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PHOTO BY GWINN DAVIS ©2014 GWINNDAVISPHOTOS.COM

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ISSUE NUMBER III

2-3.................. Introduction 6-7.................. Local News 8-9.................. The Good 9-11................ Back in My Day 13................... Simpsonville Culture

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

14-16.............. Local Events 17................... Local Artist Spotlight 18-19.............. Chamber Update 21................... Simpsonville Mystery 22-23.............. Simpsonville History

24................... Call for Vietnam Photos 25-26.............. All in Good Fun 27................... Shop Local 27................... Announcements

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On the Cover

BETH KELLEY FANN • beth@simpsonvillebanner.com

JUNE 14, 2014

Long-time residents have watched the familiar Sunrise Run wind through downtown Simpsonville for 35 years now. Hosted by the Greenville Track Club, along with First Baptist Church Simpsonville, the Sunrise Run took place this year on Saturday, June 14th. This run is the oldest and largest in the area, and the earliest. Adult runners hit the pavement at 6:16 am and the Kids Race began at 7:35 am. The 8k course started at Hedge Street, wound through downtown and surrounding neighborhoods, and concluded in front of FBC’s Activities Center. Prizes were awarded in a multitude of age categories, from 1-99. The first place times are listed at right. For more information and complete list of race times, visit gtcsunriserun.com PHOTO BY GWINN DAVIS ©2014 • GWINNDAVISPHOTOS.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

CATEGORY

NAME

HOMETOWN

AGE TIME

OA

OA Male

Cashman, Josh

Simpsonville, SC

26

25:27.39

1

OA Female

Freeman, Ginnie

Greenville, SC

38

30:56.75

17

Masters Male

Giguere,Philippe

Simpsonville, SC 45

27:38.27

7

Masters Female Wood, Nicole

Simpsonville, SC 40

36:20.90

129

GM Female

Ruble, Sharon

Simpsonville, SC

51

39:00.23

211

GMs Male

Stewart, Tim

Simpsonville, SC

53

31:11.49

20

1-14 Male

Windsor, Paul

Greenville, SC

14

33:29.79

59

1-14 Female

Deroberts, Emma

Fountain Inn, SC 14

33:36.33

66

15-19 Male

Buddenberg, Alex

Simpsonville, SC

16

33:33.55

63

15-19 Female

Davies, Teri

Lyman, SC

18

33:04.95

51

20-24 Male

Arquette, Brandon

Greenville, SC

24

30:53.88

16

20-24 Female

Brown, Chloe

New Orleans, LA 21

33:08.48

52

25-29 Male

Liew, Ashley

Spartanburg, SC

27

27:05.35

6

25-29 Female

Decken, Lindsay

Simpsonville, SC

29

36:04.54

120

30-34 Male

Hoffman, Seth

Spartanburg, SC

30

29:48.44

13

30-34 Female

Greer, Katie

Greenville, SC

31

35:20.35

100

35-39 Male

Allen, Jonathan

Simpsonville, SC

35

29:06.03

10

35-39 Female

Rohm, Danielle

Greenville, SC

39

33:43.30

69

40-44 Male

Ferland, Christopher Mauldin, SC

44

31:38.66

29

40-44 Female

Sloan, Meredith

Greer, SC

43

38:09.40

182

45-49 Male

Godlewski, Jeff

Simpsonville, SC 49

31:50.98

32

45-49 Female

Dowis, Tracie

Simpsonville, SC 46

40:03.10

243

50-54 Male

Hutter, Jeffrey

Simpsonville,SC

51

33:31.12

62

50-54 Female

Grumbles, Beth

Easley, SC

54

41:07.58

268

55-59 Male

Sykes, George

Simpsonville, SC

57

33:25.84

58

55-59 Female

Wood, Susan

Taylors, SC

56

41:33.32

282

60-64 Female

Biebel, Mary

Greenville, SC

61

43:37.29

361

60-64 Male

Brown, Wilfred

Greenville, SC

61

36:38.33

139

65-69 Female

Childress, Octavia

Salem, SC

67

43:16.35

346

65-69 Male

Spark, David

Greenville, SC

65

35:08.89

97

70-74 Male

Carner, Gerry

Clemson, SC

70

37:56.01

171

70-74 Female

Brooks, Anne

Salem, SC

72

52:01.15

622

75-99 Male

Chandler, Bobby

Greenville, SC

77

47:21.47

473

Please don’t toss this paper in the trash! Did you know there are multiple uses for newspaper once you are finished reading it? One thrifty idea is to use newspapers to make small pots for seedlings. Germinate your seeds in them, then plant seedlings, pot and all, into the ground. This helps prevent transplant shock, and the paper quickly breaks down into the soil. Local garden centers and hardware stores, such as ACE Hardware (30 Ray E. Talley Ct., Simpsonville, 864-757-8312) usually carry a variety of inexpensive seed packets for both vegetable and flower gardening. Contributed by Christy Staton of Simpsonville


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INTRODUCTION

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The Simpsonville Banner is published weekly on Fridays, and every day online. Submissions for the printed edition are due on Saturday of the week prior to publishing. Send to info@simpsonvillebanner.com. Contributed Columns and Photography from citizens of Simpsonville and surrounding areas. ©2014 Brebson Creative, LLC.


