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Transformation 2013 Design Challenge Planning Form Guide Design Challenge Title: Light Up my Life! Teacher(s): Pamela Miller School: Harlandale High School Subject: Current Electricity Abstract: Students will apply their knowledge of current electricity to design circuits for a model home.

MEETING THE NEEDS OF STEM EDUCATION THROUGH DESIGN CHALLENGES

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Begin with the End in Mind The theme or “big ideas” for this design challenge: Students will apply their knowledge of current electricity and electric circuits to circuit design in homes. TEKS/SEs that students will learn in the design challenge: §112.47. Physics. 6) Science concepts. The student knows forces in nature. The student is expected to: (E) design and analyze electric circuits;

Key performance indicators students will develop in this design challenge: Vocabulary development (current, amperes, resistance, voltage, resistor, resistivity, circuit, series circuit, parallel circuit, electric power, Ohm’s Law, electric potential), analyze various circuits using Ohm’s Law, design circuits that include independently operating elements 21st century skills that students will practice in this design challenge: www.21stcenturyskills.org Written and oral communication, collaboration, problem solving skills, critical thinking STEM career connections and real world applications of content learned in this design challenge:

Careers: Electrician, Electrical Engineer Connections: It is important for a home owner to be aware of basic wiring and electrical issues in the home, especially when making home improvements that involve an electric element.

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The Design Challenge If the Thermodynamics PBL unit was completed (building model home), use scenario 1: Scenario 1: Now that you know how your home design stands up to the heat, the next step is for you to wire your home with electricity. You and your roommates are tired of using candles after dark! Each room must have its own light that operates independently of the lights in other rooms. If the Thermodynamics unit was not completed, use scenario 2: Scenario 2: You are building your dream home, and it has come time to wire it with electricity. You want to get it right the first time, so you build a model of the house to practice your circuit design on. Your house has 7 rooms: 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, a kitchen, a dining room, and a living room. You need a light for each of the rooms and for the front door. All of these lights must operate independently of each other.

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Map the Design Challenge Taught before the project

Taught during the project

1. Vocabulary development (current, amperes, resistance,

X

X

voltage, resistor, resistivity, drift speed, electric power, Ohm’s Law, series circuit, parallel circuit, electric potential) 2. Analyze various circuits using Ohm’s Law.

X

X

3. Design circuits that include independently operating elements

X

X

Already Learned

Performance Indicators

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Team-Building Activity It is important that teachers provide team-building activities for students to help build the 21st Century Skills that are necessary for success in the workforce. Team-building helps establish and develop a greater sense of cooperation and trust among team members, helps students adapt to new group requirements so that they can get along well in a new group, serves to bring out the strengths of the individuals, helps identify roles when working together, and leads to effective collaboration and communication among team members so that they function as an efficient, productive group. Our students are often not taught how to work in groups, yet we assume that they automatically know how. Use team-building activities with your students so that you can see the benefits which include improvement in planning skills, problem solving skills, decision making skills, time management skills, personal confidence, and motivation and morale. Use the “Cup Stack Team-Building� Activity below to help develop teamwork among your students.

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Cup Stack Team-Building Activity Objectives:  Participants work together in teams to accomplish a timed task.  Participants practice effective communication skills.  Participants reflect on one’s participation in a teamwork setting. Group Size: 3 to 4 participants (ideal is 4 participants) Materials: You will need a watch or clock with a second hand or a timer/stopwatch to time 1 minute 15 seconds. Each team will need 15 foam cups and a rubber band with 4 strings attached like rays of sun.

string

Setup:  Cut string into 2-foot lengths. Tie four strings to the rubber band evenly spaced around the circle. It should look like a sun with four rays coming out. Rubber band  Divide the cups into stacks of 15. Procedures:  Explain to the class that they will participate in a team-building activity that focuses on accomplishing a task and communication.  Distribute a set of materials to each team. Explain that the task is to build a pyramid using the cups with a 1 minute 15 second time limit. The pyramid will begin with 5 cups in a row at the base, 4 cups on the next row, 3 cups in the middle row, then 2 and finally 1 cup at the top. Group members may not touch the cups with their hands or any part of their body, even if the cups fall. Each person may only hold the end of one string attached to the rubber band (unless group size is 3 and then one participant may hold 2 strings). Group members must work together to stretch and relax the rubber band to grab each cup and place the cup in the right place.  When groups are ready, give them 30 seconds to practice and plan.  At the end of 30 seconds, have them disassemble their practice pyramid. When they are ready, start timing 1 minute 15 seconds. When time is up, stop the activity and check each team’s progress.  Debrief the activity with these questions: o Was anyone frustrated at all during the activity? If so, how was it handled? o Why is teamwork so important for this activity? o Did any team come up with a strategy for working together as a team? If so, what was the strategy? o Are you ever in a situation where you must use teamwork? Is it always easy for you? Why or why not? o What are some skills needed to be good at teamwork? o How did you contribute to your team? Did you give suggestions? Lead or follow? Encourage or cheer? o How would you do the activity differently if you were asked to do it again?  Reset and repeat the activity. Give teams 30 seconds to strategize before starting the time. After the task, debrief with these questions: o Did your teamwork improve this time? How and why did it improve? o Why is good communication important to accomplishing this task? o How would you use this in your classroom, on your campus, or with other teams?

