftop views, an outdoor TV and an alfresco fireplace. Within, it’s all blond wood and cool art. Pour yourself a strong one from the walk-in pantry, kick back on your terrace and realise that, actually, you’d prefer to keep this one to yourself...

Picture the biggest, grandest hotel you can think of, then make it all glossy and really quite cool and you’ll be coming close to what it feels like to walk into the Rosewood. Head through the vast cobbled courtyard (large enough to house a weekly farmers’ market) and the brushed-bronze entrance and past the swanky bar designed by Martin Brudnizki to take your pick of one of the enormous suites – the Grand Manor House Wing is so huge it has its own postcode. If the idea of that makes your head spin, downsize to the Holborn House Suite, which, at 1,087 square feet, is still bigger than the average London flat. Large it may be, but it’s cosy as anything: a lovely sitting room – dove greys, petrol blues – and a bedroom with a bed big enough for a party of eight, plus a bathroom decked out in so much marble it’s a wonder Italy has any left. The grandest thing of all? The Holborn Traditional English breakfast, with three types of sausage.

BOOK IT Double, from £640 (thelanesborough.com).

BOOK IT Double, from £395 (theritzlondon.com).

BOOK IT Double, from £235 (doylecollection.com).

BOOK IT Double, from £380 (rosewoodhotels.com).

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6

TATLER.COM

WORDS: FRANCISCA KELLETT, FRANCESCA WHITE, MICHAEL GRAY

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‘DOUBLE THE FUN’ PAGE 88. DRESS BY ELIE SAAB HAUTE COUTURE

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Invest in domestic futures


Bysta n der Social editor TIBBS JENKINS

Photographer HUGO BURNAND

PHOTOGRAPH: SAM CHURCHILL

TURN THE PAGE FOR MORE BIG BANGS...

ELLIE SAUNDERS WATSON, JOHN SHEARON & LADY ALICE MANNERS

To see thousands more joyous bystander photographs, go to tatler.com TATLER.COM

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


B ysta n de r

JOHN SHEARON & LADY ALICE MANNERS

nners Jack Manners and Lady Violet Ma

ELLA ROSS & SKIPPER THE DUKE OF RUTLAND & DOUGIE POCKLINGTON

LORD HUGO MANNERS

CHRISTOPHER RAMSAY & THE DUCHESS OF RUTLAND

THE MORNING AFTER...

AMY FRANCIS & JOE STIEGER-WHITE

LORD REGINALD & ROBIN VANE-TEMPEST-STEWART

ELLIE SAUNDERS WATSON & MILLIE TAYLOR

ANIMAL MAGIC BRANDY

RALPH STURGESS

LUCY HALL WITH QUINCY JONES JR TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6

TATLER.COM

LADY ELIZA MANNERS WITH DAISY


LADY VIOLET MANNERS OTIS FERRY, LADY ELIZA MANNERS & LADY ALICE MANNERS

EAGER BELVOIR A bangin’ party, Manners-style GEORGE PADLEY & HARRY BAINS MILLIE TAYLOR

ome of us were wrapping presents on Christmas Eve – but Otis Ferry, Ella Ross and Christopher Ramsay were out shooting at Belvoir Castle. Nothing like a bit of fresh air to blow away the cobwebs after a night of festive dancing at Dadaballs, the Manners girls’ ‘nightclub’ in the basement. Sam Palmer and Sophia Hesketh, however, thought the hair of the dog a more attractive post-party tonic, and were caught red-handed with a water bottle filled with champagne after lunch.

ELLA ROSS & SAM PALMER ...THE NIGHT BEFORE

Photographed by SAM CHURCHILL

CARL ROSS

THE DUKE OF RUTLAND LORD HUGO MANNERS & MARQUESS OF GRANBY

Jack Manners SOPHIA HESKETH FREDDIE COLERIDGE & ALEXANDER COLERIDGE

SOPHIE SKELTON

FREDDIE COLERIDGE & FREDDIE HESKETH


B ysta n de r

HARRY CUSSINS & JAMES ROACHE

COSTUME DRAMA Giddy dancers in glad rags HOLLIDAY GRAINGER & HARRY TREADAWAY

P

erdita Weeks’s Prohibition-themed 30th was at the most exclusive speakeasy in town – her pad in Vauxhall. Twiggy Garcia DJed till 5am; the birthday girl was very nearly garrotted by bunting while dancing on a pal’s shoulders; and the Treadaway twins tore up the dancefloor to the very end – which was impressive, since Luke Treadaway was wearing a beautiful, handmade Victorian costume from Season Two of Penny Dreadful.

LUKE TREADAWAY & RUTA GEDMINTAS

Photographed by DARREN GERRISH

ANASTASIA O’HARA & PERDITA WEEKS

JENNA COLEMAN

HONEYSUCKLE WEEKS & HARRY CUSSINS

d Chris Vincent and Matthew Boy

1 6 T H I N G S T O D O W H E N YO U C A N ’ T S L E E P

Sun salutations. Thank-you letters. Write them, seal them and post them first thing in the morning. Don’t worry about the content.

Make damson jam. Especially if it is a full moon. Alphabetise your bookshelf. By author, not title. Next week you can colour-code it. Plot your Hallowe’en outfit (doesn’t matter what time of year it is).

Address the sock drawer. ‘Hello, sock drawer! Your time has finally come.’

Check out your old lovers on Facebook. Cry a little bit while looking at yourself in the mirror. Do not email them.

Redesign the downstairs loo. Hola!

Ocado Master the moves to the Bollywood dance in e.

Always wanted to do a smoky eye? Never pulled it off? Practise. Fail. Remove. Start again.

Got friends in Mexico? Perfect time to catch up. Tequila not necessary.

Get into bed with your housemate.

Wake the dog up.

Do a charcoal sketch of Arundel Castle.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SHUTTERSTOCK

Head to the local 24hour shop, sprawl on the counter and pour your heart out. Buy some milk and leave.


JEMIMA BELCHAMBERS & CAMILLA ANDERSON AMBERLEY NUTTALL & PHOEBE CHAPMAN

OLIVER RANDALL

WHERE’S HARRY? Teens seek their prince at the Bystander Ball

SAM SMITH, ZAC HEELER & MAX VAUGHN LUCY LUCAS-CLEMENTS, CARA SUMMONS & ALICE WILKINSON

P

rince Harry may not have actually been at the Bystander Ball, held in his favourite club – Bodo’s Schloss – but his spirit of merry revelry was very much in evidence. The theme was ‘Piste and Love’ (Harry is keen on both), and his happy ginger face could be found on the bottles of the Firefly drinks enjoyed by all. He would have loved adorning himself with Glint and Glory tattoos, getting a manicure from the Nail Art Pros, having his beard braided by Blow LTD and getting spotted by the Next Model scouts. But, like all the teenagers present, what he would have enjoyed the most was all that flirting on the dancefloor.

FERDINAND DE BIOLLEY, LUCA GUERRINIMARALDI & GABRIEL RAI

ISABEL CRANE & MATILDA BAINES

Frederikksson Marnie Macchiarola and Amalia ANOUSHKA MONZON LADAS, ALYSHA RAMOS & KATE ROWE

PHOTOGRAPHS: TKTKTKTKTK

BIANCA PAVEY

DARCY AMISS & ALEXANDRA KING CHARLIE SLIMMON

TATLER.COM

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


B y s ta n der

INDIA PERSKE

TEEN SPIRITS Cocktail carnage at a transatlantic 18th hat a good brother Jack Sieff is, flying all the way back from university in America to attend his little sister Jemima’s 18th-birthday bash at Scotch. This had nothing to do with getting the chance to flirt with all of Jemima’s friends, oh no – it was pure sibling loyalty. Still, there he was, jetlagged and rugged, helping Savannah Murphy and co toast his sister’s birthday with personalised cocktails, which included ‘Yeasty’ and ‘Blackout’.

W

MARCUS SIEFF

JEMIMA SIEFF

Photographed by DARREN GERRISH

EMMANUELLE ZAOUI, JACK SIEFF & OONA ORTMANS

ROXY MARRONE & MATILDA WYMAN

EVIE BOOTH-CLIBBORN & TOM DA COSTA

MELISSA GARDNER

Emil Fattal and Mary Percival

Genevieve offered to fetch me a tea. She returned with coffee.

Amazing acts at Glasto this summer! I’ll be with my children.

I took my girlfriend skiing. She could only snow-plough. I’ve fallen in love. With my cousin.

Everyone calls me Twinks. My real name is Mercedes.

I have an older brother. He will inherit everything.

My great-grandfather owned a castle. He sold it.

I shot a pheasant last month. He now pecks me in my nightmares.

I live for my cowboy boots from R Soles on the KR. It closed down in June 2015.

I really wanted to go dancing last weekend. So did my dad.

They served spaghetti bolognese. But it was actually courgetti.

I ordered an Aperol spritz. He ordered a detox smoothie.

I keep hearing my phone ring. Thing is, I lost my phone the other night. I met the woman of my dreams. She’s allergic to dogs. I wear red trousers. This is not a joke.

PHOTOGRAPH: SHUTTERSTOCK

T WO - S E NT E NC E H O R RO R STO RI ES


FELICITY BLUNT & ROB BRYDON

STANLEY TUCCI

JULIE NOLLET & MAURICE HENNESSY

LADY NATASHA RUFUS ISAACS & RUPERT FINCH

OLIVER AYTON & LORD SETTRINGTON

RACING STAGS

JOHN FRANCOME

Bad boys infiltrate the Hennessy

T Louis Gering and Denis Jourdi er FELIX COOPER & JILLY COOPER

he Hennessy Gold Cup is all about the horses, obviously. Except this year a stag was found lurking amongst the steeds. Not a real one, obvs. But Richard Lubbock’s stag do. Fortunately for Lady Natasha Rufus Isaacs, Barry Humphries and all those not involved in the celebration, the boys mainly kept to themselves and their box, later retiring to the Ministry of Sound. Meanwhile, back at the racetrack, Wayne Hutchinson rode to victory on Smad Place and Alan King, the trainer, was presented with the coveted Gold Cup. BARRY HUMPHRIES & LIZZIE SPENDER TOM THORNTON & GUY THORNTON

ANDREW NEIL & ANNOUSHKA AYTON PATRICK, CARAGH & THADY GOODWIN

SMAD PLACE CHLOE HERBERT

ALASDAIR & CHELSEA COUTTS-WOOD

TATLER.COM

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


GROOV Y, BA BY

B ysta n de r

RAIMONDO GAETANI & LAUREN REMINGTON PLATT...

DANIELLA HELAYEL, DANIEL URZEDO, ISABELLA ABALLI & CARLOS SOTTO MAYOR MATOSO CAROLINE & ALEXANDER JASINSKI & IDA AKERLIND

SABINA JASINSKI & SOFIE NIELANDER

...& NICOLAS GAUTIER...

SHAGTASTIC! An intimate homage to Austin P aimondo Gaetani, co-founder of the techno night Another Party, culled his guest list from the usual 2,000 ravers to a decidedly more intimate 200 for his Austin Powers-themed 34th-birthday party at the South Kensington Club. A sign he’s getting old? Well, maybe – except he was still going strong the next day.

R

...& CLAIRE BALSCHAMPRENAULT

Photographed by SEAN CONNOLLY WALTER FARA & ANISSA KERMICHE

FRED SACHS & ALEXANDER VON WATZDORF

Lies to tell lefties The death penalty still exists in at least eight public schools It fell out of favour after the Seventies, but has undergone a resurgence thanks to the recent influx of Chinese and Russian pupils, whose parents are often rather keen. Obviously, it can only be administered by the headteacher. Not pupils. That would be insane.

By Hugo Rifkind, who writes for The Times

JACKIE BARRETT & KAITLYN JACKSON

BLAISE PATRICK & ANDREA GELARDIN

PHOTOGRAPH: SHUTTERSTOCK

Martino Winckler andpio lep Briano Martinoni Ca


mery Joyce Hytner and Marissa Montgo JULIE BRANGSTRUP & LISA HENREKSON

VOLLEY GIRLS SARAH, DUCHESS OF YORK & TAMARA BECKWITH VERONI

Lot No.1: Lessons with a tennis legend SHERETT DAHLSTROM, SEKINA BAKER, NAOMIE HARRIS & PHOEBE VELA HITCHCOX

JENNY HALPERN PRINCE, JAMES BLUNT & SARA VAUGHAN

t’s pretty awkward when other women are fighting over your husband in front of your very eyes – but not for Lilly Becker at the Lady Garden Gala, hosted by Tamara Beckwith Veroni, Jenny Halpern Prince, Sarah, Duchess of York and Tania Bryer at Claridge’s. The skirmish was for charity at the black-tie, all-girls dinner (apart from James Blunt, who sang) – Elisabeth Murdoch and Christiane Amanpour tried to outbid one another for tennis lessons with Boris Becker – and helped to raise over £250,000 for gynaecological cancer research, split between Cancer Research UK and the Lady Garden campaign.

I

Photographed by LARA ARNOTT

TRINNY WOODALL & TANIA BRYER

ELISABETH MURDOCH & AMANDA WAKELEY

VOGUE WILLIAMS

TAMARA RALPH

MARISSA HERMER

TATLER.COM

TAT L E R M AY 2 01 6


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condenastjohansens.com Château Hôtel André Ziltener, France


3523(57< 352027,21

East London loft apartment, on sale through Savills Shoreditch; guide price ÂŁ1.75 million

Facing the headwinds *HWWLQJ DGYLFH ZKHQ EX\LQJ SURSHUWLHV LQ GLIIHUHQW ORFDWLRQV FDQ JLYH \RX WKH DGYDQWDJH LQ WRGD\¡V FKDQJLQJ PDUNHW UHSRUWV 5RVHPDU\ %URRNH For many, owning a country retreat and a home in the city is the ideal. Also high on the agenda is the ability to purchase a buy-to-let property as a safe haven for cash and as forward planning for children. But the recent increases to stamp duty on second properties have made this more traditional investment route appear fraught with problems and expense. Added to this is the spectre of an upwards shift in interest rates and an imminent referendum on Europe. But it does not have to be all doom and gloom. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This change in stamp duty will undoubtedly have an impact but, by empowering those with a real need to buy over more discretionary buy-to-let investors, it should give some much-needed balance to a market that has become increasingly polarised,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says James Watts, a buying agent at one of the UKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest buying agencies, Prime Purchase. While this could be an unexpected positive, what it does mean is that having the best advice to make the right purchase is ever more salient. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here to be the experts, but also the voice of reason,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says Lindsey Webb, a buying agent in the London office. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to make an emotional decision when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for a new home, but we

offer objective advice, based on years of experience in our respective markets.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Engaging a buying agent can be a vital tool in levelling the playing field between buyer and seller, but where Prime Purchase excels is having a team that can move seamlessly between the various nuances of a family search. With teams in London and the country, they offer a wide geographic coverage and knowledge base â&#x20AC;&#x201C; taking in everything from the estate with shoot, the commuter-belt home and chocolate-box cottage, to the investment flat in an up-and-coming area or the perfect pied-Ă -terre next to the best restaurants. They work together with clients over months and even years â&#x20AC;&#x201C; especially as a familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs grow and change â&#x20AC;&#x201C; always working to ensure that the investment is as sound as possible. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;The ability to move fluidly between markets has become a common need for our clients,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; says James Shaw, who is based in the Chilterns. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;In an industry that depends so much on trust, our capacity to offer good advice and to seek best in class across different parts of the country means we can effectively provide a service for life.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; For further information call 020 7881 2388 or visit www.prime-purchase.com

For sale through Savills Henley; guide price ÂŁ5.25 million

CLOCKWISE FROM BELOW Prime Purchaseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lindsey Webb, James Shaw and James Watts. ABOVE Yewden Lodge, Hambledon


LONDON On your doorstep... Let’s grab brunch Live close to our favourite brunch locations

The wishlist London’s most sought after properties

We speak to Gráinne Gilmore Head of Knight Frank UK Residential Research

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Welcome to LONDON VIEW Cosmopolitan and cultured, historic and contemporary, London offers endless variety and is always changing. Much the same can also be said about the Capitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fascinating and evolving property market.

