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CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION FIVE-YEAR MASTER PLAN 2019 - 2023


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS CITY OF NAPPANEE 300 WEST LINCOLN STREET NAPPANEE, INDIANA 46550 (574) 773.2112

MAYOR PHIL JENKINS

CITY COUNCIL JACOB DERMOTT TODD NUNEMAKER ANNA HUFF AMY ROSA DANA HOLLAR

CLERK-TREASURER KATHY BROWN

PARKS AND RECREATION BOARD RANDY CRIPE DALE TOBIAS MICHAEL WAGNER NIKKI WIGGINS SAM SHEETS

PARKS SUPERINTENDENT CHRIS DAVIS

PARKS DIRECTOR OF PROGRAMMING TIFFANY SALYER

Prepared By:


TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES PLANNING AREA AND MAP NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION VISION MISSION NAPPANEE PARKS DEPARTMENT AND BOARD

INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS COMMUNITY CONTEXT POPULATION DISTRIBUTION / ECONOMIC FACTORS RECREATION AND PROGRAMMING TRENDS NEEDS ANALYSIS AND BENCHMARKING PARKS FACILITIES ACCESSIBILITY COMPLIANCE PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT: PUBLIC MEETINGS PUBLIC INPUT SURVEY RESULTS

MASTER PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX DERSKEN FARM & WETLANDS MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE NAPPANEE DOG PARK RECOVERY PARK STAUFFER PARK SOUTH PARK WELLFIELD PARK WEST PARK PRIORITIES AND ACTION SCHEDULE

APPENDICES RESOLUTION & ADA COMPLIANCE PUBLIC MEETING DOCUMENTATION


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INTRODUCTION

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PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES PARKS MASTER PLAN PURPOSE

PARKS MASTER PLAN OBJECTIVES

The development of a parks master plan is a critical step for a city to take to ensure its parks support the goals and objectives of the city, meet the needs of its residents, and contribute to a high quality of life in the community. More now than ever, people are choosing to live in a community based on lifestyle and quality of life rather than the jobs available in that area, so it is critically important that a city has a strong parks system.

This Five-Year Parks Master Plan aims to accomplish the following objectives:

The Nappanee Parks and Recreation Board undertook this park master planning process in order to prioritize community needs and to ensure that the greatest benefit is achieved from each dollar spent. Facility improvements and program recommendations proposed in this plan are based on the following factors: • An assessment of current facilities and programs • Review of the previous City of Nappanee Five-Year Master Plan • Input from the community at large and stakeholder groups • Input from the those who govern Nappanee at the local level and the Nappanee Parks and Recreation Board and Department • An evaluation of the present opportunities constraints, and goals The proposed recommendations serve as a guide for the development of recreational resources and amenities for the next five years and beyond. Improvements to the park facilities and recreation programs will be identified and prioritized to create an action plan that aims to give the city and its residents the best parks facilities for the available funding, while building towards an ultimate long-term goal.

• Inventory and evaluate the physical condition of existing parks, amenities, and programming. • Acquire input from a diverse group of stakeholders, residents, and park users and report the findings in an accurate manner. • Gather public support and increase parks awareness in the community. • Discover strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats. • Set achievable goals and objectives that reflect current issues, challenges, and opportunities as they relate to the current park system. • Analyze information and public input to determine strategies, priorities, and an action plan for the next five years. • Provide a guide for the development of park and recreation amenities that reflects the interests and needs of the community. • Develop master plans for each of the individual parks showing potential improvements and new amenities. • Expand opportunities to obtain funding for the park system amenities and programming. • Serve as a supporting document to secure funding for proposed projects. • Provide the foundation to make accurate budget decisions.

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MAP OF NAPPANEE, INDIANA

LOCATION The City of Nappanee is located mostly in Elkhart county, Indiana, with a small portion of the city located in Kosciuscko county. The community is located in north-central Indiana, approximately 30 miles southeast of South Bend, Indiana and 60 miles northwest of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Other nearby cities include Bremen and Wakarusa. • Nappanee latitude is 41.4428° N and longitude is 86.0014° W. • It is in the Eastern Standard time zone. • Elevation is 876 feet. • The city encompasses 4.42 square miles, all of it land.

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PLANNING AREA AND MAP DEFINITION OF THE PLANNING AREA The City of Nappanee is a historic place in northcentral Indiana, located mainly in Elkhart County with a small portion of the city in Kosciusko County. The city has a heritage of hard work and service above self, and leaders have developed a bright future vision. Nappanee spans 4.421 square miles across Locke and Union Township in Elkhart County. The parks area makes up about 0.75 square miles of the city. The park properties include Stauffer Park, West Park, South Park, Recovery Park, Wellfield Park/Soccer Complex, Callander Sportsplex, Nappanee Dog Park, Derksen Farm and Wetlands, and McCormick Creek Golf Course.

While the parks system primarily provides recreational opportunities for city residents, many visitors from outside the city and outside Elkhart County visit the parks. This is especially true for McCormick Creek Golf Course. Due to the golf course and other unique amenities, the planning area goes beyond the City of Nappanee to other areas of Elkhart County, Kosciusko County, and St. Joseph County. Other nearby cities and towns include Wakarusa, Elkhart, Goshen, Mishawaka, Bremen, Plymouth, Bourbon, Warsaw, and Syracuse. While most of the surrounding region is rural, there are several larger metropolitan areas within a 45-minute drive from Nappanee including South Bend, Elkhart, and Warsaw.

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Image courtesy of Derek Jensen, released for public use through Wikimedia Commons CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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VISION & MISSION STATEMENT

VISION

It is the vision of Nappanee Parks and Recreation to create community through people, parks, and programs. This vision is based on the belief that through quality recreation programs, facilities, and people, a vibrant and dynamic community will be created and continually enhanced.

MISSION

Our mission is to provide our community and patrons with the highest level of programs, facilities, and services that will positively affect our vision of creating community. This mission is bolstered by defining the following specific goals: To provide diversified recreational and educational programs To promote health and wellness To strengthen community image and sense of place To efficiently utilize resources and demonstrate fiscal responsibility To develop and cultivate partnerships To support economic development To protect environmental resources To increase cultural unity

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PARKS DEPARTMENT & BOARD PARKS DEPARTMENT The Nappanee Parks Department was established under Indiana Code 36-10-3, and it operates and manages the parks system in Nappanee. This includes operating and maintaining the park’s properties and facilities and providing programs for the community. Since the focus of Nappanee Parks is on the quality of life in the community, partnerships with community groups are utilized to provide the greatest benefits. The parks department has a professional staff of management, administration, operations, and maintenance personnel. The staff is well-trained and continually seeks opportunities for further education and training. The Superintendent and certain staff members attend workshops and conferences to keep informed on the latest recreation trends and technical information.

Chris Davis became the Parks Superintendent in July 2016. Since he began this position, Chris has worked with the Parks Board and his staff to develop a plan to reinvigorate the parks system. With its diverse properties and amenities and an energized group of people that understand the importance of parks to a successful community, Nappanee Parks is poised to make a large impact on the quality of life in Nappanee through proper planning and implementation of future improvements. The Parks Department also understands it is important to be aware of inclusiveness and diversity while planning for future parks improvements. The Parks Department aims to make all facilities and programs available to everyone, regardless of race, color, national origin, limited English proficiency, sex, age, or disability.

PARKS BOARD

PARK SUPERINTENDENT CHRIS DAVIS

PROGRAM DIRECTOR TIFFANY SALYER POOL MANAGER • LifeGuards • Swimming Instructors

PARK FOREMAN

PARK LABORER SEASONAL STAFF

GREENS MAINTENANCE SUPERVISOR

PERMANENT PART-TIME MECHANIC

GROUNDS MAINTENANCE ASSISTANT SEASONAL STAFF

TENNIS SUPERVISOR • Tennis Instructors DAY CAMP DIRECTOR • Camp Staff LEAGUE COORDINATORS • Referees, Umpires & Scorekeepers • League Staff

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PARKS BOARD The Nappanee Parks and Recreation Board is comprised of five members and was established by Ordinance 322-8/15/66 under Indiana Code 3610-3. The fifth member, appointed by the Library Board, was established by a local ordinance. The local ordinance prescribes how the Board members are appointed. The guidelines include: • No more than two members shall be of the same political party. • Members appointed by Mayor, based on interest and knowledge of parks and recreation. • Terms are for four years after initial board is appointed. The first Board had a one-year, twoyear, three-year, and four-year term to allow for continuity as terms expired. • All terms expire the first Monday in January. • At the first regular meeting of the year, the Board shall elect a President and Vice President.

• The regularly scheduled Board meeting is the 2nd Wednesday of each month. (Currently, it is set for 4:30 p.m. at the West Pavilion) • The Board shall have the power to perform all acts necessary to acquire and develop sites and facilities to conduct such programs as are generally understood to be park and recreation functions. • The Board shall prepare and submit an annual budget in the same manner as other departments of City Government as prescribeed by the State Board of Accounts. • The Board may accept gifts, donations, and subsidies for park and recreation purposes. The Parks Board is comprised of the following members: Sam Sheets - President Dale Tobias - Vice President Michael Wagner - Secretary Nicki Wiggins Randy Cripe

PARKS BUDGET Category

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2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Personal Services

$

517,076 $

445,948 $

505,270 $

508,762 $

614,091

Supplies

$

129,100 $

123,900 $

127,000 $

125,000 $

120,500

Other Services & Charges

$

196,750 $

192,650 $

238,442 $

233,500 $

213,648

Capital Outlays

$

100,000 $

100,000 $

135,000 $

135,000 $

125,000

Total

$

942,926 $

862,498 $ 1,005,712 $ 1,002,262 $ 1,073,239


OTHER PLANNING DOCUMENTS As part of the inventory and analysis phase of the master plan, existing planning documents were reviewed. 2013-2017 Nappanee Parks and Recreation Master Plan This plan is an update to the City of Nappanee 20132017 Parks Master Plan. Information from this plan was updated to reflect the current conditions of Nappanee Parks, the community, demographics, etc. This plan has been a resource for the parks department over the last five years to help guide decision making and to determine goals. While many of the goals and strategies listed in this plan have been met or are still applicable today, some will be updated during the 2019-2023 master plan process to align with evolving park goals and national trends. Elkhart County Vibrant Communities Vibrant Communities is an initiative to strengthen Elkhart County’s strong communities by focusing on quality of place, community assets, creative opportunities, and collaborative partnerships. Task forces were created for active transportation, housing, and communication. The Action Agenda was completed in 2016 and was formed through a robust community engagement process that resulted in recommendations that ranged from improvement projects to new or enhanced programs and policies.

