Issuu on Google+

Form 2290 Rejection Due to Name Control

E-file Form 2290 IRS Form 2290 exists as a way to pay Heavy Vehicle Use Taxes which must be filed with the IRS for any highway motor vehicle that exceeds a gross weight of 55,000 pounds. The Schedule 1 may also be used as proof of payment to register your vehicle in any state. Form 2290 must be filed for the month the taxable vehicle is first used on the public highways during the current period. Form 2290 must be filed by the last day of the month following the month of first use.

IRS Rejections of Form 2290 Returns Make sure the correct vehicle Identification Numbers are listed and not duplications form a previous filing. Correct any duplication and re-submit the return. If you are doing VIN correction previously submitted and accepted return, you will need to file a paper return and check the designated “VIN correction� box. If the new VIN is totally different from what was listed on your original return (Schedule 1), you need to explain why the VIN you are now submitting is different. When you submitted your return, the system detected that you had already filed a return under the same EIN, for the same tax period, for the same vehicle(s) and/or the same VIN category. Check your return to make sure you are reporting new vehicles only that the other information you input is correct. Occasionally, the IRS may reject an E-file of Form 2290 return for various reasons. If your return is rejected, our system will list the specific reason for rejection and provide and clearly display how the error can be fixed. Once fixed, you may retransmit your return for no additional charge.


Name control Rejections A name control is a sequence of characters derived from a taxpayer’s name that is used by IRS in processing the tax return filed by the taxpayer. It is important that the combination of name control and taxpayer identification number (TIN) provided on an electronically filed return match IRS’s record of name controls and TINs. A name control is established by the IRS when the taxpayer requests an Employer Identification Number (EIN). The IRS creates the name control from the legal name listed on the Form SS-4, Application for Employer Identification Number. When a return or extension is filed, the IRS check whether a name/TIN combination is correct by matching it against a file containing all employer identification numbers (EIN) issued by IRS. The name control listed on the return/extension is then compared to the name control on the IRS file. If it matches the name control in our records, it is considered to be correct. In e-file, a taxpayer’s Employer Identification Number (EIN) and name control in the Return Header must match the data in the IRS e-file database. If the EIN and name control do not match at the parent (consolidated) level, the e-filed return will reject.

Importance of Name Control In e-file, a taxpayer’s Employer Identification Number (EIN) and name control in the Return Header must match the data in the IRS e-file database. If the EIN and name control do not match at the parent (consolidated) level, the e-filed return will reject.


How determining the name control? The name control consists of up to four alpha and/or numeric characters. It can be determined from the information specified on the first name line. Generally, the name control is derived from the first four characters of the corporation name. An ampersand (&) and hyphen (-) are the only special characters allowed in the name control. The name control can have less, but no more than four characters. Blanks may be present only at the end of the name control. You have to be very conscious about the details you enter in the Form 2290. Even a small mistake may lead to IRS Form 2290 rejection.


Form 2290 rejection due to name control