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Prime Central London, which in recent years has had strong price growth, has seen only small rises and even some small falls in the year end to January 2016. Meanwhile newly fashionable areas in the east of the Capital, such as the City & City Fringe and Islington have enjoyed stronger growth at 7.5% and 7.7% respectively, though this is less than recent years. The volatile nature of global financial markets so far this year, has given some buyers pause for thought, yet there has also been evidence of added impetus from buyers looking to buy ahead of the stamp duty land tax changes this April. Similarly, rental growth has levelled off with moderate 1% to 2%increases in the year end to January 2016, as more tenants let for longer or relocate outside the Capital. Longer term however, rental demand is robust as the number of households renting in the private sector in London has doubled over the last ten years. In the new development arena, new apartments and homes offering a high standard of amenities, including concierge services and gyms, are always popular and Knight Frank has both sales and lettings offices in key developments such as One Tower Bridge, Goodman’s Fields and The Plimsoll Building in King’s Cross. Overall, the picture for the year ahead is one of stability with small but steady increases, as the capital’s property market changes. Just like London, in fact. With Spring upon us, it’s fitting that this issue looks at an assortment of superb roof terraces and popular local weekend eateries within the Capital. We also take a look at our renowned residential research division which leads the way in analysing property trends across the country. Noel Flint, Partner, Head of London Sales Tim Hyatt, Partner, Head of London Lettings

Contents 04

On top of the world

06

The wishlist

08

On your doorstep…

10

We speak to Gráinne Gilmore

Exclusive roof terraces

London’s most sought after properties

Let’s grab brunch

Head of Knight Frank UK Residential Research

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On top of the world Hidden away from inquisitive eyes, London’s roof terraces are a secret world where the lucky few can soak up the views and the sunshine at their leisure.

In a city as densely populated as ours, they’re the perfect space to relax and entertain - and with the summer not too far away, a private terrace is also a selling feature that’s really coming into its own. When the fickle English London weather allows, the roof terrace adds another room to your home – one where you can fire up a barbecue for the family, throw a party or simply enjoy a sundowner after a long day at the office. Like the homes they’re perched atop, many terraces are wired for sound and boast sophisticated mood lighting. Add some planting and even a patch of grass if you have the space – the synthetic version is now a dead ringer for the

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real thing – and you have yourself a fully-fledged roof garden. If the square footage stretches to it, you can also consider additions such as an outdoor kitchen and well-stocked bar, making the terrace feel like an extension of the home. For those who don’t mind sharing, London’s modern developments often give residents access to a luxuriously appointed communal roof terrace. Reaching ever higher, they provide some of the best panoramas to be had anywhere in the Capital. River views are particularly prized, along with terraces that look out onto the royal parks. But any kind of outlook is a wonderful thing – even if your vista is a sea of rooftops, it’s still an uplifting sight and one that’s quintessentially London.

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“When the English weather allows, the roof terrace adds another room to your home”

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St John’s Building

St Marks Place

Eyot House

Kidderpore Avenue

Guide price: £3,975,000 Knight Frank Belgravia, sales +44 20 3463 0295

Guide price: £925 per week Knight Frank Notting Hill, lettings +44 20 3463 0320

Guide price: £795 per week Knight Frank Tower Bridge, lettings +44 20 3328 6540

Guide price: £2,000,000 Knight Frank Hampstead, sales +44 20 3463 0127

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LE T TI NGS

ALBERT MANSIONS | Guide price: £535 per week Knight Frank Battersea, +44 20 3355 7335

PRIMROSE GARDENS | Guide price: £950 per week 2

Knight Frank Belsize Park, +44 20 8022 1475

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wishlist

LAMB BREWERY | Guide price: £850 per week Knight Frank Chiswick, +44 20 3463 0084

ORBAIN ROAD | Guide price: £545 per week 2

QUEENS GARDENS | Guide price: £795 per week Knight Frank Hyde Park, +44 20 3463 0241 Advertisement Feature | 6

Knight Frank Fulham, +44 20 3463 0237

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HARRINGTON GARDENS | Guide price: £625 per week 2

Knight Frank South Kensington, +44 20 3463 0239

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SALE S

ELM PARK GARDEN | Guide price: £1,950,000

FIRST AVENUE | Guide price: £1,625,000 4

Knight Frank Barnes, +44 20 3328 6535

Knight Frank Chelsea, +44 20 3463 0149

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“A hand-picked selection of beautiful properties available this Spring for sale and to let across the Capital”

EGLANTINE ROAD | Guide price: £1,750,000

ST ALBANS AVENUE | Guide price: £1,699,950 Knight Frank Chiswick, +44 20 3463 0086

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OLD TOWN HALL | Guide price: £1,250,000

MARYLANDS ROAD | Guide price: £1,200,000 Knight Frank Queen’s Park, +44 20 8022 4037

Knight Frank Wandsworth, +44 20 3463 0325

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Knight Frank Tower Bridge, +44 20 3463 0053

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On your doorstep... let’s grab brunch!

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CASHMERE HOUSE | Guide price: £795 per week Knight Frank Aldgate, lettings +44 20 8022 4035

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Albion 2-4 Boundary Street Shoreditch E2 7DD

Duck & Waffle Heron Tower, 110 Bishopsgate London EC2N 4AY

For a more laid back take on brunch, try Albion. Made up of a café, shop, in-house bakery and cake counter, the majority of their produce is sourced in Britain. Dine in, buy groceries to cook at home or simply pick up your takeaway coffee and pastry for a wander around Shoreditch.

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Enjoy brunch with a view at this slick spot on the 40th floor of the Heron Tower. The signature dish - confit duck leg with waffle and maple syrup - is a must, but there are plenty of more conventional offerings to work your way through too.

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“One of the benefits of living in London is that, whichever postcode you call home, you’ll almost certainly have a generous helping of fantastic brunch spots right around the corner”

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ECCLESTON SQUARE | Guide price: £1,475,000

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Knight Frank Belgravia, sales +44 20 3463 0295

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Fifth Floor 109 - 125 Harvey Nichols Knightsbridge SW1X 7RJ

Colbert 50-52 Sloane Square Chelsea SW1W 8AX

Savour the finest seasonal produce at The Harvey Nichols Fifth Floor Café with a delicious and varied menu offering all-day dining options in a light, spacious and stylish setting. The Harvey Nichols Signature Breakfast - lobster and scrambled eggs - is a must-try.

Parisian-inspired Colbert offers brunch with a side serving of people watching - a favourite pastime of every self-respecting Londoner and there is probably nowhere better for it than Sloane Square. Their classic all-day café menu allows breakfast to segue seamlessly into morning coffee through to lunch.

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Ahead of the trend Drawing expertise from 60 offices across the country, Gráinne Gilmore produces highly detailed data and analysis on the UK residential property market.

As an expert on the UK housing market, who frequently comments on property trends in the media, Gráinne Gilmore is closely monitoring the recent policy changes on second homes and investment properties. She says, “The solid economic recovery coupled with low interest rates will likely underpin the UK property market in 2016, although the market remains highly localised”. “In terms of pricing, Greater London is leading the way. Price growth in prime central London has eased over the last 18 months, but the market is showing signs of absorbing the higher stamp duty rates introduced in December 2014”. As Head of UK Residential Research at leading property consultancy Knight Frank, Gráinne produces highly informed research on the UK residential property market. This sits within the wide range of global residential, commercial and rural research produced by Knight Frank experts from offices around the world. Gráinne is also co-author of Knight Frank’s flagship publication, The Wealth Report, providing a global perspective on prime property and highlighting future wealth trends.

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“It includes data and analysis on every aspect of prime property and investment,” says Gráinne. “It is one of the most anticipated reports produced by Knight Frank – and is seen by clients and a wider audience as a mine of information”. Whether you want to know where the number of millionaires is set to increase fastest, the relative value of prime residential property in major global cities, or the place where luxury homes have outperformed the market the most, you will find the answers in The Wealth Report, now in its 10th year. Not only focussing on prime property trends, the report’s Luxury Investment Index shows that some classic cars have appreciated by 490% over the last decade, while coloured diamonds have increased in value by 136% over the same time. “Investors have often followed their passions when choosing where to place their capital,” says Gráinne, “And tangible assets are even more alluring in a febrile global economic climate”. GRÁINNE GILMORE Partner, Head of UK Residential Research +44 20 8022 6171 grainne.gilmore@knightfrank.com


“Investors have often followed their passions when choosing where to place their capital,” says Gráinne, “And tangible assets are even more alluring in a febrile global economic climate”

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KnightFrank.com/londonview +44 20 8022 6171

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Photographed by FELICITY MCCABE

What’s it like to be... B E N F O G L E ’ S L A B R A D O R , S TO R M his is my selfie face. It’s me doing my moody pout. Won’t be able to hold it for long because – pssst – I’m not a model, I’m a thumping great Sloane! Full-on cheerful Chelsea girl! Absolutely LOVE Chelsea. Wouldn’t even dream of leaving the borough. The totes opposite of Ben, I know, it’s hilaire. K&C’s got, like, everrrrything. The parks are incred – I completely adore Kensington Gardens and Hyde Park – and home is mega LOLZ too. I’m wacko with excitement every morning to see the mini Fogles, Ludo and Iona. I, like, HAVE to wake them up and chew their toys (they’re less keen on that part). And then there’s my great friend Maggi.

T

I LITERALLY adore her. She’s older than me and also a Labrador. I just, like, learn so much from her because I’m only one year old. I’m always, like, ‘Maggi – you inspire me, you know, every single flipping day, you gorgeous old dame.’ And then Maggi gives me that ‘seriously, stop talking’ look, which makes me ROAR with laughter, and then I just run off and eat a carrot or a sock. Ben loves Labradors too. He wrote a book about us, which I devoured. Had a slightly dicky tum afterwards, but sooooo worth it. As told to Clare Bennett While Storm imagined herself on Made in Chelsea, Ben wondered if the copies of his book she’s half eaten might still work as presents.


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Please turn the page to view Supplement


PHOTOGRAPHS: RAY BELLISARIO/GETTY, HULTON ARCHIVE GETTY. COVER PHOTOGRAPH: SARA MORRIS

®

Royal Special editors Emilie McMeekan Sophia Money-Coutts Royal Special art director Jaqui Doyle Associate editor Gerri Gallagher Assistant editor Celia Thursfield Sub-editors Steve Fletcher, Kate Lauer Editorial coordinator Teddy Wolstenholme Picture researcher Gavin Green Managing editor Beatriz Choi Art director Timothy Rennie Copy chief Ian Ramsey Picture editor Hannah Brenchley Deputy picture editor Eve Jones Acting Tatler.com senior editor Annabelle Spranklen Acting Tatler.com online editorial assistant Emma Beaumont Tatler.com picture editor Michael Gray Associate publisher Clare Schifano Projects director Emma Samuel Account director Emma Heuser Fashion account director Isobel McMahon Acting fashion account director Nicki Singh Advertising manager Lucie Burton Senior advertising executive Victoria Barley Sales assistant Natasha Callin Regional sales director Karen Allgood Regional account director Heather Mitchell Senior sales executive Krystina Garnett Promotions director Sophie Fairclough Senior promotions executive Sophie Wilson Creative director, promotions Gavin Shaw Art director, promotions Samantha Brownstein Senior copywriter, promotions Anna Timoney New York Shannon Tolar Tchkotoua Milan Valentina Donini Paris Helena Kawalec Production controller Alice Ahlberg Production coordinator Sappho Barkla

Editor in chief Kate Reardon Deputy editor Gavanndra Hodge Publishing director Patricia Stevenson Managing director Nicholas Coleridge

4 THE DRIVING FORCE For she’s a jolly good fellow – the Queen at 90

8 COME DINE WITH ONE Who’s who at the ultimate royal dinner party

10 THE MERRY WIVES OF HENRY WINDSOR Just imagine if Prince Harry was really Henry VIII

12 ROYAL VISITS Do you dream about the Queen?

14 WHAT DO YOU BUY THE RULER WHO HAS EVERYTHING? Bears, crocodiles and elephants – bring them on

16 WHO THE F*** EVEN IS STEVE? Everybody needs a nickname

18 SCREEN QUEENS The Royals – sort of like ours but with Joan Collins

38 HAVING A WALES OF A TIME Why Charles is one happy prince

PA G E

4

48 KATEOPEDIA Every little thing there is to know about the Duchess of Cambridge

CONTENTS

54 PARTY ANIMALS Very regal baubles

58 GREAT FAVOURITES What’s in the Balmoral bathroom cabinet?

62 ROYAL FLASH Really big dresses to wear anywhere. Well, you can try...

72 GRANNY TAKES A TRIP From Ibiza to the Hebrides – chilling with the royals

76 IT LIST Channel your inner princess

PA G E

38

It’s a royal knockout!

80 COLOURED BY... Crayons at the ready

Copyright 2016 TATLER PUBLISHING COMPANY LTD, Vogue House, 1 Hanover Square, London W1S 1JU (tel: 020 7499 9080). Printed in the UK by Wyndeham Roche Ltd. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Not to be sold separately from the May 2016 issue of Tatler. Tatler has tried to ensure that all information is correct at the time of going to press, but the publishers cannot accept responsibility for any errors and omissions.


The Queen, New Zealand, 1953

T h e DR IVI N G ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


F OR C E Our magnificent monarch is 90 years old and still keeping the royal show on the road. But who dreams about her? Who on earth gave her an elephant? And what emojis does she use?* To celebrate her milestone,Tatler brings you a majestic miscellany... *MAYBE


&THE QUEEN

HIP HIP H O O R AY !

