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NEW ENGLAND’S FOOD AND WINE MAGAZINE

A Russian

New Year’s

RATED A

TOP 10 MAGAZINE OF 2011!

feast

page 32

3foodie RD ANNUAL

GIFT GUIDE p.40 40

OVER

30 FESTIVE DESSERT: Apricot and Walnut Crescent Cookies p.38

plus:

Boston’s Own

Ming Tsai page 26

DELICIOUS NEW RECIPES TO TRY!

GO GREEN, GO KALE! Get Punchy: New England Rum Punch Diversify Your Seafood Palette (and Palate)!

The NEW Pairings: Local Brews, Local Cheeses NORTHEASTFLAVOR.COM


Seacoast New Hampshire’s favorite dining destinations... a little something for everyone!

R ES TAUR A N T

Embracing the European philosophy of the freshest seasonal food, outstanding coffees, exceptional pastries and desserts, located right in the heart of Portsmouth’s historic Market Square.

A Seacoast favorite for locals and guests. A family-run restaurant delivering quality and consistency for over 40 years.

Grill 28 combines the Pease 27-hole Golf Course with a fun eating and drinking grill concept:

Join us for our latest success – Kay’s Kafe, a casual coffeehouse atmosphere.

27 holes & 1 great grill is Grill 28!

Popovers on the Square 8 Congress Street Portsmouth, NH www.PopoversOnTheSquare.com (603) 431-1119

Galley Hatch 325 Lafayette Road (Rte. 1) Hampton, NH www.GalleyHatch.com (603) 926-4414

Grill 28 200 Grafton Road Portsmouth, NH www.peasegolf.com/grill28 (603)766-6466

Follow us on facebook for daily specials, new menu items & more!


Departments * Winter 2012/2013

Food + Cooking 12 HEALTHY FLAVORS The Big Bowl Theory By Elaine Tomasini p. 54

12

Chefs + Restaurants 16 DINING OUT The Alpine Gourmet By Laura Pope

In the Glass 20 WINE FINDS Prosecco: Celebrate All Winter Long By Jonathon Alsop

Northeast Traditions 54 CLASSIC The Sausage Cure By Lisa Goell Sinicki

58 COMMUNITY Before You Throw That Out . . . By Debbie Kane

Get Inspired 44 SPIRITS Getting Punchy By Spencer Smith

62 IN THE KITCHEN WITH… Simple Elegance at New Hampshire’s Historic Grand Dame of the Sea By Natasha Barnes

Local + Sustainable

16

46 SEASONAL FLAVORS Kale: Ever Green By Heather Milliman

50 FLAVOR FOCUS One Fish, Two Fish, Redfish, Bluefish By Evan Mallett

IN EVERY ISSUE Editor’s Letter 7 Featured Contributors 8 Ask the Editors 10 The Book & Blog Club 66 Recipe Index 67 Advertiser Directory 68 Next Issue Highlights 69 Marketplace 70 Roots 72

44

NORTHEASTFLAVOR.COM

3


Photograph by Andre Baranowski.

A Russian New Year’s Feast (page 32)

Features * Winter 2012/2013 22 The Perfect Pair: Local Cheese Meets Local Beer

26 32 40 Double Down Dragon: The Pir: A New Yorker’s Our 3rd Annual Prime Time with Ming Tsai Russian New Year’s Feast Foodie Gift Guide

The taste revolution comes home.

Chef Ming Tsai on his extraordinary year.

Ring in the new year, old world style.

By Rachel Forrest

By Mike Morin

By Sasha Shor

On our cover: Apricot and Walnut Crescent Cookies, recipe on page 38. Photograph by Andre Baranowski. Recipe preparation and styling by Sasha Shor. Photograph of Ming Tsai by Leanna Creel.

4 WINTER 2012/2013

Just in time for your holiday shopping, and beyond.


CHEFS + RESTAURANTS | Dining Out

The Alpine Gourmet BY LAURA POPE

A GIFTED CADRE OF chefs working in the alpine reaches of New England’s ski resorts offer winter warriors options well beyond ubiquitous pub fare, from upscale rustic and European comfort food to contemporary American cuisine. Meet three ski resort chefs, all alumni of the prestigious Chef Apprentice Program at The Balsams, in Dixville Notch, New Hampshire.

