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THE STAR PRESS, BALL MEMORIAL HOSPITAL & MUTUAL BANK


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About the In the Pink Project Breast cancer strikes home with just about everyone. Odds are you know someone diagnosed with the life-altering disease — you, your wife, your co-worker, your daughter. Definitely our readers, which is why here at The Star Press, we are totally, undeniably In the Pink. And we want to make sure you are, too! So we’re bringing you an entire month of activities, stories and information to keep breast cancer awareness top of mind in our community. Today’s Breast Cancer Resource Guide is just the beginning. Every day this month we’ll bring to you an inspirational story of hope and courage, through the voice of local breast cancer survivors - and one special family. We’ll culminate on Oct. 15 with the In the Pink Community Day — in which each and every member of the community is invited to show how you’re living “In the Pink.” We expect pink T-shirts, pink water fountains, pink flood lights. Dare we hope for a pink river? There is no end to the possibilities. Join us this month as we paint the town pink. — Lisa Nellessen-Lara, Executive Editor, The Star Press

A project of Star Press Media Custom Publications • General Manager/ Advertising Director: Cheryl Lindus • Executive Editor: Lisa Nellessen-Lara • Custom Publications Coordinator/Design: Elizabeth Richman • Marketing: Tom Rothrock • Writer: Dawn Fluhler • Copy Editor: Jeff Ward • Sales Team Leader: Brad Martin

What's Inside • Breast Cancer: The Facts | 4

• Pre- and Post-Op Tips | 21

• Profile: Little Red Door | 6

• Shopping for a Masectomy Bra | 22

• Profile: The Cancer Boutique | 7

• An Excuse to Shop | 23

• Profile: The Cancer Center at Ball

• Breast Help Centers | 24

Memorial Hospital | 8

• Quips & Quotes | 24

• Reduce Your Risk | 10

• Programs for the underinsured and

• Practicing Self Awareness/How-To Guide

uninsured | 25

to Your Sel-Exam | 12-13

• Recovery & Support Programs | 26

• Genetic Testing Q & A | 14

• Counseling Services | 27

• What to Ask the Doctor | 16

• Breast Cancer Books & Magazines | 28

• Definitions, terms | 18

• Online Resources & Information | 29

• Understanding the Stages | 19

• Calendar of Events | 30-31

• Cancer Nutrition & Excercise | 20

• Other Ways to Help | 31


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Incidence

Statistics • Breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in women behind non-melanoma skin cancer. • 191,410 women were diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States in 2006, the most recent year for statistical information. • 40,820 American women died from breast cancer in 2006. • For Canadian women, the overall breast cancer incidence rate increased between 1969 and 1999 (by one percent each year), but since 1999 the incidence rate has stabilized. • The chance that breast cancer will be the cause of a woman's death is about 3 percent. • There are more than 2.5 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. • Less than 1 percent of all new breast cancer cases occur in men. • White women are slightly more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than African-American women. However, African-American women are more likely to die of the disease than white women, possibly due to more aggressive tumors. • The risk for breast cancer doubles for a woman if she has a first-degree relative (sister, mother, daughter) who has been diagnosed with the cancer. • Roughly 5 to 10 percent of breast cancer causes results from gene mutations inherited from the mother or father. • The most significant risk factors for breast cancer are simply being a woman and getting older. — Metro Creative

Every woman is at risk for breast cancer. Unfortunately, that’s one factor that so far cannot be changed. Statistics show the following relative to race, age and stage: • Breast cancer is the most common cancer in U.S. women ages 40-49 • In 2006, 2.5 million living women in the United States had a history of breast cancer • In the United States, more than 192,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. • Each year about 2,000 men are diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States. • White women over age 40 are more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer than black women • Black women are more likely to die from breast cancer than white women due to later stages of detection • The relative survival rate five years after diagnosis is 89 percent Survival rate by stage: Stage 5-year Relative Survival Rate 0 100 percent I 100 percent II 86 percent III 57 percent IV 20 percent

Table source: Cancer.org, last revised 07/01/10

Risk Factors

Even without any risk factors, every woman is at risk for breast cancer. The most common risk factors are: • Family and personal history • Certain chromosomal changes • Certain gene changes (BRCA1 and BRCA2) • Race (most commonly diagnosed in white women) • Radiation therapy to the chest • History of taking DES during pregnancy • Large areas of breast density as it appears on mammogram • Over age 40 • Early period • Late menopause • Years of menopausal hormone therapy • Late age when having first child • Late age at first full-term pregnancy • Never having a child • Obesity and postmenopausal obesity • Alcohol consumption • Inactivity Recent birth control pill use has been linked to increased breast cancer risk, according to the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute. However, the risk seems to decrease over time and return to normal after use of the pill is stopped. Researchers are still studying many other lifestyle and genetic factors that may increase breast cancer risk. Taking fish oil supplements, having a fatty diet and hormones in general and during pregnancy are topics currently under study.


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“Every chance I get, I let ladies know: If you’re 40, let’s go get screened. If you have a lump, don’t just say, ‘Oh it’s nothing.’ Let’s get it checked to make sure it’s just that — nothing.” — Denise Hurt, Little Red

Door administrative assistant and Reaching Out Breast Health and events coordinator

RIGHT: Executive Director Julie Haskins works in her office at Little Red Door. FAR RIGHT: The Little Red Door is located at 401 W. Jackson Street in Muncie. Photo by Kelly Day / The Star Press

Cancer Services of East Central Indiana, Inc. — Little Red Door provides education, transportation, referrals, equipment loan and medical supplies, nutritional supplements and financial assistance programs. Begun in the 1950s and incorporated in 1962, the agency serves anyone who lives, works or receives treatment in Delaware, Randolph or Henry Counties. In 2003, Little Red Door began its “Reaching Out” breast health programs. To date this program has reached more than 1,900 women through breast health education, early detection tools and screenings. Reaching Out offers free breast health clinics throughout Delaware County, including evening/ weekend clinics at the Little Red Door in Downtown Muncie and at the Imaging Center. The breast clinics include breast health education, free clinical breast exams and, if needed, free mammogram referral. Qualifications include no means to pay, no insurance or underinsured. “The Reaching Out breast health program is important to the community because the econo-

my has been so bad and lots of people have lost their insurance, and without our breast program, a lot of women would have not received the necessary breast health screenings,” said Denise M. Hurt, Little Red Door administrative assistant and Reaching Out Breast Health coordinator and events coordinator. Mammograms can cost $300-$500 depending on the type of mammogram service or ultrasound needed, according to Hurt. Her program helps women who can’t afford that. Women needing a mammogram should get a mammogram referral from their doctor, and then take the referral to the agency. Hurt will then schedule the mammogram at the Breast Center. If a woman has no doctor, the agency will help her get a referral. “When we have our breast clinics, we always set the atmosphere to be as comfortable as possible,” Hurt said. “There’s always fear when you talk about cancer, and with our breast program, we really work hard to make women comfortable. A lot of women don’t get mammograms done because they feel it will hurt or wonder what if

they do have breast cancer. But us setting the atmosphere and really listening to what they have to say and how they feel brings them to a place of comfort when they actually go get their mammogram done.” Hurt said she and the Breast Health Clinic staff let women know they care. “We hug, we talk, we laugh, we cry,” she said. “Every chance I get, I let ladies know: If you’re 40, let’s go get screened. If you have a lump, don’t just say, ‘Oh it’s nothing.’ Let’s get it checked to make sure it’s just that — nothing.” Funding for Cancer Services of East Central Indiana, Inc. — Little Red Door is provided by the United Way of Delaware County and Henry County United Fund, fundraisers, bequests and individual donations. Donations can be designated for the breast cancer screening program. Contact Little Red Door at (765) 204-9063 for more information and to find out when the next Reaching Out program takes place. You can also schedule a Reaching Out Breast Health Clinic at your place of business, church or community meeting location.


