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Transformation 2013 PBL 5E Planning Form Guide PBL Title: Case of the Wiped out Cotton Crop Teacher(s): Robert Marak; edited by Transformation 2013 T-STEM Center School: Taylor High School Subject: Biology Abstract: A farmer has discovered that a portion of his cotton crop has been wiped out by a pest. The students, working in teams, determine three possible solutions, at least one of which is organically acceptable, for pest management and to prevent further crop destruction. A comparison of options should be provided, including cost and environmental risk assessment. Through their research, students learn about ecology, symbiotic relationships and agricultural engineering.

MEETING THE NEEDS OF STEM EDUCATION THROUGH PROBLEM BASED LEARNING Š 2008 Transformation 2013

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Begin with the End in Mind The theme or “big ideas” for this PBL: A farmer has discovered that a portion of his cotton crop has been wiped out by a pest. The students, working in teams, determine three possible solutions, at least one of which is an organically acceptable, for pest management and to prevent further crop destruction. A comparison of options should be provided, including cost and environmental risk assessment. Through their research, they will learn about ecology, symbiotic relationships and agricultural engineering. TEKS/SEs that students will learn in the PBL: Biology: 12b: interpret interactions among organisms exhibiting predation, parasitism, commensalism, and mutualism 12c: compare variations, tolerances, and adaptations of plants and animals in different biomes 12e: investigate and explain the interactions in an ecosystem including food chains, food webs, and food pyramids. Key performance indicators students will develop in this PBL: 1. Students will identify multiple forms of symbiosis (predation, parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) that occur on a cotton plantation. 2. Students will evaluate multiple alternatives for pest management and their respective effects on ecosystems. 21st century skills that students will practice in this PBL: www.21stcenturyskills.org Health Literacy: Understanding national and international public health and safety issues Information Literacy: Accessing information efficiently and effectively, evaluating information critically and competently and using information accurately and creatively for the issue or problem at hand Life and Career Skills – Leadership and Responsibility: Acting responsibly with the interests of the larger community in mind

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STEM career connections and real world applications of content learned in this PBL: Agricultural Scientists, Integrated Pest Management, Agricultural Engineering, Farming

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The Problem A farmer has discovered that a portion of his cotton crop has been wiped out by a pest. The students, working in teams, determine three possible solutions, at least one of which is organically acceptable, for pest management and to prevent further crop destruction. A comparison of options should be provided, including cost and environmental risk assessment. Through their research, students learn about ecology, symbiotic relationships and agricultural engineering. .

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Map the PBL Already Learned

Performance Indicators

Taught before the project

Taught during the project

1. Students will identify multiple forms of symbiosis (predation,

X

parasitism, mutualism, and commensalism) that occur on a cotton plantation. 2. Students will evaluate multiple alternatives for pest

management and their respective effects on ecosystems.

X

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.

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5E Lesson Plan PBL Title: Case of the Wiped out Cotton Crop TEKS/TAKS objectives: Biology: 12BCE Engage Activity Instruct students to create a table in their journal with the following headings: Organisms Involved/How the Organisms Interact /Type of Symbiosis Show short video showing relationships between organisms, such as “Ant and Butterfly Symbiosis”. Challenge the students as they watch the video to record in their journal all the organisms that are identified in the video and how they interact with one another. For example, the plant produces sugar that the ant eats; the ant protects the plant from predators. After the video is over, randomly pick students to share the relationships they observed. All students should make additions to their lists if necessary. When the student describes the relationship, hold up and read a card with the type of symbiosis that is represented in the description. Using the example above, you would hold up a card saying “mutualism” and state “both of the organisms benefit from the relationship.” Students at this point fill in the type of symbiosis term next to the example provided in their journal. Teacher explains that these natural relationships are often exploited in organic farming pest management techniques. In this lesson, working in teams, you will provide a solution to the following problem: “A local cotton farmer recently discovered that his crop has been partially destroyed, costing him thousands of dollars in lost profits. He has provided you a photo of the pests that have infested his crop. Your job as the local agriculture county extension agent is identify the pest responsible for the crop loss and recommend three solutions, at least one of which is an organically acceptable method, to prevent further damage. You have a deadline to meet, as each day that passes results in additional crop loss to the farmer.” Inform students that in addition to their report, they will present their findings to a panel of experts in the field of cotton production and organic farming techniques. Engage Activity Products and Artifacts Journal entry from video

