Page 1

ALAMO SQUARE PARK FORESTATION

prepared for:

17 MAY 2016

Alamo Square Neighborhood Association https://alamosq.org/

prepared by:

www.tsstudio.org


CONTENTS

0

ALAMO SQUARE PARK executive summary

1

URBAN FOREST

2

VIEWS AND MICROCLIMATE

3

PARK PROGRAMS

4

URBAN FORESTATION


0

ALAMO SQUARE PARK


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Alamo Square Park Forestation Project is part of a community campaign to improve a neighborhood park. Alamo Square is most noted for its famous view of the painted ladies that attract thousands of tourists a year for a quick photo and glimpse of one of the best views of San Francisco. Although the park is popular with tourist it is also vital for an increasing population growth of residents within Alamo Square and adjacent Divisadero St. corridor. Maintaining the health of the park is critical to this community. The park’s tree canopy is nearing the end of its urban life cycle, as many of the park trees are not suitable for preservation and are declining in health. In the past 5 years drought weakened trees are slowly dying within the park, torn down by recent storms and are facing increasing risk to the public and must be removed. The park will have lost approximately 60 trees between the years of 2011 and 2017. The objective of a FORESTATION PLAN is the following: ANTICIPATE canopy trees that are susceptible and not suitable for preservation and PLAN for a forest canopy to replace these declining trees. ENHANCE CANOPY DIVERSITY to include a larger variety of trees with various life spans that are able to sustain a park that needs periodic canopy replacement, without the fear of the canopy DYING at the same time.

Aerial view of Alamo Square Park, painted ladies and San Francisco’s downtown.

COLLABORATE with SF Recreation and Park’s department (SFRPD) to increase funding for park trees to help sustain and enhance our park’s urban forest for the next generation. Coordinate efforts to install trees during SFRPD’s water conservation project, due to begin construction in May, 2016. LEVERAGE public and private community funding and maintenance to increase San Francisco’s urban canopy within the next 20 years to compete with other major cities.

ALAMO SQUARE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION (ASNA) is a community organization that was founded in 1963 to protect the park and surrounding neighborhood’s interest. The organization is collaborating with SAN FRANCISCO RECREATION AND PARKS DEPARTMENT (SFRPD) to enhance and sustain Alamo Square Park for current and future generations.

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Aerial view from Alamo Square Park looking north west


Source: BING

Aerial view of Alamo Square Park and surrounding neighborhood, San Francisco, California


CHAPTER ORGANIZATION Alamo Square Park Forestation is organized and described as follows: Forward 0: Executive Summary This chapter is a brief overview of the intentions of a forest plan for the park, and the organization of the park booklet. Chapter 1: Urban Forest This section provides background information for San Francisco’s urban forest, and details of Alamo Square Park’s depleting forest canopy and existing tree species. Chapter 2: Views and Microclimate This section provides view shed analysis and examines critical issues of microclimate and topography of the park. Chapter 3: Park programs This section looks at proposed and existing park programs for the park. Chapter 4: Park Forestation This section conceptualizes the park zones for forestation and proposed canopy species and understory list.

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1

URBAN FOREST


URBAN FOREST WHERE IS SAN FRANCISCO’S URBAN FOREST? SF City Planning and DPW are in the process of evaluating the San Francisco’s Urban Tree Forest Canopy. Their report San Francisco Urban Forest Plan explains the significant impact trees have on our environment and city. San Francisco’s tree forest canopy is in depletion, insufficient and not competing with other major urban cities. “San Francisco prides itself on being “green,” but how green is it, really? The city tops lists of the world’s “greenest” cities for its renewable energy and zero-waste goals, but it suffers from a literal lack of green. San Francisco has one of the smallest tree canopies of any major U.S. city. A city’s tree canopy is measured by the amount of land covered by trees when viewed from above. San Francisco’s tree canopy (13.7%) 1 is smaller than Chicago (17%), Los Angeles (21%), and New York City (24%). This translates to very few trees. Even worse, the city’s tree canopy is actually shrinking. New tree plantings are not keeping pace with deaths and removals. As many as 100,000 potential street tree planting spaces remain empty. Thousands of additional planting spaces exist in parks and on private property. The city’s trees are also not evenly distributed, with some traditionally underrepresented neighborhoods having less greenery. While trees may not be appropriate in all areas (i.e. sensitive habitats and natural areas), opportunities exist to expand trees and landscaping for a more equitable distribution of their benefits.” San Francisco Urban Forest Plan, pg. 9

San Francisco’s urban tree forest canopy at 13.7% remains low compared with other cities in 1 U.S.