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5-E Lesson Plan Design Challenge Title: Light Up My Life! TEKS/TAKS objectives: §112.47. Physics 6E

Engage Activity: Show students a “Visual Electricity Demonstrator” (Arbor Scientific) connected to a hand generator and a light bulb in series. Turn the generator both fast and slow, and have students make observations. Point out to the students that the bulb lights immediately when the handle of the hand generator begins to turn—this shows that electric charges are already present in the wires, the hand generator simply acts as the driving “force”. Turn the handle rapidly to light the bulb, and then stop. This demonstrates direct current (DC). Move the handle back and forth. Have the students note the flickering of the bulb and the behavior of the lights on the electronic display. Move the handle of the generator back and forth more rapidly. This demonstrates alternating current (AC) and the behavior of electric charges in an AC situation. Have students reflect on the demonstration by composing a journal entry. www.brainpop.com Science video—“Current Electricity” Students will watch video and either write down five interesting facts as they watch the video, or complete the quiz after viewing the video Introduce the Design Challenge If the Thermodynamics unit was completed (building model home), use scenario 1: Scenario 1: Now that you know how your home design stands up to the heat, the next step is for you to wire your home with electricity. You and your roommates are tired of using candles after dark! Each room must have its own light that operates independently of the lights in other rooms. If the Thermodynamics unit was not completed, use scenario 2: Scenario 2: You are building your dream home, and it has come time to wire it with electricity. You want to get it right the first time, so you build a model of the house to practice your circuit design on. Your house has 7 rooms: 3 bedrooms, 1 bathroom, a kitchen, a dining room, and a living room. You need a light for each of the rooms and for the front door. All of these lights must operate independently of each other. If students are working on scenario 2, group students at this point and have them draw a floor plan (to scale) that meets the requirements and start building their model. The model should not exceed dimensions of 24 in. x 36 in.

Engage Activity Products and Artifacts: Journal entry Video notes or quiz For Scenario 2: Floor plan, Model

Engage Activity Materials/Equipment Visual Electricity Demonstrator, hand generator, light bulb, computer with internet access, brainpop access, projector

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Engage Activity Resources Visual electricity demonstrator http://www.arborsci.com/detail.aspx?ID=532 Demonstrations for Visual electricity demonstrator http://amasci.com/viselect/vedemos.html www.brainpop.com

Explore Activity: Students should work in groups of 2-3. Instruct the students to connect the battery, the light bulb and wires (as many as necessary) to light the bulb. Have students draw a diagram of their set up in their notebooks. Explain that they have completed a simple circuit. Ask students to find a way to add a second light bulb to their circuit (most groups will create a series circuit). Have students describe any changes to the intensity of the light in their notebooks. Ask students to remove one bulb from its socket. What happens to the other light? (It goes out.) Have students record their observations in their lab notebook. Next, ask students to build a circuit where individual lights could “burn out” (be removed from their sockets) without affecting the other lights in the circuit. Have students draw a diagram of their working circuit in their lab notebooks. Ask students to add a third light bulb to their design. Have students describe any changes to the intensity of the light in their notebooks. Ask students to remove all lights except one from their circuit. Have students describe any changes to the intensity of the light in their notebooks.

Explore Activity Products and Artifacts: Diagrams and written observations from lab activity

Explore Activity Materials/Equipment Insulated wires (10 wires, 3-4 in. per group), 3 light bulbs (per group, Christmas lights work-strip ends of wires), 1-9V battery or C battery in battery holder (1 per group)

Explore Activity Resources http://www.math.ucdavis.edu/~daddel/linear_algebra_appl/Applications/Electrical_Circuits/Electrical_Circ uits.html

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Explain Activity: Students will need their notes from the previous day’s lab. Students will take Cornell notes on the PowerPoint Presentation “Electric Current and Circuits”. Students will be assigned #1 and 7 of “Energy Use of Home Appliances” for homework. Students will complete “Energy Use of Home Appliances” in groups on the following day.