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Engage Activity Materials/Equipment Computer with internet connection, student journals, symbiosis cards (mutualism, commensalism, predation, and parasitism) Engage Activity Resources Ant and Butterfly video available online at : http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/player/animals/bugs-animals/ants-andtermites/ant_caterpillarsymbiosis.html Explore Activity Complete “Learning Activity 1, steps 1-7” available at: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/lessons/symbiotic-strategies/lesson-activities/1495/. Teacher instructions are available at the website provided. Explore Activity Products and Artifacts Ecological Relationships Student Organizer – pasted in journal Explore Activity Materials/Equipment Student handout: Ecological Relationships Student Organizer, student journals, glue Explore Activity Resources Ecological Relationships Student Organizer available online: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/files/2008/08/ecological-relationships-studentorganizer_jsb.pdf

Explain Activity Complete “Learning Activity 2, steps 1-3 and Learning Activity 3, step 1” available at: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/lessons/symbiotic-strategies/lesson-activities/1495/. Teacher instructions are available at the website provided. Instruct students to record the following terms: vector, predation, competition, mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism. Instruct students to provide a brief descriptor of the terms in their own words in their journal.

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Explain Activity Products and Artifacts Journal entry Explain Activity Materials/Equipment Student journal Explain Activity Resources none Elaborate Activity Form groups of 3-4 students. Explain that each group will be investigating the case of the wiped-out cotton crop, an ecosystem thrown out of balance by an infestation of pests. Their task is to research the case and formulate an action plan outlining three possible actions that the farmer could take to eliminate the pests and prevent further crop destruction. The action plan can be presented in a variety of modes of presentation (PowerPoint, Video, Podcast, Poster, etc). Distribute the “Cotton Crop Action Plan Student Organizer” and a pest picture (appendix 1) to each group and go over the instructions as a class, giving each group a different pest as the culprit. Students will use resources (library, internet, local extension offices, etc.) to find a suitable solution for the problem. Instruct students to keep a research log as journal entries, reminding students that proper citation of resources is required. Assign a date for class presentations. Provide the students with in-class and homework time to complete their research and plan their presentations, emphasizing that experts in the field of cotton farming, pest management, and agricultural engineering will be evaluating their action plan presentations. Elaborate Activity Products and Artifacts Cotton Crop Action Plan Student Organizer, research logs as journal entries Elaborate Activity Materials/Equipment Cotton Crop Action Plan Student Organizer, pictures of cotton pests, student journals

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Elaborate Activity Resources Field Guide to Predators, Parasites, and Pathogens Attacking Insect and Mite Pests of Cotton: http://lubbock.tamu.edu/ipm/AgWeb/videos/Cotton/pdf/E-357.pdf Cotton Facts: http://www.earthsake.com/cotton_facts.html Texas State Fiber and fabric: http://www.statesymbolsusa.org/Texas/Cotton.html Cotton articles: http://southwestfarmpress.com/cotton/ Demand for organic cotton: http://www.organicconsumers.org/articles/article_2417.cfm Bat study results: http://www.txfb.org/TexasAgriculture/2004/091704/091704batstudy.htm Cotton pests and diseases: http://r0.unctad.org/infocomm/anglais/cotton/crop.htm ECONOMICS OF THE COTTON BOLL WEEVIL CONTROL IN THE TEXAS HIGH PLAINS http://www.aaec.ttu.edu/Publications/2001Beltwide/D031.PDF Predator Cockroaches Roam Texas Cotton Fields : http://www.extension.org/pages/Predator_Cockroaches_Roam_Texas_Cotton_Fields

Evaluate Activity Create a video, podcast, poster, pamphlet, PowerPoint, or other mode of presentation highlighting what they found, what they propose as solutions, and which solution they recommend most highly and why. On the assigned date, have each group present its case. Allow for class and expert feedback and discussion. What do the students think of the action plans? What do the experts think of the action plans? Use the “Cotton Crop Pest Management Action Plan Assessment Rubric” to aid in assessing the presentations. Evaluate Activity Products and Artifacts Pest Management Action Plan presentation Evaluate Activity Materials/Equipment Cotton Crop Pest Management Action Plan Assessment Rubric Evaluate Activity Resources Integrated Pest Management (IPM): http://www.epa.gov/pesticides/factsheets/ipm.htm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_pest_management Cooperative Extension System Offices by State: http://www.csrees.usda.gov/Extension/