MACOG Active Transportation Plan Michiana Area Council of Governments prepared the Active Transportation Plan to identify needs, resources, and strategies to improve and increase walking and bicycling in Elkhart, Kosciusko, Marshall, and St. Joseph Counties. The plan builds on local planning efforts and serves as part of the Michiana on the Move: 2040 Transportation Plan. WaNee Vision 2020 Plan The Community of WaNee Vision 2020 Capital Campaign is a collaboration between the City of Nappanee, Boys & Girls Clubs of Elkhart County, Wa-Nee Community Schools, and other groups. A plan was developed to address the needs of the community by improving health and well-being and strengthening public-private partnerships. Projects included development of trails, new soccer fields at Wellfield Park, and a new Boys & Girls Club facility. Over 5.75 million dollars was raised for these efforts. Joint Parks Planning Committee Representatives from Nappanee Parks, Elkhart Parks, Goshen Parks, and Elkhart County Parks, along with several consultants, met in the fall of 2018 to discuss county-wide parks planning to find better ways to leverage resources, share issues and success stories, and strengthen the regional parks system. Future meetings are planned.

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EXISTING CONDITIONS INVENTORY AND ANALYSIS

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COMMUNITY CONTEXT GEOGRAPHIC CONTEXT The City of Nappanee is located mostly in Elkhart county, Indiana, with a small portion of the city located in Kosciuscko county, Indiana. The community is located in north-central Indiana, approximately 30 miles southeast of South Bend, Indiana and 60 miles northwest of Fort Wayne, Indiana. Other nearby cities include Bremen and Wakarusa.

The soil qualities may lead to increased construction costs for appropriate drainage and meeting the proper bearing capacity for structural requirements. Ball fields should include subsurface drainage improvements to maintain playability after rain.

• Nappanee latitude is 41.4428° N and longitude is 86.0014° W. Elevation is 876 feet. • It is in the Eastern Standard time zone. • The city encompasses 4.42 square miles of land.

The Elkhart River traverses the county, entering at the southeast corner of the county and flows to the northwest to Elkhart, where it joins the St. Joseph River. Berlin Court Grand Ditch runs west to east through Nappanee on the south side of Stauffer Park and McCormick Creek Golf Course. It eventually joins Turkey Creek and enters into the Elkhart River. The two major lakes in the county are Simonton and Heaton Lakes. Both are at the northern edge of the county and north of the St. Joseph River.

NATURAL FEATURES AND LANDSCAPE The landscape of Elkhart county, Indiana was formed more than 12,000 years ago, when the last ice glacier receded from the area. The melting snow and ice left Elkhart County and nearby lands of the area now known as Kankakee Valley in a flat, slowly draining marsh and swamp-like condition with sandy, wooded knolls and highlands in and around the sides of the valley. Nappanee and all of Elkhart County are located within Indiana’s Northern Moraine and Lake Region. Like much of Indiana, Nappanee has a history of utilizing the land for farming.

SOILS According to the National Cooperative Soil Survey for Elkhart County, Indiana, Elkhart County is mainly in the St. Joseph drainage basin, the mouth of which is at St. Joseph, Michigan. This basin drains into Lake Michigan and subsequently into the Atlantic Ocean. A very small area in the southwestern part of the county is in the Kankakee River drainage basin, which drains into the Mississippi River. Much of the City of Nappanee lies on soil classified as CvdA (Crosier Loam, 0 to 1 percent slopes) and UeaA (Urban Land-Crosier Complex, 0 to 3 percent slopes) with pockets of CvdB (Crosier Loam, 1 to 4 percent slopes), BuuA (Brookston Loam, 0 to 1 percent slopes), and UgrA (Urban Land-Rensselaer Complex, 0 to 1 percent slopes). All primary soil types within Nappanee are very poor to somewhat poorly drained with high available water capacity.

WATER RESOURCES

The major flooding in the region in spring of 2018 caused some increased water levels in the Berlin Court Grand Ditch, but did not have much of an impact to the parks or city.

CLIMATE Nappanee, like all of Indiana, has a temperatecontinental climate, characterized by four distinct seasons, with significant seasonal variations in temperature. The average daily temperature in Elkhart County is 29.5° in winter with an average low of 18°, and 71° in summer with an average high of 82°. Precipitation is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year. Annual precipitation is about 36”, and annual snowfall, which occurs primarily in December through February, is about 30-40”. The first freeze usually occurs the first part of October, and the last freeze typically occurs the first part of May.

INVASIVE SPECIES The parks haven’t had major issues with invasive species, but continue to monitor vegetation at Derksen Farm & Wetlands. Emerald Ash Borer has pretty much run its course as most all ash trees in the parks have been affected and removed, despite the city forester treating the trees for years. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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Intersection of US 6 and SR 19 in downtown Nappanee

Photo courtesy of Bob Simmermon, Airport-Data.com Nappanee Municipal Airport

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NorthWood High School


HISTORY The first settlers moved into the county in about 1828. They came from Ohio, Pennsylvania, and New England and settled near the present town of Elkhart. The Miami and Potawatomi Indians previously occupied the region, but they had moved west of the Mississippi River by 1838. The county was organized in 1830 and was named for the popular trail stop at a small island at the confluence of the St. Joseph and Elkhart Rivers. This island, to an early Indian, seemed to be in the shape of an elk’s heart, and so the area was known to the Indians as “Elk Heart.” By 1870, seven farms and about 40 people were established around Nappanee. The B&O Railroad had tracks that ran right next to Nappanee connecting to Chicago. In 1874 a train station was developed and Nappanee was platted. Nappanee was first governed as a township from 1874, until 1889, when it was incorporated as a town. The Amish began migrating to southern Elkhart County in the early 1840s. Schoolhouses and churches were built, and the conservative religious community grew. Today many Amish live in Nappanee and southern Elkhart County. Accommodations such as hitching posts and buggy sheds for the Amish are prevalent throughout the city. The Amish use the parks the same as other citizens of Nappanee.

TRANSPORTATION NETWORK There are 216 miles of highways in Elkhart County, including 21 miles of the Indiana Toll Road, 91 miles of Federal highways, and 104 miles of Indiana highways. There are approximately 1,340 miles of county roads in Elkhart County, and most of these roads are paved. The major roads in Nappanee are US 6 and State Route 19, which crisscross the county so that all parts of the county are accessible. These two major roads intersect in downtown Nappanee. Three airports in the county serve small private planes and small corporate jet aircrafts, including a small municipal airport for Nappanee on US 6. The Nappanee Airport does not have scheduled flight service, but can accomodate single- and multi-engine aircraft with 4,000 feet of runway, two FAA certified approaches, a maintenance hangar, and self-serve fuel 24 hours a day. Four main railroad lines serve the county with approximately 60 miles of track. Amtrak offers the

only rail passenger service from Elkhart County. An active CSX railroad line is located just south of US 6 in Nappanee. The railroad and its crossings are at a forefront in transportation planning in the city since it divides the city just south of downtown. A public perception is that areas south of the tracks don’t receive as much attention. South Park, which is south of the railroad tracks, is often perceived to be neglected. It is a focus of current city planning to better connect the south side of the tracks with the rest of the city and address the negative perception. The city is also looking into expanding its trail network to improve bicycle and pedestrian circulation. The city has an expansive sidewalk system, but cyclists typically share the road with vehicles. US 6 has a wide shoulder for bicyclists and is heavily used by the Amish community. Creating recreational opportunities and safe connectivity via trails between neighborhoods, downtown, parks, and other community assets is of high importance to the city for quality of life and economic benefits.

EDUCATION The city of Nappanee has a combined school district with the city of Wakarusa. The Wa-Nee Community Schools consist of five schools, incling Nappanee Elementary School, Woodview Elementary School, Wakarusa Elementary School, NorthWood Middle School, and NorthWood High School. The high school building also offers the NorthWood Achievement Academy, which is a non-traditional educational option. The Wa-Nee School Corporation has a longstanding mutually beneficial agreement for cross-use of facilities and programs. The high school athletic facilities as well as elementary school playgrounds are open to public use. Activities offered by the school corporation include basketball, volleyball, football, track, cross country, softball, baseball, tennis, golf, wrestling, swimming, cheerleading, band, choir, and performing arts. Goshen College is a private christian liberal arts college located in Goshen within Elkhart county. Goshen College is about 16 miles from the city of Nappanee. As with many smaller cities, the community has deeprooted ties to the schools. Much time and effort are invested in student growth and development. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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Photo courtesy of Courtney Johnston Amish Acres Historic Farm & Heritage Resort

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Coppes Commons Shoppes and Venue


Nature not only plays a role in the growth and development of a child, but helps with the healthy interactions between children. According to a study done by NC State University in January 2012, the benefits of exposing children to naturalized outdoor learning environments “stimulates the diversity of children’s play experience and contributes to their healthy development.” As part of the planning process, Nappanee leadership considers the importance of the community’s youth and the benefits of their growth, development, and interactions. The desire is to work with the youth and their educators to integrate parks with education.