BENEFITS OF TREES 1 WIND BUFFER IMPROVED AIR QUALITY STORMWATER RETENTION ENHANCED PUBLIC HEALTH BIODIVERSITY & HABITAT CREATION CARBON SEQUESTRATION SUPPORT LOCAL ECONOMY Source : San Francisco Urban Forest Plan, pg. 9, 16 http://sf-planning.org/urban-forest-plan DPW / SF Planning / FUF

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San Francisco’s Digitized Tree Canopy Source: SF Planning (2012)


HISTORIC DATA - ALAMO SQUARE PARK TREE CANOPY

Source : Google Earth

View at Hayes & Steiner - 1906 earthquake

1906

1987

1938

View looking towards Hayes @ Fulton - 1906

View of Fulton and Scott - date unknown

View towards Hayes @ Scott - date unknown

2015

View at Hayes and Steiner - date unknown

Historic Photo Source : SF Public Library


URBAN FOREST - DEPLETION In 2011 Alamo Square Neighborhood Association commissioned Hort Science to prepare a Tree Report and Risk Assessment for Alamo Square Park. This report was prepared with the intention of understanding the health and viability of the park trees. Many of the trees in the park are not suitable for long term viability. According to the report, 63% of the park trees are not suitable for preservation. These trees are at RISK and will be continually in decline. In the past several years, drought weekend trees are continually dying or being torn down from storms within the park. Between 2013 and 2017 approximately 60 trees were lost within the park, due to death, decline, or risk removal. Suitability for Preservation (Hort Science, Report 2014) “Trees that are preserved on development sites must be carefully selected to make sure that they may survive development impacts, adapt to a new environment and perform well in the landscape. Our goal is to Identify trees that have the potential for long-term health, structural Stability and longevity. Evaluation of suitability for preservation considers several factors:

Tree suitability for preservation. Alamo Square. San Francisco CA. “Good Trees with good health and structural stability that have the potential for longevity at the site. Eleven (11) trees had good suitability for preservation.” Hort Science Report. Tree Report and Risk Assessment, Alamo Square.

• Tree health - Healthy, vigorous trees are better able to tolerate impacts such as root injury, demolition of existing structures, changes in soil grade and moisture, and soil compaction than are non-vigorous trees. • Structural integrity - Trees with significant amounts of wood decay and other structural defects that cannot be corrected are likely to fail. Such trees should not be preserved in areas where damage to people or property is likely. • Species response - There is a wide variation in the response of individual species to construction impacts and changes in the environment. For example, Canary Island date palm is relatively tolerant of construction impacts while Monterey pine is sensitive. • Tree age and longevity - Old trees, while having significant emotional and aesthetic appeal, have limited physiological capacity to adjust to an altered environment. Young trees are better able to generate new tissue and respond to change. • Species invasiveness - Species that spread across a site and displace desired vegetation are not always appropriate for retention. This is particularly true when indigenous species are displaced.“ Hort Science Report. Tree Report and Risk Assessment, Alamo Square. Pg. 5, 2014.

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“Moderate Trees in fair health and/or possessing structural defects that may be abated with treatment. Trees in this category require more intense management and monitoring, and may have shorter life-spans than those in the “good” category. Fifty (50) trees were rated as having moderate suitability for preservation.” Hort Science Report. Tree Report and Risk Assessment, Alamo Square. N

0’

40’

80’

Risk assessment based on 2014 Hort Science Report


PROJECTED FOREST DEPLETION

Canopy - 2011

Canopy - 2016

Projected Canopy - date unknown

“Poor Trees in poor health or possessing significant defects in structure that cannot be abated with treatment. These trees can be expected to decline regardless of management. The species or individual tree may possess either characteristics that are undesirable in landscape settings or be unsuited for use areas. One

hundred five (105) trees were rated as having poor suitability for preservation.�

Hort Science Report. Tree Report and Risk Assessment, Alamo Square.