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Aloft, Inc. Declares Chapter 7 Bankruptcy, Impact Felt on Multiple Levels BETH KELLEY FANN • beth@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 14, 2014

Last week the Board of Directors at Aloft announced that due to low attendance the organization would be filing for Chapter 7 Bankruptcy. The news fell heavy on the hearts of Simpsonville residents and the many volunteers who have staffed the weekend-long festival over the years. The financial impact on vendors not yet paid is also great, as is the money due to the City of Simpsonville. $52,000 is the full amount owed to the City, and that figure does not include late fees. $22,000 of that is for last year’s event. $30,000 in rent for 2014 is due in full later this summer. When asked how the loss of the anticipated payment from Aloft would affect the city, David Dyrhaug, acting city administrator, said, “With regard to the budget for fiscal year 2014-2015, Aloft’s situation may affect both revenues and expenditures. It represents a lost source of revenue if the city does not receive the $30,000 rent owed for the 2014 event which is due by August 1, 2014. It affects expenditures if the event does not take place in 2015 whereby the city would save personnel expenditures and other miscellaneous expenditures related to the event. These expenditures typically run well in excess of $30,000.” Although the numbers were not as great as in past years, local residents showed their support by attending the Aloft festival this year. However, many said they would like to see the event return to its roots including changing the name back to “Freedom Weekend Aloft”. Vendors not yet paid should direct queries to: Skinner Law Firm, 300 North Main Street, Suite 201 Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 232-2007

JEFF RICHARDSON COMPANY

Jim Kincannon Agent

Office: 864-962-1750 • Cell: 864-420-6926 PO Box 39 • Simpsonville, SC 29681 jimkincannon@hotmail.com • jeffrichardsoncompany.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

JUST THE

FACTS What you need to know about

South Carolina’s Texting and Driving Law Last week drivers in SC were given 180 days to break the habit of texting and driving. Governor Nikki Haley signed into law a bill that prohibits texting and driving. This law trumps any local laws, including the recent ban on all use by the city of Greenville. The state law includes a fine of $25 for infractions. Here is what you can and cannot do. LEGAL: • Talk on your cell phone while driving. • Use your GPS or Mapping apps while driving. • If you are parked or at a stop light, you may text or send messages. • You may use a hands free device to talk or text ILLEGAL: Send any text, email or message while operating a moving vehicle. In Simpsonville, Law Enforcement previously relied on the city’s own distracted driving ordinance if enforcement was needed. The state law will be enforced here following the 180 grace period.


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LOCAL NEWS

discover the best and boldest flavors competitors can fire up on their grills in this ultimate, outdoor cooking challenge. From the Virginia countryside where whole hogs are a classic, to Maryland’s Eastern Shore where blue crabs are legendary, host David Guas visits a different city each week where he serves up amazing local ingredients to test the epic backyard skills of America’s hardcore grillers. Competitors come from all walks of life, including a patent attorney, a professional chef, an electrician and a suburban mom. Despite their differences, all contestants have a passion for highheat, big meat and cooking over an open flame. Each episode starts with 4 competitors, but in the end only 1 walks away with the $10,000 cash prize and the bragging rights of being the killer griller.” The show has already taken place, but Simpsonville will have to wait along with Jeff and his friends and family to hear the results. American Grilled will air on Wednesday, July 2nd at 10 pm.

VIEWING PARTY ON JULY 2ND, 10:00 PM

THE NOSE DIVE 116 S MAIN ST, GREENVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA 29601

PHOTO BY JOHN M. HOYT ©2014 • FACEBOOK.COM/GREENVILLEPHOTOGRAPHY

Bovinoche Creator Jeff Banister to Appear on Travel Channel’s “American Grilled”

LUNCH, BRUNCH OR DINNER HUNGRY MUNGRY DELIVERS

Now delivering for Pete’s of Simpsonville, Tequila’s and Java Bistro. Just Pick it, Click it, and Done!

$2.50 OFF

WITH COUPON CODE: LETSEAT

864-962-7217 • HUNGRYMUNGRYDELIVERS.COM

BETH KELLEY FANN • beth@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 16, 2014

For the last two years, Jeff Banister has brought Simpsonville his Bovinoche festival (formerly called Bovinova.) The celebration involves music, fun and the cooking of whole animals over open flame. He is serious about meat, and takes pride in both hunting and preparing unique culinary experiences. This summer, Jeff will appear on the Travel Channel’s new summer series, American Grilled. The episode was filmed in Asheville, NC, where Jeff competed with 3 other contestants for $10,000 and the right to be called “Grill Master.” From the TravelChannel.com: “We’re traveling across America to

SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM


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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

SC Attorney General Releases Plan to Address Human Trafficking in SC CAROLINE RICHARDSON MAHAFFEY• caroline@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 14, 2014

Human trafficking is often referred to as modern day slavery, and may refer to sex trafficking, labor trafficking, or both. Victims are all ages, genders, and nationalities. They can be run-aways, victims of fraud, blackmail and abduction, or in financial servitude. When it relates to sex trafficking, girls aged twelve to fourteen make up the majority of victims, and may be sold ten to fifteen times a day. According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, between fifty two hundred and fifty five hundred children are involved in prostitution every day, with only three percent ever rescued.