Ninety years of royal covers

May 

JU LY 1927

M AY 1930

MAY 1 932

APR I L 1936

Founded in 

N OV E M B ER 1931

OC TO B ER 1937

JU N E 1937

M AY 1 94 1 ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

JU N E 1 9 47

PHOTOGRAPHS: ILLUSTRATED NEWS LTD/MARY EVANS

DE CE MB ER 19 42

N OVE MB ER 19 47


D E CE M B ER 1 947

MAY 19 4 9

A P R IL 1 9 53

J U N E 19 53

MAY 1 9 5 4

J A N U A RY 19 5 5

A U GU ST 1 9 57

APR IL 1 959

O C TOB E R 1 957

M ARCH 1 961

OC TO B ER 19 61

JU N E 19 59

SE P TE M B ER 1 9 62

JU LY 19 6 4

N OVEMB E R 20 0 9

M AY 2 0 1 6


T HE Z E RI

EY ES

N

P

O

Mick Jagger and Princess Margaret, 1976

F I R M FAVO U R I T E If you want to make the Queen happy, take her to the races

COME DINE WITH ONE The ultimate royal dinner party. By Tibbs Jenkins

WITH HER HORSE ESTIMATE, WHO WON THE GOLD CUP AT ASCOT ON LADIES DAY, JUNE 2013

Ah, the Merry Monarch. He sure did have an awful lot of love to give, fathering a dozen or so illegitimate children. Surprisingly, it was his mistresses, as opposed to his wife Catherine of Braganza, who were most consumed by jealousy. One lover, the Countess of Castlemaine, was so green with envy over his crush on one of the queen’s ladies-inwaiting that she plotted a mock lesbian wedding for herself and the object of his affection. Basically, a royal threesome. Invite for Inappropriate flirting.

JAMES I AT THE DERBY WITH HER THEN PRIVATE SECRETARY SIR WILLIAM HESELTINE, 1989

Yes, yes, he was a keen witch hunter (he instigated around 300 witchcraft trials during his lifetime), but this king’s court was once described as being filled with ‘malice, pride, whoredom, swearing and rejoicing in the fall of others... so wicked a place as I wonder the earth did not swallow it up.’ Fun, right? Invite for A seance.

PRINCESS MARGARET ‘Oh, it’s so much easier when Margaret’s there – everybody laughs at what Margaret says.’ So said the Queen about her sister. And she would be the first to light up. Invite for The gossip.

of brandy over the head of Tory MP Christopher Sykes just for shits and giggles. Also keen on the ladies and a spot of gambling. Invite for The larks.

PRINCESS SOPHIA George III’s beloved daughter once wrote that court life was so dull she wished she was a kangaroo. Instead, she had a scandalous affair with an equerry 33 years her senior to spice things up a bit. We salute her spirit. Invite for The wit.

Did you know? The Royal Train comes with chefs, lace-trimmed pillows and a nobumpy-track rule during the Queen’s 7.30am bath.

THE EARL OF WESSEX Edward is given to acting up – he used to work for Lord Lloyd Webber’s Really Useful Theatre Company, and once ran his own TV-production business. So, v good at charades. Invite for After-dinner games.

PRINCE HARRY Do we even have to say it? The party prince will show up, have a rollicking good time, charm the girls and the guys and possibility even flash a bit of royal buttock. What’s not to love? Invite for Everything going.

There is said to be a Billy Bass singing fish on top of the grand piano at Balmoral.

A royal footman who poured whisky into the corgis’ water as a party prank was punished with a salary cut and demotion.

THE PRINCE OF WALES (LATER EDWARD VII) CANTERING AT ASCOT ON SURPRISE IN 1961 – ASCOT IS THE ONLY ROYAL RACE MEETING IN THE COUNTRY

ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

Oh, boys will be boys! And this prince once poured a decanter

Charles II gets the party started

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES

CHARLES II


W i f e N o. 1

JECCA CRAIG Harry’s friendship with the Kenyan socialite Jecca Craig, whom he has known since his early 20s, finally changes into something more on a joint visit to an African rhino sanctuary. They are overwhelmed by the experience, and their eyes lock over a mighty beast’s tranquilised body – before he knows it, Harry has proposed. They exchange vows at sunset on the savannah, and their marriage starts well. They enjoy talking about animals, going on safari and sunbathing. But things then turn stale. Jecca constantly wearing khaki starts to bring Harry down. Harry takes Chelsy Davy as a mistress. ‘Jecca went out with my brother,’ he tries to explain. ‘And it suddenly feels a bit... ewww.’ Chelsy begins to rally, thinking she’s in with a shot. Until one fateful day...

W i f e N o. 4

ANNA ABRAMOVICH

The merry wıves of

HENRY WINDSOR According to Clare Bennett ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

Following the death of his beloved third wife, Harry hits the bottle hard. He is invited to attend a Chelsea versus Arsenal match as a guest of Chelsea’s owner, Roman Abramovich. ‘You must meet my daughter, Anna,’ Roman purrs, cunningly plying Harry with Russo-Baltique vodka. ‘Go on then,’ Harry slurs sorrowfully. ‘In fact, why don’t I just marry her?’ And before he knows it, a wedding has been arranged. Looking around at the 20 terrifying bodyguards, Harry is too scared to back out. Anna seems like a nice enough girl, though, so Harry decides to give her a wedding present. As she opens the box containing an antique brooch that once belonged to his grandmother, Anna’s face falls and she bursts into tears. ‘It’s so small. And old,’ she bawls. ‘You insult my daughter with your tiny presents!’ Roman shouts. ‘Get out!’ As the bodyguards start to loom, Harry makes a break for the door. The marriage is annulled before the end of the day.


W i f e N o. 2

W i f e N o. 3

P I P PA M I D D L E T O N

CRESSIDA BONAS

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, K IS FOR KATE, CAPITAL PICTURES, ALAN DAVIDSON, ALAMY

Her name is Pippa Middleton, his sister-inlaw’s sister. She’s dark, mysterious and good at skiing. She doesn’t even let him win at tennis and knows how to lay a table properly. Harry is bewitched by this social sorceress. Huge rows erupt over his infatuation. ‘Sod your protocol! I love her!’ Harry is heard shouting, as he storms out of a crisis meeting with the Lord Chamberlain. Jecca is served with divorce papers and flees to Kenya. Chelsy is spotted roaming up and down the King’s Road, weeping loudly. Harry and Pippa get married in secret at Windsor, but it’s tempestuous from the start. Harry begins to wonder if Pippa only married him for seats in the Royal Box at Wimbledon. And why is her brother James ALWAYS hanging around? Her witch costume on Hallowe’en confirms his worst suspicions that her otherworldliness may have darker connotations. ‘I’m sorry, but I’m axing this marriage,’ he tells his hysterical wife, as she throws her brother’s homemade cupcakes at him.

In an attempt to cheer him up, Harry’s friends take him to see a contemporary-dance version of Uncle Vanya. The willowy blonde in the role of Helena is familiar – his old flame Cressida. It’s as if his whole world has stopped. ‘I must take her as my wife,’ he gasps. He insists on going backstage and barges into Cressida’s dressing room. ‘Marry me,’ he begs. She falls into his arms. Theirs is the love of Disney films. She entertains him every night – sometimes reciting soliloquies, sometimes performing modern-dance pieces. Harry has never been happier. However, Cressida, perhaps too committed to the arts, actually dies at the end of her debut performance of Antigone, leaving Harry heartbroken and bereft. ‘I shall never love again,’ he announces.

W i f e N o. 5

W i f e N o. 6

KYLIE JENNER

CLARE BALDING

After a fall from a polo pony, Harry is unable to play the sport again. Still drinking heavily, he starts to pile on the pounds. This does not, however, deter the greatest Machiavelli of the modern age from pulling off her ultimate deal. Kris Jenner, mastermind behind America’s First Family, offers her youngest daughter, Kylie, in marriage. The wedding appears on Keeping Up with the Kardashians, and breaks audience records. The couple’s net worth as a brand triples. Now almost permanently in a drunken stupor, Harry is delighted with his teenage bride and her blue hair extensions, even though she perpetually chews gum and only looks up from her phone to go to sleep. Harry suggests they try for a baby. ‘My mom says I can,’ she whispers, ‘as long as I sign a contract saying I’ll give birth on the show.’ Every element of their relationship has to be run past Kris first, and things start to unravel quickly. In a rage, Harry texts Kylie saying, ‘This marriage is KANCELLED.’

Miserable, overweight and dragging a leg from his old injury, Harry reflects on his past loves. Where has it all gone wrong? Now only able to enjoy horses as a spectator, he is introduced at a charity polo match to a woman who he finds hard to forget. Robust, cheerful and thoroughly knowledgeable about sport, Clare Balding is different from all his other wives. Sensible. Solid. Soothing. He makes enquiries. ‘Er... she’s already married, Sir,’ his private secretary informs him. ‘So what?’ Harry barks. ‘To a woman called Alice,’ the courtier goes on. But nothing will put Harry off. Clare is given the news that she must perform her duty, divorce her wife and marry the Prince. Reluctantly, she concedes. They live harmoniously, watching Channel 4 racing and playing backgammon until, as Clare reads aloud to him from War Horse one evening, Harry dies happily in his sleep. (

THE GR EAT BR ITISH

B E A R D - O FF Aristocratic winners by a whisker

9

8

1ST DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM (1592–1628)

1ST DUKE OF LANCASTER (1340–1399)

7

6

KING ARTHUR (FIFTH CENTURY)

GEORGE V (1865–1936)

5

4

THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH (1844–1900)

EDWARD VII (1841–1910)

3

2

PRINCE GEORGE, DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE (1819–1904)

PRINCE MICHAEL OF KENT (b.1942)

1 PRINCE CHARLES (b.1948)

Somebody stop me!

ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


The Queen in Canada, 2001

Royal visits Dream about the Queen? You are not alone, says Matthew Bell

S

igmund Freud said dreams are the expressions of our deepest desires. If that is true, it seems a lot of us have some very confused feelings about the Queen – a poll* suggested that 60 per cent of us dream about her. Experts say it’s because she’s an authority figure, while some see a link to our own sense of inadequacy. Most dreams are really quite boring – muddled strolls around our subconscious, in which we carry out mundane activities half-remembered from the day before. But if the Queen is there, dull becomes fascinating. Here, we chronicle Her Majesty’s adventures in dreamland, as witnessed by some top Tatler types. And Johnny Cash.

H M ’s b o n m o t s

ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

‘I very often have dreams about the Queen. She’s always popping round, and doing very ordinary things like having a cup of tea or going for a walk. I’m constantly trying to think of subjects that would interest her – like dogs or horses. She always wears whatever she wore in the most recent photo of her I have seen. It’s like having a friend drop round – except she’s the Queen.’ H A R R I E T V Y N E R , writer ‘I dreamt about the Queen at Christmas. She asked if she could borrow my fur hat for a funeral. I suggested it might be too big for her (I’m much taller than HM). “Nothing is too big for me,” said the Queen, so I handed it over. As far as I know, she has still got it. I have absolutely no explanation for this dream.’ L A DY A N TO N I A F R A S E R , historian zzz zzz z

z

‘Let us not take ourselves too seriously. None of us has a monopoly on wisdom.’

S O V E R E I G N S AY I N G S ‘Like all the best families, we have our share of eccentricities, of impetuous and wayward youngsters and of family disagreements.’

‘I quite often dream about the Queen, unexpectedly. In my dream, we’re rather good friends and going for a walk in one of her gardens. I don’t confide in her or confess anything to her – we just amuse each other with general comments. Once, recently, she was rather impatient and couldn’t understand why “that gentleman” kept turning up – I was mortified when I woke up. No idea what it means. A couple of weeks ago I confessed to her that I wasn’t sure I liked Der Rosenkavalier as much as I once did. She quite agreed, with mild but kindly amusement.’ P H I L I P H E N S H E R , novelist

THE DESCENDANTS IF YOU’RE NOT RELATED TO CHARLES II, YOU’RE BASICALLY NOBODY

SAMANTHA CAMERON

THE DUCHESS OF CORNWALL

EARL OF MARCH & KINRARA

THE DUKE OF NORFOLK

ISABELLA BRANSON (AND ALL HER HOT SIBLINGS)

LADY MELISSA PERCY (AND ALL HER HOT SIBLINGS)

‘Have you been playing a long time?’ The Queen in the Seychelles, 1972

SPEAKING TO ERIC CLAPTON, 2005 THE DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE

*DEEPLY SCIENTIFIC, OF COURSE – CONDUCTED IN THE TATLER OFFICE. PHOTOGRAPHS: CHRISTOPHER WAHL/CONTOUR PHOTOS, LORD LICHFIELD, DARREN GERRISH, GETTY IMAGES, REXFEATURES

Kingsley Amis loved the Queen and claimed to dream about her often. On one occasion, she was sitting on his knee. His son Martin recounts: ‘I said to him, “What happens in these dreams of yours?” And my father said, “Well nothing much, she’s on my lap and... I’m kissing her.” And I said, “What does the Queen say in your dreams?”’ Amis said his father replied: ‘Well, I’m saying, “Come on, come on, let’s go somewhere.” And she says, “No, Kingsley, we mustn’t, or we can’t.”’ Johnny Cash once told an interviewer: ‘I had a dream that I was in Buckingham Palace and I walked in and there was [the Queen] sat on the floor – which she probably doesn’t do at all. But she had a friend there, and they were laughing, they had their knitting needles. And I walked up and she looked at me... and kind of gasped and said, “Johnny Cash, you’re just like a thorn tree in a whirlwind.”’ He didn’t know what it meant, but later said he found a reference to a thorn tree in the Book of Job. Then he wrote a song about it.


Handcrafted by

Land Rover Special Operations for

Champagne Pol Roger


S O V E R E I G N S AY I N G S

Nikki playing with his keeper, Ted Andrews, at London Zoo, 1956

H M ’s b o n m o t s

‘If it were not for my Archbishop of Canterbury, I should be off in my plane to Longchamp every Sunday’

Should I do the royal wave?

‘I have to be seen to be believed’

WHAT DO YOU BUY THE RULER WHO HAS EVERYTHING?

‘The British Constitution has always been puzzling and always will be’ ‘ How reassuring’

Go and pet the crocodile, darling. By Sophia Money-Coutts #THE QUEEN’S CHAMELEON The Queen’s cousin, Lord Mountbatten, brought a chameleon back from a foreign posting for the then Princess Elizabeth and her sister Princess Margaret during the Second World War. Margaret was particularly thrilled when she placed it on a copy of Debrett’s and it turned red. It didn’t much like the British weather and died not long afterwards, whereupon the princesses held a burial ceremony for it. #PRINCE CHARLES’S SOUTH AMERICAN LOVEBIRDS When Charles was 10, the Queen Mother gave him and Princess Anne a pair of lovebirds, which Charles promptly named David and Annie. They lived in the nursery with their hamster, Chi-Chi, and rabbit, Harvey. #THE QUEEN AND THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH’S ELEPHANT In 1972, the president of Cameroon sent the royal couple a seven-year-old bull elephant called Jumbo, to show just how elated he was about their silverwedding anniversary.

Did you know? Prince Harry gets his hair cut by a local woman in Tetbury, who has been cutting it since he was a child. Prince Philip’s pet names for his wife are said to include ‘Cabbage’ and ‘Sausage’.

The ravens at the Tower of London are officially enlisted as soldiers.