Solstice at Stowe Mountain Lodge Lobster Pot Pie (recipe on p.19)

16 WINTER 2012/2013


Left: Vermont’s Stowe Mountain Lodge. Right: Solstice’s Executive Chef Joshua Berry.

Vermont: Stowe Mountain Lodge Featuring a menu that is rustic, seasonal, and contemporary, Solstice at Stowe Mountain Lodge (www.stowe mountainlodge.com) has long been “the big place on the hill, a family resort where everyone chooses an entrée and lots of side dishes to pass around, family style,” describes Joshua Berry, executive chef at the premier dining and inn destination, as well as Hourglass, a lounge setting offering lighter, gastro-pub cuisine. The casual, comfortable ambiance at the 110-seat Solstice presents a signature neo-lodge aesthetic that pairs seamlessly with an imaginative, interactive á la carte menu, allowing Chef Berry to not only lower price points, but “fully engage diners who are wowed by all the options and flavor possibilities.” The build-it-yourself menu style generates instant buzz with Stowe Mountain Lodge patrons. Starters, soups and salads begin the menu (the Vermont Goat Cheese Croquettes, served with stewed apricots, Kalamata olives, watercress and fennel seed merit serious consideration), followed by an impressive charcuterie array of assorted meats, sausages and terrines, available in small or large portions. Continue with a selection of local Vermont cheeses, served with raw local honey, stone fruit chutney, toasted walnuts and fresh bread.

“We’re part of the acclaimed Destination Hotels Company, which has properties all over the United States, and I’m proud to say that here at Solstice, we have the largest cheese selection,” boasts Chef Berry, another graduate of The Balsams’ Chef Apprentice Program who went on to serve as executive chef there for three years. Diners at Solstice custom design entrées by first deciding whether they want one that is braised and sautéed (such as their signature Truffled Beef Pot Roast) or stone-oven-roasted (local cod, duck breast, baked stuffed mountain trout or scallops) or grilled (prime cuts of beef and Shetland salmon). Once that decision is made, they have the option of adding flavor enhancements such as truffle, lobster, foie gras, crab, shrimp or Blue cheese, and they can choose from a wide selection of side dishes, including Braised Red Cabbage, Confit of Wild Mushrooms and Caramelized Root Vegetables. A Chef’s Signature item, a winterhearty dish of Spiced Local Venison Medallions; a Friday-through-Saturday Queen- or King-cut of Slow Roast Prime Rib of Beef; specials such as a Braised Lamb Shank, served with Creamy Polenta, Gremolata and Braising Jus; and vegan and pasta items round out the winter wonderful menu.

“The heart of my culinary style is seasonal and local so that diners can experience a taste of northern Vermont and New England. I use a lot of regional ingredients and prepare them with a twist, such as the New England staple, pot roast, an old recipe I transform when I add the truffles from Italy.”

Maine: Sunday River Ski Area & Resort As Executive Chef of several eateries serving skiers a variety of cuisine during their time on the eight peaks at Sunday River Ski Area & Resort (www.sunday river.com) in Newry, Chad Davidowicz, with his delegation of managers and assistants, operates three daytime cafeterias, five restaurants at two slope-side grand resort hotels, (the Grand Summit and Jordan Grand) plus a popular nightspot called The Foggy Goggle at Southridge. The offerings vary, from family friendly cuisine at Grand Summit’s Legends Restaurant and Moonstruck Café and the upscale pub food at Jordan Grand’s Sliders to the on-the-go, lunchtime cafeteria buffets for skiers eager to refuel. For those seeking fine dining, Chef Davidowicz recommends the 100-seat restaurant, Dining at the Peak, “A place on top of the mountain, on top of the world.” NORTHEASTFLAVOR.COM

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The Perfect Pair: Local Cheese Meets Local Beer BY RACHEL FORREST

The local food movement has extended deliciously to include craft beers and artisanal cheeses.