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

According to the plan, it is this increased awareness that will make the difference in eliminating the issue of human trafficking. Education may help prevent people from becoming victims in the first place, as traffickers often prey on those unaware of their rights and the services available to them. Law enforcement officers, first responders, social workers and other public service providers, as well as the private sector, must be made aware that there is a problem, and the severity of it. This awareness, as well as recognizing the “red flags” will aid in victim identification, and possibly in the arrest of human traffickers. For more information, and the complete report, go to scag.gov

Traffickers are pimps, family members, business owners, gang leaders, labor brokers, and employers of domestic servants. They use physical, psychological, emotional and financial methods to control their victims. In the case of foreign born victims, traffickers may retain victims’ passports, if they arrived legally, or threaten to turn them over to authorities if they did not. While statistics are difficult to obtain due to the underground nature of the crime, it is believed that the United States ranks in the top ten of developed countries in the area of human trafficking. According to South Carolina Attorney General Alan Wilson, South Carolina is a source, a destination, and a pass through state. SC’s spider web of interstates, and its dependence on tourism and agriculture make it attractive for those engaged in the criminal enterprise of human trafficking. In fact, human trafficking occurs in South Carolina every day. Victims are rarely in a position to seek help, making it necessary for the public to be aware of the problem, and to be alert to signs. These modern day slaves may have few, if any possessions. It is possible they never appear in public without another person. Victims may show signs of physical abuse, appear unhealthy, and sometimes have been tattooed as a modern way of branding. The Attorney General’s office released the State Plan on Addressing Human Trafficking on June 12. According to Mark Powell, Communications Director for the Attorney General’s office, this report is an important step toward combating the growing problem of human trafficking in South Carolina. It serves to increase awareness of the problem, as well as provide a blue print for moving forward.

June 24th Runoff Election

Don’t forget to vote this coming Tuesday. Republican Runoff for Lt. Governor: Henry McMaster v. Mike Campbell Republican Runoff for Superintendent of Education: Sally Atwater v. Molly Spearman Democratic Runoff for Superintendent of Education: Sheila Gallagher v. Tom Thompson Find your polling place here: greenvillecounty.org/voter_registration/ pdf/2014primarypollingsites.pdf

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THE GOOD

Bringing Home Cameron’s Diabetic Alert Dog BETH KELLEY FANN • beth@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 16, 2014

Cameron Szymanski was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when he was just 18 months old. This was a very big diagnosis for a small boy, but the Szymanski’s met the challenge head on. Now 12, Cameron is active and happy, even participates in both swimming and baseball. His family and friends provide the constant support he needs to grow and thrive. Type 1 Diabetes occurs when the insulin producing cells in the pancreas are attacked by the body’s immune system. As a toddler, this meant Cameron would need an insulin pump, medication, and testing several times a day. Complications from asthma and seasonal allergies also contribute to his highly fluctuating sugar levels, making vigilance a necessity. And the last two years brought more. Cameron was diagnosed with gallbladder disease, and post removal brought the new challenges of gastroparesis and acid reflux. The family made the decision to look into a Diabetic Alert Dog, also called a DAD. Cameron’s mother, Stacie Szymanski, had been researching diabetic alert dogs for a few years. At the urging of her sister in California, Stacie made the decision to move forward with the effort. The cost of purchasing and training a dog is $16,000, and adding in supplies and care, the total need was set at $20,000. Stacie says this decision was no small one, but she decided to rely on her faith and trust they would be able to bring a DAD home for Cameron. Earlier this year, she opened a YouCaring fundraiser and used the online platform to tell Cameron’s story. The fund began to grow quickly as the community learned of their story.

PHOTO BY BETH FANN ©2014

On March 25, 2014, the Szymanski’s 11 year old son Logan was also diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Purchasing a DAD took on a whole new meaning. Friends and family began spreading the fundraising effort anew. Stacie’s good friend and neighbor, Stacy McGraw, was on board from the start. McGraw organized a carnival at the Simpsonville Activity and Senior Center with a raffle and silent auction. $5,200 was raised at the event held June 1st, and the Szymanski’s exceeded their goal of $20,000. The money came from both individuals and businesses, and was truly a community effort. (Continued on page 8)


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FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

(Continued from page 7) The Szymanski’s new dog and DAD hopeful, Max, is currently in training with Diabetic Alert Dogs by Zakk in Anderson. Max is a standard poodle, and that breed was chosen to accommodate family allergies. Cameron and his family travel once a week to train with their DAD, who will become a part of the family officially in October. When Cameron starts high school next year, he will have Max by his side, looking out for him and providing peace of mind to the entire Szymanski family. To learn more about Cameron and his DAD Max, visit facebook.com/ CameronsDADJourney