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“I ask that they come in and let me take over making them feel good again.” - Mary Rigel, Boutique manager

The Cancer Center Boutique at Ball Memorial Hospital. Photo by Chris Bergin / The Star Press

The Cancer Center Boutique at Ball Memorial Hospital is a store like no other in the region. From personalized bra and prosthetic fittings to custom wig selection to apparel, accessories and stationery — the boutique is a one-stop-shop. Boutique manager Mary Rigel, herself a breast cancer survivor with an empathetic yet take-charge attitude, is a certified fitter for prosthetics following mastectomy. “I ask that they come in and let me take over making them feel good again,” she said of her clients. When a client enters the boutique, Rigel takes time to get to know the individual’s circumstances and concerns, and then answers questions. She offers a survivor’s perspective and informs her client what to expect. For clients going through chemotherapy, wig

selection at the boutique is a private experience. The boutique has a small private room for wig and bra fittings. Rigel helps her clients match color and style and orders wigs for quick delivery, usually within two days. Four to six weeks after breast surgery — typically enough time for sufficient healing so that the body can hold weight — Rigel assists with bra selection and does a prosthetic fitting. It’s important to understand that breast prosthesis should balance the weight of the remaining breast, and in the case of a double mastectomy some weight still should be added. The weight is necessary to prevent curved spine, shoulder droop and neck problems, Rigel said. Rigel will obtain the prosthetic prescription from the physician, and handles all insurance filing and billing on behalf of her clients. Medicare pays for up to 12 bras yearly and a new prosthe-

sis every two years, with most insurance companies following these guidelines as well. Beyond the cosmetics, the boutique is stocked with items touting the pink ribbon, as well as hats and sleep caps, personal care items, postmastectomy swimwear, candles and relaxation CDs, gifts and cards and much more. Beginning Oct. 1, in celebration of breast cancer awareness month, Rigel will be stocking the boutique with fun new T-shirts and awareness flip-flops, among other new items. The Cancer Center Boutique, inside Ball Memorial Hospital, is open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. To schedule a consultation or fitting with Rigel, call the boutique at (765) 751-5302. The Cancer Center Boutique at Forest Ridge in New Castle is open Monday through Friday 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and can be reached at (765) 593-2960, ext. 2.


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The Breast Surgery Recovery Program is available for both women and men. The program includes preadmission testing, a free breast surgery recovery program kit, free post-surgical screening and more. FAR RIGHT: Art lines the wall at the Ball Memorial Hospital cancer center. RIGHT: The waiting room at the Ball Memorial Hospital cancer center. Photo by Chris Bergin / The Star Press

Beyond chemotherapy and radiation, The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital offers numerous support services intended to provide a continuum of care for cancer patients, their families and their caregivers. The cancer support services are free and encourage patient participation to meet each individual’s overall educational, spiritual and emotional needs. The Breast Surgery Recovery Program is available for both women and men. The program includes pre-admission testing, a free breast surgery recovery program kit, free postsurgical screening and all other free support services offered at The Cancer Center at BMH. Following breast surgery, program partici-

pants receive additional literature and support concerning drain care and recovery exercises. The Cancer Education Program provides resource materials, personal navigation services, group programs and individualized support to help those touched by cancer to gain a better understanding of the disease and their experience. The Cancer Center also has a full-time patient educator available, as well as a touch-screen CancerHelp computer updated monthly with information from the National Cancer Institute. It allows patients to privately find and print information about their conditions and treatments. The Cancer Counseling Services Program provides free professional counseling services to cancer patients, their loved ones and their support people. The program is designed to help

individuals cope throughout the commonalties of cancer diagnosis and treatment, such as shock, fear, confusion and overwhelming decision making. The counseling program is staffed by Dr. Don Nicholas, a professor of counseling psychology at Ball State University, along with four other professional counselors. Counseling takes place at The Cancer Center by appointment, beginning early in the cancer treatment process. Other free support services available at The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital include: cancer registry, pastoral care, social services, cancer exercise, genetic risk assessment and cancer prevention and screening programs. Contact Patient Education and Support Coordinator Melody Stanley at (765) 751-1400 for more information on cancer support services.


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Tips to reduce your risk of getting breast cancer While there is no way to eliminate the risk of getting breast cancer completely, some studies indicate that the following tips could help reduce the risk: • Be vigilant about breast self-exams, clinical breast exams and mammograms • Contact your doctor if you notice breast changes, lumps or changes to your skin or nipples • Breast feed • Use condoms instead of the birth control pill • Use naturopathic therapies instead of hormone replacement therapy • Eat right and limit fat in your diet • Exercise regularly • Maintain a healthy weight • Limit alcohol consumption • Chemo prevention (Tamoxifen, Raloxifene and other drugs) • Prophylactic mastectomy and/or oophorectomy Research is under way to determine the impact of herbs and dietary supplements on reducing breast cancer. Note that conflicting study results show diet and vitamins, active and passive smoking, environmental and chemical factors and oral contraceptive use may or may not impact breast cancer risk, according to the National Cancer Institute.

Steps to breast cancer early detection Early detection of breast cancer saves lives. Becoming aware of what your breasts look and feel like normally will help you when following these guidelines to breast cancer early detection: • Monthly breast self-examinations beginning at age 20 • Clinical breast exams every three years beginning at age 20 • Clinical breast exams every year beginning at age 40 • Mammograms every year beginning at age 40 — National Cancer Institute


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Early detection of breast cancer is the singlemost effective way to beat the disease. That is why it’s essential for women to conduct their own breast exams to discover any potential anomalies early on. While doctors stress the importance of selfexamination, many women still show up for routine wellness visits admitting they don’t do examinations because they simply don’t know how. Perhaps because the practice was given the formal name “breast self-exam.” Today, however, doctors tell women to have “breast self-awareness.” That means women don’t have to follow a set protocol regarding checking for breast changes, and simply being aware of how the breasts look and feel is key. Why the change in the formalities? Doctors have determined that most women notice a lump in their breasts while doing routine activities, such as bathing or dressing. They also figured out that a formal method of examining the breasts was not necessary. Lumps can be found simply by touching the breasts in any pattern, as long as the entire breast is checked.

