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Nodes of Intersection Development in China

Christine Foley, Xiaoyun Li, Tyler Guidroz 2012 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


PROJECT DESCRIPTION When considering an area for redevelopment, it is important to consider the existing conditions that could contribute to the overall redesign. In both Jintang and Long Pao, China, certain elements of the land were to be preserved, and also the origins from which the development plan stemmed from. Jintang’s existing elements, the university and old city, and vital new entities, sports arena and cultural center, create important “nodes” for design. Each node considers the walk-able area of .5 kilometers that becomes the radius around which vehicles circumvent. At the center of each node is an important element for the expansion of the city: the stadium, commercial pockets, cultural center, etcetera. Long Pao was thought about in a similar way. By preserving the “old city” and larger agricultural hubs, the essential existing roads and canalways were recognized. These became the main axis to be expanded upon in the new plan for Long Pao. These main arteries became the basis for our overall expansion and lef to discoveries for creating logical zoning. Imposed overthe existing grid is another grid that creates a comprehensive road system. It is shifted to face directional north-south and east-west, which creates intersections with the old grid. This adds variety through the new city, while being conscious of the area of preservation. Densities of commercial zoning are created at crucial intersections. Specific cultural attractions anchor these dense commercial zones including community centers, libraries, parks, malls, etcetera. These “nodes” essentially become regional centers of all different scales, adhering to the size and population of the CBD to smaller neighborhood town centers.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Jintang Maps The physical mapping done for the Jintang project highlights areas in which nodes stemmed from. The cultural spots were marked with a circular radius, which become the areas of development. The intersections between the nodes signaled important moments for vehicular traffic as well as pedestrian ways. The large green park created a buffer for the new development.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Preserved Existing Conditions The red lines represent the existing roads and interstate. Their grid form lends itself to start an organized roadway system. The black represents the old city that is currently full of industry and some residential. The green represents an area of agriculture that we feel should be preserved because of its density.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Grid Shift Once the existing conditions to be preserved were determined, another grid was added to further breakdown the existing grid. It was shifted in order to create more dynamic conditions. The shift helped in adding more intersections and smaller breakdowns in scale of blocks.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Nodes of Intersection and Zoning With the intersections the roads and canals create, the nodes of regional centers are recognized. These nodes are then zoned mostly commercial (red) with some mixed-use (grey). On the outskirts of the nodes, residential (purple) resides. Other blocks then become green space.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


CBD Section This section is taken from the CBD where the high-rise commercial buildings surround a large open park. The canals are an important element in the design, as they are instrumental in creating the nodes of intersection, around which a regional center is created.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


CBD Perspective This view shows the divisions in blocks that designate the green from the built. The paths of both canal and roads are visible, which break up park from commercial and residential. The open green space creates a generous plaza between high-rises that breaks up the CBD.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL HIGH-RISE MIX-USE COMMERCIAL LOW-RISE RESIDENTIAL LOW-RISE MIX-USE GREEN

Long Pao Masterplan The new area to be developed is a 5 km area near the water and the existing old city. This map represents the zoning designation in the area.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


RESIDENTIAL INDUSTRIAL

RESID

COMMERCIAL

INDU

MIX-USE

COM

GREEN

MIX-

GREE

Transitional Development Instead of creating a separate city from the existing, the new development will have a smooth transition from the old to the new.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


CBD and Old City The 3-dimensional views show the new high-rise CBD nested near the water, and tapering off towards the old city.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


The City That is Two Cities

Tyler Guidroz Fourth Year Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


PROGRESS EFFICIENCY PRODUCTIVITY CLEAN STRAIGHT ORTHOGONAL

+

WHAT CHINA WANTS

RICH URBAN EXPERIENCES

"It must be granted that there is some value in mystification, labyrinth, or surprise in the environment... the surprise must occur in an overall framework, the confusions must be small regions in a visible whole." The Image of the City, P. 5