PHOTO BY BETH FANN ©2014

Cameron’s story intersects with Zakk Wrabiutza, Max’s trainer and creator of Diabetic Alert Dogs by Zakk. Born a T1 Diabetic himself, Zakk first learned of DADs as a teenager when his labradoodle Annie came into his life. He is now a remarkable self-taught trainer and dedicated to helping other families pair with a DAD. Along with his parents Billy and Donna, the 19 year old has trained and placed more than ten dogs over the last two years. Each dog is trained to recognize the scents associated with a diabetic episode, and taught to alert their handlers by pawing or circling. Zakk says that while the dogs reach maturity at varying ages, they learn early on that alerting will create a “party” for them, referring to the human praise and reward that follows a job well done for their owner. His calm composure and focus are not just of benefit to the dogs he trains, but also as an example for future DAD handlers and families to follow when working with their own dogs. The entire family works together to train the dogs not just on-site at their home, but out in public environments and under varying circumstances. They will work with families within an eight hour radius from their home, and maintain contact to ensure that the DADs are performing well and continually learning. Group workshops are held regularly, both off-site and at their home and training facility. For more information visit diabeticalertdogsbyzakk.com and follow them at facebook.com/diabeticalertdogsbyzakk


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HISTORY: BACK IN MY DAY

All the Buzz Around Simpsonville An Interview with Morris McKinney GARY FANN • gary@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 14, 2014

Morris McKinney was 9 years old when he moved to Simpsonville from Spartanburg with his father and two sisters, following the passing of his mother. He would go on to spend his teen years much like other boys at that time earning a check from the government by keeping the school yard clean of trash and debris. McKinney graduated Simpsonville High School in 1938 and in 1941 joined the Army Air Corps in Greenville. He was sent to Mechanic Trade School in New Orleans and graduated two weeks after the bombing of Pearl Harbor. He was then accepted into the Flight Training Program where he would graduate as a flight officer assigned to the 357th Fighter Group of the Second World War. McKinney would go on to fly the P-51 Mustang he nicknamed “Round Trip” for a total of 74 missions. One-third of all 357th Squadron pilots were killed during the war. In the winter of 1944, McKinney was one of fifty-one pilots from the U.S. chosen to fly new Mustangs straight from the assembly line in Burbank, California to New York where they would then be shipped to England. The fighter planes were unmarked, had no auxiliary tanks and no guns. The job of ferrying the planes to New York began in late winter. Due to bad weather, the northern flight route was closed. Morris and two other pilots were ordered to take the southern route. As luck would have it, they would be flying right over Simpsonville. Somewhere around Anderson, S.C., Morris and his fellow pilots decided to fly in tight formation and “buzz” (Continued on Page 11)

PHOTO BY GARY FANN ©2014

864-630-5429 • BRANDON.HERRING@LIVINGSTONECHARITIES.COM


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FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014


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HISTORY: BACK IN MY DAY

SIMPSONVILLE DRUG STORE PHOTO SUBMITTED BY REBECCA MAYFIELD

(Continued from Page 9) the town of Simpsonville. No one will ever know who made that decision. The noise was deafening. People all over town ran out of buildings seeking cover from what surely must be an enemy air strike. McKinney said he found out later schools had to dismiss because students had rushed out to the football field to see what was going on. On May 7, 1945, Germany signed an unconditional surrender. Soon after, Morris McKinney came back home to Simpsonville. He was met with the news from his grandmother that Mrs. Ella Burdette, wife of B.W. Burdette of Burdette’s Hardware, wanted to see him. When he arrived at the Burdette home which still stands at the corner of East Curtis and Hedge Streets, Mrs. Ella met him on the front porch with her hands on her hips. She proceeded to tell him thanks to “that buzz job he did” her chickens quit laying for over a week and her cats ran up the trees where they stayed for two solid days! She concluded with a warning to the young war hero. If he “kept it up” Mrs. Ella and his grandmother would be going to a funeral - his! Mrs. Ella Burdette was not the only person in town who did not care to be “buzzed.” In the 1940’s, Simpsonville had a “rinky dinky” phone system. The operator’s office was above what is now Howard’s Drugs. The pharmacist at that time said two ladies who came in the store looking for a telephone were among those who were not amused. They made a beeline to the telephone operator’s office and called Greenville Army Air Base, currently known as Donaldson Center, to complain about the incident. Because the three brand spanking new planes were unmarked, they were unable to identify the culprits. The two ladies next encountered Jack Boyd, a horse trader from Fountain Inn, who was sitting at a soda fountain enjoying a Coca Cola. When Mr. Boyd heard what the two had done he turned to them and said, “Why I’ve never heard of such a thing! A young man who has fought to protect his country gets the chance to buzz his hometown after combat duty in Germany and you two gals want him court-marshaled! I’ve never heard of such a thing in my life!” Hopefully, the two gals learned their lesson. Morris McKinney was never reprimanded for the “buzzing” of Simpsonville. He was honorably discharged from the Army Air Corps at the age of 25. He returned to his hometown of Simpsonville where he lives to this day. Seven years after his discharge from service, Morris married Mary Jane, the love of his life. Their first home was a rented room in the house which is now the location of Elegant Gourmet. Mary Jane

PHOTO SUBMITTED BY MORRIS MCKINNEY

was a teacher at Simpsonville High School when the two met. She went on to teach at Hillcrest High School and continued to teach for forty years. Morris participated in the GI Bill and went to trade school where he learned Heating, Air and Refrigeration. He learned it well because locals say Morris knew more about Heating, Air and Refrigeration than anybody. At 94, Morris is the only living male from his graduating class of 1938. He and Mary Jane have one son, Stan, and two grandsons. One thing that can be said of Morris McKinney, his is a life welllived and he has never met a stranger.