67% of trees in the park are Monterey Cypress, projected deforestation is due to an aging canopy, dying and diseased trees, high risk canopy and storms and high winds.


PARK TREES Many park trees are in relatively good health, however, the canopy at the park is aging and it is recommended that a tree replacement program is initiated. 67% of trees at the park are Monterey Cypress trees and these trees should remain the basis and foundation of a replanting program. ASNA has been working with San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department (SFRPD) and Hort Science to evaluate the trees and initiate a replanting program for the park. A replanting program should consider the following objectives: •

Suitability of existing tree species to be replanted in the park due to poor performance, invasive, disease, etc. • Suitability of proposed tree species to coordinate with SFRPD’s Irrigation and planting plan for the park.

Tree forestation in areas of high-risk canopy trees. Trees that are at the end of their life span and likely to decline.

• •

Tree forestation for less active areas of the park. Diversify Tree Palette to increase habitat within the park

EXISTING DOMINANT PARK SPECIES Common Name

Scientific Name

Quantity

Monterey cypress Lawson’s cypress Monterey pine Lombardy poplar Flowering cherry Weeping willow Corkscrew willow

Cupressus macrocarpa Chamaecyparis lawsoniana Pinus radiata Populus nigra ‘Italica’ Prunus serrulata Salix alba ‘Tristis’ Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’

79 7 10 9 6 10 1

*

OTHER PARK SPECIES Common Name

Scientific Name

Quantity

Blackwood acacia Agonis She-oak Cordyline Blue gum Mayten Myoporum Canary Island date palm Italian Stone pine Victorian box Ribbonwood Corkscrew willow Giant sequoia Eugenia Windmill palm

Acacia melanoxylon Agonis flexuosa Casuarina sp. Cordyline australis Eucalyptus globulus Maytenus boaria Myoporum laetum Phoenix canariensis Pinus pinea Pittosporum undulatum Plagianthus regius Salix matsudana ‘Tortuosa’ Sequoiadendron giganteum Syzygium paniculatum Trachycarpus fortunei

2 3 3 1 4 1 3 4 2 6 1 1 3 1 10

Source: Hort Science Report, 2011 *quantity based on tree below 8” caliper, 2011 data

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N

0’

40’

80’

Alamo Square - Existing Park Trees


Poplar trees are poor performers in Alamo Square, slowly dying over the past few years in the park.

Willow trees along Scott and Fulton Street

Cherry trees located at entry stairs

Monterey cypress trees form 67% of park canopy

Victorian box and Lawson’s cypress trees adjacent the playground along Steiner Street


STREET TREES Several different species of street trees are across from Alamo Square Park along the residential neighborhood edges. Currently there are no street trees directly adjacent the park.

D

C

FULTON STREET

F

Existing street trees located around the Alamo Square Park are wind resistant street trees, typically performing well in San Francisco. All existing tree species are located on DPW’s recommended street tree list, with the exception of Ficus trees located on Steiner Street.

B SCOTT STREET

A plan for street trees adjacent the park has the potential to be a coordinated effort between ASNA and SFRPD. Street trees along the park could potentially connect with pervious paving, rain gardens or understory planting to lessen the burden of the extensive amount of water that percolates rapidly out of the park during a rain event. The park was not designed to infiltrate stormwater on site; however adjacent street network has the potential to implement stormwater management techniques to lessen the impact.