The wine and cheese party is so ’80s. Welcome to a new era of pairing: local craft brews meet locally made cheeses. With the rise of beer bars, micro and nano breweries amid rolling hills and urban industrial parks, and cheeses caved and aged at farms right nearby, we’re seeing more gatherings making the most of the complementary and contrasting flavors this alliance brings. Some breweries are even teaming up with nearby cheese makers for tasty collaborations. So we asked chefs, brewers and cheese makers what goes with what. At the Portsmouth Brewery in New Hampshire (www. portsmouthbrewery.com), Executive Chef Todd Sweet gets regular shipments of cheese made at local creameries like Sandwich Creamery in North Sandwich, New Hampshire. The 20-year-old brewery serves brews crafted by Head Brewer Tyler Jones, who experiments with everything from single-hopped IPAs to lightly salty Gose. To pair brews with cheese, Chef Sweet says complements and contrasts are both fair play. “The lighter and fresher the cheese, the lighter the beer is one way to go, but we play with variety on our plates. The hoppy beers, of course, have more intensity. We have Tyler’s Project X, which is good with a peppery goat cheese, hops with creaminess and spice. The flip side is a washed rind from Sandwich Creamery, which is washed in our Blonde Ale so it goes well with that. If there is a beer that has a light body, then the effervescence brings out a cleanness in an intense cheese.” More robust beers like a stout are great with roasted and smoked cheeses like a smoked Cheddar or one infused with a strong herb like sage, says Chef Sweet. “We brew Belgian-style beers here which are good with blues. The clove and banana esters make a pairing with a soft-rind cheese like a Brie work well, too,” he says. Nicole Carrier and Annette Lee from Throwback Brewery (www.throwbackbrewery.com) in North Hampton, New Hampshire, use primarily local ingredients in their eclectic Photograph by Russell French, courtesy of Allagash Brewery.

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: n o g a r d n w o d e bl h Ming Tsai DouTim e wit Prime

Photograph by Leanna Creel

Morin BY Mike

26 WINTER 2012/2013


He’s driven, unafraid of challenges and willing to take risks. In short, Ming Tsai is the prototypical dragon from the Chinese zodiac. On top of that, 2012 has been the year of the water dragon, a once-in-every-six decades occurrence. It was, for many other reasons, the right time to open his second restaurant called, fittingly, Blue Dragon.

“I

am a dragon (born in 1964), so, during your year every 12 years, you’re supposed to just crush it,” says the popular owner of Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley. “You’re supposed to start new projects. On top of that being an element in Chinese folklore, this is the year of the water dragon, which occurs every 60 years, so I’m pretty positive I’m not going to make the next water dragon, as I’m 48 and living to 108 would be pushing it. This is the only year of the water dragon in my whole life, hence the name Blue Dragon which, of course, connotes water,” Chef Tsai says of his new restaurant located near the water, in Boston’s Seaport district. Tsai’s done his homework and knows the area is on the economic upswing. “It’s the only stand-alone building really in the whole Seaport district. Everything else is large buildings with tons of restaurants and whatnot. That, coupled with the fact that there’s going to be 3.5 million square feet of office space built in the next five years . . . it just made so much sense,” he says. So why has it taken the chef, cookbook author and television personality, 14 years to open a second restaurant after Blue Ginger’s 1998 debut? “You know, I’ve always taken pride in the fact that I’m a onerestaurant chef,” says Tsai. “It’s really for two reasons. One is quality of life. I chose to have children and have two boys. It’s tough to maintain a good quality of life at home if you have an empire of 10 restaurants. And secondly, just as important is quality of product. Blue Ginger’s the type of restaurant about which I never want to hear, ‘Ginger used to be a good restaurant.’ That would just crush me. It was really more to contain that quality.” Tsai doesn’t hesitate to draw from family influences, having grown up in the culture of his family’s Mandarin Kitchen restaurant in Dayton, Ohio. Lesson number one: Treat your staff well. “My father said a long time ago, ‘It’s much less important what the bosses think of you. It’s the people you work with and the people that actually work for you . . . what they think of you is more key because they’re the ones who are going to help you