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Plan the Assessment Engage Artifact(s)/Product(s): Journal Entry; Uses complete sentences, thorough

Explore Artifact(s)/Product(s): Ecological Relationships Student Organizer; completed in full

Explain Artifact(s)/Product(s): Journal entry; Uses complete sentences, thorough

Elaborate Artifact(s)/Product(s): Cotton Crop Action Plan Student Organizer, Research Logs as journal entries

Evaluate Artifact(s)/Product(s): Pest Management Action Plan presentation; addresses all criteria set forth in problem definition

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Rubrics Engage, Explain, Elaborate: Journal Entry DIRECTIONS: Read each statement below. Indicate from the following rating scale that best reflects your assessment of the student's work. 1=Weak 2=Somewhat Weak 3=Average 4= Strong 5=Very Strong 1. The topic of the journal entry meets the requirements of the assignment. 1

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4. The organization of the journal entry is clear and easy to follow. 1

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5. The journal entry flows smoothly from one idea to another. 1

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6. The spelling, grammar, and punctuation in the journal are accurate. 1

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7. The journal entry is neatly handwritten. 1

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8. The effort put forth has demonstrated the full potential of the student's capability. 1

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Total Score: _____/40 x 100 = _______%

Explore: Ecological Relationships Student Organizer Teacher answer key available at: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/files/2008/08/teacher-answerkey_jsb.pdf

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Evaluate: Cotton Crop Action Plan Assessment Rubric Criterion

Score, from 1-5: 1= element is missing 2= minimally satisfies 3=partially satisfies 4=mostly satisfies 5= fully satisfies

1.

Is the threat to the cotton crop clearly explained?

2.

Are the at-risk species named and their risk clearly described?

3.

Are the symbiotic relationships present clearly defined in the presentation?

4.

Are the consequences that might result if no protective action is taken described at the species level and at the ecosystem level?

5.

Are at least three possible actions named that could help prevent these consequences?

6.

Is the first action logical, reasonable, and feasible (relying on resources currently available, such as current and/or emergent technology)?

7.

Is the second action logical, reasonable, and feasible?

8.

Is the third action logical, reasonable, and feasible?

9.

Does the group outline at least one best solution that the farmer might take immediately to make an impact on the cotton crop and provide justification?

10.

Overall, does the presentation seem high quality? (Is it well organized? Do students speak clearly and project their main points? Do they use visual aids effectively, and respond to questions from the class and experts?) Total (maximum: 50)

_________________

Grade (Total score x 2, maximum= 100)__________

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Story Board (45 – 55 class periods) 

Day 1 Engage activity

Day 2 Explore activity

 

Week 1 Activities

 Week 2 Activities

Day 6 Elaborate research /work on presentations continued

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Day 7 Elaborate complete presentations

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Day 3 Explain activity Elaborate (reintroduce problem and begin research)

Day 4 Elaborate research continued and begin working on presentations

Day 5 Elaborate research/wor k on presentations continued

Day 8 Presentation Day

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Appendix 1 Team Members: Class Period: COTTON CROP ACTION PLAN STUDENT ORGANIZER Your assignment:

A local cotton farmer recently discovered that his crop has been partially destroyed, costing him thousands of dollars in lost profits. He has provided you a photo of the pests that have infested his crop. Your job as the local agriculture county extension agent is to characterize the pest responsible for the crop loss and recommend three solutions to prevent further damage, at least one of which is an organically acceptable method. Additionally, make your recommendation as to best solution and support your reasons for your choice. You have a deadline to meet, as each day that passes results in additional crop loss to the farmer.

 

Research the case using classroom and web-based resources. Based on your research, prepare a presentation, in a format of your choice, for the class and panel experts in which you describe the type of pest infestation and suggest THREE possible actions that could be taken to restore the balance of the ecosystem.

The presentation should address all of the following points: 1) What is the threat to the cotton crop? 2) What are the possible consequences to the cotton crop if nothing is done to address this problem? 3) What types of symbiotic relationships exist in the problem and your solution? 4) Suggest THREE possible actions that humans could take to restore the balance of the ecosystem, at least one of which must be an organic solution. State your case as to which is the BEST solution and why. PEST INVESTIGATED:

Notes:

PRESENTATION DUE ON: _______________________

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http://www.transformation2013.org/docs/Design%20Challenges/CaseOfTheWipedOutCottonPlants