E

Common Name

Scientific Name

Location

DPW LIST

Red flowering gum Laurel fig Maidenhair tree Brisbane box Southern magnolia New Zealand Christmas tree Victorian box Evergreen pear Small leaf tristania

Corymbia ficifolia Ficus microcarpa ‘Nitida’ Ginkgo biloba Lophostemon confertus Magnolia grandiflora Metrosideros excelsa Pittosporum undulatum Pyrus calleryana Tristaniopsis laurina

Fulton Steiner Hayes Hayes / Scott Scott Hayes / Fulton Scott Steiner Fulton

Yes No Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

STEINER STREET

EXISTING DOMINANT STREET TREE SPECIES

A

G HAYES STREET

H N

0’

40’

I

J

80’

Alamo Square - Existing Street Trees

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A

HAYES ST - FICUS TREES

B

F

SCOTT ST - VICTORIAN BOX

G SCOTT ST - MAGNOLIA TREE

HAYES ST - EVERGREEN PEAR

C FULTON ST- RED FLOWERING GUM

D FULTON ST- SMALL LEAF TRISTANIA E

FULTON ST- NEW ZEALAND CHRISTMAS

H HAYES ST - BRISBANE BOX

I

J

HAYES ST- NEW ZEALAND CHRISTMAS

HAYES ST -GINKGO TREES


2

VIEWS AND MICROCLIMATE


VIEW CORRIDORS San Francisco’s topography and maritime location enhances view corridors throughout the city. Primary views occur along the waterfront edges or from the sides of the high points of slopes looking towards lower elevations. Views echo the planning of the city, where parks on high points allow for views towards lower elevations. Our park system provides a sense of neighborhood identity along with a larger connection to adjacent neighborhoods and the city of San Francisco. Alamo Square Park provides significant views of San Francisco, towards downtown, adjacent parks, neighborhoods and even a glimpse of the Golden Gate Bridge. Viewshed analysis: (see opposite page) The viewshed study illustrates the expansive views available from Alamo Square Park towards San Francisco. This study takes into account topographical relationships and building footprints to understand the primary and secondary views as an important foundation for implementing a forestation plan. Any forestation plan should prioritize and optimize view corridors with careful placement of trees to allow for completely transparent views or filtered views of San Francisco.

San Francisco View Corridors - 1968 ViewShed Study per SF Planning

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Source: Google Earth

Projected primary and secondary views from Alamo Square Park

Source: Google Earth

Visible buildings through primary and secondary view corridors from Alamo Square Park


VIEW CORRIDORS Thousands of tourist a year flock to Alamo Square Park for one of the best views of the city, the postcard view of the painted ladies with San Francisco’s downtown beyond. Many views throughout the square connect to various parts of San Francisco. Views of the city are critical to protect and must be balanced with a forestation plan. As part of replanting effort primary views to the east should remain completely open, or provide filtered views and glimpses, similar to the existing condition. Planting smaller trees at lower elevations will preserve views from the top of the hill at Alamo Square.

F

View corridors to the west, mainly from the dog play area will need to be balanced with forestation, particularly with acknowledging the need for wind protection on the windiest side of the park. Glimpses of views to the west will be established through an established canopy of trees.

D

G E

C

H B

I J

N

0’

40’

A

80’

Alamo Square View Corridors

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A

E

B

F

C

G

D

H


WIND & TOPOGRAPHY San Francisco’s wind patterns are channeled by the urban hills and valleys of the city creating various microclimates that can vary greatly in short distances. San Francisco’s windy climate is impacted by the topography and maritime influences. Summer winds move in from the west bringing fog and cold to the city by the bay. San Francisco is windy throughout the year, but in the summer the wind and the fog pick up and channel through the city moving from the eastern ocean all the way to the San Francisco Bay. Topographical patterns in the city channel the wind in various extremes from one street to another. Hayes Street in San Francisco has always been known as a wind tunnel, in particular the park is extremely windy in the afternoon and summer evenings along the south east corner of Hayes and Steiner adjacent the dog park. Wind patterns in the afternoons and evenings are due to cold waters of the Pacific Coast in contrast to the high temperatures of the valley. Alamo Square Park’s south eastern edge remains extremely windy, with uncomfortably high winds throughout the year. ASNA and Rec and Park strongly recommend creating better wind protection through vegetation on this edge of the park. The importance of creating this wind buffer would allow areas like the dog park and entire park to be more comfortable during intense wind particularly during the summer months.