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FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014


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SIMPSONVILLE HISTORY: NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURE

Being Cherokee JANICE CURTIS JUNE 14, 2014

I am a Tribal Member of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Today’s Eastern Band members are direct descendants of those who avoided the Cherokees’ forced relocation to Oklahoma in the early 1800’s in what is known as the “Trail of Tears”. I wanted to share a little bit of my story with you. First, let me state there are NO Cherokee Princesses. I have heard countless people tell me their Great-Great-Great Grandmother was an Indian Princess. The Tribe does not have a King, a Queen or a Princess. We have a Chief. A Chief elected by and for the Tribal Members. We have a Tribal Government. We are a sovereign nation with a three-branch government consisting of the Executive Branch, Legislative Branch, and a Judicial Branch. We do not live in tee-pees. We live in our homes and have running water and electricity. We have ONE Chief. Our Chief is Michell Hicks, currently serving his third term as Chief. He has proven himself to be an advocate for the growth and prosperity of the entire Tribe, not a select few. I have had the honor and privilege of meeting and speaking with our Chief on several occasions and find him to be an honorable man. The tribe has a current list of enrolled members of 10,000 strong. In addition, the Harrah’s Cherokee Casino and Hotel is a powerful, positive financial impact on the Tribe and its residents. This has meant more traffic to the area and tourism has increased tremendously. The Chief welcomes responsible new businesses and growth to the area. As a result, the Cherokee people have new schools, a new hospital, new roads and new opportunities for all Tribal Members and surrounding communities.

JANICE CURTIS’ GRANDMOTHER, MELEA SIXKILLER, PHOTOGRAPHED AND DRESSED BY THE US GOVERNMENT AT AGE 14

parent received any food or water, the child would bring it to the parent. Can you imagine that today? In full disclosure: My family and I are Tribal Members and still have strong family ties to the Reservation with family remaining on our Tribal lands in Cherokee. As a Tribal Member, we are entitled to medical care, educational funds and pro-rata disbursements from Harrah’s Casino. Life on the Reservation was difficult when I was a child. We lived in a one-room house, built by my grandfather, without running water or electricity. We lived as a family. My grandparents, their nine children and eight grandchildren.

The Tribe hosts a Pow-Wow every fall where other tribes travel to Cherokee to participate in the festivities. This is a week-long celebration of everything Native American, including Choc-taw, Cheyanne, Apache and others. The extra costs to support this annual event are paid by the Cherokee government and the event planners are not asked to contribute money to the government to hold their events.

As a child, we all had chores to do daily which included carrying water from the spring, cooking and cleaning. It took everyone in the house to make it through the long rough winters in the mountains, where being snowed in for days was commonplace. In the spring and summer, we all helped to plant and work the garden. In the fall, it was harvest time for canning to survive the winter again. I have such fond memories of the hard work and time spent with my grandmother, aunts and uncles. I just didn’t feel poor at the time, but looking back we were poor, dirt-poor, and I loved it.

In the early years of the Pow-Wow meetings if children misbehaved, the parents were held accountable. The parents of the unruly children were pulled away from the meeting and tied to a post in the town square for the duration of the Pow-Wow. This meant if the

While writing this article, I find myself asking, if we, Simpsonville, could come together as a cohesive Tribe, and support our business community and one another perhaps we too could be just as prosperous as my Tribe, The Cherokee Nation.


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FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

Friday, June 20th AN EVENING WITH MR. JOSEPH EPLEY Friday, June 20, 2014 7:00pm – 8:00pm Simpsonville Museum of Revolutionary War History

EDUCATION GIVE BACK DAY WITH THE ICE CREAM STATION Tuesday, June 24, 2014 12:00am – 11:00pm Ice Cream Station

SIMPSONVILLE FARMERS MARKET Saturday, June 21, 2014 8:00am – 12:00pm Simpsonville City Park

EMILY ELIZABETH PAPER BOUTIQUE PAPER CRAFT NIGHT Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:00pm – 8:00pm Emily Elizabeth Paper Boutique

LIBRARY: TEEN SCRIBBLERS Saturday, June 21, 2014 12:00pm – 1:30pm Hendricks Branch - Greenville County Library

STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS Tuesday, June 24, 2014 6:30pm – 8:00pm Simpsonville City Hall

LIB RYAN DANCE Saturday, June 21, 2014 6:00pm – 10:00pm Simpsonville Activity Center

SIMPSONVILLE ROTARY CLUB WEEKLY MEETING Wednesday, June 25, 2014 12:15pm – 1:15pm Simpsonville Rotary Club

SUMMER MOVIES IN THE PARK AT HERITAGE PARK

THE NUT JOB July 18th at 7:30 pm SPIDERMAN 2 August 9th at 7:30 pm All Summer Movies are Free


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LOCAL EVENTS

through Friday, July 4th THE GOOD TO GO MOBILE MARKET Wednesday, June 25, 2014 3:00pm – 5:30pm GHS Hillcrest Campus