Follow these guidelines

• Breasts are best checked for changes directly after a menstrual period. At this time the breast tissue will be softer and less tender due to diminishing hormone levels. • Look at the breasts every day and notice their appearance and shape. Recognizing subtle differences can help alert a doctor if something is amiss. Be conscious of these changes: • changes in breast size, shape, skin texture, or color • dimpling or puckering of the breast • discharge from the nipples • scaliness of the skin • nipple pulling to one side • lump or mass in the breast • enlarged lymph node under the arm • Any changes or questions about breast condition should be promptly brought up with a doctor. • Women should know their risk for breast cancer. While there isn’t a definitive genetic correlation, the high rate of breast cancer in one family might mean a particular woman is more at risk. • Get routine screenings at a doctor’s office. Women over the age of 40 should get a mammogram every year. — Metro Creative


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Sources: Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association, American Cancer Society, McGraw-Hill, Gannett News Service and WebMD

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It seems we all know somebody who has been affected by breast cancer. That’s quite possibly true since the lifetime chance of a woman getting invasive breast cancer is one in eight, according to the American Cancer Society. Though most cancers aren’t passed on from parent to child as are eye and hair color, there are several types that are. Breast cancer is one of them. But a person’s risk of developing cancer is also influenced by environmental factors; lifestyle factors such as diet, exercise, smoking and alcohol consumption; hormone changes and other cancer-causing exposures. The majority of hereditary breast cancer is linked to mutation in either of two genes, BRCA1 (BReast CAncer 1) and BRCA2 (BReast CAncer 2), which are passed down from parent to child. Breast and ovarian cancer heredity can also be linked to mutations in several other genes. A cancer risk assessment and genetic testing can help ease your concerns about inheriting cancer, or it can provide information to help you make decisions to reduce your chances of developing cancer.

Q: What are my chances of developing a hereditary form of breast cancer? A: Only 10 percent of breast cancers are genetically hereditary. Another 30 percent are considered familial, which means there is a family history but no genetic component. The remaining 60 percent of breast cancers are considered sporadic. Q: What kind of genetic testing for breast cancer is available? A: A simple blood test is available to test for BRCA1 and BRCA1 mutations. Q: Who should consider getting BRCA genetic testing? A: Talk to your doctor about your family history of breast cancer. Not everybody should get tested. But among other factors, if you have had two or more family members develop breast or ovarian cancer before age 50, or one family member develop two forms of breast cancer, you should consider BRCA genetic testing. Q: What if I test positive for BRCA mutations? A: Keep in mind that genetic testing is not a cancer test, but a test that determines if you are at higher risk for developing cancer. BRCA mutations increase your breast cancer risk fivefold. If you test positive, you should be diligent about getting cancer screenings. Your doctor might also talk to you about family planning and measures to prevent cancer, such as taking medications or having preventive surgery. Q: How can I get more information about cancer risk assessment and genetic testing? A: The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital regularly offers free cancer screenings, and they also offer a Risk Assessment Program. Your doctor or a health care professional at The Cancer Center can discuss genetic testing with you. More information about this topic is available at http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/ factsheet/Risk/BRCA.


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What is my diagnosis? What is my stage? What is my prognosis? What are my treatment options? Should I get a second opinion? Will I have pain, and if so how will it be treated? Who will perform my treatments? Where will I go for treatments? What is the goal of treatment (cure/control/comfort)? What are the possible side effects of my treatments? What will happen if I decide I don’t want to undergo treatment? How many treatments will I need? How long will the treatments last? How should I prepare for treatment? Do I need to bring somebody with me for treatments? What items should I bring with me for treatments? How or when will I know if my treatments are working? Is there any population of people I should not be around during treatments? Do I need surgery? What costs will I have? What other medications are still safe for me to take? Are there any natural therapies available for my cancer? Are there any clinical trials or experimental therapies available? What should I tell my spouse or partner, children, family and friends? What changes will I need to make to my daily life (work/childcare/school)?

Hearing a diagnosis of cancer can be scary and overwhelming. You might find yourself having many questions, but forgetting to ask them. It’s a good idea to write down a list of questions before visiting the doctor and to take a trusted family member or friend with you to help you listen and understand all of the information you will hear. An example of some questions you might want to ask:

Can I still exercise? Can I still have a sex life? Can I drink alcoholic beverages? What if I become depressed? What counseling services are available to me, my family and my caregivers? What side effects or other problems should I report and to whom? Who should I call if I have additional questions or if I forget something? What long-term follow-up testing and treatments should I expect? What are the chances my cancer will recur? Will I still be able to have children, give blood, donate organs or plasma? What resources are available to help me understand what I’m going through?


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Cancer-related terminology can seem complex and technical. There are dozens of words you might hear during your diagnosis, treatment and follow-up appointments. This is not a complete list. Don’t be afraid to ask the meaning of any term your health-care provider uses. Be your own advocate to ensure you completely understand any discussion regarding your personal health, diagnosis and treatment. This list will get you started understanding some of the most common medical terms used when discussing breast cancer. Adjuvant therapy: Additional cancer treatment given after the primary treatment to lower the risk that the cancer will come back. Adjuvant therapy may include chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy, targeted therapy, or biological therapy. Axillary lymph node dissection: Surgery to remove lymph nodes found in the armpit region. Also called axillary dissection. Atypical ductal hyperplasia: A benign (not cancer) condition in which there are more cells than normal in the lining of breast ducts and the cells look abnormal under a microscope. Having atypical ductal hyperplasia increases the risk of breast cancer. Also called ADH and atypical ductal breast hyperplasia. Atypical lobular hyperplasia: A benign (not cancer) condition in which there are more cells than normal in the breast lobules and the cells look abnormal under a microscope. Having atypical lobular hyperplasia increases the risk of breast cancer. Also called ALH and atypical lobular breast hyperplasia.

Chemotherapy: Treatment with drugs that kill cancer cells. Clinical breast exam: A physical exam of the breast performed by a health-care provider to check for lumps or other changes. Also called CBE. Ductal carcinoma in situ: A noninvasive condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lining of a breast duct. The abnormal cells have not spread outside the duct to other tissues in the breast. In some cases, ductal carcinoma in situ may become invasive cancer and spread to other tissues, although it is not known at this time how to predict which lesions will become invasive. Also called DCIS and intraductal carcinoma. Fibroadenoma: A benign (not cancer) tumor that usually forms in the breast from both fibrous and glandular tissue. Fibroadenomas are the most common benign breast tumors.

Bilatera: Affecting both the right and left sides of the body.

Hormone therapy: Treatment that adds, blocks, or removes hormones. For certain conditions (such as diabetes or menopause), hormones are given to adjust low hormone levels. To slow or stop the growth of certain cancers (such as prostate and breast cancer), synthetic hormones or other drugs may be given to block the body’s natural hormones. Sometimes surgery is needed to remove the gland that makes a certain hormone. Also called endocrine therapy, hormonal therapy, and hormone treatment.

Breast: Glandular organ located on the chest. The breast is made up of connective tissue, fat, and breast tissue that contains the glands that can make milk. Also called mammary gland.