PROJECT DESCRIPTION China exists in a state of rapid expansion. The chinese people have a strong desire to be seen by the world as a modern, industrialized nation. The government favors the construction of large, ominous, looming urban elements. Everywhere there are examples of the broad stroke of urban design, a symbolic and literal conquest of the limits of nature. As urban planners we know that bigger is not always better, that the wonder of an intimate, tightly woven urban fabric is desired for an enriched life in the city. We look to the cities of europe, the product of organic urban growth, for the best examples of this urban condition. This exercise is an attempt to reconcile these two urban conditions. The efficiency of the orthogonal grid creates an air of rigidity, order, and maturity to this new city. The efficient metropolis is only so on the surface, as within each ‘superblock’ the pattern is fractured by a highly organic, meandering layout. The interior of these blocks is where the special moments of Long Pao exist. Exploration and wandering through this new pattern encourages mixing of interests, discoveries of new public and commercial institutions, and an overall wonder and eventual ownership of the ‘neighborhood’.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


ECOSYSTEM OF ZONING easily navigable streets promote commercial activity, high rise buildings block sound for neightborhoods, neighborhoods create Efficient + Experiential enjoyable communities to live promote and work in. The solution became an ‘ecosystem of zoning’. Easily navigable streets commercial activity. They also articulate the efficiency and success of modern China. High rise office buildings contain and isolate neighborhoods, creating serene oases. These neighborhoods employ computer generated organic layouts to create urban settings rich with the possibility of wonder and discovery.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Plan White areas - zoned commercial office Green areas - zoned mixed use residential and commercial service

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Massing Rendering - Overall Zone of construction bounded by existing canals. This amplifies the density of the project, giving it a grander appearance from afar.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Massing Rendering - Efficient Grid

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Massing Rendering - Experiential Neighborhood

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Individual Work

Long Pao, China

Xiaoyun Li 2012 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


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Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Extraction of Existing Buildings

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Extraction of Ponds

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Stephanplatz, Vienna

Harbour Bridge, Sydney

OCT Ecological Square, Shenzhen

Commercial

Agri-Tourism site, India

Town Center (CBD) Agricultural Tourism Development Greenery/Canal Corridor

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center

SOM planning, Nanjing

Zoningg


Aerial View (existing) ( g)

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Aerial View (developed) ( p )

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


A New Perspective:

Development Plan for Long Pao

Kevin Jackson | Drew Mazur| Mark Strella 2012 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Long Pao Master Plan utilizes an urbanism that is personal and engaging. The residential sections of Long Pao are medium to high density, providing an atmosphere that is urban without the impersonality of much of late Chinese urbanism. They are designed to be within walking distance of a local commercial high street. These commercial high streets are located along a network of preexisting and newly constructed canals. The canals of Long Pao are to be landscaped to provide a natural aesthetic, and will be bounded by pedestrian malls of mixed-use development. Streetlevel commercial use provides residents with access to all of their daily needs in an aesthetically pleasing shopping environment, and the pedestrian only canal frontage encourages outdoor seating and a street that is teeming with life. By encouraging pedestrian oriented development, we will ensure that the future City of Long Pao is vibrant, active and social. The personal feel of Long Pao is aided by a strict separation of pedestrian activity and automobile traffic. By relegating automobile traffic to elevated highways placed strategically to minimize disruption of the urban fabric, pedestrians and bikers become the focus of the design of local surface streets. The large central park and waterfront parks of Long Pao supplement the pedestrian canal frontages to provide residents with plenty of public space in which interaction and a high quality of life is easily achieved. Finally, Long Pao will be the site of a new stadium that will prove an economic boom to the city as it attracts visitors from the entire region to see what Long Pao has to offer.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


RESIDENTIAL QUARTER urban living mid-scale residences

OLD CITY CENTER

BUSINESS DISTRICT

high end retail small commercial residential mixed-use

PUBLIC ENTERTAINMENT large mixed-use

PUBLIC GREEN

large commercial corporate headquarters high end residential

parks preserves reservoirs

Master plan

By restructuring the zoning arrangement of Long Pao, we will be able to implement more accessible nodes of program. With the implementation of green spaces sprawled throughout our master plan, we hope to achieve cleaner air, and a more pedestrian friendly street scape.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