CULTURE The parks play an important role in the culture of Nappanee. The Parks Department partners with community groups to provide programs in the parks, partners with the schools for facilities and programs, and provides materials, labor, and volunteers at city festivals and events. Below are some attractions, festivals, and events that occur in the city. AMISH ACRES Amish Acres was founded by Richard Pletcher. It is a historic farm and heritage resort that embodies a preserved barn and Amish house that help to “Embrace the Pace,”Nappanee’s slogan. Amish Acres celebrates the Amish and shows features of their lifestyle. Amish Acre’s original preserved Round Barn was relocated to its current location, and within it was constructed a theater in order to feature shows. Other than seeing all kinds of plays at Amish Acres, tourists can experience authentic Amish style cooking, tours of an Amish house, and horse-drawn carriage rides. Another main attraction is the annual Amish Acres Arts & Crafts Festival. The festival has received numerous awards, making it one of the best festivals in the United States. COPPES COMMONS Originally the factory for Coppes Kitchen Cabinets that once produced the famous “Hoosier Cabinet,” the 100,000-square foot renovated factory now houses a variety of small businesses that offer shopping for locally made, handcrafted, and freshly baked items. Coppes Kitchens, once visited by Frank Sinatra and President John F. Kennedy, offers a uniique history and shopping experience within the rustic brick structure.

NAPPANEE PUBLIC LIBRARY The library holds many programs and events throughout the year. The library offers numerous electronic resources, meeting rooms, and the “Cube.” The Cube is a market space where members can learn about new technologies and equipment they might not have access to at home or work.

NAPPANEE THEATRE

The Nappanee Theatre originally opened in 1926 as the Fairy Theatre under the original owner, Guy Loudermilk. Seating up to 435 people, the theatre includes a balcony and box seats. In 1936, the theatre changed hands but continued to have both movies and live shows. Today, the theatre is independently owned and operated, and continues to screen movies, usually on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday evenings.

FESTIVALS AND EVENTS NAPPANEE APPLE FESTIVAL The Apple Festival is one of the largest festivals in Indiana and attracts over 80,000 people annually. The 44th annual Apple Festival will take place on September 19th to September 22nd in 2019. It showcases two performance stages, over 150 exhibitors, carnival rides, a parade, 5k run, apple pie baking contest, tractor pull, and many other activities. NAPPANEE FARM AND FLEA MARKET The flea market is every Saturday from June to September from 9:00 a.m. until 2:00 p.m. It is an outdoor market held on the grounds of Coppes Commons. Vendors sell farm fresh produce, baked goods, crafts, and collectibles. NAPPANEE SECOND SATURDAYS Various events, store discounts, and entertainment opportunities are held on the second Saturday during the summer months. ELKHART COUNTY 4-H FAIR Held annually in late July, the Elkhart County 4-H Fair is one of the largest 4-H county fairs in the nation attracting nearly 200,000 people annually. The fair offers quality family entertainment, free grandstand shows, positive competitions, and terrific food.

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Cobus Creek County Park in Elkhart County

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Bonneyville Mill County Park in Elkhart County


OTHER RECREATION OPPORTUNITIES In addition to the amenities provided by the Nappanee Parks and Recreation Department, community members have other recreation opportunities within Elkhart and Kusciusko counties. Some of these opportunities include: Bonneywille Mill County Park • Fishing • Biking • Snow Sports Ox Bow County Park • Fishing • Hiking Trails • Archery • Disc Golf • Field Sports • Snow Sports

River Preserve County Park • Fishing • Hiking Trails • Kayak / Canoe • Bird Watching • Snow Sports Cobus Creek County Park • Biking • Bird Watching • Fishing Boot Lake Nature Preserve • Hiking Trials • Bird Watching

Lieber Nature Preserve • Hiking Trials • Bird Watching Treasure Island • Bird Watching • Kayak / Canoe • Fishing Tri-County State Fish and Game Area • Fishing • Hunting Camping • Camp Alexander • Camp Crosley • Camp Dick Runyan • Camp Tippecanoe Elkhart County Historical Museum • Over 30,000 artifacts reflecting the county’s cultural heritage • Twelve permanent galleries

Churches A number of churches serve the Nappanee community. They offer a variety of programs for youth, adults, and families, including activities such as ball leagues, camps, youth groups, open gym, and retreats. Nappanee Youth Sports Leagues •Nappanee Youth Baseball League •NorthWood Soccer Club •Wa-Nee Waves Swim Club •NorthWood Panther Youth Football League

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POPULATION, DEMOGRAPHICS, & ECONOMICS POPULATION Nappanee is located approximately 25 miles from the Michigan state line and about 70 miles from the Lake Michigan shoreline in Elkhart County. Nappanee is one of the smaller cities within Elkhart County, with neighborhoring cities of Elkhart and Goshen being the largest in the county. YEAR .................. NAPPANEE ....... ELKHART COUNTY 1970 ......................... 4,111 ........................... 126,529 1980 ......................... 4,694 ........................... 137,330 1990 ......................... 5,510 ........................... 156,198 2000 ......................... 6,710 ........................... 182,791 2010 ......................... 6,648 ........................... 197,559 2017 ......................... 6,839 ........................... 205,032 AGE AND SEX According to census.gov, the following are the demographic statistics for age and sex: Nappanee National Persons under 5 years................... 8.8% ............. 6.1% Persons under 18 years................ 29.4% .......... 22.6% Persons over 65 years.................. 11.9% ........... 15.6% Male............................................. 47.7% ........... 49.2% Female......................................... 52.3% ........... 50.8%

RACE AND HISPANIC ORIGIN According to census.gov, the following are the demographic statistics for race and hispanic origin: White alone (not Hispanic or Latino)................. 89.7% Hispanic or Latino................................................ 7.3% Black or African American alone.......................... 2.5% American Indian & Alaska Native alone............... 0.0% Asian alone.......................................................... 1.0% Native Hawaiin or Pacific Islander alone.............. 0.2% Two or more races............................................... 1.2% EDUCATION According to census.gov, 86.9% of Nappanee residents that are older than 25% are a high school graduate or higher. Of residents older than 25 yrs, 17.2% have achieved a bachelor’s degree or higher. HOUSING & HOUSEHOLDS According to census.gov, the following are the demographic statistics for Nappanee households: Owner-occupied housing unit rate.................... 62.2% Median value of owner-occupied units........ $121,300 Median gross rent................................................ $668 Households...........................................................2,637 Persons per household.......................................... 2.62 Language other than English spoken at home...... 5.7% Renter vs Owner Occupied by Household Type

Male Population

Female Population

HEALTH According to census.gov, 9.0% of Nappanee residents under the age of 65 have a disability. Of residents under the age of 65, 15.4% do not have health insurance. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMICS According to census.gov and datausa, the following are the statistics for the economy in Nappanee: In civilian labor force (total 16+)......................... 69.0% In civilian labor force (female 16+)..................... 58.0% Median household income............................. $47,546 Poverty rate........................................................ 10.1% Nappanee has a diverse economy with many business opportunities. The largest sector is light manufacturing, focusing mostly in building materials and recreational vehicles. Some of the large manufacturing companies in Nappanee include Newmar Corporation, Fairmont Homes, Amerimax Building Products, Kountry Wood Products, Gulf Stream Coach, Damon Corp, and Borkholders Furniture. In addition to many of the large manufacturing companies, Nappanee has a unique tourism industry that emphasizes culture and heritage of the area. One of the largest tourist attractions, Amish Acres Historic Farm and Heritage Resort, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY

EMPLOYMENT BY OCCUPATIONS

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Information received from stats.indiana.edu


CONCLUSIONS Several conclusions can be drawn from the demographic data that might have an impact on planning for parks and recreation facilities and services. While population grew quickly from 1970 to 2000, growth has slowed significantly in the last 15 years. With low population growth expected, adding new facilities and park lands should be considered carefully. Focus on improving the existing parks to better serve current residents and attract new residents. Nappanee has a higher percentage of the population 18 years old and under and a lower percantge of the population 65 years and older compared to national averages. While it is important to provide programming and services for older citizens, focusing on the youth and families with children should be considered to meet the demographic needs. This statistic is also important while planning future amenities in the parks. It will be critical to address the recreation needs of youth in the community since this age group makes up a larger than normal percentage of the population. Providing families proper amenities and developing amenities that focus on recreational opportunities for teens will both be critical to planning successful parks.

Nappanee also benefits from a low cost of living. According to Hoosierdata.in.gov, Elkhart County has an average housing cost about 20% lower than the national average, with utility costs 7% less and an overall composite cost 5% less than the national average. Yet even with this low cost of living, Elkhart County imports far more workforce from neighboring counties than it exports to them. While this is a good sign of a strong manufacturing and business industry, it shows that many people would rather live outside the county even though they work in Elkhart County. This information shows that the county and its communities need to improve the quality of life to attract more workforce to live in the county and thus pay taxes within the county. Statistical information such as this will be critical when talking Mayors, City Councils, and funding entities about placemaking and quality-of-life improvements such as parks projects. Recent national trends emphasize that quality of life plays a key role in the success of a community. Parks and recreation are critical to improving quality of life and attracting workforce and families. Attracting workforce and families will lead to a stronger tax based, increase school populations, and a stronger, healthier community.

Image courtesy of Inhabitat.com CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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2.3

LEVEL OF SERVICE & NEEDS ANALYSIS LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS To better understand the impact of both the existing park system as well as the relative success of its strategies to implement the overall goals, this Master Plan process employed contextual measurement techniques that collected qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative methodologies, which rely on numbers to report results, included public input surveys, amenity boards with sticky dot responses, census research, as well as the spatial analysis of the parks themselves. Quantitative data collection tactics included group dialogue at the stakeholder and public meetings, fill-in options on the surveys, and the use of sticky note responses in our planning exercises.