Hysterectomy: Surgery to remove the uterus and, sometimes, the cervix. When the uterus and the cervix are removed, it is called a total hysterectomy. When only the uterus is removed, it is called a partial hysterectomy.

Breast cancer: Cancer that forms in tissues of the breast, usually the ducts (tubes that carry milk to the nipple) and lobules (glands that make milk). It occurs in both men and women, although male breast cancer is rare.

Lobular carcinoma in situ: A condition in which abnormal cells are found in the lobules of the breast. Lobular carcinoma in situ seldom becomes invasive cancer; however, having it in one breast increases the risk of developing breast cancer in either breast. Also called LCIS.

Benign: Not cancerous. Benign tumors may grow larger but do not spread to other parts of the body. Also called nonmalignant.

Breast self-exam: An exam by a woman of her breasts to check for lumps or other changes. Carcinoma: Cancer that begins in the skin or in tissues that line or cover internal organs. Cellulitis: An acute, spreading infection of the deep tissues of the skin and muscle that causes the skin to become warm and tender and may also cause fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes and blisters.

Lumpectomy: Surgery to remove abnormal tissue or cancer from the breast and a small amount of normal tissue around it. It is a type of breast-sparing surgery. Malignant: Cancerous. Malignant tumors can invade and destroy nearby tissue and spread to other parts of the body. Mammogram: An X-ray of the breast.

Mastectomy: Surgery to remove the breast (or as much of the breast tissue as possible). Metastisis: The spread of cancer from one part of the body to another. A tumor formed by cells that have spread is called a “metastatic tumor” or a “metastasis.” The metastatic tumor contains cells that are like those in the original (primary) tumor. The plural form of metastasis is metastases (meh-TAStuh-SEEZ). Necrosis: Refers to the death of living tissues. Needle biopsy: The removal of tissue or fluid with a needle for examination under a microscope. When a wide needle is used, the procedure is called a core biopsy. When a thin needle is used, the procedure is called a fine-needle aspiration biopsy. Oophorectomy : Surgery to remove one or both ovaries. Palliation: Relief of symptoms and suffering caused by cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Palliation helps a patient feel more comfortable and improves the quality of life, but does not cure the disease. Prosthesis: A device, such as an artificial leg, that replaces a part of the body. Radiation therapy: The use of high-energy radiation from X-rays, gamma rays, neutrons, protons, and other sources to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation may come from a machine outside the body (external-beam radiation therapy), or it may come from radioactive material placed in the body near cancer cells (internal radiation therapy). Systemic radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance, such as a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody, that travels in the blood to tissues throughout the body. Also called irradiation and radiotherapy. Remission: A decrease in or disappearance of signs and symptoms of cancer. In partial remission, some, but not all, signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared. In complete remission, all signs and symptoms of cancer have disappeared, although cancer still may be in the body. Staging: Performing exams and tests to learn the extent of the cancer within the body, especially whether the disease has spread from the original site to other parts of the body. It is important to know the stage of the disease in order to plan the best treatment.

Definitions source: National Cancer Institute Dictionary of Cancer Terms


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Understanding the stages

STAGE III: Stage III breast cancer is divided into stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC. In stage IIIA, (1) no tumor is found in the breast, but cancer is found in axillary (under the arm) lymph nodes that are attached to each other or to other structures, or cancer may be found in lymph nodes STAGE 0: There are two types of stage 0 breast carcinoma in situ: ductal carcinoma near the breastbone; or (2) the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller and cancer has spread to in situ (DCIS) and lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS). DCIS is a noninvasive condition in which axillary lymph nodes that are attached to each other or to other structures, or the cancer may abnormal cells are found in the lining of a breast duct (a tube that carries milk to the nipple). have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone; or (3) the tumor is larger than 2 centimeters The abnormal cells have not spread outside the duct to other tissues in the breast. In some cases, DCIS may become invasive cancer and spread to other tissues, although it is not known but not larger than 5 centimeters and cancer has spread to axillary lymph nodes that are how to predict which lesions will become invasive cancer. LCIS is a condition in which abnormal attached to each other or to other structures, or cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near cells are found in the lobules (small sections of tissue involved with making milk) of the breast. the breastbone; or (4) the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters and cancer has spread to axillary lymph nodes that may be attached to each other or to other structures, or the cancer may This condition seldom becomes invasive cancer; however, having LCIS in one breast increases have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone. the risk of developing breast cancer in either breast. Also called breast carcinoma in situ. In stage IIIB, the tumor may be any size and cancer (1) has spread to the chest wall and/or STAGE I: Stage I breast cancer is divided into stages IA and IB. In stage IA, the tumor is 2 the skin of the breast; and (2) may have spread to axillary lymph nodes that may be attached centimeters or smaller and has not spread outside the breast. In stage IB, (1) no tumor is found to each other or to other structures, or the cancer may have spread to lymph nodes near the breastbone. In stage IIIC, there may be no sign of cancer in the breast or the tumor may be in the breast, but small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than any size and may have spread to the chest wall and/or the skin of the breast. Also, cancer (1) 2 millimeters) are found in the lymph nodes; or (2) the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller and small clusters of cancer cells (larger than 0.2 millimeter but not larger than 2 millimeters) are has spread to lymph nodes above or below the collarbone, and (2) may have spread to axillary lymph nodes or to lymph nodes near the breastbone. In operable stage IIIC, the cancer is found found in the lymph nodes. (1) in 10 or more axillary lymph nodes; or (2) in the lymph nodes below the collarbone; or (3) is found in axillary lymph nodes and in lymph nodes near the breastbone. In inoperable stage IIIC, Stage II: Stage II breast cancer is divided into stages IIA and IIB. In stage IIA, (1) no tumor the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes above the collarbone. is found in the breast, but cancer is found in the axillary (under the arm) lymph nodes; or (2) the tumor is 2 centimeters or smaller and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes; or (3) the STAGE IV: Cancer has spread to other organs of the body, most often the bones, lungs, tumor is larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than 5 centimeters and has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes. In stage IIB, the tumor is (1) larger than 2 centimeters but not larger than liver, or brain. 5 centimeters and has spread to the axillary lymph nodes; or (2) larger than 5 centimeters but — Stage definitions source: National Cancer Institute Dictionary of Cancer Terms has not spread to the axillary lymph nodes.