San Francisco View Corridors - 1968 Wind and Topography Study per SF Planning

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Fulton Street

Alamo Square Park

Primary Wind Direction

Monterey cypress - Wind sculpted trees at Alamo Square Park

Hayes Street

Fog pushes in from the west of San Francisco bringing strong winds in summer


TOPOGRAPHY AND DRAINAGE Few parts of Alamo Square are level; the park is formed through a serious of gentle slopes and steeper berms. Run off is directed to catch basins throughout the park or directed to low points on adjacent sidewalks and directed into the city’s sewer system. San Francisco is one of the few cities with a combined sewer system - capturing and treating stormwater and wastewater simultaneously. Unfortunately because of all of the hard surfaces in the urban watershed stormwater is quickly forced into the sewer system instead of percolating into the ground. In large storm events the combination of wastewater and stormwater can be left untreated overflowing into the bay.

+ 220

+ 151 LOW POINT

At Alamo Square due to the topography and large expanses of lawn, water rapidly leaves the site and can overwhelm the storm drain system during rain events. The advantages of stormwater retention on site include the capacity to recharge the groundwater, filter pollutants and reduce run off and erosion, with the ultimate goal of managing overall watershed health. There are opportunities within the park or on adjacent streets to invest in stormwater management within the park. Rain gardens, swales or permeable paving are strategies that could aid in managing stormwater on site. Techniques for managing stormwater on site are required for all new developments in San Francisco, and our park system has the capability to aid in the reduction of stormwater volume while increasing stormwater quality. Maintaining and replenishing our groundwater supply is critical in California, and will aid in the next challenging cycle of drought.

+ 240

+ 250

+ 259 HIGH POINT + 201

N

0’

+ 246

40’

+ 216

80’

Alamo Square - Drainage patterns, high points, low points and catch basins

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Alamo Square the park on the hill, does not typically retain stormwater on site, due to steep topography and expansive areas of lawn stormwater is often directed rapidly into the cities sewer system.

Alamo Square Park - section looking north along Hayes St. - Due to steep topography Alamo Square park has challenging issues with rapid stormwater runoff and erosion at park edges.


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3

SITE PROGRAMS


GREEN CONNECTIONS Green Connections is a proposed project directed by the efforts of San Francisco planning department to create better connection between people, parks and wildlife habitat. The proposed connectors include 24 routes totaling 115 miles throughout San Francisco.1 Goals of the Network include the following: • Promote public health through active transportation and im proved access to parks • Increase non-motorized trips to parks • Enhance habitat for wildlife, including birds and butterflies • Increase permeability of the ground surface to reduce storm water runoff • Create space to facilitate social interaction and community stewardship • Implement the network within a twenty-year period 2

Alamo Square Park is along proposed Route 16: West Coast Painted Lady, (Vanessa annabella). This butterfly is the most widespread species in the world, inhabiting 6 continents. Associated plants include the Checkerbloom, Wild Aster, Trifolium variegatun, and Hollyhock.3

1.San Francisco Green Connections, Final Report, March 2014. 2.Green Connections: The Draft network October 2012. http://www. sf-planning.org/ftp/files/Citywide/green_connections/GC_Wkshp2-3_ Network_1.pdf 3.Green Connections Ecology Guides. pg 18. Green Connections - SF City Planning http://sf-planning.org/green-connections

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16. SPECIES : WEST COAST PAINTED LADY Vanessa annabella

Route #16 - Vanessa annabella - West coast painted lady passes along the west edge along Scott Street at Alamo Square Park

Green Connections Route #16 - SF City Planning

Vanessa annabella

Sidalcea malviflora

Symphyotrichum chilense

Alcea rosea

Trifolium variegatum


PARK PROGRAMS Alamo Square Park owned and maintained by San Francisco Recreation and Parks Department (SFRPD), although best known for views of the painted lady remains an active and vibrant park for a growing neighborhood. Various programs nestle in between the Monterey Cypress trees on the hill-top park, including a large unleash area for dogs, tennis courts and playground. During the week tourist can be spotted at the lawn berm viewing the painted ladies, while local residents take over during the weekend, sitting, playing and activating the lawn berms that filter throughout the park. Walking trails are located throughout the park, mainly inhabited by local residents. SFRPD - Water Conservation Project and Restroom Installation SFRPD is currently funding a 2.4 million dollar construction project that includes a new irrigation system, park restroom and new landscaping. This will include new understory planting at park edges, no-mow grasses, shrub plantings within the interior and 40 additional trees installed in phases. The basis of this re-design is water conservation. There is an estimated 37% water savings a year, equivalent to 3,260,000 gallons. Construction will begin in May 2016 with a projected closing of 8 months. ASNA has been actively working with SFRPD throughout the planning and design stages of this project and will continue to volunteer during the construction phase.