• Operating expenditure per capita of $78.26/Year

Referencing this data against itself, the Project Team determined reliability and validity of the responses. This information can then be used to verify existing Parks Level of Service(LOS) successes and gaps, using three typical metrics: system acreage, amenities, and access.

• LOS metrics differ between various components of a parks system (ball fields vs trails vs nature reserve).

Common in the public sector, civic departments and agencies utilize LOS standards to plan and monitor the quality of services provided to their constituents. A common example of this is the LOS roadway scores that transportation engineers and planners use to categorize traffic flow. “Grades” are assigned to roadways based on speed, density, and other performance measures. In all cases, these metrics tell only part of the overall story, emphasizing the need for reframing the measures of success that do not directly relate to parks (economics, for instance) as well as multiple source validation of the data collected. NRPA Park Metrics, formerly PRORAGIS, offers data standards and insights for park and recreation agencies. Based on the 2018 NRPA Agency Performance Review Key Findings, the typical park and recreation agency offers: • One park for every 2,114 residents served • 10.1 Acres of parkland per 1,000 residents

• Revenue-to-operating expenditure of 28% • 7.9 Full-time equivalent employees per 10,000 residents In spite of this information, determining LOS standards for parks and recreation systems can be challenging for several reasons. • Parks and recreation systems can be measured in different ways. (Parkland acreage, numbers of recreation facilities, distance to parks and facilities, qualities of parks and facilities, operating costs, revenues, etc.).

• Appropriate LOS standards may also differ based on the community context. (Proximity to urbanized or rural areas). With this in mind, the NRPA also notes that the diversity of communities and their park systems does not necessarily lend to comparing different systems against each other. While it is important to benchmark Nappanee parks against other similar communities to help understand potential deficiencies, it should be used as only one of the analysis tools in a toolbox that includes other contextual analysis methods. ACREAGE LEVEL OF SERVICE Acreage LOS evaluates the total amount of park acreage a community has when compared with its current and projected population (expressed in acres per 1,000 residents). This technique is often one of the most widely utilized due to its ease of calculation. It is generally regarded that the higher the acreage LOS, the high the quality of life enjoyed by the community’s residents. The Indiana Statewide Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) guidelines for recreation lands and facilities was reviewed to CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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determine if the Level of Service (LOS) provided by Nappanee Parks is consistent with the standards that IDNR provides. These guidelines recommend 20 acres of recreation land per 1,000 population at the local or community level. Nappanee has roughly 6,800 residents, so per SCORP’s recommended LOS, this equates to 136 acres. Nappanee has about 270 acres of recreational land, which exceeds the recommended LOS. Nappanee has a higher amount of recreational acreage than most communities its size because it is home to the 155-acre McCormick Creek Golf Course. Since not everyone plays golf, without the golf course Nappanee has 115 acres of recreational land, which is shy of the recommended 136 acres. However, one of the proposed improvements is a trail that traverses the golf course, giving non-golfers recreational opportunities within the golf course property. AMENITIES LEVEL OF SERVICE Amenity LOS expresses equal opportunity through the availability of recreation facilities within a community when compared with its population. The Indiana SCORP was referenced to determine basic standards for amenities, and also to analyze recent themes and trends in the recreation industry to see how they align with Nappanee’s parks. The NRPA also analyzes

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amenities in its Agency Performance Review. For a community of Nappanee’s size and density, Nappanee parks meet or exceed standards for the quantity of most types of recreational amenities. Nappanee could improve its sports facility offerings to make them more diverse. While soccer and baseball have extensive facilities, sports such as lacrosse and rugby that are growing in popularity could benefit from having a multi-use field facility. These sports could be played on a soccer field at least in a casual or in a learning environment. Programs for these types of activities could be offered to test popularity in the community. ACCESS LEVEL OF SERVICE Access LOS is used to analyze the distance residents must travel to utilize parks and recreation facilities within the city. Currently Nappanee has parks in most areas of the city. Very few residents are further away than 1 mile from a park. While parks and recreation standards haven’t been set for access, 1 mile is an acceptable distance for the density of Nappanee’s population. Although distance isn’t an issue, providing safe pedestrian access to the parks and functional, appealing amenities at each park should be priorities. Many residents may live within a quarter mile of a


park, but don’t have a safe way to bike or walk to the park whether it is a lack of sidewalks or sidewalks in poor condition. Also, some parks lack amenities that attract families, which doesn’t give residents a reason to go to them.

PARKS AND RECREATION NEEDS ANALYSIS The 2016-2020 Indiana Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) takes an in-depth look at recreation needs and trends in Indiana. The report is based on thousands of survey responses and input from park professionals in the state and nationwide. During analysis of the feedback acquired, several themes became common. Nearby recreation appears to be vital to Hoosiers and their families, as well as the free or low-cost local parks and recreational options. Additionally, outdoor activities that were inexpensive and did not require a great deal of skill were more popular than their expensive, skillful counterparts. This statewide trend coincides with national recreation trends. In the past ten years, both walking and cycling have seen dramatic participation increases across all age groups. Similarly, running and jogging participation rates have also increased. These activities are particularly popular because they can be done with a partner or alone. Team sports are very popular among school-aged children, with over half of students participating every year. However, participation declines during and after high school, with only about 25% of the 16 and older population participating every year. This trend suggests there is no urgent need for additional sports fields unless a community is at a deficit in this area. Nappanee Parks and its partners manage six baseball/softball fields and have consistent league participation. Maintaining this activity for youth and adults is important to the citizens of Nappanee. Upgrading the facilities or replacing them might be more affordable than adding new fields. Some alternative sports such as skateboarding have seen a significant increase in the past ten years. With the sport making its first Olympics appearance in 2020, it should continue to increase in popularity. Participants involved in “urban associated” activities are more likely to increase their participation level of “traditional” activities, so improving the skate park should increase activity levels in other recreational pursuits.

Family oriented activities are also popular among Hoosiers. Activities such as picnicking, splash pads, and disc-golf have seen a rise in popularity. This fits the needs of citizens who desire an inexpensive family activity and is congruent with the expressed desires of Nappanee residents.

ACCESS AND CONNECTIVITY

The popularity of walking and cycling, especially fat-tire cycling, has impacted the construction of trails and paths suitable for activities throughout Indiana and the United States as a whole. Parks and Recreation Departments throughout Indiana are focused on maintaining existing trails and constructing new trails, paved and non-paved. These trails serve multiple purposes as they connect a variety of community centers and green spaces, and serve as an excellent venue for recreation and exercise. Furthermore, participants who use these trails and paths are more likely to use other park facilities. Indiana’s statewide obesity epidemic is still increasing. The SCORP report states that according to a U.S. CDC health survey, one-third of Hoosiers are obese. This percentage places Indiana as one of the most overweight states in the nation, with much concern. Some of the reasons for this are many communities are built in ways that make it difficult or unsafe to be physically active. Access to parks and recreation centers may be difficult or lacking and public transportation may not be available. Safe routes for walking or biking to school, work, or play spaces may not exist. Looking to improve connectivity between parks, schools, and neighborhoods has been shown to improve physical activity. Many funding programs such as Safe Routes To School have been developed to help communities build safe pedestrian infrastructure to connect neighborhoods and schools. This continues to be a prevalent issue the government wants to help solve, so Nappanee should plan pedestrian connectivity and seek state and federal funding to help implement projects. Pedestrian connectivity is especially important for families that have no or limited access to vehicular transportation. Providing equitable access to parks for all users may help reverse the concerning trend of less affluent families having higher inactivity rates.

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ACTIVE RECREATION PARTICIPATION The 2018 Physical Activity Council Participation Report analyzes the partcipation rates in different recreational activities by age, race, and income. By analyzing this information, trends can be realized and strategies can be determined that align with trends or aim to fix negative trends that can be reversed. While the figures below show national population and

may not reflect the levels in Nappanee specifically, it is important to understand the national trends. Merging this data with local data may yield more specific results. For example, the national trend shows that participate in team sports declines sharply after 18. Nappanee has a larger-than-average youth population, so the community may need their athletic fields more than other communities with lower averages of youth population.

TYPES OF PARTICIPATION BY GENERATION (U.S. POPULATION)

TOTAL PARTICIPATION RATE BY ACTIVE CATEGORY (U.S. POPULATION) Figures sourced from 2018 Physical Activity Council Participation Report

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INACTIVITY RATES IN THE UNITED STATES The 2018 Physical Activity Council Participation Report analyzes the inactivity rates in the United States based on age, income, and race. Trends continue to show that inactivity has many influences, from lower income levels to health to educational attainment. In 2017, most age groups saw a slight decrease in inactivity. While this is promising, the two

age groups that became more inactive were ages 1824 and 65+. While many initiatives and programs are aimed to fight inactivity and obesity, about a quarter of the US population, 82.4 million people, did not participate in even the lowest caloric burning activity in 2017. Perhaps even more concerning is the trend concerning inactivity and income level shown in the figure below; the affluent are becoming more active, and the less affluent are becoming more inactive.