SUBURBAN EXIT

URBAN EXIT

Master plan The addition of secondary canals will create breaks from the hard lines of the high density housing needed to accommodate China’s rapid growing population. Important nodes will be focused on with the addition of commercial pieces as well as a Civic Center for gatherings and sporting events.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Sectional Perspectives

Design Urbanism Seminar

Fall 2012


Civic Node This render depicts the Civic Center proposed for sporting events as well as public gatherings. The addition of a stadium is advantageous drawing attention to the potential for further economic development of the Long Pao area.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Re-Imagining China

A Look Towards A Greener City

Ryan Keszczyk | Amanda Rosales| Nora Schwaller 2012 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Jintang, China

A Green Redevelopment

We began our design with two concepts. The first involved a focus on high-density development along the main roads connecting the development to existing infrastructure. The second led to the creation of a continuous, interactive waterfront. The Central Business Distract was concentrated between the two main roads, with high-rise residential areas and then medium-density and low-rise areas radiating out to provide a gentle change in elevations. The three universities were split into two areas. Two of them were placed in the high-rise development, to provide a logical connection between ample living options and large-scale centers of activities. The stadium was also placed within close proximity, so that it could double as a facility for the colleges. The third university was placed in the more suburban setting at the edge of the low-rise development. It was also placed near the Cultural and Historic District as well as the old town. This provides an entirely different feel for the campus, while still providing it with urban amenities. The waterfront development begins at the southern boundary of the development and continues to the suburban development in the far north. This effectively takes a compelling natural feature, the river, and glorifying it in a manner that provides wonderful public spaces across the entire development. Furthermore, it is well integrated into the major commercial aspects of the site, which will help draw more people into this economic center. For the organization and integration of the entire site, three major roads cut east to west, connecting the area to existing development, and another major road connects north to south. Within these created blocks, the space is subdivided normally with the intention of remaining parallel and perpendicular to the main roads. A final major road boarders the site on the outside, eastern edge, which both helps to define the site, to connect outside people into the site, and to facilitate movement for people within the site.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Circulation

Low-Rise Mid-Rise Universities Old-Town Cultural Center Central Business District Stadium Commercial Green-Space

Jintang Master Plan Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Long Pao, China The Green City

Our intent with this proposal was to create a small, but vibrant city that maximized green space and focused on an interactive waterfront. To achieve this, the main core of the project is focused in the corner where the major canal that borders the west side of the development meets the river to the south. This space integrates high-rise residential areas with the Central Business District, in order to minimize travel distances between home and work, integrate various facets of daily life, and to keep the place active at all hours of the day. The rest of the development begins to radiate out from this dominant node. To assist with this, the canals cutting through the site are preserved and glorified as main transportation paths with integrated, pedestrian pathways. Green space is placed on either side of this area, making the space walk-able by providing amenities for pedestrians. As a final layer, directional traffic boarders on the outside of this. This subdivides the site into a series of major subdivisions. These spaces are further dissected into walk-able block sizes, separated by smaller roads. The radiation of building density and heights from the center is reflected in these block sizes. The denser core, with its larger buildings, is given 500 square feet per block, the mid-rise is given 400, while the lower rise areas and the commercial sector is given 300 square feet. Green spaces are integrated into each block, to provide a pleasant amenity and a public forum for the inhabitants. The commercial sector once again follows the riverfront development. This allows for these areas to play off of each other in the pursuit of visitors and clientele, thus allowing each sector to help activate the other. While two of the major canal streets boarder this area, it is planned to be extremely walk-able and pedestrian friendly, creating a true, urban construct. Taken in its entirety, this development builds up a vibrant core and then bleeds out in both plan and section to avoid any uncomfortable jumps in scale and typology. This ensures that the area has the density necessary to create an active and diverse urban condition. However, it accomplishes this in a way that preserves and glorifies some of the most striking features of the existing site, including the river and the canals that crisscross the area.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Keszczyk Work Area sub-division

LongPaO_Overview

LOW RISE MID RISE HIGH RISE GREEN SPACES PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY

BUSINESS/ COMMERCIAL DISTRICT INDUSTRIAL GREEN AREA RESIDENTIAL

Rosales Work Block Divisions

Schwaller Work

Block sub-division

Transport

Expansion

Low-Rise Transistion Zone

Low-Rise Transistion Zone

Transitional Park Space

Transitional Park Space

Landscaped Park Space

Main Transport Routes

Commercial

Secondary Transport Route

Mid-Rise Residential (low end units)

Main Transport Hubs

Mid-Rise Residential (high end units)

Secondary Transport Hubs

Early Diagram Work

Here are a few examples of selected individual work prior to our collaborative design as a group.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Mid-Rise Housing Low-Rise Housing City Core Waterfront Development Commercial

Overall Plan Our design focuses on a Central Business District, with housing radiating from the center outwards. The waterfront creates a long strip of land for public use, including commercial sections, vast parkland, and other various elements.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Circulation

Precedent Research

Alexandria, VA New Orleans, LA

Nat. Harbor, MD

Portland, OR

Amsterdam Burlington, VT

Abu Dhabi

Louisville, KY

Green Spaces

Paris

Building Typology

Diagrams While designing our proposal for Long Pao, we focused on circulation, building typology, and most importantly green spaces. The High-Rise portion acts as the CBD for the city, with Mid-Rise and Low-Rise radiating outwards. The buildings along the main circulation paths would act as mixed-use buildings to encourage commercial development.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Fall 2012


Master Plan The design is broken down into blocks of various sizes, depending on the intent of use. The red blocks are the high-rise buildings which are a mix of business and residential. The orange and yellow blocks are the mid-rise and low-rise buildings, respectively, which radiate outwards from the CBD.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Sections

Section A

Section B

Height Comparisons

A

High Rise

Mid-Rise

Low-Rise

Block Scaling

High Rise Block Footprint

B

Mid-Rise Block Footprint

Low-Rise Block Footprint

S Sections

What these sections and sectional diagrams show are the methods utilized to scale down the built environment towards the edges of the development, as well as the scaling utilized in both plan and section to bring the block dimensions to a size that related back to the function and scale of the buildings occupying it.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Fall 2012


Perspective This image shows how we plan to integrate the built environment with a series of park spaces, as well as the green space that dominates the water front. Wide streets and an ample neutral ground helps to mitigate the drastic transition, so that the spaces connect comfortably.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Perspective As mentioned previously, we intend to keep many of the original canals to connect to the history of the area, and also to provide a beautiful green space that integrates pedestrian spaces with vehicular traffic. As you can see from the image, the direction of the traffic is split down the middle by this feature.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Fall 2012


Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


LONG PAO WATER-BASED INFRASTRUCTURE MIXED-USE DEVELOPMENT Kevin Michniok | Aditi Padhi M.Arch 2013 | M.Arch II 2012 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


LONG PAO, CHINA, WATER-BASED, MIXED-USE URBAN VILLAGE Water proximity is both a blessing and a curse. Is it possible to invest development to actively respond to abrupt and gradual changes in urban needs while we give more space to the natural flow of rivers? Can we make the water an important productive force? If we look at the historical/ cultural importance of rivers, ponds and lakes can we again approach these water bodies as attracting cultural mediators that can guide urbanization? Two principles of approach - Making the city and orienting the region • Primarily this rural district is marked by the lack of open public spaces. • Water based farms and urban farming may be the future of development strategies • Open air amenities in the adjacent water surface, as the only surface free from construction and development and a refuge to the residents and the visitors open to the sky • Water front development and beautification. Precedent of Water based connectivity: 5-FINGER PLAN | KØBENHAVN The goals of Copenhagen’s Green Structure Plan are to control urban development to ensure that people are always able to access to open space, parks and undeveloped, natural areas on a regional scale. The plan strives to weave new “green elements” into the existing mosaic of neighborhoods in the city by means of the following key principals. + Urbanization will develop in slender fingers fingers + Green wedges of u ndeveloped land will remain between fingers + Finger development will follow public transport (esp. railways) + Suburbs will develop like pearls on a string + Inhabitants will live in close proximity to green spaces The guiding principles of the Green Structure apply both to recreational possibilities as well as the greater environmental context of the city. In developing their strategy, planners took into account cultural-historical and ecological concerns.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Copenhagen has repeatedly been recognized as one of the cities with the best quality of life. It is also considered one of the world’s most environmentally friendly cities. Suburban Copenhagen (or the Copenhagen metropolitan area) is planned according to the Finger Plan initiated in 1947, dividing the suburbs into five fingers. The S-train lines are built according to the Finger Plan, while green wedges and highways are built between the fingers. URBAN o Water-front city center o Connecting the old development to new development at the CBD o gridded transit system o reclaiming o parking and plazas for open space o dense mixed development with transit nodes GREEN o green wedges o bicycle paths, o harbor side o promenades o well distributed network of o urban parks o undeveloped areas / nature reserves