HENDRICKS LIBRARY: CRAFT IT Friday, June 27, 2014 11:00am – 12:00pm Hendricks Branch - Greenville County Library

DUAL-CHAMBER BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Thursday, June 26, 2014 11:30am – 1:00pm Smitty’s

THE ACCIDENTALLY IRISH LADS (AND LASS) Friday, June 27, 2014 8:00pm – 10:30pm SAFi Arts Building - Tater Shed

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETING Thursday, June 26, 2014 6:30pm – 7:30pm Simpsonville City Hall

LEGISLATIVE LUNCH: TOURISM IN SC Monday, June 30, 2014 11:30am – 12:30pm Simpsonville City Hall

FROZEN SING ALONG PARTY Thursday, June 26, 2014 7:30pm – 9:00pm Heritage Park

INDEPENDENCE DAY AT CHARTER AMPHITHEATRE Friday, July 4, 2014 8:00pm – 10:00pm Charter Ampitheater


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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

Simpsonville Rocks. The Banner Covers It. Send your events to events@simpsonvillebanner.com

655 FAIRVIEW ROAD, SUITE N. SIMPSONVILLE 864-962-1767


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SIMPSONVILLE ARTS

Local Artist Spotlight Art and Soul Instructor Sandy Cogen GARY FANN • gary@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 17, 2014

Sandy Cogen, 75, from Brooklyn NY, received her Masters in Art Education at NYU and spent 53 years teaching art classes in New York, Pennsylvania and Florida. She moved to Simpsonville five years ago to be with her children and grandchildren. Her daughter visited the Simpsonville Activity and Senior Center one day and asked if they offered an art class. At that time, the answer was no. A week later, Sandy Cogen began teaching a mixed media art class with three students. Five years later, she now has anywhere from 15 to 20 students on a weekly basis, the oldest being 90 years old. Her class is called “Art and Soul” Painters. The class uses mixed media, and Cogen allows her students to pick their own subject based on what inspires them. Every couple of months the class exhibits their pieces at the Activity Center. She is currently planning to create a calendar for 2015 to display her students artwork. The class regularly visits local art museums and holds offsite sessions in locations around Greenville. Cogen recently returned from Paris, where her work was featured in an international juried art show. One of her students accompanied her on the two week trip, a first for both of them. The class meets every Wednesday from 8am-Noon. To find out more about the “Art and Soul” painters visit simpsonvillerecreation.com or call the Simpsonville Activity and Senior Center at 864-967-9533

The Simpsonville Activity and Senior Center is located at 310 W. Curtis Street


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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014


NOTES FROM THE SIMPSONVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

THE 4-WAY TEST OF THINGS WE THINK, SAY OR DO 1. Is it the truth? 2. Is it fair to all concerned? 3. Will it build good will and better friendships? 4. Will it be beneficial to all concerned?

The Rotary Club Of Simpsonville meets Wednesdays at 12:15 at Rotary Hall in Downtown Simpsonville

The Simpsonville Rotary Club granted three scholarships for $500 to Hillcrest High School students. Rotary Scholarships are awarded based on community service, character, and academic achievement. The winners were Kimberly Briseno, Asa Kelly, and Sean Horgan.

. R A

C R U

YO . E LOV DO

WE

1034 NE MAIN STREET SIMPSONVILLE, SC 29681 864-962-5555 sales@cleancaronline.com


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SIMPSONVILLE MYSTERY

It Tolls for Thee - The Legend at City Cemetery BETH KELLEY FANN • beth@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 16, 2014

I first heard the story of the ringing bell in the City Cemetery when I was a student at Simpsonville Elementary School. For me that was in the 1980s. For some of you, the 70s, 60s, and earlier. I can remember crossing the street at the old school, pony-tail swinging, and standing on my tippy-toes to try and peer over the rock wall that protected the site. What I can’t recall is the first time this tale was told to me. However the story itself remains, albeit a little faded around the edges. Towards the back of the cemetery, a smooth-faced mausoleum stands directly ahead of the side arched entrance. It is the only structure of it’s sort in the entire graveyard. The legend is that if you visit at midnight, and circle the mausoleum three times, a bell will ring. And it’s no church bell. Many decades ago people were laid to rest holding a bell. It was to be rung if the person were accidentally buried alive. There are records of this actually happening in times of plague and untreatable illness. The Simpsonville legend says that one of the permanent residents of the mausoleum is holding such a bell. On hearing the continuous footsteps outside, the deceased would have time to muster the strength to ring the bell, in a plea for rescue.