INACTIVITY RATES SEGMENTED BY INCOME

CONCLUSIONS It is important to look at the national and state level of service standards to see how the Nappanee parks provide recreational opportunities to its residents. That being said, each community is unique and has contextual implications that go beyond state or national standards. There may be very appropriate reasons why a community may lack in some areas compared to national standards while far exceeding standards in other areas. Nappanee far exceeds the national standards for park acreage with McCormick Creek Golf Course and other larger facilities such as Derksen Farm & Wetlands, Wellfield Park, and Callander Sportsplex. Nappanee has adequate amenities, but would benefit from a more diverse offering or upgrades to the quality of current amenities. Some amenities can be replaced with newer amenities that align with recent trends in recreation such as splash pads, alternative

sports, and growing sports such as pickleball, archery, and lacrosse. Using park facilities to address related issues such as obesity, quality of life, workforce attraction, and economic development should be priorities for planning future park improvements and acquiring funding. Nappanee’s youth population is larger than average, so amenities and improvements that serve teens and the youth population should be priorities. Team sports, alternative sports, and family activities and programs would be good areas of focus. While most people live close to a park, having safe access to the parks and each park having functional, appealing, and unique amenities should be a focus so residents can have a good reason to go to their nearby park and a safe way to get there other than by vehicle. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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2.4

COMMUNITY BENCHMARKING INTRODUCTION The benchmarking study provides an exploration of the parks and recreation facilities in five cities in Indiana comparable to Nappanee. The process of benchmarking is to compare the Nappanee parks and facilities with similar cities in the state to analyze similarities, differences, deficits, and surpluses. The purpose is to provide a metric that assists the planning team in setting standards and goals and generating ideas for parks and recreation facilities in the city. By analyzing the parks and recreation system of any one of the benchmark counties, Nappanee can compare, contrast, and plan its future facilities and programs in a measurable context. The benchmark cities in this study were chosen because of their comparable size and context.

BENCHMARK CITIES HUNTINGBURG, IN The City of Huntingburg is located in southern Indiana, about 7 miles south of Jasper and 60 miles northeast of Evansville. Huntingburg has a population of 6,125 people, which is about 700 people less than Nappanee. Huntingburg is home to five parks, including a 9-hole golf course and a senior citizens center. About a half mile northeast of the golf course is Charles C. Niehaus Memorial Park, which has a driving range. Huntington City Park has a 50-meter swimming pool with slide, wading pool, bath house, and concessions; a 3,000-seat professional baseball field; softball fields, little league field; 2 lighted tennis courts; 2 lighted volleyball courts; 2 lighted basketball courts; 3 lighted horseshoe pits, and a 1.5-mile lighted walking trail. Southside Park has a picnic shelter, large playground, public restroom, baseball field with concessions, practice field, and the 1-acre Huntingburg Bark Park. In 2018, Huntington finished construction on Market Street Park downtown. It includes an amphitheater, outdoor seating, and event lawn.

MOUNT VERNON, IN The City of Mount Vernon is located on the Ohio River in southern Indiana, about 20 miles west of Evansville. Mount Vernon has a population of 6,500 people, which is about 300 less than Nappanee. Mount Vernon has six parks including a public pool facility and a newly constructed riverfront park with an amphitheater and beautiful river views. Brittlebank Park is the largest park in Mount Vernon at about 40 acres and has many amenities. It is home to the Brittlebank Pool, which has a waterslide, two diving boards, baby pool, swim lessons, classes, and events. Brittlebank Park also has ballfields, playgrounds, lighted tennis courts, two shelters, and a pond. Fairview Park, Kimball Park, and Sherburne Park feature a variety of playgrounds, shelters, and benches. The Mount Venon Senior Citizens Center is located at Kiwanis Park. RUSHVILLE, IN The City of Rushville is located in central Indiana, about 45 miles east of Indianapolis. Rushville has a population of 6,050, which is about 800 people less than Nappanee. Rushville has six city parks including the Waggener Community Pool. Veterans Memorial Park North is located within the Rushville Consolidated School Corporation Campus and shares many school facilities. In addition to the school facilities, the park is home to a zero depth entry outdoor pool with locker rooms, sun deck, and concessions, a covered shelter house, picnic areas, playground equipment, cabins, and trails. Riverside Park is home to the Riverside Park Amphitheater, which has free concerts and can be rented for weddings and events. South Veterans Memorial Park and Laughlin Park have lighted basketball courts, playgrounds, ballfields, picnic tables, restrooms, and walking trail. Wilkie Park is a small pocket park downtown with a gazebo, benches, and flowerbeds. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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Market Street Park in Huntingburg, Indiana opened in 2018 and was funded through the Stellar Communities Program

Riverbend Park in Mount Vernon was opened in 2013 to better connect the community with the Ohio River

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Riverside Park in Rushville has a large amphitheater and shelter that accommodate large public and private events.


BENCHMARKING MATRIX Below is a matrix that compares the park systems between the cities of Nappanee, Huntingburg, Mount Vernon, and Rushville. Some of the communities have shared facilities with the city or schools that are included as part of the parks system. For example, Rushville shares North Veterans Memorial Park with the school system, which has several ballfields, soccer fields, and tennis courts. Nappanee

Huntingburg

Mount Vernon

Rushville

6,840

6,125

6,500

6,050

9

6

7

6

270

150

70

90

Number of ballfields

6

6

5

8

Number of Playgrounds

3

5

6

3

Number of Tennis Courts

2

2

4

6

Number of Basketball Courts

1

3

1

5

Number of Volleyball Courts

1

2

0

0

Number of Soccer Fields

4

0

0

5

Multi-Use/Walking Trails (mi)

2

3

2

1

Golf Course

Y

Y

N

N

Pool Facility

Y

Y

Y

Y

Splash Pad/Interactive Water Feature

N

N

Y

N

Community/Senior Center

N

Y

Y

N

Dog Park

Y

Y

N

N

Skate Park

Y

N

N

N

Amphitheater

N

Y

Y

Y

Population Number of Parks/Facilities Total Acreage (est)

BENCHMARKING CONCLUSION The benchmarking study looked at three comparable communities to Nappanee. These communities have a similar population and are located in a rural setting but within a half our or hour drive to larger cities. Nappanee had by far the most acreage of parks, partly due to the McCormick Creek Golf Course. If you don’t include the golf courses, Nappanee still has the most park acreage but only by about 20 acres. Nappanee also has the most parks of any of the communities at nine. As far as amenities, the communities are comparable. All four cities had public pools, playgrounds, ballfields, tennis courts, and basketball courts. Nappanee and Rushville had soccer fields while the other two did not. Nappanee is the only city without an amphitheater, but is the only one with a skate park. Two communities had each of the following: a golf course, senior center, volleyball courts, and dog park. Both Mount Vernon and Huntington had two new parks constructed within the last five years. Each had an amphitheater and public gathering spaces as major features and were located in or near the downtown. These new park facilities have been very popular with residents and have transformed important spaces in their cities. While Nappanee has the most parks and most park acreage, some of the other communities had newer or more recently updated park facilities. This supports Nappanee’s goal to improve their current parks before adding more park land. Two amenities that may be good additions to the Nappanee Parks include an amphitheater and splash pad. A community center could warrant some additional consideration to potentially implement long term. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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2.5

PARKS FACILITIES

Wellfield Park/ Soccer Complex

Stauffer Park

West Park

South Park

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CITY OF NAPPANN


Derksen Farm & Wetlands

Nappannee Dog Park

Callander Sportsplex

McCormick Creek Golf Course

Recovery Park

NEE PARKS

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CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX Just south of Derksen Farms and Wetlands and west of McCormick Golf Course, you’ll find Callander Sportsplex. The 27-acre site is home to four baseball diamonds, a parking area, and a sledding hill. Used throughout most of the year, the sportsplex is a staple for many hosted events, both private and public. During the fall months of the year, parts of the site are used as part of the high school country course, mainly taking advantage of the steep incline paths the sledding hill has to offer. The baseball / softball fields are used throughout the year except during the winter months. The Nappanee Youth Baseball/Softball Leagues host many of their games and tournaments here. Callander also hosts adult softball leagues and tournaments. As part of the annual Apple Festival for the city, Callander hosts the tractor and truck pull event. However, after its 10th year for hosting the event, it was decided to remove the tractor pull area from Callander Sportsplex due to several factors. During the winter months, the sledding hill is highly used. The sledding hill was formed with with extra fill material leftover from the golf course construction. The sledding hill is also used for walking and training purposes, as a trail is mowed on the hill.

PARK ADDRESS:

Callander Sportsplex 1655 Thompson Drive Nappanee, IN 46550 42


McCormick Creek Golf Course Driving Range

Dog Park

Thompson Drive

Country Road 7

McCormick Creek Golf Course

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DERKSEN FARM AND WETLANDS AREA This 24-acre nature preserve was created in the early 1990s to serve as a great area to watch wildlife, birds, and butterflies. Trails take visitors to the marsh near the intersection of Woodview Drive and Oakland Avenue. Benches and a lookout shelter along the way provide observation areas. This protected area is serene and a perfect complement to the city parks system. Several events and programs are held at the Wildlife Oberservation building for all ages through the summer and fall months. During the fall, the park is home to part of the Nappanee High School crosscountry course that snakes through the park and surrounding areas to the south. Derksen Farm and Wetlands area serves as a well maintained and beautiful stop for passerbys on the nearby bike trail.

PARK ADDRESS:

Derksen Farm & Wetlands 71559 Co Rd 7 Nappanee, IN 46550 44


Nappanee, IN | Derksen Farm & Wetlands

Woodview Drive

County Road 7

McCormick Creek Golf Course

SCALE 1” = 50’

McCormick Creek Golf Course Driving Range

0’

50’

100’

200’

300’

600 ft

Dog Park

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MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE McCormick Creek Golf Course is Nappanee’s 18 hole public course that was originally designed in 1973 by Gary Kern. Laying out over 155 acres of land, the course is a par 72 with distances ranging from 4,966 yards from the front tees to 6,434 yards from the back tees. The course is affordable and welcoming, encouraging anyone in the community to come out and play. There is a pro shop that carries a large selection of clothing, shoes, bags, clubs, and accessories. A large barn is used for golf cart storage on the lower level, and the main level is used for events. The facility also has a driving range and practice green for golfers to use. Lessons are available from the golf pro. The golf course is the home course for the Northwood Panthers boys and girls golf programs. It also hosts many golf outings and other events throughout the year.