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Cancer and cancer treatments can zap your appetite and leave you feeling exhausted. Chemotherapy and radiation wreak havoc on the digestive system, as can cancer itself. It can be difficult to eat. It can feel impossible to muster the energy for exercise. But despite feeling awful, it is important to ensure proper nutrition and exercise during cancer treatment. Studies show both are proven to assist with healing and to increase overall energy levels. The National Cancer Institute offers fact sheets on these and many other cancer-related topics. This is what the NCI says about cancer nutrition and exercise: Did you know that many people with cancer also have anorexia? Anorexia is the most common cause of malnutrition during cancer. Since anorexia leads to malnutrition, cancer patients end up tired, weak and unable to resist infections and endure cancer treatment. Other side effects of cancer that interfere with nutrition are: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, mouth sores, anxiety and depression. Not only is appetite affected, but taste and smell can be, too, leaving cancer patients low on calorie and protein intake, which are important for fighting infection and healing. Did you know that proper nutrition is linked to a better prognosis? Detecting nutritional deficiencies and correcting them may help cancer patients gain and maintain weight, improve response to therapy and reduce complications of treatment. Proper nutrition can also prevent muscle and bone wasting, maintain strength and energy and improve quality of life. To help correct nutritional deficiencies during cancer and cancer treatment, consult a dietitian or physician for an assessment. Eating high-calorie, high-protein foods in small, frequent snack-sized amounts can be helpful. Ask for help preparing meals, especially if food odors are repulsive. And consider liquid supplements and smoothies if eating solids is difficult. Did you know that exercise promotes energy during cancer and cancer treatment? Cancer Related Fatigue (CRF) is a form of fatigue that does not respond to rest. It does, however, respond to low- to moderate-intensity exercise. Exercise not only helps increase energy, but it also helps boost mood, muscle strength, endurance and the immune system. Exercise is also proven to improve both physical health and psychological well-being. It helps maintain healthy bones, joints and muscle mass; controls weight and reduces risk of developing high blood pressure and diabetes; and reduces risk of death from heart disease. Did you know that exercise is linked to a better prognosis and decreased risk of cancer recurrence? Though numerous studies are still underway, prior studies suggest exercise improves survival rates and can offer a protective benefit from future cancers. In fact, one study showed that women who exercised moderately after breast cancer diagnosis had better survival rates than sedentary women. Nonetheless, Cancer Related Fatigue can be combatted by exercise. It’s important to begin exercising as early as possible following diagnosis. A trained exercise physiologist or cancer exercise expert can help develop an exercise program that suits individual lifestyle. Seated exercise works well in the case of extreme weakness, but walking and light weight resistance work well for more active and less fatigued individuals. For more detailed information on these topics, consult a cancer nutrition and exercise expert and visit Cancer.gov to read more.


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Pre-op and Post-op tips In anticipation of any breast surgery, a few items need to be completed and some plans arranged in order to ensure an easier recovery. After surgery, it’s important to ensure you have a restful atmosphere and all other obligations are postponed.

Before surgery, be sure to: • Consult other women who have had breast surgery for tips and advice • Shave or wax your armpits because it will be difficult to raise your arms afterward • Fill automobile gas tank even if you won’t be driving for a while • Water the plants well, and arrange to have a friend or neighbor water them during recovery • Clean the house thoroughly because you won’t be allowed to do any lifting for a while

After surgery, be sure to: • Turn off the phone and get plenty of rest • Limit visitors at first until you truly feel like having extra company • Have plenty of pillows on the bed to arrange for propping and comfort • Select a simple hairstyle during recovery, such as a pony tail or tied up in a scarf • Consult your physician concerning discomfort, including constipation and trouble sleeping

• Care for your nails, but leave them unpainted

• Arrange help caring for wounds, bandages and drain tubes

• Plan and prepare for easy meals after surgery or allow friends to bring meals

• Ask your physician about moisturizers and oils to reduce scarring

• Lay out shirts that button up rather than pull over

• Resume activity slowly, but only on the advice of your doctor or cancer center adviser

• Rearrange the location of items on high shelves so you’ll be able to reach them without raising your arms

• Attend all follow-up appointments • Continue to do monthly breast self-exams


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Many women find that mastectomy offers the best option of ridding the body of breast cancer and preventing recurrence. Mastectomies can be done in different forms, from partial to total, where a portion or the entire breast is removed. Women who have undergone a mastectomy procedure are often left with some deformity and scarring. Their breasts may be uneven or even totally removed. While there are some people who embrace their new breastless bodies, the large majority of women who have had a mastectomy prefer a method of camouflage that offers the appearance of natural breasts. Reconstructive surgery is certainly an option. However, a less expensive and invasive consideration is the use of mastectomy bras and prosthetics. Mastectomy bras can be used alone or in conjunction with a breast form, also called a breast prosthesis. These bras are either padded or have a pocket inside of the cup that allows the insertion of the form. Prosthetics

The process of shopping for mastectomy bras and other wardrobe essentials can be challenging. However, there are support systems in place and ways to make the process a little easier.

place and ways to make the process easier. • Check with the breast surgeon’s staff for recommendations on where to shop for items. One local source is the The Cancer Boutique at Ball Memorial Hospital. See Page 7 for more information. • Ask friends or family members who have undergone a mastectomy for suggestions. • Look for establishments that specialize in the medical needs of women. They will have experienced staff that can provide proper measurements and fittings of special products. • Consider online shopping if self-concan be made of silicone, microfiber or another sciousness is an issue. Just be sure to confirm material that is comfortable. return policies in the chance that a product Because no breast surgery is completely doesn’t fit correctly. the same, mastectomy products can typically • Having a support system of friends and be customized depending on the amount of family, particularly others who have shared breast tissue removed. the same experiences, can provide the laughBras and forms can be purchased whether ter, hugs and other help that’s needed. there is partial or total removal of the breast • Realize that roughly 50,000 mastectomies or both breasts. Individuals can experiment are performed each year in the U.S. alone. with different shaped forms to recreate the This equates to plenty of women in the same natural look they desire. situation. No one is alone in their fight against The process of shopping for mastectomy bras and other wardrobe essentials can be chal- breast cancer. — Metro Creative lenging. However, there are support systems in


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Vera Bradley

Available at local retailers and www. verabradley.com • 10 percent of proceeds from breast cancer patterns is donated to the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer • For more information visit www. verabradley.org • Breast Cancer patters: Hope Garden, Pinwheel Pink (pictured), Loves Me

The Cancer Center Boutique at Ball Memorial Hospital

• Hours: Monday through Friday 9 a.m.-4 p.m. • 2401 W. University Avenue, Muncie • 765-751-5302 • Boutique Manager Mary Rigel, CFm, is a breast cancer survivor • post-mastectomy orthotics and prosthetics fitting • insurance filing for Medicaid and private insurance • breast forms and partials • pocket bras, camisoles and swimwear • wigs and hairpieces • seasonal hats and sleep caps • cancer awareness clothing and jewelry • skin care items and non-metallic deodorant • specialty CDs for relaxation, meditation and stress relief • gel sheets, candles and gifts

The Cancer Center Boutique at Forest Ridge

• Hours: Monday through Friday 8 a.m.-3 p.m. • 2200 Forest Ridge Parkway, New Castle • 765-593-2960

JoAnn’s Magic Touch

Contact JoAnn Witherspoon at 260-726-9197 • custom fit bras • breast prosthetics • wigs and caps

The Breast Cancer Site Store

https://shop.thebreastcancersite.com/store • every purchase helps fund mammograms for women in need • helps fund breast cancer research through Mayo Clinic • clothing, shoes and accessories • bags, purses, jewelry and gifts • kitchen and home decor • sale, clearance and daily deals