N

0’

40’

80’

Alamo Square - Existing Park Programs

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Berm on south east edge along Hayes with view of the painted ladies

Playground surrounded by Lawson and Monterey Cypress Trees

Berm on south west edge along Hayes

Dog park at Alamo Square

Tennis courts at the top of the hill surrounded by Monterey Cypress Trees


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4

ALAMO SQUARE FORESTATION


FORESTATION DIAGRAM PARK FORESTATION for Alamo Square Park includes the planting of 300 trees over a period of 10+ years. Trees will replace the depleting canopy and will supplement an inefficient canopy. Within the next 20 years there should be on-going planting of trees to supplement unanticipated death of trees. The foundation of park planting will remain Monterey Cypress trees. Native and / or drought tolerant trees will supplement, support and strengthen this canopy. ALAMO SQUARE FORESTATION DESIGN PRINCIPLES: PROTECT EXISTING TREE CANOPY Due to the majority of the canopy declining, we can anticipate that over the next 10 to 20 years there will be significant canopy loss as there has been over the last 10 years. Replanting efforts over the next 10 years should strategically examine the state of the existing tree canopy while planting efforts are on-going throughout the park. Existing trees should only be removed when there are safety concerns as a risk management tool. Existing trees should be pruned and taken care of to avoid decline. PRESERVE VIEWS Expansive views within the park should be preserved, maintaining openness at primary view corridors and filtered views at secondary view corridors. ENHANCE FOREST DIVERSITY While the majority of park trees will remain Monterey Cypress it is critical to plant for more diversity within the park. Increasing diversity will naturally strengthen the life span of the park trees as different species have different life spans. CONSERVE WATER Drought tolerant and resistant trees should make the basis of the tree canopy. Tree species should coordinate with understory planting and irrigation hydro-zones. ATTRACT NATIVE HABITAT Native planting and park diversity will attract birds, bees and butterflies and other native habitat. Providing food, shelter, water and nesting places are critical to encouraging a thriving park ecosystem for native habitat. Planting adjacent Scott St. should coordinate with City Planning Green Connections corridor. CREATE WIND PROTECTION The south west corner of the park remains extremely windy. Proposed wind tolerant and resistant trees along this edge will form a natural wind break to protect the dog play area as well as the majority of the park.

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N

0’

40’

80’


PROPOSED FOREST PHASING BASED ON PROJECTED DEPLETED CANOPY PHASE I - on-going 2016 - 2017

PHASE II - on-going 2019, 2022

PHASE III - on-going 2025, 2028

Proposed ~120 trees shown @ ~ installed size

Proposed ~ 50 trees installed in two phases - 100 trees total Phase I - canopy slowly maturing

Proposed ~ 50 trees installed in two phases - 100 trees total Phase 1 & 2 - canopy slowly maturing

Projected canopy size in depletion due to health and age (actual canopy depletion may occur several years after second phase planting)

Existing canopy size Suitable canopy to remain (actual canopy depletion will be on-going and will need periodic monitoring)

Existing canopy size Existing primary viewshedsmaintain clear of trees

Forestation Diagram illustrates a proposed tree canopy based on a projected depleted canopy. This projected depleted canopy is based on trees that are not suitable to be preserved and are on continual decline, as noted in 2011 Hort Science Report. A base planting of 300 trees is recommended to meet the needs for increasing canopy diversity and size, while anticipating decline of existing canopy. After the initial planting of phase I and phase II it is recommended that the existing and recently planting trees be monitored for unanticipated decline and death. It is projected that a third phase of planting coordinate with canopy depletion and be an ongoing effort as part of park maintenance. An exact quantity for third phase should be based on canopy depletion and overall health of recently planted trees. Initial planting quantity is based on initial cost and funds available by the community. If community is able to fundraise for 300 trees, recommend planting as many as feasible to coordinate with Rec and Park’s irrigation project. This will allow the project to be coordinated with on-going construction efforts and planting establishment period for understory. Recommend initial planting to have a mix of 15 gallon, 24” box and 36” box trees. 15 gallon trees are adequate for on-going efforts of planting. Canopy and park life span will be based on tree diversity and is not reliant on phasing. However, Monterey Cypress Trees should continue to be planted as an on-going effort to enable a mixed canopy of Monterey Cypress trees with various life spans.