The Queen on board HMS Eagle, 1969

8 S I G N S T H A T Y O U M IG H T S EC RE T LY B E AN IL L EGITIM ATE ROYAL Always felt like an insider? We may have the answer why. By Clare Bennett You are not repulsed by the thought of eggs Drumkilbo. You have never worn jeans. You don’t like being touched. People NEVER stop asking you to be a godparent. Your mood immediately

ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

lifts whenever anyone mentions horses. You’re obsessed with Tupperware. You took your dog on honeymoon. You know how to change a spark plug. When you see a swan, you feel an unusual sense

of... not ownership exactly, but you’re strangely proprietorial. The same thing happens whenever you happen to see a sturgeon, whale, dolphin or porpoise in British waters. Your handwriting is totally illegible.

You’ve never told anyone what’s in your handbag. Your mother insists that you serve in the Royal Navy, even if it’s just for a bit. You really wish someone would give you a crocodile as a present. Being stared at doesn’t worry you.

You wouldn’t dream of leaving the house without your double string of pearls. You are mysteriously good at polo. You’ve always felt the urge to celebrate your birthday twice a year. * If you tick more than 10 boxes,

you need to get a paternity test.

PHOTOGRAPHS: FOX PHOTOS / GETTY IMAGES, PRESS ASSOCIATION

e all know that the royals are into their dogs: the Queen has her corgis and dorgis, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have Lupo the spaniel, and the Duchess of Cornwall has two Jack Russells. But there have been far weirder pets in the royal menagerie... # PRINCESS ANNE’S BEAR CUB In 1956, the Soviet leaders Nikita Khrushchev and Marshal Bulganin visited Britain, bringing with them horses for the Duke of Edinburgh and Prince Charles, and a bear cub called Nikki for the three-month-old Princess Anne. Nikki was sent to London Zoo, where he was fed from a bottle and swung on a swing in his enclosure. #PRINCE ANDREW’S CROCODILE In 1961, while on a trip to the Gambia, the Queen was given a crocodile for Prince Andrew, then aged one and a half. Sir Martin Charteris, the Queen’s Private Secretary, kept the crocodile in his bath until the royal tour came to an end, whereupon it was brought back and, like Nikki, placed in London Zoo.

W

WHEN TOLD DURING A WALKING TOUR OF SCOTLAND THAT SHE LOOKED LIKE THE QUEEN


TATLER â&#x20AC;˘ PROMOTION

DISTINCTIVELY DAKS 122 years and three Royal Warrants later, DAKS is still as fresh and innovative as the day it began. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d expect nothing less from a British icon hen Alec Simpson developed the selfsupporting waistband in the early 1930s, the Simpson family already had a long history of creating top-quality menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing. Since 1894, in fact. But it was this sartorial invention which gave the brand a real boon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; the idea was patented and garnered ZRUOGZLGHDFFODLP6XGGHQO\WKH6LPSVRQVZHUHÂżUPO\ on the fashion map with a brand-new name for their vision. DAKS (derived from the words dad and slacks) ZDVRIÂżFLDOO\ERUQ Over the years, DAKS has become part of the fabric of British life, evolving from sharp menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tailoring to encompass stylish and directional womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fashion. There have been pleated tops and knitted, buttoned capes, cascading skirts and micro-minis. When DAKS showcased its Autumn/Winter 2010 collection to the discerning fash-pack at London Fashion Week, its SRVLWLRQDVFRROKHULWDJHEUDQGZDVFRQÂżUPHG

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THE DUCHESS & DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE

Or Pippa Middleton and Lord Dalmeny?

WHO THE F*** EVEN IS STEVE?

SCORE

Tibbs Jenkins decodes regal nicknames (941–958). This was due to Eadwig’s great beauty. Swoon. He died still beautiful aged about 18, and was succeeded by his brother, Edgar the Peaceful.

like the English equivalent of the Hunchback of Notre Dame. Sort of.

1 A L L - FA I R = E A DW I G

9 T HE V I RG I N QU E E N = ELIZ A B ET H I

2 T HE U N R E A DY = E T H E LR E D I I Literally...

10 FA R M E R G E ORG E = GEORGE III

(1738–1820). He disliked the glitz and glamour of court life, and was far happier applying the latest agricultural ideas in the countryside. Later known as... Mad King George, after he went a little, er, mad.

3 HA R E F OOT = H A RO LD I

(c. 1016–1040). Harold was one monarch you’d have wanted on your team: the king was super-fast on his feet and a pretty nifty hunter. C U RT M A N T L E = H E N RY I I (1133– 1189). Henry was a forwardthinking, fashionista kind of king. He wore a short cloak (curtmantle in Middle English) instead of the previously preferred long robes. Infinitely more practical. J E A N S A N S T E R R E or L ACK L A N D = JO H N (1166–1216 ). Poor King John: his father, Henry II, gave his brothers England and France and left him with only Ireland. Ireland, FFS! As was the view at the time.

OF EUROP E 11 =THEQ UEGRANDMOTHER E N V I C TO R I A

(1819–1901). She won herself this title because she engineered marriages for all her children with members of other European royal families. Rather like a regal Mrs Bennet.

4 THE QUEEN MOTHER

SARAH, DUCHESS OF YORK

THE QUEEN

Or Mrs Brown?

Or Mary Berry?

Or David Walliams?

SCORE:

SCORE:



SCORE:

12 ST E V E = P R I N C E WILLIA M

(b. 1982). Steve? Steve? Who the f*** is Steve? Well, exactly. And that’s how the Prince supposedly kept his anonymity at St Andrews University when larking around.

5 PRINCE HARRY

THE DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE

THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH

Or Niall Horan?

Or Peter Phillips?

Or Bryan Cranston?

SCORE:

THE PRINCE OF WALES

THE PRINCESS ROYAL

Or Naomi Watts?

Or Vladimir Putin?

Or Liam Neeson?

SCORE:

Dubonnet o’clock

(1452–1485). He was so known due to his curved spine – rather

SCORE:

S I GN S OF THE TI ME S

One feels like kicking ass today

Essential reading matter

Because even queens get emojinal these days

Need a sit down

Greetings

Sparkles

I LLUST RATED BY C A ROLYN JONES ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

Who are you calling mad, you awful little Frenchman?

8 CROUCHBACK = R I C H A R D I I I

DIANA, PRINCESS OF WALES SCORE:

6 LON G S HA N KS = E DWA R D I

(1239–1307). Edward was very tall. He stood at around 6ft 2in. They didn’t go for irony in those days. #giant Also known as... Hammer of the Scots, which is etched on his gravestone thanks to his ferocious battles against the Scottish.

SCORE:

SCORE:

Lol

Mmm, breakfast

Not amused

PHOTOGRAPHS: CAMERA PRESS, EYEVINE, GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, SOLO SYNDICATION

APPALLING OLD WAXWORKS

(968–1016). He gained this name while losing everyone’s respect – by refusing to listen to advice and making reckless decisions. Or did he? Some sources claim ‘unready’ really means ill-advised, ie, he just received bad advice... either way it didn’t work out so well – he lost his throne to a complete Cnut.

(1533–1603). She never married. Let’s just leave it at that. Also known as... The Glory of Her Sex, the Great, the Maiden Queen, the Faerie Queene, the Peerless Oriana, the Queen of the Northern Seas, the Queen of Shepherds, Good Queen Bess. They liked virgins in those days.


S T Y L E YO U WA N T TO W E A R A N Y W H E R E +44 ( 0 ) 2 0 7 7 3 0 3323 | KI KI .CO.UK


creator Mark Schwahn’s previous hit – the palace once requested a box set. The Queen is the only person who can legally eat swan. We’re not sure if she’s ever done so, but our evil King Cyrus has a bird roasted the minute he gets himself on the throne. No real swans were harmed. We had a puppet and a swan puppeteer.

4

Her Majesty has banned mauve flowers and carnations of any colour. As a contrast, The Royals purposefully uses mauve for Joan Collins’s character, the Queen’s mother – our set director fills every scene Dame Joan is in with Reine des Violettes roses. We never use carnations – even we are not that gauche.

5

SCR EEN QUE E NS

6

W

Making polite small talk with strangers for a living is a lot more fun with some social lubricant. A former equerry to the Prince of Wales claims that the personal bottle of sparkling water he sips at public functions is often filled with gin (his

1

st I ju ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

granny’s fave). In honour of that idea, The Royals had Princess Eleanor drop E when she had to visit an old folks’ home. A fan favourite, that scene. It is hard to look dignified if your shoes are chafing. The Queen has a junior member of palace staff – nicknamed Cinders – with exactly the same shoe size as her (and very clean feet) to wear in her shoes. Costing about £1,000, the leather pumps are handmade by Anello & Davide of Kensington. Elizabeth Hurley’s queen prefers Louboutins and her wellies are high-heeled. Tut-tut!

2

If you’re a royal and you enjoy The Royals, you can’t possibly admit it. Unless you do so in that very special subtextual way that the real royals speak to the press. A week after the episode in which The Royals’ playboy prince has too much to drink and sings a pub karaoke version of ‘I Just Can’t Wait to be King’, Prince Harry told The Sunday Times that he has watched The Lion King more than 20 times. ‘I still can recite some of it. It’s definitely my favourite.’ Subtext: Prince Harry liked the karaoke episode. Perhaps the show was recommended to him by Wills and Kate, who are rumoured to be big fans of One Tree Hill, which is The Royals

3

c a n’t w a i t t o b e K ing..

Did you know?

The Duke of Cambridge has a Harry Potter-style scar on his forehead, after he was accidently hit on the head with a golf club at school in 1991. XII

IX

III

VI

HM TIPPLES

Before lunch Gin and Dubonnet, with a slice of lemon and a lot of ice. With lunch Wine. In the evening A dry martini and a glass of champagne. Go Queenie!

a n ’t .I jus st c u j t c a n’t I . . . wait to be King

Like most families, the royals have their fair share of domestic power struggles. Theirs, however, are outlined in an official document, the Order of Precedence, which states which family member must bow or curtsy to whom – not only in public but behind palace doors too. Royal noses have been put severely out of joint by this. Sophie, Countess of Wessex, was the second-highest ranking woman in the Royal Family until the Queen required she bend a knee to Camilla. According to a royal courtier, Sophie ‘didn’t like it one bit’. Then William put a ring on Kate’s finger, and Sophie went down another peg. To silence any grumbles, a note is said to have been circulated in the private royal household, clarifying Kate’s higher ranking. Drama requires conflict but (conspiracy theories aside) only fictional royals would act on their murderous thoughts. At least in this century. (

7

wai

t

PHOTOGRAPH: LANDMARK MEDIA/(C) E! ENTERTAINMENT

Seven things writer Scarlett Lacey learned about the royals while working on ‘The Royals’ riter and producer Scarlett Lacey may have lived in LA for the past 20 years, but she’s actually a London girl – and the only Brit on the writing team for E! Entertainment’s brilliantly bonkers show about a fictional British royal family, The Royals, starring Elizabeth Hurley and Dame Joan Collins. Chronicling the lives of kings and queens runs in the family: Scarlett’s father, Robert Lacey, is known as ‘the king of the royal biographers’ and is married to Lady Jane Rayne, who was the Queen’s maid of honour at her coronation. When Scarlett asked her father if he minded her taking the job, he replied: ‘Darling, we get the joke.’ Her favourite royal is Prince Harry: ‘I’m deeply grateful to him. If he hadn’t been snapped grasping his crown jewels during strip billiards in Vegas, The Royals might not exist.’ LB

We had our own version of the Wedding Ring of England – which the Queen wore at her coronation – made, and it cost a fair bit more (£5,000) than the original £157 spent in 1831 when it was commissioned for the crowning of William IV. It’s one of many props we keep in a safe at night, along with the £50,000 worth of diamonds worn on set by Dame Joan every day. Part of her entourage is a guard with handcuffs attached to his wrist and a briefcase full of sparklers. Our royals might not be real, but our jewels are.


TATLER • PROMOTION

SEAL OF APPROVAL You’ve spotted the iconic crests on everything from cooking condiments to perfume bottles, but what exactly are Royal Warrants? Here we delve into the fascinating story of an age-old tradition t is telling that when Royal Warrant holders describe their esteemed function, they talk about supplying the household. The palaces of Her Majesty The Queen, His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh and His Royal Highness The Prince of Wales are stately institutions, tourist attractions, historical landmarks but above all, homes. We can easily forget, in all the pomp and ceremony surrounding them, that these households have many of the same daily living requirements as we do – soap and washing-up liquid, bread and fish, shampoo and toothpaste. With one significant difference, of course. That the needs of the Royal Family also extend to glittering jewels, fine wines and smart tailoring. And the public view their choices with keen interest. So much so, that the Royal Family has developed quite a reputation for discernment. The Royal Warrant acts as a mark of recognition for their preferred goods and

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Photographed by Chris Turner

services. These can be granted by each of the three Royal Households, and indeed a brand can hold more than one Royal Warrant. However, such seals of approval are not necessarily forever and are regularly reviewed. The history of the Royal Warrant dates back to medieval times. Competition amongst tradespeople was intense and all of them were vying for the Monarch’s favour. It wasn’t until the 15th century that the practice of appointing tradespeople to the Royal Household was formalised. Nowadays, the Royal Warrant Holders Association assists with the administration of the Royal Warrant. Since 1840, the organisation has strived to maintain respect and trust in what is a truly historic institution. They also do fantastic work through their charity QEST (Queen Elizabeth Scholarship Trust), which funds the education of talented craftspeople. Today there are approximately 800 Royal Warrant holders. Here we present 16 – and offer a small window into that world...