rise to the top, and they’re the ones who’re going to support you if you do fall down. If you don’t treat them well, they’ll just laugh when you fall down.’” The sage advice of the elder Tsai has paid off nicely in terms of loyalty from key players at Blue Ginger. “Some of my guys have been with me for years, like J.T. (Jonathan Taylor) my executive chef, he’s been with me 14 years; Woody (Tom Woods, chef de cuisine) has been with me 10. So I have these guys that just won’t leave, which is great for me because it reflects our quality of product, consistency and customer appreciation,” he says. The Ivy League-educated chef graduated with a degree in mechanical engineering from Yale, with a junior year summer stop at Le Cordon Bleu cooking school in Paris and then finished with a master’s degree in hotel administration and hospitality marketing from Cornell. While working his way in kitchens around the world, Tsai had the good fortune to spend some time with acclaimed pastry chef Pierre Hermé, whom he once bailed out of a situation as the chef tried to make some pumpkin pies. “I remember walking into it at 5:30 or 6:00,” Tsai recalls. “He was already cussing, trying to cook fresh pumpkin down. There’s so much water. He’s screaming, ‘I gotta make 20 pumpkin pies.’ I said, ‘Chef, let me help you. I can get the purée in a can.’ He said, ‘What?’ And sure enough I showed him the can recipe. ‘It’s right here.’ He took the recipe off the can. His pastry crust was better than a normal pumpkin pie. The filling? Libby’s all the way,” Tsai laughs.

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BY SASHA SHOR | PHOTOGRAPHS BY ANDRE BARANOWSKI


The Pir: A New Yorker’s Russian New Year’s Feast

Kapustniky Piroshki (recipe on p.36)

Having grown up in a Russian family, I could fill volumes with my memories of food. Everything revolved around it. Everyone in our family and circle of close friends (many and varied!) were always cooking, pickling, stewing, smoking, frying, drying or grilling something. Russians are masters of the pir (feast), and my family was no exception. As far back as I can remember, we always had a reason for an abundant, festive meal: a birthday, a Jewish holiday, an anniversary, the purchase of a new house, the first snowfall. But the biggest pir of all, New Year’s Eve, was an occasion for a meal of immense proportions. There were always menus, sometimes consisting of four to five courses each. There were long, detailed lists of ingredients to shop for, many of which were not available in Nashville, Tennessee — where we settled after immigrating to the States in 1979 — and thus, were subject to much sacrificial substitution. But now that I live in New York, sourcing Russian staples is not a problem. (Editor’s note: see our list of specialty stores on page 39.)

Vinegret (recipe on p.36)


LOCAL + SUSTAINABLE | Seasonal Flavors

Kale: Ever Green B Y H E AT H E R M I L L I M A N | P H O T O G R A P H S B Y G R E G W E S T

VARIETIES Like its cool-weather cousins broccoli, Brussels sprouts and collard greens, kale has been a foraged food for over 2,000 years, sustaining the hungry during the cold winter months. A descendant of wild cabbage, kale is believed to have originated in the eastern Mediterranean, brought to Europe by nomads in 600 B.C. and eventually landing in the United States in the 1600s. In modern times, kale (Brassica oleracea) has been elevated to a trendier culinary status because of its delicious varieties, culinary flexibility and myriad health benefits. Heirloom varieties of kale are becoming increasingly available in markets. With names like Lacinato, Red Russian, Winter Red and Nero di Toscana, kale is harvested as individual leaves which are replaced by new growth, so it is a sustainable and longharvesting plant for the garden.

WHY YOU SHOULD TRY Have you ever seen the bumper stickers and tee shirts that instruct us to “Eat More Kale” (a phrase coined by Vermont maverick Bo Muller-Moore)? Considering its numerous health benefits, that might not be such a bad idea! Loaded with iron, manganese, and vitamins A & C, one cup of cooked kale has 36 little calories and 10 percent of recommended daily fiber. Because of its high fiber content, kale is thought to lower the risk of certain cancers, as well as lowering cholesterol. As if that weren’t enough to sell you on the idea, kale is full of antioxidants and, well, it just tastes really good.

HOW TO SELECT AND STORE As Nigel Slater said in his wonderful book, Tender, kale can be “softer than spring greens or so tough you feel like a donkey chomping at thistles.” As funny as it is true, kale can vary in flavor and

46 WINTER 2012/2013

texture depending on its maturity when harvested. When buying kale, consider your cooking method. For more delicate dishes such as omelets or savory tarts, look for smaller, more tender greens. If it is being used in a soup or a long, slow braise, look for larger and more substantial leaves. Kale develops its best flavor, color and texture after periods of frost, as cold breaks down the bitter qualities of the vegetable and brings out more supple sweetness. When chilly weather approaches, look for kale that is fresh, crisp and free from any browning or tears in the leaves. Kale is best stored unwashed in a sealed plastic bag in the fridge for no more than five days, as prolonged storage after harvesting promotes bitterness.