I would complete elementary school at SES, then middle and high school, and life moved on with the legend tucked safely away somewhere in my mind. I never did get the chance to find out if it were true. Until tonight. Three friends joined me at the edge of the rock wall beside the Tater Shed and City Park. We walked the cemetery, reviewing names and wondering at the new fiber optic headstone accessories. My camera malfunctioned after just one photograph, and I spent a few minutes solving the strange quirks. I somehow coaxed the misbehaving device into taking a couple of photos, and then we lined up in front of the mausoleum. We watched the time change to midnight in the glow of our smartphones then began to walk. One lap. (We may have chuckled at our adult selves as we paced slowly forward.) Two laps. (We realized we had headed clockwise, a decision that would hinder a hasty exit if needed.) Three laps…

DO YOU HAVE A STORY TO SHARE? A MYSTERY TO SOLVE? EMAIL US AT MYSTERY@SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM


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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

PHOTO BY CHRISTY STATON ©2014

The Battle of Great Cane Brake ANDREW STATON • andrew@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 12, 2014

My name is Andrew Staton, and I am a genealogist and historian currently studying at the College of Charleston. Having grown up in Simpsonville, I am incredibly proud of the history of our town and I am excited to share this history with others through this column, which will feature some aspect of Simpsonville’s rich history every month. Did you know that more battles of the American Revolution took place in South Carolina than any other colony or state? While this may not always be evident in our area, South Carolina (including the upstate) indeed played a large role in the Revolutionary War. Despite the city not being officially organized until over a hundred years later, the Simpsonville area was the location of a sequence of events known as the battle of Great Cane Brake and the “Snow Campaign” that followed. The battle of Great Cane Brake took place in lower Greenville County, along the Reedy River near the present day location of Highway 418

and Jenkins Bridge Road. The battle is named for the cane plants that commonly grew in river valleys, known as “canebrake” when found in large, dense numbers. Receiving information that there was a Loyalist camp in Cherokee land, Col. Richard Richardson (a patriot) dispatched Col. William Thomson and a number of soldiers to seek them out. On December 22, 1775, the Patriot forces led a surprise attack on the Loyalists and defeated them, killing six and capturing 130. The patriots themselves suffered significantly fewer losses, with only one man wounded and none captured or killed. Following the battle, the Patriots turned around and headed for their camp. On the day after the battle, however, a snowstorm impacted the Upstate (or “backcountry”) of South Carolina, leaving fifteen inches of snow. The men were forced to walk back through this accumulation, and many suffered frostbite as a result. This became known as the “Snow Campaign,” for which the current local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) is so named.


SIMPSONVILLE HISTORY: THE REVOLUTIONARY WAR

Now Open

SIMPSONVILLE MUSEUM OF REVOLUTIONARY WAR HISTORY

110 ACADEMY STREET SIMPSONVILLE, SC 29681

Want to know more about Revolutionary War History in South Carolina, and even see artifacts from the battle of Great Cane Brake? The Library and Museum of Revolutionary War History is located in the Simpsonville Fine Arts Center at 110 Academy Street! The museum is open Mondays (10 AM – 3 PM), Wednesdays (10 AM – 3 PM), Fridays (1 PM – 9 PM) and Saturdays (10 AM – 5 PM). The museum also recently began a series of guest speakers entitled “An Evening With…” that will occur on the third Friday of every month. The next of these events is “An Evening With Mr. Joseph Epley,” discussing the Battle of Kings Mountain, on Friday, June 20 at 7 PM at the museum. Future speakers will include Mr. Bobby James (July 18) and Ms. Elaine Thorp (August 15). See you there!

FOLLOW THE MUSEUM ON FACEBOOK

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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

Honor our state’s fallen Vietnam heroes and help preserve their memories

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

Help put a face with a name The “Faces Not Forgotten” project is missing 578 photos of S.C.’s fallen Vietnam soldiers, including the ones from our area listed below.

The Army Soldiers below were all listed as Greenville County: SP4

MELVIN ROBINSON

SP4

JOHN W MASSEY JR

SP4

KENNETH RHODES

SGT

JERRY S MCDONALD

SGT

JOHN H PRIEST JR

SGT

CLYDE E MORGAN

SGT

JERRY W BYERS

SGT

JAMES C MULLINAX JR

PFC

WILLIAM E BRUSTER

PFC

RONALD E PACE

SP4

GARY R BRYANT

CPL

PHILLIP A PAGE

The names of the 896 South Carolinians killed in the Vietnam War are engraved for history on the polished Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall in Washington, D.C. The Wall has helped heal the nation’s wounds and honor Vietnam veterans.

SGT

THOMAS D BROCK

PFC

SILAS E GIBSON

PVT

MATTHEW A BOWEN

SGT

JAMES B FOSTER JR

PFC

JOHN L BARNHART

SGT

BENNY H FERGUSON

The Vietnam Veterans Memorial Foundation is now working to add faces to those names by collecting photographs of all who died fighting in the Vietnam War.

PFC

JAMES ARNOLD

1LT

LEWIS C WUESTENBERG

SSGT

WILLIAM H HAWKINS

LCPL

RONALD A WILLIAMS

SP4

BRUCE E HAZLE

FSGT

ROBERT L TURNER

SGT

ARTHUR L JORDON

CPL

CHARLES H ROBINSON

SP4

JERALD L JONES

SP4

MELVIN ROBINSON

SP5

FREDDIE L LAMKIN

SP4

KENNETH RHODES

SGT

CHARLIE LYLES JR

SGT

JOHN H PRIEST JR

Help collect photos of all S.C. soldiers killed in Vietnam

The “Faces Not Forgotten” project is collecting photos of the nearly 59,000 men and women who served our country and sacrificed their lives in Vietnam. Collected pictures will be displayed at The Wall’s Education Center and online at www.vvmf.org/Wall-of-Faces.