Susan G. Komen for the Cure Indianapolis

www.komenindy.org/donate/shop • Lists information about local (Indianapolis) shopping specials • 75 percent of donation and shopping proceeds stay in Central Indiana • Links to ShopKomen.com, for official Susan G. Komen for the Cure merchandise

ShopKomen.com

www.shopkomen.com • 25 percent of proceeds returned to the Komen Indianapolis affiliate • Indianapolis even apparel • Men’s apparel • Promotional offers

Featured products

There’s certain gear that just goes along with breast cancer and chemotherapy. Go in fighting dressed in a decorative pink ribbon shirt, pink wristbands and flip-flops, and armed with excellent reading and writing material. And it can get cold sitting in a treatment room waiting on a treatment to be completed, so a pink ribbon fleece blanket is the perfect item to complete the guise — breast cancer awareness style. • “Fight Like a Girl” jersey style T-shirt Available at The Cancer Center Boutique at BMH, $28.50 • Breast Cancer Ribbon flip-flops Available at The Cancer Center Boutique at BMH, $10 • Chicken Soup for the Breast Cancer Survivor’s Soul By Jack Canfield, Available at most book retailers, $14.95 • Pink Ribbon Wave Fleece Blanket Available at TheBreastCancerSite.com, $19.95 • “Imagine” breast cancer cause pink silicone wristbands Available at ShopKomen.com, $5 for 5 bracelets


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Quips & Quotes “I was only 12 when my Neenie died of breast cancer. I felt extreme anger and I couldn’t understand why she couldn’t fight it. I would advise parents to get their children into therapy to help them work through what they are feeling.” — Julie Sosbe, in memory of her grandmother “When you’re going through radiation, wear men’s undershirts. It’s the softest cloths on your burns.” — Pat Sandoe, 10-year breast cancer survivor “To anybody facing a new diagnosis of breast cancer: We have the resources, the technology and the individuals to give you the best care — right here.” — Melody Stanley, patient education and support coordinator at The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital “Whoever said winning isn’t everything ... obviously was not fighting breast cancer” — Bumper Sticker “Yes they’re fake. My real ones tried to kill me.” — T-shirt “It’s a big price to pay for a boob job. Mammograms save lives.” — Bumper Sticker “Women agonize ... over cancer; we take as a personal threat the lump in every friend’s breast.” — Martha Weinman Lear, Heartsounds “Breast cancer is like being admitted to this wonderful sisterhood none of us wants to be in but we are all here for each other.” — Lynbob, Evansville, Ind., breastcancer.org discussion community forum user “When my mom had breast cancer, I wanted everyone to know how important their support was to my family and how much we all appreciated their help.” — Shelby Miller, age 15, in honor of her mother

The Comprehensive Breast Health Center of Ball Memorial Hospital 2598 W. White River Blvd., Muncie, (765) 282-7595 • Breast health education • Community outreach and education • Breast cancer risk assessment • High quality digital mammography • Screening mammograms • Diagnostic mammograms • Diagnostic breast ultrasound • Breast MRI • Pre-operative needle localization • Mammogram guided • Ultrasound guided • MRI guided • Same-day minimally invasive biopsy • Ultrasound guided aspiration • Ultrasound guided core needle biopsy • Stereotactic needle biopsy • Ductograms • Breast MRI expert Dr. Colleen Madden The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital Gilbert and Cilia Streets, Muncie, (765) 751-1449 • Focuses on prevention, early detection and treatment • total care approach through state-of-the-art technology, clinical research, advanced forms of therapy and supportive programs • Accredited by the American College of Surgeons, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the American College of Radiology • Medical oncology • Radiation oncology • Cancer counseling • Oncology inpatient unit

Henry County Hospital 1000 N. 16th, New Castle, (765) 521-0890 • Digital mammography • Works closely with Ball Cancer Center at Forest Ridge Ball Cancer Center at Forest Ridge 2200 Forest Ridge Parkway #120, New Castle, (765) 593-2960 • Radiation oncology services • Medical oncology services • Education services • Supportive services • Breast Surgery Recovery Program Jay County Hospital Specialty Referral Center 500 W. Votaw St., Portland, (260) 726-1814 • Offers oncology services through Richmond Oncology and Hematology


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“Reaching Out” Breast Health Program Cancer Service of East Central Indiana, Little Red Door 401 W. Jackson Street, Muncie, (765) 284-9063 LittleRedDoorECI.org • Breast health information • Free clinical breast exams • Free mammogram referrals to those who qualify • Monthly programs and clinics February through November Jay County Cancer Society Contact: Bev Inman at (260) 726-4641 or (260) 726-8110 • Financial resources • Intended to help with transportation, medication and prosthetic devices Jay County Hospital Imaging Department Indiana Breast Cancer Awareness Trust Fund Contact: (260) 726-1821 • Free screening mammograms and interpretation of results • Eligibility determined during appointment scheduling Breast & Cervical Cancer Program, Indiana State Department of Health Regional Contact (765) 747-2970 • Breast and cervical cancer screenings • Diagnostic testing • Cancer treatment • For underserved and underinsured Hoosier women • Eligibility based on household size and income

National Breast & Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program A Centers for Disease Control and Prevention program Contact: (800) 232-4636 • Program for low income women • Provides access to breast and cervical cancer screening programs ENCOREplus ® Program of the YWCA Contact: (888) 953-9922 • Call to find the nearest participating YWCA • Program targets medically underserved women • Education • Screening mammograms • Support • Exercise program Interlocal Community Action Program/Mammogram Assistance Program Contact: (765) 529-4403 • Uninsured and underinsured program • Provides free screening and diagnostic mammograms • Provides free screening and diagnostic mammograms

@thestarpress.com

Visit our In the Pink site for more information and read profiles of surivors. • www.thestarpress.com/section/pink


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Breast Surgery Recovery Program at Ball Memorial Hospital Contact: The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital (765) 751-1449 • Requires referral from physician • Free BSRP kit before surgery • Surgical bra or camisole • Exercise instruction booklet • Stress reliever ball • Educational resources appropriate for procedure • Tote bag Ball Memorial Hospital (other support services) Contact The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital: • Cancer Registry: (765) 747-3025 • CancerHelp touchscreen computer: (765) 751-1400 • Cancer Education Program: (765) 741-2938 • Cancer Risk Assessment Program: (765) 747-3810 • BMH Pain Management Clinic: (765) 741-2957 • Cancer screenings: (765) 741-1449 • Patient navigations and support services: (765) 751-1400 • Cancer counseling: (765) 751-1449 • Pastoral care: (765) 747-3111 • Cancer exercise program: (765) 751-5304 • Social services: (765) 751-1449 • Complimentary cancer therapies • Relaxation and guided imagery • Support groups • Grief/bereavement support

Indiana Women in Need Foundation (I.W.I.N.) Contact: (317) 475-0565, iwinfoundation.org • Assists women enduring breast cancer treatment with services and support • Errands, child care, pet care, housekeeping, transportation, exercise and more American Cancer Society programs and resources Contact: (800) 227-2345, www.cancer.org • Reach to Recovery ® • I Can Cope ® • Look Good… Feel Better ® • “tlc” - Tender Loving Care ® • Hope Lodge ® • Cancer Survivors Network Bosom Buddies support group in Muncie • Contact Joan Smith for reservations at (765) 759-9627 • Meets first Friday each month (except January and July) at Vera Mae’s in Downtown Muncie • Luncheon meetings • Guest speakers on breast cancer topics • There is a registration fee Blackford Community Breast Cancer Support Group Blackford Community Hospital, Main Conference Room 410 Pilgrim Blvd., Hartford City, Ind. • Meets every first Thursday at 6 p.m.