PREPARATION METHODS Before cooking, make sure your kale is rinsed well and free of any garden grit, then carefully remove tough stems and center ribs.

Young leaves are best when cooked quickly, such as in a sauté, stir fry, or if they are really small and tender, try adding them to salads for additional texture. Larger, older leaves are delicious steamed, braised and added to soups, as they break down and become more tender with longer cooking methods.

FLAVOR BOOST The assertive flavor of kale pairs well with fat — think cream, butter, cheese and even cured pork (chorizo, bacon, ham). Kale also loves to be brightened up with a squeeze of lemon or a few drops of your favorite vinegar (a tarragon or nice balsamic are lovely). If I am looking for a fast fix, I warm olive oil, garlic and onions in a pan, throw in some chopped kale greens, sauté them for a few minutes until limp and finish with a few chopped anchovies, cream and a grating of Parmesan. Delicious!


The Old English name for February was Kalemonath, as it was often the only green crop available for harvest in late winter.

Kale and Lentil Soup (recipe on p.48)

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NORTHEAST FLAVOR | Advertiser Directory

900° Neapolitan Pizzeria . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Allagash Brewery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Anneke Jans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Ariston . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Attar Herbs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68

photo: Ken Burris

Celebrate with hUs!

Avon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Great gifts for everyone on your list at our

Daily, Dec. 23 - Jan. 1

77

check our website for more dates & times

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including our artisanal cheddar!

77

Chez Boucher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

Drew’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

Welcome Center & Farm Store Sleigh Rides!

Boston Harbor Hotel Wine Festival . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

7

SHELBURNE FARMS 1611 Harbor Road Shelburne, VT 802-985-8686 • www.shelburnefarms.org

Expert European Skin Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Firefly American Bistro & Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Formaticum Cheese Paper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Galley Hatch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Grill 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Harbor’s Edge/Sheraton Portsmouth Harborside . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 King Arthur Flour . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover McKinnon’s Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Nantucket Pasta Goddess . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70

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Popovers on the Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Portsmouth Catering Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Republic Café . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Ristorante Massimo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Shelburne Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Smith/Kerr Associates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19, 67 South Street & Vine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Sunday River . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Brooklin Inn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 The Sun WineFest at Mohegan Sun . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vermont Butter & Cheese Creamery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Vermont Smoke & Cure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Virtue Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Winter Wine Festival at Wentworth by the Sea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 XO on Elm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

CREDITS:

Since 1969, 6 New England’’s l d trusted source of quality herbs, spices and essential oils. Visit us online www.attarherbs.com 68 WINTER 2012/2013

P.8: Photograph of Debbie Kane by John W. Hession P.16: Photograph by Kathleen Landwehrle provided courtesy of Stowe Mountain Lodge P.17 (right): Photograph by Kathleen Landwehrle; photographs provided courtesy of Stowe Mountain Lodge P.18: Photograph courtesy of Sunday River Ski Area & Resort P.27: iStockphoto.com/songspeckles PP.32-39: Recipe preparation and food styling by Sasha Shor PP.40-43: Photographs provided courtesy of product manufacturers P.48: iStockphoto.com/photokitchen PP.46-48: Recipe preparation and food styling by Heather Milliman, assistant stylist Isabel Poirot P.50: iStockphoto.com/hlphoto P.51: iStockphoto.com/lvinst PP.58-61: Photographs provided courtesy of Food For Free (photograph Mike Diskin), Lovin’ Spoonfuls and Downtown Evening Soup Kitchen.


TASTE, ENJOY, LEARN… AND BAKE Discover our new campus in Norwich, Vermont. Take a class at our stunning Baking Education Center. Watch the bakers at work in our state-of-the-art Bakery. Relax in our Café with a warm croissant. Explore every aspect of baking in the all-new King Arthur Flour store – filled with ingredients, tools, and pans for your very best baking. Come and visit. The pure joy of baking lives here.

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