TO ADD A PHOTO ONLINE OR BY MAIL, VISIT: WWW.VVMF.ORG/HOW-TO-SUBMIT This notice is sponsored by this newspaper and the S.C. Press Association.

We would like to thank those that have entrusted us to care for their family. Find comfort in the experience that our Heritage provides and in our promise to treat your family today the way we would want our family treated. Please ask any Golden Strip family that we’ve served how we helped them, and know that we would be honored to serve your family.

Andy Byrd

HERITAGE FUNERAL HOME 313 NORTH MAIN STREET • SIMPSONVILLE, SC 864-757-1771 • HERITAGE-FUNERAL.COM


ALL IN GOOD FUN

Animal Word Hunt

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flashback JUNE 20 ”You’re gonna need a bigger boat.” This became one of the most quoted movie lines following the premier of Jaws on this day in 1975. JUNE 21 The Constitution of the United States becomes the supreme law of the land when New Hampshire, the ninth and last necessary state ratifies the document. The year is 1788. JUNE 22 Joe Louis, nicknamed the Brown Bomber, wins the world heavyweight boxing title on this day in 1937. Louis held the title of heavyweight champ longer than anyone else to date. JUNE 23 The year is 1927 and while on a visit to North Dakota, President Calvin Coolidge is given a grand ceremonial feathered headdress by Sioux Chief Henry Standing Bear. The president is officially declared an honorary tribal member. JUNE 24 The U.S. Air Force releases a report on this day in 1997 entitled “The Roswell Report, Case Closed”. This was to put an end to theories about a government cover-up of the crash of a UFO in 1947. Despite the report, conspiracy theories are alive and well. JUNE 25 South Carolina Patriot Thomas Tudor Tucker is born in Bermuda on this day in 1745. He served as a hospital surgeon for the Continental Army, was a member of the U.S. House of Representatives and was treasurer of the United States under four presidents.

QUESTIONS, COMMENTS, STORY IDEAS AND MORE: INFO@SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

JUNE 26 Senator Strom Thurmond died on this day in 2003 at the age of 100. He participated in the D-Day storming of the beach at Normandy with the Army’s 82nd Airborne division. Senator Thurmond became the only candidate ever elected to the Senate by a write-in vote. He served in the Senate for 46 years.


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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

ACROSS 37. T  ree with large, shiny leaves and fragrant blossoms pollinated by beetles 38. Popular poem by Lewis Carroll 39. Place for a baby or plants 40. A  second job or a TV series starring Bruce Willis 42. P  opular crime show set in Los Angeles or a something pulled along the bottom of a river or lake 45. Walks like a duck 47. Made a leaf pile

4. Grounded geese 6. Greatest show on earth 8. Not wild 9. Opposite of convex 12. Deep sleep 15. Pugilist 17. First in Greek 19. Fruit or Bronx cheer 20. Miserly 26. “Play it again, Sam” movie 30. Angler 31. Fissure in the earth’s crust 32. Specter or Casper 33. Atrocious, outrageous 35. Maria Callas was one of these 36. Owner or manager of a hostelry

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Down Instrument often found in a church or something vital Small rodent or computer device Hang freely Nocturnal superhero Outspoken

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Wood around a picture or provide false evidence Mind reader Laugh quietly or with restraint Trademark representation Tray for carrying food or drinks

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24. Emerged from an egg 25. R  oom where audiences hear and watch performances 27. Originally called before marriage 28. Protect form heat, cold, noise, etc. 29. Fussy, demanding 34. Legends or popular beliefs 35. Precious stone 41. Fiber used to make baskets and hats 43. New Orleans in a bowl 44. Boredom or tedium 46. Short nap


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ANNOUNCEMENTS

Shop Local: Event Decor & More GARY FANN • gary@simpsonvillebanner.com JUNE 17, 2014

Joy Cox spent years working in the event rental industry, and during her time she noticed the market was changing. Brides were not finding the unique items that they were seeking for their weddings. Event planning had evolved with the growth of the internet, where inspiration and exchange of ideas abound. Joy saw this need, and launched her own business called Event Decor & More. She continues to innovate by offering event rentals on consignment, allowing clients to earn a percentage for sharing their items with others. Because of her intuition and responsiveness to the needs of today’s brides, Event Decor & More has grown into a thriving downtown business located on historic Main Street in Simpsonville. Stop by her shop at the corner of Curtis and Main, or visit eventdecorandmore.net to find out how Joy can help make your event vision a reality.

Adam Brenda RANDOLPH

Scot

Christi

SHERMAN

Will celebrate their 8th wedding anniversary

Celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary

on June 24th, 2014.

on June 17th, 2014. The Shermans have two children, Tyler & Caroline.

We Love Good News. If you have exciting news to share, send it to us at wed@simpsonvillebanner.com Your announcement will run in print, and online, completely free. We will even link to your registry or wedding planning sites - great for sharing with friends and family long distance.

SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM


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SIMPSONVILLEBANNER.COM

FRIDAY, JUNE 20, 2014

Friday, June 20, 2014  

Issue III