PARK ADDRESS:

McCormick Creek Golf Course 1300 N. Oakland Ave. Nappanee, IN 46550 46


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NAPPANEE DOG PARK Constructed in 2011, Nappanee Dog Park is located just off County Road 7 (Oakland Avenue). The dog park is adjoined to Derksen Farm and Wetlands, McCormick Creek Golf Course, and Callander Sportsplex. The dog park offers yearly $25 memberships to all residents of Nappanee and those who reside outside of the city as well. The dog park is about 1.5 acres and has a large lawn area that is surrounded by a black vinyl coated chain link fence with many mature shade trees. The park has an entrance off of the multi-use trail that runs along County Road 7. The dog park is very popular with local residents and even has its own Facebook page that shares information, photos, and policies.

PARK ADDRESS:

Nappanee Dog Park 1654 Thompson Drive Nappanee, IN 46550 48


County Road 7 (Oakland Ave.)

McCormick Creek Golf Course Driving Range

SCALE: 1” = 150’

Derksen Farm and Wetlands Area

Thompson Drive

Callander Sportsplex

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RECOVERY PARK Founded after the 2007 tornado, the 2.5-acre Recovery Park at Summit and Indiana Streets is dedicated to the great community spirit shown after that terrible event. Bright and inviting play equipment will keep children busy, while an open-air shelter is available for people wanting to lunch in the park. Greenspace is inviting to kite fliers or those wanting to throw the football around. The park is 2.5 acres in size.

PARK ADDRESS:

Recovery Park S Summit St & E Indiana Ave Nappanee, IN 46550 50


180’ 120’

Summit Street

Vernon Street

Nappanee, IN | Recovery Park

SCALE 1” = 30’

0’

30’

60’

Nappanee Investment Properties

Indiana Avenue

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SOUTH PARK South Park sits between Reed Street and High Street in the neighborhood of Southwest Nappanee, just east of the Miller Orchard. At only two acres, the park is a largely open recreational space, but offers the opportunity for several activities. The park is used for activities such as neighborhood baseball/wiffle ball games, frisbee, and the occasional kite-flying. The park also has a shelter available for small events and or picnics.

PARK ADDRESS:

South Park Reed Street Nappanee, IN 46550 52


| South Park Reed Street

Locke Street High Street

Private Property

SCALE 1” = 40’

0’

40’

80’

160’

240’

West Indiana Avenue

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STAUFFER PARK Situated on 16 acres just southeast of McCormick Creek Golf Course on Nappanee’s east side, Stauffer Park offers incredible diversity in its activities—the community swimming pool, ball diamonds, basketball and tennis courts, a skate park, picnic facilities, and the renowned Little Paws playground. The Little Paws playground is a large wooden community-built play area that combines several play activities including climbing, swings, sandboxes, towers, slides, and more. When exploring the park, there is also the community swimming pool that is used for family recreation and swim lessons in the summer times. As part of the summer programs offered, swim classes such as Mommy and Me and lessons for children ages 3 and up are held regularly. Some open-air shelters are available to rent for private events. Ample parking is provided by three separate parking areas. In 2018, a city sewer separation project tore up the south side of the park as new large storm sewer pipes were installed. When the ground was repaired and park conditions restored, a multi-use trail was installed that now runs along the entire length of the south side of the park.

PARK ADDRESS:

Stauffer Park 403 Hickory Lane Nappanee, IN 46550 54


McCormick Creek Golf Course Derksen Road

Jackson Street

Summit Street Hickory Lane

NORTH Hartman Street CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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WELLFIELD PARK Wellfield Park is a newly constructed recreational asset for the City of Nappanee. In 2002, Nappanee purchased about 30 acres of agricultural land to supplement its well field at West Side Park. The city thought of ways to further utilize the land beyond its usage as a well field, and through partnerships with the schools and other organizations a soccer complex was developed. Tucked behind Northside Manor Apartments and situated between agricultural fields, a forested area, and Berlin Court Grand ditch, the park is home to 3 full size open soccer fields. Currently, part of the site is being developed into an artificial turf soccer complex to accomodate year-round activity. The construction of the project will be finished by the summer of 2019.

PARK ADDRESS:

Wellfield Park 910 Northside Blvd. Nappanee, IN 46550 56


Nappanee, IN | Wellfield Park / Soccer Complex

Northside Manor Apartments

Norths id

e Blvd.

Berlin C ourt Gr and Dit ch SCALE 1” = 80’

0’

80’

160’

320’

480’

Nappanee Street

600 ft

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WEST PARK The 7-acre park on Nappanee Street features open space, playground equipment, and a picnic area. It’s also home to the historic West Park Pavilion, which is available to rent for special events. The pavilion was built in 1923 to hous a local Chautauqua. It was renovated in 1946 to serve as a school house, and in 1958 it became home to the Nappanee Civic Theater. The pavilion was renovated in 1990 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1994. More local history is located in front of the building; the bell originally used by the fire department to signal the community about emergencies in the 1890s is on display. There is a large open space for various uses and a beautiful shaded area with picnic tables due to many mature trees located in the park. West Park is one of the most frequently used parks, especially among elementary school children. Situated in west central Nappanee, it is surrounded by neighborhoods, many of which have sidewalk access to the park.

PARK ADDRESS:

West Park 500 N. Nappanee St. Nappanee, IN 46550 58


200’

300’

Nappanee, IN | West Park

Nappanee Street

West Park Pavilion

SCALE 1” = 50’

0’

50’

100’

Park Drive

Van Buren Street

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2.6

ADA COMPLIANCE & ACCESSIBILITY ADA AND DISABILITY OVERVIEW The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) took effect January 26, 1992 and is aimed at protecting the rights of people with disabilites. The passage of ADA guarantees that access to recreation and play settings is now a civil right for all Americans. According to the 2017 Disability Statistics Annual Report by the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research, about 13% of the population have a disability. The report defines a person as having a disability if they are deaf or serious hearing deficiency, blind or serious sight deficiency with glasses, difficulty concentrating, remembering or making decisions due to a physical, mental, or emotional condition, difficulty walking or climbing stairs, difficulty dressing or bathing, difficulty doing errands alone due to a physical, mental, or emotional condition. Other report findings include: • The percentage of those with a disability in the U.S. civilian population slowly increased from 11.9% to 12.8% in 2016. • Disability increases sharply with age. For ages 5-17, only 5.6% had a disability, for ages 18-64 the rate was 10.6%, for ages 65+, the rate was 35.2%. • In 2016, 38.9% of people ages 18 and over with disabilities were obese. In comparison, only 26.4% of those without disabilities were obese. • In the U.S. in 2016, 35.9% of people with disabilities ages 18-64 living in the community were employed. The employment percentage was more than double for people without disabilities at 76.6%. ADA RESOURCES ADA Information Hotline: (800) 514-0301 ADA Home Page www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm

NAPPANEE PARKS SYSTEM ACCESSIBILITY REVIEW During the preparation of this plan, an overall accessibility review of the Nappanee Parks and Recreation facilities was conducted. It is the goal of the department to offer barrier-free facilities, programs, and services that are inclusive of all users. Nappanee has an ADA Transition Plan, but there is little information pertaining to the parks in that plan because it focuses on street intersections in the right of way. The city should expand its ADA Transition Plan to include all public facilities. Most of the park facilities need to have improvements made to provide better accessibility and comply with regulations. These improvements should be integrated into the planning of future improvements and capital projects. If a capital improvement project is completed, the improvements must meet ADA requirements. Other ADA improvements should be prioritized and completed as resources become available. A review of the accessibility of parks amenities is on the following pages. In addition to reviewing the accessibility of physical amenities, communication practices were also reviewed. Information about the park system and its accessible park and recreation amenities should be added to the parks’ website, along with a grievance policy and contact information. Then, if citizens have an ADA grievance, they may submit their comments to the proper personnel. The ADA Coordinator for Nappanee is Brent Warren, the City’s Street Superintendent. Brent can be contacted at bwarren@ nappanee.org or 574-773-2112. The ADA grievance procedure is included in the appendices.

ADA Checklist www.adachecklist.org CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX

There is a large gravel parking area with an asphalt pad that is marked with one accessible parking sign. While it is a designated paved area, it does not meet ADA requirements for pavement markings. An ADA compliant sidewalk provides access to the restroom and concessions building. Further evaluation of the restroom building’s accessibility should be completed. ADA-compliant drinking fountains should be added.

DERKSEN FARM & WETLANDS

There is a gravel parking lot with a concrete area for accessible parking. However the concrete does not have any markings and there are no accessible parking signs. A sidewalk provides access to the building on site, but there are some major cracks and sidewalk settling that have led to height differences in the sidewalk at joints. Concrete grinding should be completed as necessary to make heights flush at joints.

MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE

Sidewalks provide access from the parking area to the pro shop, but drive aisles must be crossed. Dedicated ADA parking spaces with an unobstructed route to the clubhouse should be developed. The large barn that is used for events is not accessible. Since providing accessibility would be difficult and the barn is in poor condition, it may make sense to develop a new pavilion that is fully accessible that can be used for events.

NAPPANEE DOG PARK

Nappanee Dog Park has a sidewalk entrance off of the multi-use path along Oakland Avenue, but there is no designated parking area at the dog park. A parking area with appropriate ADA parking should be developed with sidewalk access to and within the dog park facility.

RECOVERY PARK

There is a small asphalt parking area that has a sidewalk connection to the playground, but there are no markings on the pavement or signage to designate accessible parking. If a vehicle parked at the end of the sidewalk, there would no longer be an accessible route to the playground. Also at some point the city should consider replacing the mulch in the playground with an ADA-compliant safety surfacing.