Proposed Mixed-Use Zoning

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012




Long Pao Zoning Barge urban farming and low density development and recreation

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Long Pao Zoning Integration of 5-Finger plan into developmental zoning

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Urban Massing View of City Center Centrum (Palm) View from low-rise housing units

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Urban Massing View from Highway system View from low-density barge

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Jintang – Sports and Cultural Destination China’s Jintang province though is largely an agricultural community with a thriving industries include farming and fishing has the potential of being development as a major Sports and cultural Destination. Located across the river are proposed and existing University projects that will provide a framework to establish a world class sports venue that will not only cater to the requirements locally but also establish the city as a major destination for the region. The scenic site is bound on the northeastern by mountains and on the south and west by the river, sloping down naturally which inspire the three-tiered contoured concept plan. Following the natural elevation from the mountain to the river facilities are placed from the highest elevation near the mountains to the lowest near the River. This in-turn will provide a Vista and a landscape that uses the natural views to the best advantage.

Jingtang

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


The sports facility is located centrally giving access to the University campuses and being close enough to the commercial and residential areas. The cultural area is divided by a recreational zone and put up on the highest contour to establish hierarchy and a focal point. The road network maintains the existing roads and access but additionally follows the new contours created concentrically to form a fine network of connection. Mixed-use functions allow for a vibrant cityscape.

Jingtang

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Jingtang Model

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Cultural Center

Sports and Recreation

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Jingtang Zoning

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Jintang: Spiky Urbanism S. Nikdast, R. Schoenfeld, R. Solinski, J. Ungar MSRED 2013/M.Arch 2013 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


PROJECT DESCRIPTION Our concept for Jintang distributes cultural institutions around the site in a “spiky” fashion to create and define distinct urban districts. Instead of placing all three universities in a row, the third university is moved to the far edge of the site, creating a “crosstown” relationship between the universities. Similarly, the museum, library, and cultural center are each placed 1-2 miles apart on riverfront sites, anchoring a series of riverfront districts instead of a combined civic/cultural center that might stand apart from the city. OTHER TEXT The edges of the site are carefully considered. As riverfront property is the most desirable, it is planned to host luxury residential at high density. Corridors leading inland from river bridges host major office and retail districts. The edge separating the floodplain from the mountains is largely defined by the already-planned highway, but this highway is bridged and covered at several locations to allow free flow between the city and the natural surroundings, including a major stadium that is nestled into a mountainside to reduce the amount of construction material and maximize views. Also along the planned highway are a medical center and a large park intended for area residents’ sports and recreation.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


University Retail/Mixed-Use Office Recreation/Exercise Medical Middle & Working Class Residential Luxury Residential Park/Open Space Cultural/Civic Stadium