Illustrations by Emma Rios

Art Direction by Samantha Brownstein & Gavin Shaw


ASPREY Asprey is where luxury lives. he refined Asprey eye passes over a diverse range of materials, from silver and crystal to leather and china, crafting the heirlooms of the future. One of the original British all-rounders, Asprey creates homeware, jewellery and handbags with attention to detail and signature style. First established as a silk-printing business in 1781, the following years saw the company move into stationery, travel cases and homeware. By the dawn of the 20th century Asprey had expanded to include silversmiths, goldsmiths and watchmakers. Commissions for fabulous things were ďŹ&#x201A;ooding in from well-heeled customers all over the world. Queen Victoria granted Asprey its first Royal Warrant in 1862 for travelling bags and writing cases. Since then Asprey has held a Royal Warrant for every British monarch and several other foreign heads of state. Today, Asprey holds a Warrant as jeweller, silversmith and goldsmith to His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales. 167 New Bond Street, London W1; asprey.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

SMYTHSON OF BOND STREET For 128 years Smythson has been the destination for luxury leather accessories and stationery. Indeed, Smythson has come to epitomise elegance, quality and a certain, quintessentially British, charm. Smythson represents the idyllic lifestyle – one where correspondence is de rigueur and there is a pretty, ordered place for everything. Nothing captures this better than the brand’s classic Grosvenor collection, encompassing handbags, home accessories and much more, all designed in sumptuously smooth calf leather. Smythson holds three Royal Warrants to Her Majesty he Queen, His Royal Highness he Duke of Edinburgh and His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales. In 1987, he Queen Mother granted Smythson a Royal Warrant, making the company one of only eight in the world to have ever held all four Warrants simultaneously. smythson.com


FORTNUM & MASON A never-ending labyrinth of scrumptious delicacies and exquisite designs, Fortnum & Mason is truly a British institution. For the past three centuries, the store’s iconic hampers and famous teas have been essential companions to visitors at seasonal events like Wimbledon and Ascot. It invented the Scotch egg. Had a short stint as a post office. And has an ongoing connection with the Royal Family, holding two Royal Warrants: to Her Majesty he Queen as grocers and provision merchants, and to His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales as grocers and tea merchants. With a long and storied history and a future brimming with possibilities – both at their long-standing home in the heart of Piccadilly and their newer locations – Fortnum’s encapsulates all that is charming about our fair nation. 181 Piccadilly, London W1; fortnumandmason.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

WILLIAM & SON William & Son has a taste for the finer things in life. he two-floor emporium hosts own-brand, internally designed products, as well as a curated collection from independent watchmakers, jewellers and designers. Beautifully crafted, high-quality goods range from silver and glassware to town and country clothing – a treasure trove of luxury. hink gem-encrusted cufflinks and silver ornaments. his is an iconically British brand, delighting in whimsy and elegance. William & Son was established in 1999 by William Asprey. In 2009, the brand was granted a Royal Warrant by Her Majesty he Queen as goldsmiths and silversmiths. Pictured is an illustration of William & Son’s ‘Breakfast like a King’ castle-shaped toast rack and egg cups, as well as beautiful coloured-glass and sterling-silver jam pots. Designed to light up any kitchen table. 34-36 Bruton Street, London W1; williamandson.com


JAMES PURDEY & SONS he Purdey name has become synonymous with country pursuits. Since 1814, when James Purdey the Elder opened a small shop in Princes Street, London, James Purdey & Sons has been supplying enthusiasts with the finest quality guns, rifles and shooting equipment. Guns and rifles are entirely bespoke, with stock, style and engraving chosen by you. Craftsmen work to your exact specifications – bringing your vision to life. A Purdey gun should feel like an extension of you, perfectly weighted and balanced. he ultimate hunting sidekick. James Purdey & Sons received its first Royal Warrant in 1868 from the then Prince of Wales. A decade later the company was granted a Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria. James Purdey & Sons has enjoyed a recurring honour from every succeeding British monarch and today holds Royal Warrants from Her Majesty he Queen, His Royal Highness he Duke of Edinburgh and His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales. 57-58 South Audley Street, London W1; purdey.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

CHAMPAGNE LAURENT-PERRIER Champagne has been described as the ‘wine of Kings, King of wines’. A particularly fitting description for Laurent-Perrier, given its Royal connections. Bernard de Nonancourt, the man responsible for taking Laurent-Perrier from 100th to 3rd in the world, fought alongside Lord Mountbatten, Prince Charles’s greatuncle, during the Second World War. hey became comrades-in-arms. It was much later, while on a visit to the Champagne region with Lord Mountbatten, that Prince Charles first became acquainted with Laurent-Perrier and its passionate winemakers. Founded in 1812, Laurent-Perrier remains proudly family-owned to this day. In 1998 His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales granted Alexandra Pereyre de Nonancourt a Royal Warrant for Laurent-Perrier champagne. he house’s sustainable wine-making practices are perfectly in line with the Prince’s ethos of organic and sustainable agriculture. Today, this prestigious champagne is inextricably linked with celebration. he Cuvée Rosé is inspired by the classic bottles of the French Royal court and is characterised by its iconic colour and berry flavours. Sublime. laurent-perrier.com


PARKER PENS As long as there are Parker pens, the art of letter-writing will never die. hese stylish pens, crafted from the very finest materials, add a certain flourish to even the most mundane of notes. his year, Parker celebrates 128 years of creating exquisite writing instruments and inks. he brand’s ‘Better hinking’ campaign revolves around the belief that the simple act of putting pen to paper encourages a clearer thinking pattern. his in turn allows for a more precise form of communication. Take that, typing! In 1962, Parker was granted a Royal Warrant by Her Majesty he Queen. His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales also honoured the company with a Royal Warrant in 1990. It holds both to this day. Pictured is the magnificent Sonnet fountain pen in purple-lacquered sterling-silver, featuring 18-carat solid-gold nib and elegant Ciselé pattern. Rediscover traditional correspondence with a meticulously crafted Parker fountain, rollerball or ballpoint pen. Uncap sheer refinement. Harrods, The Great Writing Room, 87-135 Brompton Road, London SW1; parkerpen.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

JEEVES OF BELGRAVIA If you’re a fan of richly luxurious fabrics like velvet, silk and cashmere, you’ll already know the value of a good dry-cleaner. In fact, any true fashion lover should have a dry-cleaner on speed dial – to keep shirts crisp, colours bright and evening dresses fresh. For an expert in the field, look no further than Jeeves of Belgravia. Founded in London in 1969, Jeeves has been sprucing up clothes ever since. he name is derived from one of PG Wodehouse’s most famous characters – Jeeves, the ‘gentleman’s personal gentleman.’ Focusing primarily on high-quality clothing, Jeeves has become a name to trust amongst its esteemed clientele. he Seven Stages of Garment Care were developed to ensure even the smallest task is carried out with meticulous attention to detail. hese include thorough inspection, stain removal, cleaning, hand-finishing, minor repairs of buttons or details, final examination and packaging. His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales granted Jeeves a Royal Warrant for dry-cleaning services in 1980. 8-10 Pont Street, London SW1; jeevesofbelgravia.co.uk


CORNEY & BARROW Corney & Barrow wine merchants began life in 1780 as Edward Bland Corney’s shop in London’s Old Broad Street. he store was small, the selection of port, sherry and Bordeaux meagre and yet business thrived. In 1838 a cousin, Robert Barrow, jumped on board the family business and the Corney & Barrow we know today came into being. By 1912, Corney & Barrow’s cellars were teeming with an impressive collection of fine wines that attracted the attention of the Royal Family. he brand earned its first Royal Warrant from King George V that year and has held a Royal Warrant ever since. Today, Corney & Barrow holds two Royal Warrants, as suppliers to Her Majesty he Queen and His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales. he white Burgundy pictured hails from Domaine Dominique Cornin, a small family-owned vineyard on the southern tip of Burgundy. Here, old vines – planted as early as 1968 – are tended using traditional techniques. Every grape is handpicked – exclusively for Corney & Barrow. corneyandbarrow.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

MAPPIN & WEBB he Mappin family’s skill was first revealed in a small cutlery workshop in Sheffield in 1775. From these humble beginnings the family went on to form Mappin & Webb with their brother-in-law George Webb, in 1864. Silver, fine jewellery, clocks – everything they made bore the same high level of quality. It didn’t take long for word of their craftsmanship to spread, and the Royal Family’s interest was piqued. Queen Victoria first granted a Royal Warrant to Mappin & Webb as silversmiths in 1897 and wore one of their glittering creations to her Diamond Jubilee. Since then, Mappin & Webb has held a Royal Warrant to each of the five subsequent sovereigns and today has a Royal Warrant as silversmiths to Her Majesty he Queen and His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales. In 2012, their master craftsman became Crown Jeweller. Today, you can choose from bespoke pieces by the Crown Jeweller himself or something dazzling from the collections. he Empress range is elegant, feminine and oh-so-covetable. 1 Old Bond Street, London W1; mappinandwebb.com


LYLE & SCOTT British men have a reputation for being dapper gents. he look? Well-groomed and sophisticated with a certain polish. Of course, they wouldn’t look half so stylish without the help of clothing brands like Lyle & Scott. Since 1874, it has tailored distinctive garments with a smart-casual feel. hink crisp, clean buttondowns and pub-lunch-worthy knitted cardigans. here are gilets for blustery country walks and chinos in every colour you could possibly imagine (yes, even red). Lyle & Scott has crafted the perfect lifestyle wardrobe which aims to have men well-dressed from boardroom to bar, golf-course to gala. Lyle & Scott’s illustrious history is dotted with some true stars from the haute-couture world. In 1954, the label partnered with Christian Dior to create joint-branded cashmere. Later, associations with Chanel, Yves Saint Laurent, Liberty, Bergdorf Goodman and Michael Kors would follow. In 1975, Lyle & Scott was granted its first Royal Warrant as supplier of knitwear to His Royal Highness he Duke of Edinburgh – the brand holds the Warrant to this day. 1 Carnaby Street, London W1; lyleandscott.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

SWAROVSKI OPTIK Founded in Austria in 1949, Swarovski Optik creates a range of high-quality optical instruments – from binoculars and telescopes to rifle scopes and night-sight optics. hese clever and elegantly designed pieces are intended to enhance the user’s enjoyment of a number of activities. Like when hunting, for example. Or out on safari. Not to mention spectating at sporting events. With Swarovski Optik binoculars, you can watch the horse you’ve backed at the races streak through the final furlong in glorious high definition. In 2009, Swarovski Optik was granted a Royal Warrant for supplying binoculars to Her Majesty he Queen. Swarovski Optik is also the supplier of binoculars to the six leading Naval Officer Cadets and one overseas Cadet at the annual Royal Navy Passing Out Parade. swarovskioptik.com


WOLSEY hough Wolsey was officially registered in 1897, its origins can be traced back much further. In 1755, a small company was established during a particularly innovative period in the textile industry. It grew in skill and experience before developing into Wolsey as we know it today. Famed for its socks, underwear and (more recently) golf attire, Wolsey has broken many records over the years. he company is credited with creating unshrinkable wool, for example. No mean feat. But then we’d expect nothing less from a clothing company that has kitted out soldiers, arctic explorers and, of course, Royalty. In 1935, Wolsey was granted a Royal Warrant as hosiery manufacturers to King George V. he honour continues to this day – Wolsey has been supplying products to Her Majesty he Queen since 1953. In 1959, a Royal Warrant was also granted to Wolsey by he Queen Mother. 83A Brewer Street, London W1; wolsey.com


TATLER • PROMOTION

CLARINS Since its foundation in France in 1954, Clarins’ range of beauty must-haves has been helping women everywhere achieve a certain je ne sais quoi. Perhaps best known for its multi-award winning anti-ageing Double Serum and the radiance-boosting Beauty Flash Balm, Clarins creates everything from luscious lipsticks and zesty fragrances to moisturising hand creams and protective SPF care. A strong focus on natural, plant-based ingredients sets Clarins apart from the competition. Powerful ingredients like sesame, shea, coconut, aloe vera and hazelnut are harnessed to hydrate and comfort the skin. he brand has become a household name and an essential component of any woman’s beauty bag. In 2007, Clarins was granted a Royal Warrant by Her Majesty he Queen as manufacturers of skincare and cosmetics. clarins.co.uk


HALCYON DAYS his is a purveyor of the most wonderfully ornate trinkets and treasured keepsakes. At Halcyon Days you’ll find enamel music boxes (painted in exquisite detail), English fine bone china teaware (emblazoned with anything from leopard print to iconically British occasions), beautiful friendship bangles etched in gold and a medley of scarfs, shawls and other delights. Here, the hat of luxury is worn at a slightly jaunty angle as British eccentricity mingles with British refinement. Pieces are fun, pretty and made to last. Halcyon Days began life as an antiques emporium in London’s Mayfair in 1950. While the company has since grown and added many more strings to its illustrious bow, its love of old and traditional things is still clear to see. Halcyon Days has its own team of skilled artists and craftsmen – who also carry out a bespoke service. he brand holds three Royal Warrants – to Her Majesty he Queen, His Royal Highness he Duke Of Edinburgh and His Royal Highness he Prince of Wales. Halcyon Days is the only Warrant-holding supplier of objets d’art to the Royal Family. halcyondays.co.uk


TATLER • PROMOTION

WEDGWOOD What could be more British than an afternoon tea? Warm scones smothered in clotted cream and jam, triangular sandwiches and tier after tier of sugary cakes. Delicious. And what better to serve it on than Wedgwood. he most prestigious ceramics house has become a by-word for elegant tableware. Josiah Wedgwood began the legacy in 1759 as an independent potter. He became a pioneer of the ceramics industry, turning his craft into both an art form and a commercial enterprise. Wedgwood has graced the Vatican, the Kremlin and the White House and is instantly recognisable in some of the world’s most renowned hotels. From pretty pin-striped saucers to blossoms blooming over teacups, every set is creative brilliance. he brand also enjoys an enduring connection with the Royal Family. he ‘Queen’s Ware’ collection is named after Queen Charlotte who ordered the cream-coloured earthenware. Today, Wedgwood holds a Royal Warrant to Her Majesty he Queen for tableware and giftware. wedgwood.co.uk


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PHOTOGRAPHS: HUGO BURNAND/GETTY IMAGES, DOUGLAS MILLER/KEYSTONE/GETTY IMAGES

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An official portrait to mark the 60th birthday of the Prince of Wales, 2008. Opposite, on stage at Trinity College, Cambridge, 1970

Everyone thinks heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a prince with a passion for plants and polo who has spent a lifetime fretting. But in reality he is upbeat, laughs easily and has achieved huge amounts while waiting for the top job. By royal biographer Hugo Vickers ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

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Left, Charles with Princess Anne in Malta, 1954. Below, at Cambridge, 1969

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s the nation pauses to celebrate the Queen’s 90th birthday, her eldest son finds himself 67 years old and the longestserving Prince of Wales. The reign of Elizabeth II has lasted 64 years so far. Some say that Charles longs to take over, others that he dreads the day. Fortunately, there is no hint that things will not continue as they are for years to come. We live in a golden age created by the Queen. Personally, I hate to consider ‘transition’, but there are many who spend time working out what will happen when this reign draws to its close, which, like that ever-rolling stream, inevitably, eventually, it must. In preparation for these changes, there have been developments. The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall have been present at all the State Openings of Parliament since 2013, a reminder that one day Charles will not be sitting silently in a chair at the side, but reading the speech from the throne. The Queen has taken him to two Commonwealth Heads of Government Meetings (CHOGM),

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and he presided alone at the meeting in Sri Lanka in 2013. In Malta, at the CHOGM in 2015, she commended his commitment to the Commonwealth: ‘Nor could I wish to have been better supported and represented in the Commonwealth than by the Prince of Wales, who continues to give so much to it with great distinction.’ At Buckingham Palace he undertakes investitures on her behalf. It is undeniable that relations between Buckingham Palace and Clarence House (the Prince’s London office) were not always in tune. But that has changed. And if there was a moment when popular opinion surged towards Charles, it occurred at the Diamond Jubilee concert, after which he struck absolutely the right note in expressing his warm admiration for his mother. ‘This is our opportunity to thank you and my father for always being there for us, for inspiring us with your selfless duty and service, and for making us proud to be British,’ he said. Furthermore, he expressed his concern for his absent father, the Duke of Edinburgh, then suffering from a serious chill in King Edward VII Hospital: ‘Ladies and gentlemen, if we shout loud enough he might just hear us in hospital.’ It worked. The nation warmed to these remarks.