Explain Activity Products and Artifacts: Cornell notes Revised Lab diagrams “Energy Use of Home Appliances”

Explain Activity Materials/Equipment “Electric Current and Circuits” PowerPoint presentation, computer with PowerPoint, projector, “Energy Use of Home Appliances” Handout

Explain Activity Resources “Electric Current and Circuits” PowerPoint Additional Practice Problems http://www.physics.uoguelph.ca/~phyjlh/Prob/Problems.html Instructions for Cornell notes http://coe.jmu.edu/learningtoolbox/cornellnotes.html

Elaborate Activity: Provide Students with the rubric before they begin. The “Light Up My Life! Home Design” rubric will be used if you are using scenario 2 and building the models during the unit. The “Light Up My Life! Wiring Rubric” will be used for both scenarios after wiring is complete. Students will draw plans for wiring their model homes that meet requirements in design challenge scenario. No more than two 9V batteries may be used. Students will wire model homes based on their diagrams. Students will need to provide their own 9V batteries to use as a power source. No more than two 9V batteries may be used.

Elaborate Activity Products and Artifacts: Wiring Diagrams Wired model homes

Elaborate Activity Materials/Equipment Multiple rolls of insulated wire (or aluminum wire), Christmas lights (ends stripped) or LEDs, wire strippers, model homes

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Elaborate Activity Resources http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/circuits/circuitstoc.html

Evaluate Activity: Students will write an essay describing how their project relates to the terms and concepts learned during this unit. (See assignment sheet). This can be done in class or as a homework assignment. If you have a multimeter that measures resistance, students can measure the resistance provided by one bulb and then actually calculate the equivalent resistance in their circuit(s) and the current using Ohm’s Law.

Evaluate Activity Products and Artifacts: Student Analysis of Home Wiring Project

Evaluate Activity Materials/Equipment Student models, multimeter

Evaluate Activity Resources http://www.glenbrook.k12.il.us/gbssci/phys/Class/circuits/circuitstoc.html

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Energy Use of Home Appliances 1. List the appliances that your group has researched with their volts, amps, and watts included. Appliance Voltage (Volts) Current (Amps) Power (Watts)

2. Which types of appliances seem to use the most power? _______________________ 3. Your television plugs into a 120 V outlet and draws 0.3 A. What is the resistance of the circuit? Include the formula!

4. You want to know what the power of your hair dryer has, but all you can find on the label is that the amperage is 10A. If your household circuit delivers 120 V, what is the power of the hair dryer? Include the formula!

5. If a 7 W electric toothbrush was used 0.08 h/day how much energy would it use in one day? How much would it use in one month? Include the formula!

6. Your new energy-efficient system (solar power) has a maximum load limit of 2400 W. Which appliances can you have running at one time without exceeding this load (i.e. blowing a fuse)?

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7. For homework, research and find out your kWh rate. With your parents' help, look at your electric bill and find out how much each kWh costs you.

8. Complete the following table; be reasonable, if you live in a cold area, you need a heater, and if you live in a hot area, you need an air conditioner. You also must have lights in your home, one in each room. Use the following formula to estimate the amount of energy a specific appliance consumes: Wattage x Hours Used Per Day = Daily Kilowatt-hour (kWh) consumption (1 kilowatt (kW) = 1,000 Watts) Multiply this by the number of days you use the appliance during the year for the annual consumption. You can then calculate the annual cost to run an appliance by multiplying the kWh per year by the cost per kWh consumed. Refer to your most recent energy bill for the latest kilowatt-hour rate. Appliance

Power (Watts)

÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷ ÷

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Convert to kW 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000 1000

x

#hours/ day

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x X X X X X X X X X X

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kWh rate (from bill see #7)

=

Cost per day

= = = = = = = = = =

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Light Up My Life! Home Design You are building your dream home, and it has come time to wire it with electricity. You want to get it right the first time, so you build a model of the house to practice your circuit design on. 1) Gather materials appropriate for your model. 2) In addition to these materials, find a shoebox that you can use as a starting point. 3) Your model must be to scale, and must be based on your scale drawing. 4) You must include windows, doors and a roof. All of windows must be covered. The door must be able to close. 5) You must have a bedroom for each group member (minimum of 3), a kitchen, a bathroom, a dining room, and a living room.