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SOUTH PARK

There is a small asphalt on-street parking area, but there are no pavement markings or signs to designate ADA parking. Currently there is only an open field and small pavilion, but as amenities are added at South Park, accessible routes must be provided to them. If a playground is added, ADA-compliant safety surfacing should be used to provide a safe and accessible playground for all users.

STAUFFER PARK

Sidewalks that meet ADA requirements provide access to most of the key amenities in Stauffer Park, but some of the amenities do not have an accessible route to them such as the pavilion shown in the photo to the right. Also some of the parking areas have parking spaces with adjacent striped aisles, but the parking spaces aren’t compliant with all related guidelines such as blue color, symbol of accessibility, and signage.

WELLFIELD PARK

There is a gravel parking lot servicing the existing soccer fields. Currently the park is under construction, developing a new synthetic turf soccer field and parking area. Accessibility improvements are being made with the construction of the new field and parking lot.

WEST PARK

There is on-street asphalt parking but no accessible parking spaces are designated. Pavement markings and signs must be added that meet ADA regulations. There is ADA compliant sidewalk access to the pavilion. Further analysis of ADA compliance within the pavilion and its restrooms should be completed as any interior renovations are made.

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2.7

COMMUNITY & STAKEHOLDER ENGAGEMENT

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT Public involvement in the planning process is necessary for final plans to reflect the needs and wants of the public. In the end, implementation of the plan by the Parks and Recreation Department should be well supported to effectively deliver a communityoriented park system. Community collaboration builds trust and invites successful master planning efforts. A successful public involvement process should accomplish several tasks: Acquire input about the parks and feedback on ideas, increase support for the parks, and expand the community’s understanding of what the parks have to offer. The Parks and Recreation Board and other stakeholder groups are at the forefront of master planning progress, but it takes deep public participation to identify certain action items. Several methods of outreach were completed to involve participation from the residents of Nappanee to broaden the reach and impact of the planning process. This section discusses the methodology and results of the public engagement strategies implemented during the planning process.

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POP-UP BOOTH ENGAGEMENT The City of Nappanee’s largest event is the Apple Festival held annually in September. Over 80,000 people attended the event in 2018. In addition to being a popular local event, the Apple Festival draws a large crowd from all over the region. The planning team thought it would make sense to engage this diverse mass of people to acquire input, promote the parks, and educate about the master planning process. Project boards were set up in a public location outside of the library for a few hours on Saturday September 15th during the festival. One was a parks promotion board showcasing the facilities, amenities, and events. The next board had information about the planning process. The final two boards were interactive to engage people to gather feedback. One board had current and potential amenities, and people were given sticky dots to vote on their favorite current amenities and amenities they would like to see in the future. The other board showed the parks and people were given sticky dots to place on the parks they have visited. The boards were also displayed in the library for a few days after the festival. Over 80 responses were received on the two boards. In addition to the sticky dot feedback,

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many great conversations were had with people about the planning process and the parks. Discussions focused on amenities and which parks are visited. Adding amenities such as a splash pad, amphitheater, and expanding the trail system were the most common items discussed. Nappanee has a large Amish population. Many Amish came through the booth and viewed the boards in the library. Trails were mentioned several times as well as the ball fields at Callander Sportsplex. Safe bicycle access to the ball fields and parks is important as well as programming of the fields for leagues and open play.


PUBLIC MEETINGS September 12, 2018 Public Meeting A public meeting to seek input on the Nappanee Parks and Recreation system was held on September 12, 2018 at 5:30 pm at the West Park Pavilion. The meeting was announced via legal notice in the local newspaper and promoted by the parks department through their website, social media, and word of mouth. A total of 14 members of the public attended the meeting, along with several parks department personnel, Parks Board members, and other city personnel. A presentation of the Master Planning process and preceding engagement activities were made to those who attended. After the presentation, input was gathered through multiple planning activities. The first activity had boards with aerial maps of the parks and the public was encouraged to write ideas specific to each park on those boards. The second activity had boards with amenities and experiences and people were given sticky dots to place on the boards corresponding with the images that they preferred. Blue dots represented their top choice, and orange dots were their next three favorite. February 13, 2019 Public Meeting A public meeting to present the draft master plan and acquire public feedback was held on February 13, 2019 at 5:30pm at the West Park Pavilion. A total of 13 members of the public attended the meeting, along with several parks department personnel, Parks Board members, and other city personnel. The public engagement process, draft plan and concept master plans for each park were presented. Attendees asked questions and provided feedback on the plans. After the group discussion, an open house format allowed people to walk around and view the park master plan boards up close and talk with Troyer Group staff and Nappanee Parks representatives. The draft plans were very well received. Some of the feedback and questions focused on prioritization, phasing, and funding. Other questions were more specific to certain parks or amenities such as the amphitheater and splash pad. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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STAKEHOLDER GROUP MEETINGS Stakeholder meetings were held at City Hall on July 12th, 2018 at various times. Close communication with City hall and the Parks and Recreation Department enabled the identification of key stakeholders who would prove important in the interview process. Stakeholders were interviewed in groups at four different times, with a total of 15 stakeholders participating, representing:

Connectivity is a solution for how to bring awareness of all of the parks and the availability of resources that each one allows. In the past, some programs were not a success. Stakeholders believe that connecting the parks via bike path routes will enable the parks to play off each other with activities, weekly events, and so on. Connectivity would help introduce more park activities to the public.

• • • • •

During the meetings, several other cities were mentioned and their successful park systems and there was some discussion as to how and why these parks were so successful. The Quality of Life that these parks added to their respective communities is a crucial factor in the success of a town/city.

Parks and Recreation Department Staff City Staff Library Boys & Girls Club Family Christian Development Center

An interview guide was created by the Troyer Group and served as the agenda for all the stakeholder meetings to ensure consistency of questioning. All responses were recorded and analyzed using standard qualitative data analysis techniques. The results indicated four core themes that occurred consistently among stakeholders: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Underutilized Parks / Connectivity to Parks Quality of Life Bringing in People/Visitors Maintenance

Stakeholders at all of the meetings agree that the parks are underutilized compared to other parks. The City of Nappanee currently has nine community parks that are open and used by the public, located in several places around town. The problem that was discovered was that parks south of the railroad, Recovery Park and South Park, seemed to be extremely under utilized in comparison to those parks that were on the north side.

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Because of the relationship between quality of life and its impact on parks, stakeholders believe that it’s important for the City of Nappanee to address improving amenities. They are motivated to address quality of life. Stakeholders unanimously agree that a couple of their parks are successful, but some of their parks held little value to residents and visitors. They want Nappanee to create a five-year plan that will be strategic and purposeful in addressing quality of life and providing parks that will put the city on the radar of great places to live. Finally, stakeholders also agree what quality of life and place are critical factors for people when deciding where to live and work. They know that parks play an important role in achieving quality of life.

The stakeholders recognized how crucial these parks were to the current population of Nappanee because of their location and the connectivity to nearby neighborhoods. It was found that these parks will hold even more value in future plans of the city because of proposed residential development that is to happen on the south eastern part of the city.

Bringing in people/visitors into the community of Nappanee was another problem that stakeholders wanted to address. Being one of many different communities in Elkhart and Kosciusko county, the stakeholders felt that the City of Nappanee has the potential to show distinct differences and stand out. The why and how the parks could do this was the goal desired many stakeholders. With the five year master plan, they want to capatilize on certain items that would help catapult the community.

The question that was posed was how to bring awareness and popularity to these sites. What programs or facilities do these particular parks need in order for their use to be quantified? Currently it appears that many people from the community are unaware of these parks.

One idea stakeholders discussed for increasing visitors to Nappanee was increasing marketing of the annual Apple Festival. Other discussion focused on adding to the existing bike path system to that numerous additions could be extended throughout the city toward new developments and to the regional


trail system. This in turn would bring folks from surrounding cities/towns to Nappanee. The one factor that plagues most park systems is Maintenance. It is an ongoing issue that most all parks departments face due to lack of budget and personnel. This is more evident when you get to smaller communities that are wanting to etxpand their park systems, but cannot feasibility do this due to budget constraints. Several of the Parks and Recreation Department members were asked to join in the stakeholder meeting to get reliable feedback from what they saw needed to change and bring ideas to the table. This was important because these were the people that dealt with the parks day in and day out and knew what happened at each of the parks. Of the observations brought to the table it was discovered again that South Park and Recovery Park were the most under utilized parks, but had a great potential. They just needed more activities involved at them. Currently some of the regular agencies that use the parks are the schools, Boys and Girls Club and FCDC. These programs are mainly focused around education, but make up a huge amount of yearly visitors to all the parks. So part of the parks master plan will need to look at how to involve more agencies to make it worth keeping the current parks maintained and kept up, along with the possible idea of acquiring more land for another park. Another potential deturrent from the current parks system is the outdated facilities that many of the parks have. There is a direct correlation with the use of parks and outdated features that exist. With improvements to the parks and additional, newer, items such as a new pool or splash pad facility, shelters, playground equipment there should be an exponential growth in park use. The goal of the Stakeholder meetings were to gather as much feedback from as many stakeholder groups as possible. The information gathered would help develop a better and more comprehensive master plan that the Parks and Recreation Department could follow for years to come. Having a list of project priorities and detailed line items will help the Parks Department accomplish the proposed improvements on a more precise timeline and hold accountability. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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2.8

PUBLIC INPUT SURVEY & SCHOOLS SURVEY METHODOLOGY

KEY SURVEY FINDINGS

The community survey questionnaire was designed by the project team in conjunction with the Nappanee Parks and Recreation Board. The questionnaire was published using an online survey design and implementation website. The survey questionnaire was designed by the project team in conjunction with Nappanee Parks leadership. The survey was published using an online survey design implementation website.