Land Use Diagram Three cultural institutions lie along the river, the “axis of the mind”. Along the planned foothills highway are a stadium, preserves and recreational facilities - the “axis of the body”. Each of these amenities anchors a distinct neighborhood.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Detail Plan: Library District The large, straight street leading to the river becomes a major mixed-use district, anchored at one end by a landmark library building along the river, and at the other end by a triangular gateway plaza. Blocks further away are residential and office, and all blocks have building mass oriented to the perimeter with a central open space.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Precedents: Barcelona/London The left image shows the central part of Barcelona, which adheres to a fairly rigid grid system with large blocks and central open space. The right image shows The City in London, where small skyscrapers have now been built on the interiors of traditional urban blocks.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Long Pao: A Contemporary Canal City S. Nikdast, R. Schoenfeld, R. Solinski, J. Ungar MSRED 2013/M.Arch 2013 Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


PROJECT DESCRIPTION In our design for the new city of Long Pao – located across the river from the thriving city of Nanjing – we sought to incorporate the area’s existing natural resources and integrate them into the urban fabric. The region is made up of marshlands, cut through by both natural and manmade canals used by local residents for both economic and transportation necessities. The manmade canals are cut parallel and perpendicular to each other, creating a gridded system that we built upon. The existing village of Long Pao will be designated a Historic Low-Rise District, allowing for its development and modernization while maintaining its traditional atmosphere. The majority of the expansion will take place to the northeast of the existing village. This extension will take place on the other side of an existing canal, which will be widened, with roads extending on both its sides. The expansion is comprised of a series of gridded blocks, each block measuring 300’ x 300’. Every three to five blocks, the urban blocks will give way to canals, serving as both urban amenities and transportation bodies. Each canal is crossable at various points by either pedestrian or traffic bridges. Imagery ©2012 TerraMetrics, Map data ©2012 Mapabc -

Through the center of the city’s extension will run a six-block-wide linear park, with a wide “grand canal” snaking through it. Within this strip of greenery will be a Mid-Rise residential neighborhood, allowing residents to live in, shop in, and experience their city’s focal point. Similar park living will also be zoned along the lagoons on the city’s south side, and a large city park will be located on the city’s north side. The plan seeks to create an urban environment in which commercial and residential are intertwined, creating a city that is almost entirely “mixed-use.” The zoning would generally regulate whether the neighborhood would be low-rise (under six stories), mid-rise (six to fifteen stories), or high-rise, (above fifteen stories). These designations will allow for architectural and economic diversity within neighborhoods, will still allowing each neighborhood to have a distinctive feel. In addition to these mixed-use and residential neighborhoods, there will also be an area zoned as a central business district, in the northwestern corner of the new city, and an Industrial and Harbor area, to the southwest of the historic city.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Diagrams The first diagram shows water systems existing on the site. The second diagram shows existing built areas and their intensity (orange is low-density, blue is moderate density).

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Precedent Analysis Clockwise from top left: Aerial View of Barcelona’s L’Eixample District; Canal in Venice, CA; Canal in Amsterdam, Netherlands; Jardín del Turia in Valencia, Spain; Canal in St. Petersburg, Russia

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


CITY PARK

LONG PAO ZONING DISTRICTS HISTORIC CORE (LOWRISE) CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT (HIGHRISE) MIXED-USE RESIDENTIAL (HIGHRISE) MIXED USE RESIDENTIAL (MIDRISE) HISTORIC CORE

PARK/WATERFRONT RESIDENTIAL (MIDRISE) HARBOR & INDUSTRIAL

HARBOR & INDUSTRIAL

PARKS & RECREATION MARSHES

DELUXE APTS IN THE SKY

SCALE SHIFT

CENTRAL PARK

WATERFRONT LIVING

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Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


DELUXE APTS IN THE SKY

SCALE SHIFT

Sections The “Apartments in the Sky” section shows the inland edge of the development, with the highest densities. In “Scale Shift”, building typology shifts from highrises to a more human-scale mid-rise neighborhood.

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


CENTRAL P PARK

WATERF WA ATERFRONT LIVING

Sections “Central Park” shows how the mid-rise neighborhood relates to the large park designed around a drainage canal. “Waterfront Living” shows how large apartmenr buildings are tied into the Yangtze River levee, with parking below.

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Grand Canal View

Tulane Regional Urban Design Center


Central Business District View

Design Urbanism Seminar

Spring 2012


Tulane Regional Urban Design Center: Student Work, Spring 2012