Category

1

2

3

4

Materials

Materials are not

Half of materials

More than half of

All materials used are

appropriate for

appropriate

are appropriate

materials are

appropriate

home

appropriate

structure/design Doors windows and Doors/windows

Doors/windows

Doors/windows cut

Meets all

roof

Drawn only, roof

drawn only, roof

out but not covered,

door/window/roof

missing

present

roof present

requirements

Not built to scale,

Scale information

At least half of

Entire model is built to

scale information

included, but

home is built to

scale specified by the

not included on

inaccurate

scale specified by

builder

Built to Scale

model

Overall design

builder

Home is poorly

Home is sturdy, but

Home is sturdy and

Home is sturdy and all

constructed using

not all building

more than half of

building materials are

inappropriate

materials are

building materials

appropriate

materials

appropriate

are appropriate

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Analysis of Home Wiring Project On a separate sheet of paper, write an essay describing how your project relates to the terms and concepts learned during this unit. The essay should be at least two paragraphs (5-7 sentences each) and should address each of the following: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Did your model use direct or alternating current? Why? (3 pts) Which circuit element provided electric potential? (2 pts) Which circuit element(s) was a source of resistance? (2 pts) Describe how you would find the equivalent resistance of your complete circuit. (2 pts) 5. How could you use Ohm’s law to calculate the amount of current flowing through your circuit (s)? (2 pts) 6. How did you incorporate series and/or parallel circuits in your home wiring? Why did you choose this design? (4 pts) Total Points:

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Plan the Assessment Engage Artifact(s)/Product(s): Journal entry, Brainpop notes/quiz, Floor plan/Model (for scenario 2)

Explore Artifact(s)/Product(s): Lab notes and diagrams

Explain Artifact(s)/Product(s): Cornell notes, revised Lab diagrams, “Energy Use of Home Appliances”

Elaborate Artifact(s)/Product(s): Wiring diagrams, wired model homes

Evaluate Artifact(s)/Product(s): Student Analysis of Home Wiring project

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Rubric Light Up My Life! Wiring Rubric Now that you know how your home design stands up to the heat, the next step is for you to wire your home with electricity. You and your roommates are tired of using candles after dark! Each room must have its own light that operates independently of the lights in other rooms.

CATEGORY Wiring -Materials

4 Appropriate materials were selected and creatively modified in ways that made them even better.

Wiring - Care Taken

Great care taken in construction process so that the structure is neat, attractive and follows plans accurately.

Wiring Function

Wiring functions extraordinarily well, holding up under atypical stresses. All rooms independently wired.

Modification/Testing

Clear evidence of troubleshooting, testing, and refinements based on data or scientific principles.

Clear evidence of troubleshooting, testing and refinements.

Plan

Plan is neat with clear measurements and labeling for all components.

Plan is neat with clear measurements and labeling for most components.

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3 Appropriate materials were selected and there was an attempt at creative modification to make them even better. Construction was careful and accurate for the most part, but 1-2 details could have been refined for a more attractive product. Wiring functions well, holding up under typical stresses. Most rooms independently wired.

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2 Appropriate materials were selected.

1 Inappropriate materials were selected and contributed to a product that performed poorly.

Construction accurately followed the plans, but 3-4 details could have been refined for a more attractive product.

Construction appears careless or haphazard. Many details need refinement for a strong or attractive product.

Wiring functions pretty well, but deteriorates under typical stresses. Lass than half of rooms independently wired. Some evidence of troubleshooting, testing and refinements.

Fatal flaws in function with complete failure under typical stresses. Rooms are not independently wired. Little evidence of troubleshooting, testing or refinement.

Plan provides clear measurements and labeling for most components.

Plan does not show measurements clearly or is otherwise inadequately labeled.

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Story Board 

Day 1 Cup-Stack Team Building Activity (30 Minutes) Visual Electricity Demonstratio n (10 min.) Journal Entry on demonstration (5-10 min.)

Week 1 Activities (based on 50 minute periods)

Week 2 Activities

Day 6 Students go over the previous day’s homework in groups and complete “Energy Use of Home Appliances” (30 min) Students complete wiring plan (15 min)

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Day 2 BrainPop video “Current Electricity” (5-10 min) Introduce design challenge (15 min) If using Scenario 2, give students the rest of the class period to draw a floor plan and come up with a materials plan. Homework: students bring materials for next class period (25 min.) If using Scenario 1, begin the Explore “Circuit Building Activity (25 min.) Skip to Day 4.

Day 7 Students begin wiring home. Make sure students make note of plan modifications (45 min)

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Day 3 Students will use materials gathered from home to build model homes based on scaled floor plan (50 min.)

Day 4 Start/Finis h Explore Activity (20-45 min).

 

Start Explain PowerPoi nt with Cornell notes (2545 min.) 

Day 8 Students finish wiring home. Make sure students make note of plan modifications (45 min)

Day 9 Students complete “Analysis of Home Wiring Project” (45 min)

Day 5 Start/Finish Explain PowerPoint with Cornell notes (25- 45 min.) Use remaining time for student groups to develop wiring plan. (5-25 min.) Homework: #1 and 7 of “Energy Use of Home Appliances”

Day 10

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Electric Currents