A mere year before, at the time of the Royal Wedding, the press continually asked me: ‘Surely William will be the next King? Surely Charles will be passed over in the succession?’ Since I am still asked this, even by people who should understand the laws of succession, I stress that Charles will automatically become King. So long as he declares his intention to serve at the Accession Council, and then in Parliament, and he takes the Coronation Oath (the few stipulations that were put in place by acts such as the Bill of Rights and the Act of Settlement, etc), then of course he will be crowned. And so he should be, since he is extremely well qualified for the job, and besides, it would be very hard for the much younger Duke of Cambridge to follow his very experienced grandmother. Incidentally, despite what may have been suggested back in 2005, the Duchess of Cornwall will automatically become Queen and there is every possibility that she will be crowned alongside him in Westminster Abbey. The only way that Charles will not succeed as King is if he predeceases his mother. It might also be worth stating that the Queen will never abdicate. She is an anointed sovereign (unlike her step-down European ]

PHOTOGRAPHS: PRESS ASSOCIATION, GETTY IMAGES

The Queen and the Prince of Wales at the Chelsea Flower Show, 1998


Prince Harry and the Duke of Cambridge with Ant and Dec, 2015

[counterparts in the Netherlands, Belgium and Spain). Should she be unable to carry out her duties there would be a regency, as was the case in 1811 with George III and the future George IV. Happily, the Queen is more than switched on, and there is not a hint that such a solution will be required. This is a superb example, incidentally, of why no one should ever retire. he Royal Family underwent difficult times in the Eighties and Nineties, but as the Queen reaches this milestone birthday, she must be pleased that matters are very different now. The press have not used the word ‘dysfunctional’ in connection with her family for many years, for the reason that

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it is now in excellent shape. Her steadfastness and her clear sense of duty about what it means to be a monarch are the qualities that have brought her to this position. Even those who dislike the institution of monarchy can but respect a lady who has done her bit for Britain for more than 64 years. It must have required considerable strength of character at times, but the future is well set. So what is that future? What kind of a man will we get? No one would suggest that Charles is an easy character. His two marriages have provided enough controversy to last a lifetime. He has been criticised for interfering in government matters, for decrying architectural monstrosities and for stirring up trouble. He can be indecisive and his team do not always

interpret his wishes correctly. (If he lived in the 12th century, there might have been a few dead Beckets around.) Those are the negatives. On the other hand, he has been ahead of his time in matters of conservation and climate change, and he has extracted millions of pounds from benefactors – or ‘Bond villains’, as his team apparently call them – for his charities, such as the Prince’s Trust. In the quest to raise the profile of this work, last year he gave access to those two cheeky chappies of jungle TV, Ant and Dec. In When Ant and Dec Met The Prince: 40 Years of the Prince’s Trust, shown on ITV in January, the Geordie duo adopted the pose of two ingénues never before let loose inside a royal residence. This was Charles’s way of reaching out to a new generation and highlighting 40 years of the charity, which he started in 1976 with severance pay from his five years in the Royal Navy. The Prince told of one man loaned £5,000 18 years before, now turning over £70m. The message came across. He was trying to help ‘the hardest to reach… giving attention to those who don’t get it’. Not everyone had taken him seriously in the early years of the project. As he put it: ‘The story of my life. You have to overcome people who don’t see the point.’ The programme gave us the chance to hear the Duke of Cambridge praise his father: ‘He’s got an insurmountable amount of duty in him, he’s incredibly driven to do his duty… [He’s] taken so many knocks over the years.’ It also highlighted another recent enthusiasm: Dumfries House, the Palladian mansion in Ayrshire, which was due to be sold, with its outstanding collection of 18th-century furniture sent to auction. In 2007, the Prince put together a consortium and rescued not only the house but also the contents. The aim is to make it a self-supporting enterprise, providing employment for the local community. Meanwhile, the Prince relies on generous sponsors, entertaining them there in his ]

PHOTOGRAPHS: REX FEATURES, HULTON ARCHIVE

Left, the Queen with Sir Winston Churchill, Anne and Charles, 1954. Above, the Duchess of Cornwall and the Prince of Wales in Delhi, 2013


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The Prince of Wales taking a flying lesson, 1968

[quest for open wallets – to the point that one jester has nicknamed it ‘Dum-fleece House’. Charles has numerous interests. He loves art and classical architecture. He likes to listen to music. He has sponsored an art school, and he has a personal harpist. He contributes greatly to the artistic life of Britain. He knew Yehudi Menuhin, Noël Coward and John Betjeman and he painted with Derek Hill. He was an admirer of the cellist Jacqueline du Pré and heard her play before she was struck down with multiple sclerosis. In his long years as heir to the throne – an apprenticeship of more than six decades, you could say – he has always been a serious and concerned figure. He is not a playboy like Edward VII or Edward VIII. He is something of a traditionalist. He has travelled the world and the Commonwealth and he has met world leaders since he was a small boy. Not many people can say they met Winston Churchill at such a young age, or chatted with men such as Richard Nixon, President Makarios of Cyprus, or Marcos of the Philippines. All that experience he brings to his role. Maybe it is forgotten now that he went through his full time at Gordonstoun (which he hated); that when serving in the Royal

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Navy, he was parachuted into the sea; that he was a skilled polo player, took some bad spills in steeplechases and qualified as a jet pilot. He has visited government departments, served as a Counsellor of State and even spent a few days and nights with crofters in the Outer Hebrides. e is aware that he can be a catalyst and convenor for good causes. He’s one of a handful of people (former US President Bill Clinton is another) for whom people will sit around the table together. In 2009, he held a summit for his Rainforest Project – in one room discussing it were the likes of Angela Merkel, Nicolas Sarkozy, Kevin Rudd, Silvio Berlusconi and Hillary Clinton. He made a considerable impact by appearing in person in the flooded Somerset Levels in 2014. Politicians took note and £140m was granted towards the damage. His influence extends across the Commonwealth and into countries such as Romania, where he launched an educational charity last year. In Canada he set up the Prince’s Charities Canada, which has achieved a great deal over four decades. Charles knows that his main contribution will be as Prince of Wales. When he becomes

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King, he understands that he must be more circumspect. He once declared: ‘I think you could invest the position with something of your own personality and interest but obviously within the bounds of constitutional propriety.’ Apparently, he wanted to go and see the play King Charles III in the West End but could not find a way of doing so incognito. It showed a man being forced to abdicate for being too overtly political and refusing to sanction legislation passed by Parliament. Charles will not fall into that kind of trap. As King, he will suddenly be a new man. When he married Camilla Parker Bowles in 2005, she changed more or less overnight from being the divisive mistress into the supportive wife. Albert, Prince of Wales, was a wastrel as heir to the throne who became a respected ambassador for Britain as Edward VII. The Duke of Windsor was a charming Prince of Wales, an anxious and tetchy King Edward VIII and a forlorn and whining man in the exile that followed his abdication. It will be interesting to see what kind of king Charles makes, though there is no hurry to find out. Meanwhile, he has declared his mission to be a ‘desperate desire to put the “Great” back into Great Britain.’ (

PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES

He is a skilled polo player, took some bad spills in steeplechases and qualified as a jet pilot


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SILVER LININGS From a small cutlery workshop in 1755 to a globally recognised jewellery brand today, Mappin & Webb has a fascinating history charted by intricately crafted pieces

TIMELINE ILLUSTRATION BY DANIEL COOK

Illustrations by PETRA DUFKOVA


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BY ROYAL APPOINTMENT Since 1897, Mappin & Webb has held a Royal Warrant as silversmiths. During its 240th anniversary year, Mappin & Webb was granted a Royal Warrant as jewellers, goldsmiths and silversmiths to Her Majesty The Queen.


EVERYTHING YOU’VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT THE DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE. PROBABLY. BY CLARE BENNETT

K AT E OPE ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


Left, the Duchess of Cambridge at the premiere of Spectre, October 2015

PHOTOGRAPHS: RICHARD GOLDSCHMIDT/PIQTURED, © 2011 THE MIDDLETON FAMILY/GETTY IMAGES, ALPHA

ONCE UPON A TIME ...

E DI A

#Catherine Elizabeth Middleton was born on 9 January 1982 at the Royal Berkshire Hospital, in Reading, the eldest child of Carole and Michael Middleton. #Kate is a Capricorn. #One of her earliest memories is of the white-marshmallow rabbit cake her mother baked her for her seventh birthday. #Her favourite dressing-up outfit was a pair of clown dungarees made by her grandmother.

THERE WAS A YOUNG GIRL # In 1984, when Kate was two years old, the family moved to Amman in Jordan for two and a half years, where she attended nursery school. #Once back in England, Kate went to St Andrew’s School, near Pangbourne. She was tremendously sporty, getting stuck into tennis, netball, hockey and the high jump, breaking the school record for her age group. #After a brief spell at Downe House, she went to Marlborough College, where she is said to have once mooned the boys from her window. #Her school nickname was ‘Princessin-waiting’. #The poster she had on her wall at school was not of Prince William, as her future husband once joked, but of a Levi’s model.

WHO FOUND A PRINCE ...

LEFT, KATE (FAR LEFT ) WITH HER SISTER, PIPPA, AND FATHER, MICHAEL, IN JORDAN, 1986. RIGHT, AT ST ANDREW’S SCHOOL, PANGBOURNE, C.1990 (FRONT ROW, LEFT )

#During her first year at St Andrews University, in 2001, Kate lived in St Salvator’s Hall – the same hall of residence as Prince William. #She was named the prettiest girl at St Salvator’s. #Her first boyfriend was another St Andrews student, Rupert Finch, who is now married to Natasha Rufus Isaacs, the Marquess of Reading’s daughter. #Her romance with William was revealed after they were pictured on a skiing holiday in Klosters. Their first public kiss was photographed in the same town two years later. ]

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At the Six Nations rugby tournament, 2007

The Reiss dress worn by Kate in her official engagement photos was, at one point, selling at the rate of one a minute.

#Everyone says that Kate is the better skier, and even William agrees. He also says that she’s better than him at tennis. #Kate and William went to their final May Ball dressed as Scarlett O’Hara and Rhett Butler.

Below, Kate, far right, at the Concert for Diana, 2007

AND NEARLY LOST HIM #Kate’s first jobs after university were working for the family business, Party Pieces, and as a buyer for Jigsaw. #She had panic buttons installed in her Chelsea flat in 2005 by the police. By 2007, Kate and William’s relationship had started to suffer because of his Army commitments and press intrusion, and the couple split up after a skiing holiday in March of that year. #In June, Kate was spotted in the royal box at the Concert for Diana, two rows back from William. #Their friend Sam Waley-Cohen brokered their reunion at a party thrown at his family’s mansion in Oxford. #Kate first met the Queen at Peter Phillips and Autumn Kelly’s wedding in May 2008. #In January 2010, William moved to Anglesey for his RAF search-and-rescue posting, and the couple rented a cottage in Bodorgan from Sir George Meyrick.

Kate is related to George Washington. They are cousins eight times removed. She’s also distantly related to Beatrix Potter.

William’s nickname for his wife is supposedly ‘Babykins’. She, it is said, calls him ‘Big Willie’.

BUT HE PUT A RING ON IT #William proposed to Kate next to a lake on the slopes of Mount Kenya in October 2010. #Kate’s engagement ring, famously her late mother-in-law’s, is a Garrard design made of a 12ct Ceylon sapphire surrounded by 14 solitaire diamonds and set in 18ct white gold. She had it resized for fear it would fall off. It was originally bought for £28,000 and is now valued at around £300,000. #Her first official engagement as the fiancée of the future monarch was the naming ceremony and service of dedication for Hereford Endeavour, a lifeboat in Anglesey. #Kate did not sign a prenup. ]

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As a brand, the Duchess of Cambridge is said to be worth an estimated £4.7bn to the UK economy – and £1bn to the fashion industry alone.

PHOTOGRAPHS: PRESS ASSOCIATION, REX FEATURES, GETTY IMAGES

RIGHT, PRINCE WILLIAM AT ST ANDREWS UNIVERSITY, 2003. BELOW, KATE’S EX-BOYFRIEND RUPERT FINCH

Leaving her Chelsea flat, 2007

DID YOU K NOW?


THE LOBBY LOUNGE

THE GRAND HOTEL WITH A HEART The Full Moon chandelier created by Parisian designer Chafik Gasmi. A single red crystal bauble amongst a thousand represents the heart of London’s 21st Century Grand Hotel. Welcome to Corinthia London.

CORINTHIA HOTEL LONDON, WHITEHALL PLACE, LONDON SW1A 2BD, UK +44 (0) 20 7930 8181 | RESERVATIONS.LONDON@CORINTHIA.COM | CORINTHIA.COM /LONDON


AND TWO BILLION PEOPLE CAME TO THEIR WEDDING ABOVE, THE DUKE AND DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE ON THEIR WEDDING DAY, 2011. BELOW, AT THE PREMIERE OF AFRICAN CATS, LONDON, 2012

#Kate and William were married on 29 April 2011 at Westminster Abbey. Their wedding was attended by 1,900 guests and watched by two billion people worldwide. #Kate’s ‘something blue’ was a ribbon sewn into the inside of her dress, and the Queen lent her her Cartier ‘halo’ tiara. #The bride’s dress was designed by Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen. It had a nine-foot train. #Kate’s wedding ring is a band of Welsh gold made by Wartski, who also created the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall’s wedding rings. #The new Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s first dance was to Ellie Goulding singing Elton John’s ‘Your Song’. #The couple also performed a dance routine to ‘You’re The One That I Want’ from Grease, miming the words and pointing at each other. #Kate will eventually become the sixth Queen Catherine – but the first-ever queen with a degree.

Kate is allergic to horses.

She holds an Advanced Open Water Diver qualification, which means she can dive to a depth of 30 metres.

...THEN THEY WERE FOUR

AND THEY ALL LIVED HAPPILY EVER AFTER *

Above, at Princess Charlotte’s christening, 2015. Right, cheering a British victory at the 2012 Olympics

#The couple were given Apartment 1a at Kensington Palace in November 2011. Renovations took 18 months and cost an estimated £4.5m. The family moved in in October 2013. #Kate can often be spotted shopping with George and Charlotte at the Spar in Dersingham, Norfolk, now that the family is living at Anmer Hall, on the Sandringham Estate, while William is based with the East Anglian Air Ambulance. She is also said to visit the local garden centre because she is growing organic vegetables, and she likes to browse the antiques shops in Holt and Fakenham. #Don’t be surprised if you find her standing in the queue at JE Howard family butcher and village store in West Newton, Norfolk, in skinny jeans, gum boots and minimal, if any, make-up. Royal protection officers, while always present, keep an appropriate distance so she can go about relatively unnoticed. #Kate and William sometimes have dinner with friends at the local pubs like the Crown Inn or the King’s Head, but in a private room so they don’t attract attention. #Kate has an annual pass to Snettisham Park, where she takes George to the petting zoo. ( * SO FAR, SO GOOD.

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The Duchess’s sausage-and-mash suppers are legendary. Her favourite drink is said to be a Jack Daniel’s and Coke.

William once said that Kate could ‘dance me under the table’.

Kate’s favourite TV programmes are ‘Downton Abbey’, ‘Homeland’, ‘The Apprentice’ and ‘Keeping Up With the Kardashians’.