FORESTATION DIAGRAM F Existing canopy to remain is based on projected canopy depletion. Actual canopy depletion will only be visible with time

E

E

F

B

B

F

E

C

B

A

D B B

Street trees shown at ~ 20’ o.c. Projected quantity of street trees is 111

A

Prunus ilicifolia ‘Lyonii’

F

N

0’

40’

80’

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Proposed long range vision diagram projects depleted canopy and proposed replacement trees


A

WIND BUFFER Common Name

Scientific Name

Drought

Native Community

Wind Tolerant Height

A

Main Canopy Species Monterey cypress Italian stone pine Torrey pine

Hesperocyparis macrocarpa Resistant Yes Pinus pinea No Yes Pinus torreyana Yes Yes

Understory Canopy Species New Zealand Christmas tree Metrosideros excelsa Heteromeles arbutifolia Toyon

B

C

E

F

No No

Yes Yes Yes

50’ + 40’ + 40’ +

NA Coastal Sage scrub

Yes Yes

25’ + 15’ + Monterey cypress

Italian stone pine

torrey pine

New Zea. Christmas

toyon

Monterey cypress

strawberry tree

primrose tree

Catalina ironwood

totara

Catalina cherry

strawberry tree

canyon live oak

red maple

Catalina ironwood

URBAN FOREST Common Name

Scientific Name

Main Canopy Species Queensland kauri Monterey cypress

Agathis robusta Resistant No Hesperocyparis macrocarpa Resistant Yes

NA Closed cone pine

Yes Yes

80’ + 50’ +

Understory Canopy Species marina strawberry tree Primrose tree Catalina ironwood Totara

Arbutus x ‘Marina’ Lagunaria patersonii Lyonothamnus floribundus Podocarpus totara

Yes Yes Yes Yes

No No Yes No

NA NA Coastal sage scrub NA

Yes Yes Yes Yes

25’+ 30’ + 50’ + 25’ +

Scientific Name

Drought

Native Community

Drought

Native Community

Wind Tolerant Height

B

ACCENT TREE Common Name Main Canopy Species Armstrong red maple

D

Yes Yes

Closed cone pine NA Coastal Sage scrub

Wind Tolerant Height Queensland kauri

Acer rubrum ‘Armstrong’

Resistant No

NA

Resistant

50’ +

C

HABITAT GARDEN Common Name

Scientific Name

Drought

Main Canopy Species Canyon live oak

Quercus chrysolepis

Resistant Yes

Understory Canopy Species marina strawberry tree Catalina cherry

Arbutus x ‘Marina’ Prunus ilicifolia ‘Lyonii’

Yes Yes

Native Community

No Yes

D

Wind Tolerant Height

Mixed-evergreen

Resistant t

60’ +

NA Coastal Sage scrub

Yes Resistant

25’+ 25’ + armstrong maple

EDGES Common Name

Scientific Name

Drought

Native Community

Wind Tolerant Height

Main Canopy Species marina strawberry tree holly oak

Arbutus x ‘Marina’ Quercus ilex

Yes Yes

No No

NA NA

Yes Resistant

Scientific Name

Drought

Native

Community

Wind Tolerant Height

NA NA NA

Resistant Yes Yes

25’+ 30’ +

holly oak

E

F

STREETS Common Name

Armstrong red maple Acer rubrum ‘Armstrong’ Catalina ironwood Lyonothamnus floribundus New Zealand Christmas tree Metrosideros excelsa

Resistant No Yes Yes No Yes

50’ + 50’ + 30’ +

strawberry tree

evergreen oak

n. zea. christmas

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