Jay County Cancer Support Group Contact: Jay County Hospital, 430 W. Votaw Street, Portland, Ind., (260) 726-1809 • Meets every last Tuesday (except December) at 5 p.m. Supporting Survival Contact: Ball Cancer Center at Forest Ridge, 2200 Forest Ridge Parkway, New Castle, (765) 593-2960 • Meets every third Thursday at 6 p.m. National Cancer Institute (NCI) Cancer Information Service Contact: (800) 422-6237, www.cancer.gov Sisters Network Contact: (866) 781-1808, www.sistersnetworkinc.org Susan G. Komen for the Cure Contact: (877) 465-6636, www.komen.org Your Shoes 24/7 Breast Cancer Support Center Contact: (800) 221-2141, www.networkofstrength.org Clarian Ball Hospice Contact: (765) 747-4274


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The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital 2401 W. University Avenue Muncie, IN 47303 (765) 751-1449 www.thecancercenteratbmh.org Meridian Services 240 N. Tillotson Avenue Muncie, IN 47304 (765) 288-1928 www.meridiansc.org Stillwaters Jodi L. Nixon, Ph.D., HSPP 2205 N. Wheeling Avenue Muncie, IN 47303 (765) 204-0043 www.stillwaterspc.com Associates in Behavioral Counseling Terrie Vannatta, Ph.D. or Michele Boberg, Ph.D. 4607 N. Wheeling Avenue Muncie, IN 47304 (765) 288-1110 Being concerned about or diagnosed with breast cancer can take an emotional toll on you, your family and your other support members. You might experience fear, anxiety, fatigue and difficulty sleeping and making decisions. Professional counseling can help, and in fact has been shown to improve breast cancer outcomes. Contact a counseling provider in your area, or one of these listed above.

Charitable funding for local breast cancer programs is provided by: Avon Foundation for Women Breast Care Fund www.avonfoundation.org/donate/ Avon Foundation 1345 Avenue of the Americas New York, NY 10105 Susan G. Komen for the Cure Indianapolis www.komenindy.org/donate/ Indianapolis Affiliate of Susan G. Komen for the Cure 1099 N. Meridian Street, Suite 111 Indianapolis, IN 46204 The Indiana Breast Cancer Awareness Trust www.breastcancerplate.org/ 866-724-2228 Indiana Breast Awareness Trust Inc P.O. Box 8212 Evansville, IN 47716 Cancer Services of Delaware County-Little Red Door http://littlereddooreci.org/ 401 W. Jackson St. Muncie, IN 47305


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BREAS CANCE T BOO R MAGA KS & ZINES Breast Cancer Wellness Magazine BreastCancerWellness.org Free, downloadable PDF version CURE Magazine CureToday.com, Free subscription When your doctor says breast cancer By David A. Cooke ISBN: 9780780811690* Release Date: November 2010 Retail Price: $32.95 Female Force: Olivia Newton John - Breast Cancer Awareness Issue! By Sandra C. Ruckdeschel and Alessandro Miracolo ISBN: 9781450708906 Release Date: November 2010 Retail Price: $3.99 Quickfacts Breast Cancer: What You Need to Know — Now By American Cancer Society ISBN: 9781604430318 Release Date: November 2010 Retail Price: $8.95 Breast Cancer By Joel Pardee ISBN: 9781615040759 Release Date: November 2010 Retail Price: $38.50

Wome n breas diagnosed t of res cancer hav with o literat urces whe e thousand s u sourc re. In addi n it comes es and tion to to there a few online a entert re books fo magazines encou ainment, s r informat , io u r titles agement. T pport and n, publis his lis t cont year — hed d u a be rel and a few ring the pa ins t e are al ased. Som hat are soo st e of th so val n to u e spous es and able readin se titles gf other suppo or rt peo ple.

The Psychological Impact of Breast Cancer: A Psychologist's Insight as a Patient By Cordelia Galgut, Jenni Murray, Carmel Coulter and Cathy Roberts ISBN: 9781846193033 Release Date: October 2010 Retail Price: $43.95 Pink Ribbon Blues: How Breast Cancer Culture Undermines Women's Health (Hardcover) By Gayle A. Sulik ISBN: 9780199740451 Release Date: October 2010 Retail Price: $32.95 Previvors: Facing the Breast Cancer Gene and Making Life-Changing Decisions By Dina Roth Port ISBN: 9781583334058 Release Date: October 2010 Retail Price: $16.00 Yoga and Breast Cancer: A Journey to Health and Healing By Ingrid Kollak and Isabell Utz-Billing ISBN: 9781932603910 Release Date: October 2010 Retail Price: $21.95

Brown Skin and Breast Cancer By P. J. Hargrove ISBN: 9781449063160 Release Date: December 2009 Retail Price: $12.09 The Pink Ribbon Diet: Winning Back Your Body After Breast Cancer By Mary Flynn and Nancy Verde Barr ISBN: 9780738213941 Release Date: September 2010 Retail Price: $16.95 Promise Me: How a Sister's Love Launched the Global Movement to End Breast Cancer (Hardcover) By Nancy G. Brinker ISBN: 9780307718129 Release Date: September 2010 Retail Price: $25.99 Living Well Beyond Breast Cancer: A Survivor's Guide for When Treatment Ends and the Rest of Your Life Begins (Paperback - Revised Ed.) By Marisa Weiss, Ellen Weiss ISBN: 9780307460226 Release Date: January 2010 Retail Price: $20.00


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A Jar for My Tears: A Journal of Prayer and Healing for Women with Breast Cancer By Jane Wilson ISBN: 9781607999539 Release Date: December 2009 Retail Price: $14.99

A Random Interruption: Surviving Breast Cancer with Laughter, Vodka, Smoothies and an Attitude By Suzanne Zaccone ISBN: 9781441580566 Release Date: November 2009 Retail Price: $23.99

Patient Self Management for Women with Breast Cancer By Siew Yim Loh ISBN: 9783639197891 Release Date: December 2009 Retail Price: $126.50

The ABC's of Breast Cancer from Victim to Survivor By Jannette Kortman ISBN: 9781438923406 Release Date: October 2009 Retail Price: $15.39

My Mommy Has Breast Cancer By Gina Wright and Janine Yordy ISBN: 9781449021504 Release Date: October 2009 Retail Price: $14.84 Memoir to My Bosom Buddy: Journal of My Walk with Breast Cancer By Janet Bergdoll ISBN: 9781602730106 Release Date: December 2009 Retail Price: $14.25 The Breast Cancer Sisterhood By Brenda Ray Coffee, Nd Rd LD ISBN: 9781439254677 Release Date: December 2009 Retail Price: $14.29 Husbands and Heroes the Breast Cancer Caregiver By Brenda Ray Coffee ISBN: 9781439254684 Release Date: December 2009 Retail Price: $14.29

Stand by Her: A Breast Cancer Guide for Men By John W. Anderson ISBN: 9780814413913 Release Date: October 2009 Retail Price: $18.95 Empowered: A Woman-To-Woman Guide to Preventing and Surviving Breast Cancer By Sheryl Ellinwood ISBN: 9780980008470 Release Date: October 2009 Retail Price: $12.00 My Sister Has Breast Cancer By Christine L. Morgan ISBN: 9781607990307 Release Date: October 2009 Retail Price: $11.99 * The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a unique, numeric commercial book identifier and may help you if you are searching for the books listed above.