PHOTOGRAPHS: K IS FOR KATE, MIRROR PIX, REX FEATURES, GETTY IMAGES

#Following their marriage, the couple continued to live in Anglesey for another two years – and Kate was seen darting around the local Waitrose just a couple of days after they returned from their honeymoon. #George Alexander Louis was born on 22 July 2013 in the Lindo Wing at St Mary’s Hospital, Paddington. #Charlotte Elizabeth Diana was born on 2 May 2015. #Kate and William’s spaniel Lupo was given to them as a present by Kate’s parents. Lupo’s mother is the Middletons’ dog, Ella.


460 years of combined creative heritage DESIGN CENTRE, CHELSEA HARBOUR SAMUEL-HEATH.CO.UK MADE IN ENGLAND


PARTY ANIMALS

We’re off to London to visit the Queen, so we are wearing our sparkliest things

Styled by AILSA MILLER

THIS PAGE, PRINCESS PUSSYCAT, FR OP, PLATINUM, DIAMOND & SAPPHIRE EARRINGS, £26,500, BY BOODLES. PLATINUM & DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA, BY GRAFF. PLATINUM & DIAMOND BUTTERFLY BROOCH, £39,100, BY TIFFANY & CO.

Photographed by EMMA TODD

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OPPOSITE PAGE, OP, HRH RABBIT, FR WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRINGS, £16,500, BY ASPREY. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & SAPPHIRE CUFF, £39,950, BY MAPPIN & WEBB. BARON BADGER, FR TOP, PLATINUM & DIAMOND RING, POA, BY DE BEERS. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & PEARL BRACELET WATCH, £130,500, BY PATEK PHILIPPE


Je w e l l e ry

Puppets by LOUISE BURGESS ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


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Je w e l l e ry

THIS PAGE, THE DUKE OF D TIAN, STUD EARRINGS ON HAT, FR TOP, GOLD, DIAMOND & LEMON QUARTZ; WHITE GOLD, DIAMOND & BLUE TOPAZ; WHITE GOLD, DIAMOND & LAVENDER AMETHYST; WHITE GOLD, DIAMOND & WHITE TOPAZ; WHITE GOLD, DIAMOND & GREEN AMETHYST; GOLD, DIAMOND & PERIDOT; GOLD, DIAMOND & CITRINE, ALL £795 PER PAIR, BY KIKI MCDONOUGH. JUGGLING BALLS: PLATINUM, WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND BROOCH, POA, BY CARTIER. BROOCH, AS BEFORE, BY TIFFANY & CO OPPOSITE PAGE, THE X, FR OP, ROSE-GOLD & PINK-SAPPHIRE EARRING, £10,920 (FOR PAIR), BY WILLIAM & SON. PLATINUM, PINK& WHITE-DIAMOND & MORGANITE BROOCH, POA, BY DAVID MORRIS. PLATINUM, DIAMOND & CHRYSOPRASE BRACELET, £228,000, BY TIFFANY & CO. OP, SIR SPANIEL, FR WHITE-GOLD & DIAMOND EARRING (AROUND HAT), £6,750 (FOR PAIR), BY ASPREY. PLATINUM, DIAMOND & EMERALD CUFF, POA, BY BOODLES FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK IN MAIN MAGAZINE. PUPPETS BY LOUISE BURGESS AT WINI-TAPP PUPPETS ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


Be au t y PRINCESS BE ATRICE

Great favourites Secrets of the royal beauty cabinet.* By Katie Thomas

T H E QU E E N There are 78 bathrooms in Buckingham Palace, and there’s a bar of Yardley’s lavender soap in every single one. Some call it old-fashioned – the Queen calls it good sense.

Yardley English Lavender Luxury Soap, £7.99 for three

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Princess B just loves a holiday (see page 72), which can take its toll on pale skin. But Beatrice is no fool. She stocks up on Clarins’ high Clarins SPF sunscreen to Sun Care protect her delicate Milk-Lotion Spray SPF50, £19.50 complexion.

PR INC E G E ORG E Kent

Bronnley

Baby Brush and Comb Set, £5

Lemon & Neroli Hand & Nail Cream, £5

Here’s a chap who really likes to get his hands dirty... in his garden. Pruning the hydrangeas, repotting the money plants and pulling up the cabbages. So you’d think he’d have calluses, or at least dry skin. You’d be wrong, though, because he’s regimental about applying hand cream after a hard day’s work.

THE DUK E OF C AMB R IDGE THE DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE Never one to be caught looking out of sorts or, worse, pasty, Kate keeps a bronzer in every handbag. Just in case. She’s clever like that.

P RIN C E H A RRY

William is loyal, he perseveres and he wouldn’t dream of leaving a man behind. And that’s why he’s never giving up on his follicles.

Harry knows that girls don’t kiss boys with rough facial hair. So he softens his stubble with Dr Harris Hair Lotion. Success is guaranteed.

Truefitt & Hill

DR Harris

Hair Management Thickening Shampoo, £16

Bay Rum Hair Lotion with Oil, £17

THE DUKE OF E DI N BURGH Penhaligon’s Juniper Sling Eau de Toilette, £115 for 100ml

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Prince Philip is partial to a G&T at cocktail hour. Not surprising, then, that the sharp whiff of juniper is in his preferred cologne. Manly.

Elizabeth Arden Sunset Bronze Prismatic Bronzing Powder, £28

*WE SUSPECT. PHOTOGRAPHS: GETTY IMAGES, REX FEATURES, FEATURE FLASH, CORBIS, PIXELEYES

T H E PR I N C E O F WA LE S


TATLER â&#x20AC;˘ PROMOTION

MAJESTIC MALTA This sun-drenched archipelago is an inviting mixture of stunning architecture, hidden lagoons and mouth-watering cuisine. Discover the Mediterraneanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crowning glory...

M

THE CITY OF MDINA. BLUE LAGOON. TRADITIONAL LUZZU BOATS. ST JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CO-CATHEDRAL, VALLETTA

alta was a British overseas territory until 1964. In the late Forties and early Fifties, Her Majesty The Queen lived in Guardamangia, in Maltaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Valletta, while His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh was based there with the Royal Navy. Malta continues to have a very special place in the hearts of the British people. Essentially, it is a relationship between two islands â&#x20AC;&#x201C; one rainsplashed, one sun-soaked. Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t visited yet? Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re missing out. Here we draw up an LWLQHUDU\ÂżWIRU5R\DOW\

GETTING AROUND MALTA Chill out like a real islander and slow things down. This is a place made for exploration by foot or bike. At just 316 square kilometres, Malta is small â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but there is lots to see.

WHERE TO STAY 9DOOHWWDLVDJRRGSODFHWRVWDUW7KLVIRUWLÂżHG city, perched above the sparkling waters of the Mediterranean Sea, is the capital of Malta. A UNESCO World Heritage site, it was built by the Knights of St John and boasts winding cobbled streets brimming with artworks, statues, fountains and, of course, plenty of bustling markets. St Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Co-Cathedral is packed to the rafters with glinting treasures, exquisite tapestries and paintings by Caravaggio. For HTXDOO\PDJQLÂżFHQWDFFRPPRGDWLRQZK\QRW skip along to Casa Ellul. This family-run affair within the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s walls combines boutique charm with high-octane glamour. Everything is clean lines and elegant shades. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s super-chic and even has a spa. Sublime.

NOT TO BE MISSED Tear yourself away from Valletta to explore Mdina â&#x20AC;&#x201C; another gem. The walled town is chock-full of medieval and baroque architecture and quaint little restaurants. Located on a hill, it offers an unparalleled view of the island. Freestanding megalithic temples â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they are the oldest in the world â&#x20AC;&#x201C; hark back to ancient times. The Three Cities (Vittoriosa, Senglea and Cospicua) are a trio of harbour towns steeped in history. Vittoriosa, with its newly restored marina, is postcard-perfect. Watch the brightly FRORXUHGOX]]RV ÂżVKLQJYHVVHOV FKXJLQIURP the sea then sample the fresh catch at the local restaurants. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve fallen in love with Malta, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll adore her sister island Gozo, just a 25-minute ferry jaunt away.

For more information on Malta, check out visitmalta.com


REGAL PIECES

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TATLER • PROMOTION

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ESSENCE BANGLE (£49) WITH 14CT-GOLD AND STERLINGSILVER CHARMS (FROM £45). ON CHESS BOARD (LEFT TO RIGHT), 14CT-GOLD RADIANT ELEGANCE STUDS, £149. FORGET-ME-NOT RING, £99. STERLING-SILVER STACKING RING, £55. MOTHER-OF-PEARL FLORAL STUDS, £40. STERLING SILVER DAISY STUDS, £30. CHESS BOARD AND PIECES BY PURLING LONDON PURLINGLONDON.COM

For information, visit pandora.net


R OY A L FL A S H One is never knowingly underdressed...

ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


Slug SILK GOWN, POA, BY LUISA BECCARIA. LAPIS-LAZULI & GREEN-PERIDOT EARRINGS, POA, BY ATELIER VERSACE JEWELLERY

Styled by SOPHIE GOODWIN

Photographed by STEPHANE GALLOIS

ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


THIS PAGE, SILK DRESS, POA, BY GILES. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & PINK-SAPPHIRE EARRINGS, POA; WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND & PINK-SAPPHIRE NECKLACE, POA, BOTH BY CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY OPPOSITE PAGE, COTTON DRESS, £4,865, BY RALPH LAUREN COLLECTION. VINTAGE PETTICOAT, FROM A SELECTION, AT WILLIAM VINTAGE. DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA; DIAMOND NECKLACE, POA; DIAMOND RING, POA, ALL BY ATELIER VERSACE JEWELLERY ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


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OPPOSITE PAGE, EMBROIDERED SILK-JACQUARD DRESS, £11,400, BY DELPOZO

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THIS PAGE, SILK DRESS, £5,015, BY OSCAR DE LA RENTA. DIAMOND EARRINGS, POA; DIAMOND RING, POA, BOTH BY ATELIER VERSACE JEWELLERY OPPOSITE PAGE, EMBROIDERED SILK TOP, £470; EMBROIDERED SILK SKIRT, £1,170, BOTH BY CAROLINA HERRERA. GOLD, DIAMOND, TOURMALINE & RUBELLITE EARRINGS, POA, BY DIOR JOAILLERIE. VELVET SHOES, POA, BY ULYANA SERGEENKO ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


Slug

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EMBROIDERED SILK-ORGANZA DRESS, POA, BY GIAMBATTISTA VALLI. WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND, PINK-SAPPHIRE & OPAL RING, POA; WHITE-GOLD, DIAMOND, PURPLE-SAPPHIRE & PEARL EARRINGS, POA, BOTH BY CHANEL FINE JEWELLERY. CROCHET SHOES, £625, BY TABITHA SIMMONS FOR STOCKISTS, SEE ADDRESS BOOK IN MAIN MAGAZINE. HAIR BY DAVID WADLOW AT PREMIER HAIR AND MAKE-UP, USING SHOW BEAUTY. MAKE-UP BY LIZ DAXAUER AT CAREN, USING CHANEL S/S 2016 & NO. 5 BODY CREAM. MODEL, EMELINE GHESQUIERE AT OUI MANAGEMENT. PRODUCTION, M B K. FASHION ASSISTANT, POM OGILVY ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6


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Granny

TA K ES A TR IP Wh e re d o the yo u ng roy al s e nj oy a little off-du t y dow n t ime? And whe re d o e s t h e Qu e e n m i n i bre ak ? If you w an t t o bu mp i nt o H M o r an H R H o n h o l iday, look no fur th er th an t his d e f i n it i ve gu i d e to re gal re l axing. T h ey are q uit e good a t it . By Franc i s c a Ke l l e t t and Luc iana Bellini

ON SAFARI K ENYA Who The Duke of Cambridge loves Kenya, and the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy in particular. He spent part of his gap year there, and proposed to the Duchess of Cambridge at the rustic Rutundu log cabins, high up on the slopes of Mount Kenya. The Queen is a fan too, and was famously at Treetops Hotel in Aberdare National Park when her father died. How Make nice with Jecca Craig, an old pal (and rumoured old flame) of William’s, whose father, conservationist Ian Craig, founded Lewa. The Duke stays in the family’s private lodgings when he’s there. When July to October is the cool, dry season – all the better for spotting wildlife (and royals).

ABOVE, THE LEWA WILDLIFE CONSERVANCY. RIGHT, A LOG CABIN AT RUTUNDU IN KENYA

SOUTH A F R I CA Who Prince Harry’s ex, Chelsy Davy, divides her time between London and Cape Town, and he hung out with her family when he last visited. He’s got a soft spot for the whole region – he hearts Lesotho, and gave an emotional speech at the opening of the Mamohato Children’s Centre there last November. The Earl and Countess of Wessex like gamespotting in Kwandwe, in the Eastern Cape, and Zara and Mike Tindall’s favourite hotel is the Four Seasons Westcliff in Johannesburg. How Try the Sentebale Polo Cup, where Harry likes to swing his stick about. Otherwise, head to where the rhinos are – he recently spent some time working on the Wilderness Safaris rhino projects. When Christmas and New Year are HOT. Clifton, in Cape Town, is the place to show off. I totes love Cornwall ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

White rhino in the Lewa Conservancy. Above, the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh on safari, 1979. Left, the Prince of Wales in Kenya, 1971


Tr av e l

Princess Margaret in Sardinia, 1967. Right, Margaret with Lord and Lady Glenconner eating macaroni cheese on Macaroni beach on Mustique in the Sixties

ON THE BEACH

PHOTOGRAPHS: JOE SOHM, SERGE LEMOINE & POPPERFOTO/GETTY IMAGES, EYEVINE, FRANS LANTIG/NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC, REX FEATURES, ALBANPIX.COM, SLIM AARONS/GETTY IMAGES, SOLARPIX.COM, THE SUN/NI SYNDICATON, INSIGHT NEWS AND FEATURES, VANTAGE NEWS

M UST IQ UE Who Lord Glenconner started it all by buying the island in 1958. And then he invited his fabulous pals to come and play – Princess Margaret among them. Her former villa, Les Jolies Eaux, is available for rent, FYI. Who goes now? Everybody. In terms of royals, Kate and Wills are big fans – they’ve visited a dozen times, give or take, and Prince George had his first ever holiday abroad there in 2014. The Middleton clan have been coming for yonks, and all met there last year to celebrate Carole’s 60th. They’re often seen hanging out at the island’s hotspot, Basil’s. How Everyone stays in villas and everyone congregates at Basil’s come sundown. When Christmas, New Year and Easter. The February blues festival at – you’ve guessed it – Basil’s is fun: Sir Mick Jagger has been known to grab the mike; Daphne Guinness might leap up for a song; the Middletons are likely to take to the floor for a family boogie in their tennis gear, post-match.

I B I ZA Who Way back in 2006, Kate and Wills stayed in Kate’s colourful uncle Gary Goldsmith’s villa, the infamous Maison de Bang Bang (get your minds out of the gutter, people – Gary insists the name alludes to the island’s music scene). More recently – in 2014 – the Earl and Countess of Wessex took their children on a yachting holiday around the Balearics, and last summer Princess Beatrice was spotted on Roman Abramovich’s £1.5bn whopper of a superyacht with her boyfriend, Dave Clark. She also had a lounge on Oprah’s yacht. How By boat – the smartest set arrive on their yachts. When In the height of summer, when the nights are at their most raucous: a good starter party is the Groucho Club Summer Party every August, where you might find Mario Testino getting down with Jade Jagger, or Sophia Hesketh and Jazzy de Lisser dancing on chairs. ]

Wait, this is so not Cornwall

HONOURABLE MENTIONS N E C KE R I S L A N D Branson’s bolthole in the BVIs is where Diana, Princess of Wales took a tiny Harry and Wills in 1990. Princess Beatrice goes to hang out with pal Holly Branson.

COSTA S ME R A LDA The Aga Khan put this Sardinian spot on the map and Princess Margaret loved it. The Danish and Saudi royal families are regulars, and the Duke of York is keen on the Cala di Volpe hotel.

ABOVE, KATE & WILLIAM IN IBIZA, 2011. BELOW, LORD SNOWDON IN COSTA SMERALDA, 1970

ST BARTHS Because of Abramovich’s New Year’s Eve parties – you’ll bump into countless A-listers (including PRINCE. The musician. See what we did there?). Oh, and Princess Beatrice, probably, with Derek Blasberg and Bee Shaffer.

CO R N WA LL Thanks to the Rock scene in the late Nineties (take a bow, Harry and William), and THIS picture, below , of Harry bodyboarding on Polzeath in 2012.

T H E SOUTH O F F R A N C E Which Diana loved. Kate and Wills have stayed at Viscount Linley’s chateau in Provence and Harry hung out on a yacht in St Tropez with Ben Goldsmith and Jemima Jones in 2014. And yes, Princess Beatrice is a regular.

RIGHT, DAVE CLARK & PRINCESS BEATRICE ON OPRAH WINFREY’S YACHT IN IBIZA, 2015. LEFT, PRINCE HARRY IN POLZEATH, 2012

Is it?


Chalet Helora in Verbier. Right, Pippa Middleton, who has completed the Cresta

HONOURABLE MENTIONS VERB IER

LEFT, THE PRINCE OF WALES IN KLOSTERS, 1980. RIGHT, KATE & WILLIAM SKIING, 2007

in the Kulm Hotel, or King’s Club (très appropriate) in Badrutt’s Palace. When Late January for the Snow Polo World Cup, held on the frozen lake; February for the Cresta.

The Duke and Sarah, Duchess of York recently bought Chalet Helora, where Prince Harry hangs out with Emma Pilkington, Astrid Harbord, Holly Branson and cousins Beatrice and Eugenie.

A SPEN Princess Beatrice. Again.

AT SEA ON THE SLOPES K LOST E R S

Who The Prince of Wales and the Duchess of Cornwall. It’s Charles’s favourite ski resort in the WORLD. He skied here with the PalmerTomkinson family at a young age, and still visits every year – they even named a gondola after him. Princes William and Harry learned here and still visit, as do the usual suspects (the Duke of York and Princess Beatrice). Lots of Euros too. How The Prince of Wales likes skiing on the Madrisa, so keep your eyes peeled. Chesa Grischuna is the go-to après joint (it’s chilled – no dancing on the tables, please), and the only racing club worth knowing about is Marden’s, run by Clair Southwell, Charles’s former PA – sign up your kids when they’re tiny. Casa Antica was once the Duke of Cambridge’s favourite club, and you may still find him there in his fleece, having a sneaky Jägerbomb. And do try to get invited to the drinks parties at the big-name chalets – Chalet Bear, owned by Gilly Norton, and Haus Alpina, Chrissie Rucker’s place. Oh, and everyone shops at the Co-op. When The whole point of Klosters is that it’s low key, so any time between Christmas and March.

ST M O R I TZ Who Zara Tindall, Lord Frederick Windsor, the Earl and Countess of Wessex – Sophie is the honorary president of the St Moritz Tobogganing Club, AKA the Cresta Run. How Become a temporary member of the Cresta – the most famous (and most dangerous) downhill toboggan race in the world – and rub shoulders/broken legs with the likes of Count Luca Marenzi, Lord Dalmeny, Lord Wrottesley and Constantin von Liechtenstein. Ladies can take part just once a year, and Pippa Middleton did it six years ago. The Corviglia Ski Club is the swankiest of the lot – founded in the Thirties by a Shell heiress and now presided over by Prince Augusto Ruffo di Calabria, it includes the Aga Khan and Princess Caroline of Monaco as members. At night, everyone decamps to the Dracula club, run by Rolf Sachs, son of Gunter, Where am I?

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THE OUTE R HEBRIDES AN D BE YOND Who The Princess Royal and Sir Timothy Laurence are avid sailors, and bought a new boat, a Rustler 44, in 2014. The Outer Hebrides is their favourite destination, and the couple spend at least a week zipping around the islands every summer. Zara Tindall has caught the bug, and has taken part in the Artemis Challenge around the Isle of Wight. The less, ahem, understated members of the family prefer their boats bigger: superyachts have been big hits with everyone from Diana to the Duke of York, Princess Beatrice and the Wessexes. The Queen likes the prettily old-fashioned Hebridean Princess, a converted car ferry, which she has chartered for big family get-togethers. How The yacht clubs are where you want to be. Poshest of the lot is the Royal Yacht Squadron on the Isle of Wight, which can claim the Queen as its patron. The Royal Thames Yacht Club is another sure-fire hit – the Duke of York is a regular at the Knightsbridge HQ. Or see if you can bag yourself an invitation onto one of the mega-yachts – HMS Mahiki, for example, where Prince Harry and Princess Beatrice partied in 2014 in Abu Dhabi. When Cowes Week, in early August, at which the Gosh, Cornwall’s highlight is the Royal Yacht Squadron Ball, where you’re changed BOUND to bump into someone royal. The Hebridean Princess on Loch Fyne, 2007


Tr av e l The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh and, below, the Duke with Princess Anne, at Balmoral, 1972

European ROYALS AND W HER E THEY G O T HE SWEDES Wi nt er Skiing in St Moritz is a favourite, and the family usually decamps to Suvretta House hotel and hires private guides for the slopes.

Su m m er Last year, Prince Carl Philip looked dangerously hot in his trunks on the deck of a yacht moored off St Tropez. The whole clan usually gathers at Villa Mirage, their retreat in SainteMaxime, just opposite St Tropez.

IN THE COUNTRYSIDE

T HE MONEGASQUES Wi nt er

PHOTOGRAPHS: PERRY OGDEN, NI SYNDICATION, REX FEATURES, PATRICK LICHFIELD/GETTY IMAGES, ALAMY, SPREAD PICTURES, XPOSUREPHOTOS.COM

NO RF O LK Who What with Sandringham and Anmer Hall, this is fertile royal-spotting ground. How Bag an invitation to stay at one of the mega-statelies or book into the Hoste in Burnham Market (aka ‘Chelsea-on-Sea’). Kate loves the Old Stables antiques shop in Bayfield Hall (where Camilla buys her Christmas presents), and the colourful Wiveton Hall Café. The Queen is more reclusive, though she’s been known to have lunch with her neighbours and the county’s most glamorous pin-ups, the Marquess and Marchioness Cholmondeley, at Houghton Hall. When Christmas and New Year. The Cokes at Holkham Hall throw the most fun New Year’s Eve parties (think bullshots, roast pheasant and walks on their beach), and Greville Howard’s annual football match in Castle Rising is the place to be on Christmas Eve – even the Duke of Cambridge takes part.

CARL PHILIP IN ST TROPEZ, 2015

The family visit Zürs every year – Princess Caroline is the keenest skier.

Su m m er Prince Albert and Princess Charlene either go to off-thebeaten-track places like Telemark in Norway, where they stayed at the Kragerø Resort, or stay close to home in Monaco or St Tropez, generally on a yacht.

PRINCESS CAROLINE, WITH DOG, IN ZURS, 2013

T HE DANES Wi nter Prince Frederik and Princess Mary go to Verbier every year with their four children. Mary’s birthday is on 5 February, so the family travel down in time to celebrate it.

Su m m er Holkham Hall

SCOT L A N D Who Balmoral has been the holiday home of choice for the Queen I can see Rock! forever, and Kate and Wills often join her in the summer with sprogs in tow. Just down the road is Birkhall, Charles and Camilla’s lodge, where they spent their honeymoon in 2005. HONOURABLE How Again, it’s all about bagging an invitation to a castle or a grand MENTION house. If you get the choice to stay at either royal residence, plump for Birkhall – it’s much comfier than Balmoral, with highRO MA N I A The Prince of Wales fell in threadcount sheets and proper food. Pay a visit to the MacphersonGrant family’s distillery, Ballindalloch, opened by the Prince of love with Transylvania in 1998, and now owns two Wales last year, or see if you can pop into Candacraig House, where he’s been known to drop in on pal Billy Connolly (Connolly sold restored 400-year-old cottages there that you can the house in 2014 but still keeps a cottage in the grounds). rent. Viscri is his original When In August, which is reeling month, so get a ticket to one of house, and you can sleep the balls – the Oban and the Skye are two of the grandest. There’s in HIS ACTUAL BED. Not also the Tartan Heart Festival, held by Joe and Leonie Gibbs at with him, though. Belladrum, their fairytale estate near Inverness. Or try a spot of flyfishing on the River Dee – one of the Queen’s favourite pastimes.

The Danish royals are big fans of a staycation, taking their holidays at their summer home, Grasten Palace, in the Jutland region of southern Denmark.

PRINCESSES MARY & JOSEPHINE IN VERBIER, 2015

T HE S PANIARDS Wi nt er

The family owns a chalet in Spain’s top ski resort, Baqueira Beret, where King Felipe and Princesses Elena and Christina whizz down the slopes.

Su m m er The Spanish monarchs always holiday at their place in Mallorca, Marivent Palace, on the headland next to Cala Major. If our summer house looked like that, we’d go every year too. (

THE SPANISH ROYALS IN MALLORCA, 2013

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Karen Deeks brings you nothing but the best for the Queen’s birthday celebrations

TOP OF THE FROCKS

THE ITLIST The Queen’s corgis and dorgis board a Land Rover at Aberdeen Airport in the Eighties

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his Hale dress from DAKS is a cunning creature. Observe the pleats. Admire the bow collar. Pine after the art-deco print. It planned to ensnare you. None of this is an accident, so you might as well give in and get it. daks.com

£55, BY PANDORA

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f you feel like parking your diamonds for the evening, these new sterling-silver Radiant Elegance earrings by Pandora, £55, will step up to the plate. Terribly smart without being overdressy. A pair of lifesavers. pandora.net

£565, BY DAKS

POSH GEAR We are v excited about the new Range Rover Evoque convertible, £47,500. It’s so smart it could take your child’s Common Entrance and get a scholarship. This is not a picture of it, but we liked the corgis (still buy the new car, though). landrover.com

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wning this brandnew white-gold and diamond Cartier Hypnose watch means nothing bad can ever happen to you ever again. This is because you will be protected by the forcefield of glamour for eternity. cartier.co.uk £20,100, BY CARTIER £795, BY SMYTHSON

SMART CASUAL

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mythson make everything look good in leather. If they made a replica of you out of leather, you would be obsessed with it. While we wait for that technology, here is their supersoft-calfskin and bonded-suede Albemarle bucket bag. smythson.com

TWO SUGARS, PLEASE £65,000, BY THEO FENNELL

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OH YOU PRETTY THING

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orevermark’s ethically sourced diamonds are the elite. Less than one per cent of the world’s diamonds pass their perfection test, so you can imagine the quality we’re talking. That’s why Theo Fennell has chosen them to partner with for a marvellous new collection, including this sleek white-gold tiara. theofennell.com

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£15, BY FORTNUM & MASON

o celebrate the Queen being our longest-serving monarch, Fortnum & Mason bring us this Queen’s Blend Tea. Quite delicious. fortnumand mason.com

PHOTOGRAPHS: TIM GRAHAM/GETTY IMAGES

Once upon a time, there was a dry cleaners called Jeeves of Belgravia. They were so good that they caught the attention of a prince called Charles.‘Splendid work,’ he said, and awarded them with a Royal Warrant for their services to our clothes. jeevesofbelgravia.co.uk


The Ritz, 1906

LA VIE EN ROSE

POA, BY GARRARD

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ime has never looked rosier. Trust Rolex to knock it out of the park with its Everose gold. The Lady-Datejust 28 is one of the lucky beneficiaries of this exclusive creation. Magical. rolex.com

GET IN THE RING

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PUTTIN’ ON THE... £17,150, BY ROLEX

Our monarch is not the only one with a big birthday this year – the Ritz is turning IIO. Cele brate both with a two-night stay, from £4,660, and receive an invitation to HM’s official birthday celebrations in the grounds of Windsor Castle from 12-15 May. The Queen herself is going on the 15th. theritzlondon.com

DO SIT ON THE GRASS Decoration, diversion and a divine red for a birthday picnic

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LIGHT AS A FEATHER, SOFT AS A FEATHER AND, APTLY, ALSO COVERED IN FEATHERS, THIS HANDMADE SCARF BY PURDEY, £295, IS OF ENGLISH STOCK AND WOULD LOOK TERRIBLY PRETTY ON A PRETTY BIRD LIKE YOU. PURDEY.COM

arrard has been making kings and queens across the globe shinier and prettier with its jewellery for nearly 300 years. This is its relaunched 1735 Marguerite diamond and sapphire ring – so dazzling, it practically comes with a kingdom. garrard.com

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ome to us, Mappin & Webb Aster collection. Shower us with sparkling kisses and spoil us with flowers. Wait – not actual flowers, the diamond kind, obviously. Like this platinum floral pendant and its pretty twin pals, these earrings. mappinandwebb.com £2,440, BY CASSANDRA GOAD

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3 2

WE ALL LOVE BACKGAMMON. OF COURSE WE DO. BUT WE REALLY LOVE THIS LEATHER AND SUEDE TRAVEL BACKGAMMON ROLL, £145, FROM THOMAS LYTE. YOU’LL WANT TO TAKE IT EVERYWHERE – AND YOU CAN. THOMASLYTE.COM

CORNEY & BARROW HAS BEEN IN THE GAME LONG ENOUGH – 230 YEARS TO BE EXACT – TO HAVE EARNED ITS PLACE AS ONE OF THE UK’S FINEST WINE MERCHANTS. SAMPLE THIS TRADITIONAL HOUSE CLARET, £9.25, AND YOU’LL KNOW WHY. CORNEY ANDBARROW.COM

EARRINGS, £3,250; & NECKLACE, £1,850, BOTH BY MAPPIN & WEBB

assandra Goad roams the globe gathering materials and inspiration to make beauties like these Volo d’Angelo gold and lapis-lazuli earrings. Wearing them is like going on a Grand Tour. cassandragoad.com

GW Scott invented the wicker picnic basket, and even made wicker sculptures to jazz up the Mall for the Queen’s coronation. The company closed for a bit, but is relaunching with two new hampers. Such is the power of the Queen turning 90. gw-scott.com ROYA L S P EC I A L 2 01 6

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years

90 years

Coloured in by..........................

ILLUSTRATION: JAY DIZZLE

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