Online breast cancer information

It’s important to know as much as you can about your diagnosis. For some, asking questions or searching the book shelves in a public book store or library can be intimidating. Numerous online sites provide current, reliable information about breast cancer and related issues. Whether you use these recommended websites or others, be sure the site you use provides well-researched and current information. Government websites, university research study sites and cancer organization sites are generally recommended. Do follow up with your health care provider to be sure you understand the information correctly. • State of Indiana www.in.gov/isdh/24435.htm • National Cancer Institute www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/types/breast • American Cancer Society www.cancer.org/Cancer/BreastCancer/OverviewGuide/index • Susan G. Komen for the Cure ww5.komen.org/ • National Breast Cancer Foundation www.nationalbreastcancer.org/ • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/features/breastcancerawareness/ • Mayo Clinic www.mayoclinic.com/health/breast-cancer/DS00328 • BreastCancer.org www.breastcancer.org • Breast cancer terminology www.suite101.com/article.cfm/breastcancer/75294


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Oct. 1

Oct. 15

• October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month Schedule your annual mammogram today! • Bosom Buddies Breast Cancer Support Group: Luncheon Meeting at Vera Mae’s in Muncie. Call to register: (765) 759-9627 • Tickled Pink: Benefiting the Vera Bradley Foundation for Breast Cancer in Roanoke from 69:30 p.m. $75 www.verabradley.org/tickledpink

Oct. 2

• Perform breast self-exam • Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Walk, An American Cancer Society event: Registration begins at 9 a.m. Walk begins at 10 a.m. No registration fee or minimum fundraising amount at The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital. www.makingstrides. acsevents.org • Benson Motorcycle Ride for Breast Cancer benefitting the Little Red Door. 9 a.m. www. bensonmotorcycles.com. 765-288-1817 • The Community Hope Cancer Banquet benefitting Little Red Door-Cancer Services of East Central Indiana. 6-11 p.m. $400/table or $50/person at Cornerstone Center for the Arts. (765) 284-9063

Oct. 8

• Cancer Survivor/Cancer Patient Support Group at The Cancer Center at BMH. Call to register: (765) 751-1400.

Oct. 9

• Stars of Pink Breast Cancer Survivor Fashion Show: A Pink Ribbon Connection event. 10:30 a.m. $75 at Indianapolis Downtown Marriott. www.pinkribbonconnection.org

• The Star Press/Ball Memorial Hospital In The Pink Community Day: More information at www. thestarpress.com/inthepink

Breast Health Day set for Oct. 16 Breast Cancer Awareness Month is the perfect time to schedule a clinical breast exam and screening mammogram. The Ball Memorial Hospital Comprehensive Breast Center and Cancer Services of East Central Indiana — Little Red Door are teaming up this Breast Cancer Awareness Month to provide breast health services from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Oct. 16. “Because October is breast cancer awareness month, Ball Hospital and The Little Red Door are pleased to offer this screening event for women who do not have insurance or are underinsured,” said Nancy Lee Brown, nurse navigator at the Comprehensive Breast Center. The All-In-One Breast Health Day event will take place at Comprehensive Breast Center at the Imaging Center, 2598 W. White River Blvd., Muncie. Medical doctors will conduct clinical breast exams while other staff provides breast health education. Screening mammograms for those who qualify can be completed the same day. “This is one of our most popular breast clinics,” said Denise M. Hurt, Little Red Door administrative assistant and “Reaching Out” Breast Health coordinator and events coordinator. “The ‘Reaching Out’ Breast Health Program is the sponsor and will be paying for all the mammogram services for those that don’t have insurance.” To schedule an appointment, call Little Red Door, 284-9063. Plan for the appointment to take about an hour. You don’t need to take anything with you, but you will go home with a goodie bag and helpful information about breast health.

Oct. 16

• The Star Press/Muncie Mall’s Women’s Head to Toe Expo at the Muncie Mall. www.thestarpress.com/ headtotoe • All-In-One Breast Health Clinic: Clinical Breast Exams and Mammograms from 9 a.m. to noon. Call Little Red Door for more information. (765) 284-9063

Oct. 21

• Supporting Survival, Ball Cancer Center at Forest Ridge in New Castle, Ind. Call to register: (765) 593-2960

Oct. 26

• Jay County Cancer Support Group: Jay County Hospital at 5 p.m. 430 W. Votaw Street, Portland, Ind. (260) 726-1809

Oct. 27

• What You Need to Know Wednesdays: The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital in Muncie, Ind. Call to register: (765) 751-5304

Nov. 5

• Bosom Buddies Breast Cancer Support Group: Luncheon Meeting at Vera Mae’s in Muncie. Call to register: (765) 759-9627

Nov. 6

• Perform breast self-exam

Nov. 12

• Cancer Survivor/Cancer Patient Support Group: The Cancer Center at BMH. Call to register: (765) 751-1400


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Nov. 17

• Look Good Feel Better: The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital in Muncie, Ind. Call to register: (765) 751-5302 • Look Good Feel Better: Ball Cancer Center at Forest Ridge in New Castle, Ind. Call to register: (765) 593-2960

Nov. 18

• Supporting Survival: Ball Cancer Center at Forest Ridge in New Castle, Ind. Call to register: (765) 593-2960

Other ways to help

• Brides Against Breast Cancer: Donate your gown. Enables Making Memories to grant final wishes to those with terminal breast cancer. www.bridesagainstbreastcancer. org • Pink Envelope Project: Host a Pink Envelope fundraiser. Enables Making Memories to grant final wishes. www. pinkenvelopeproject.org

Nov. 24

• What You Need to Know Wednesdays: The Cancer Center at Ball Memorial Hospital in Muncie. Call to register: (765) 751-5304

Nov. 30

• Indiana Breast Cancer Awareness Trust — License Plates: $25 per license plate is returned to Delaware County to benefit the “Reaching Out” program. $40 specialty plate fee. www.in.gov/bmv

• Jay County Cancer Support Group: Jay County Hospital at 5 p.m. 430 W. Votaw St., Portland. (260) 726-1809 For additional meeting times and related events through the year, visit www.thestarpress/calendar


October 1, 2010

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In the Pink  

A Breast Cancer Resource Guide

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