Some of the highlights from the survey questions and open response section:

Distribution of the survey was accomplished by several means and methods for maximum input by a diverse population. Initially, the survey was made available on Nappanee Parks Department and city website. The survey was also announced via online media outlets. Given that not everyone has access to a computer and that Nappanee has a large Amish population, paper surveys were available at the library and parks office. The survey was also spread through word of mouth to different community groups, and posted and shared on social media.

Duplicate online survey responses were prevented by the Google Forms survey, which only allows one response per IP address. In addition to the public survey, a shortened version of the survey was given to students at two elementary schools in the city.

SURVEY RESPONSES A total of 158 valid responses were received and analyzed for the public survey. All responses were received online, as no paper copies were returned. The survey gathered the opinions from a varying demographic, with ages ranging from 20 to over 60. The reviews were overwhelmingly positive, with both residents and non-residents showing care and investment in the Nappanee parks.

• Many respondents were concerned about the condition of South Park and want better amenities so people want to use the park. • Pool programs and activities were mentioned to be very popular among respondents, but many wanted a splash pad to supplement the traditional pool facility. • Stauffer Park was the most visited park among respondents to the public survey, but West Park was the most visited among by the 1st through 5th graders that took the school survey. • Most people find out about park information and events through social media. • The most popular activities in the parks are using the playgrounds and walking, jogging, or running. • Improving and extending the trail network was a popular response, which aligns with the popularity of walking, jogging, and running. • A lack of time was cited as by far the biggest reason that people do not use the parks. Lack of time often comes down to a prioritization of life activities, so perhaps by improving the parks and its programs more people will make time for visiting the parks. • The vast majority of respondents are willing to pay more themselves and have the city invest more money in the parks to make improvements.

The school survey had nearly 500 responses. The responses were from children in kindergarten through 5th grade. CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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72

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120

100 80

60

40

20

How often do you use the Nappanee Parks? 45

40

35

30

25 20

15

10

How are you currently informed of Nappanee activities and programs?

120

100

80

60

20

40

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Which of the following current park activities are important to you and/or your family? What programs and activities would you like to see continued or added in the future? 100 90

70

80

50

60

40

30

20

10

What is the single most important thing that prevents you from using the parks or programs more often?

120

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Would you like the City of Nappanee to invest more money in the parks?

Yes No Maybe, depends on the investment

Are you willing to pay for improvements in Nappanee Parks using any of the following methods? Yes, small increase in program fees Yes, small increase in facility reservation fees Yes, small yearly city park user tax No, can’t afford to pay anything for parks No, unwilling to pay anything for parks

Where do you live?

How old are you? 18 or under

Within city limits Outside of city limits

19-29 30-45 46-60 Over 60

How many children are in your household?

0 - Adults only 1 Child 2-3 Children 4+ Children

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SCHOOL SURVEY RESULTS How often do you use the Nappanee Parks?

What do you typically do in the parks? 450

400

350

300

250

200

150

50

What grade are you in?

140

120

100

80

60

40

20

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)

03

PROPOSED PLAN RECOMMENDATIONS

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DRIVING RANGE

CLUBHOUSE

MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE EVENTS PAVILION

SEASONAL SHOPS

NEW PARKING

RECREATION CENTER

PLAYG RESTROOMS AMPHITHEATER TUBING HILL

TRAIL CONNECTION TO STAUFFER PARK

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3.1

NAPPANEE DOG PARK

CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX A RECREATIONAL HUB FOR NAPPANEE

NEW PARKING

CR 7 (OAKLAND AVE.) BALL FIELDS

EX. MULTI-USE TRAIL

GROUND

TRAIL LIGHTING

Callander Sportsplex is currently home to four ballfields and is adjacent to the McCormick Creek Golf Course. There is a large parking area and adjacent open space, giving the park great opportunity for future development. It is the long-term vision of the parks department to make Callander Sportsplex a recreation destination for residents and visitors. The large open space could be the site of a future community recreation center. This facility would provide much needed indoor recreation space and could include a gym, fitness center, and other community gathering spaces. Having the recreation center centrally located between the ball fields and golf course clubhouse would enable the use of large shared parking lots. This could help service peak demands for events, but minimize the overall parking need compared to each amenity having its own parking area. Another critical component of the location for the improvements to the Callander Sportsplex is its connectivity to Stauffer Park, which is southwest of the golf course. The existing multi-use trail runs along the western edge of the property. As proposed, routing the multi-use trail that connects Stauffer Park to Callander Sportsplex would utilize space that is not prone to golf ball flight and increase the length of the trail system, making it more ideal for safe recreational activities such as running, walking, biking, and hiking. Residents and visitors could take advantage of the beautiful views of the golf course. With full build-out, the Callander Sportsplex could be home to a baseball/softball complex, indoor recreation center, amphitheater, sledding hill, trails, and a seasonal retail and concessions area that would attract residents, visitors, and sports teams to use the facilities and spend time in Nappanee.

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CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX PROPOSED AMENITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS BALL FIELD UPGRADES

The existing ball fields are in good shape overall, but some upgrades are needed. The restroom building needs ADA upgrades as well as some functional and aesthetic upgrades. A concessions area and press box would serve users of the ball fields. The dugouts need to be renovated to repair some maintenance issues. A new parking area could be added north of the ball fields, especially if other amenities are added to the park that would utilize the existing parking area. An accessible sidewalk connection should then be made from the new parking lot to the center of the ball field facility.

AMPHITHEATER

The inclusion of an amphitheater was one of the most popular ideas at stakeholder meetings and the public meeting. An existing large mound on the site is used as a tubing hill in the winter months. The amphitheater could be built with seat rows integrated into the slope, and the performance stage could have the backdrop of the pond. Amphitheaters are popular additions in many communities in recent years, with concerts and events being heavily attended. The space could also be rented for private events such as weddings, fundraisers, church services, and performances.

RECREATION CENTER

A long-term goal of the park department is to develop a community center with indoor recreational space Programming the recreation center space could include a fitness center with cardio and weightlifting equipment; fitness classrooms; a gym with multiple courts for basketball, volleyball, pickleball, and other sports; locker rooms; a community gathering space; concessions; a teen zone; and a kids watch area Park and recreation offices and storage could also be located in the building. In addition to providing indoor amenities, the recreation center would provide numerous programming and event opportunities. Programming could reach many groups from youth to senior citizens and focus on sports, fitness, education, arts and crafts, and other areas of interest. It would be recommended to do a business pro-forma to fully understand the construction costs, operational and maintenance costs, funding options, target audience and potential users, and long-term financial impacts that a project of this magnitude would have on the City of Nappanee and its Parks Department.

This amphitheater in Culver, IN was recently constructed and a similar one could be developed at Callander.

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PLAYGROUND

Between the ball fields is a large open area that would make an ideal area for a playground for younger children. Families spending time at the ball fields could utilize the playground while older siblings or parents participate in ball games. Create a baseball themed playground would be a fun way to tie the playground to the surrounding fields.

SLEDDING HILL

An existing hill on the site is used for sledding, but the topography of it doesn’t work well because it’s not steep enough on the front of it and too steep on the sides and back portion. Regrading the hill and integrating it with other improvements, adding restrooms in a nearby building and concessions, and providing inner tubes on location could make this a fun and heavily utilized amenity.

SEASONAL SHOPS & CONCESSIONS

Example of a baseball themed “tot lot” playground

Example of a tubing hill with a separate slide and return

With the potential for the Callander Sportsplex to be a recreational hub that draws crowds from the city and region, there is an opportunity to have seasonal “pop-up” shops and concessions that can sell a variety of merchandise and food. There is also an interest by a local businessman to open an ice cream shop on the premises. These shops would create a seasonal mini-village that would provide a unique amenity to the Callander Sportsplex and McCormick Creek Golf Course. Example of seasonal “pop-up” shops

Rendering image courtesy of Montrose, Colorado Recreation District An example rendering of a gymnasium at an indoor community recreation center CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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TENT CAMPSITES

BORKHOLDER ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER

NATURAL PLAYGROUND PICNIC PAVILION

RESTROOMS

PARKING IMPROVEMENTS

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3.2

DERKSEN FARM & WETLANDS CREATING A DESTINATION Currently Dersken Farms & Wetlands is one of the lesser known Nappanee Parks. It lacks man-made amenities like some of the other parks, but it has natural features that the other parks don’t possess. Trails wind through some beautiful prairie, wooded, and wetland areas. The goal is to bring some select amenities that will help bring people to the site without being a detriment to its natural qualities. It was creating some primitive tent campsites along with a few basic amenities could offer residents and visitors a unique experience. The primitive tent campsites could start out being free and first come, first serve. If the demand is there, enough sites could be created that a payfor-reservation system could be developed and the campsites could draw some revenue for the parks. One of the campsites should be made accessible. Each campsite could have a pad for a tent, a grill, a campfire ring, and a picnic table.

Example of a natural playground

Additional functional amenities would include a restroom building and a picnic pavilion that would be designed with rustic, simple architecture that fits the site. Derksen Farm & Wetlands is also a perfect location for a natural playground. A natural playground utilizes natural building materials as much as possible to give kids a play experience that is based in nature and allows them to use their imagination and creativity to develop more ways to play. Research has shown that natural play contributes to the overall physical, cognitive, and emotional development of children and makes them healthier. A natural playground would be a different play experience that would attract people to the park for an hour or two while also serving as an amenity for those that are camping on site. The picnic pavilion should be located close to the playground and could become a popular shelter for rentals for parties and events.

Example of a tent camping pad and campsite

Example of a timber picnic pavilion with grills CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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DERKSEN FARM & WETLANDS

DRIVING RANGE

MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE

PROPOSED EVENTS PAVILION

CONNECTION TO EX. TRAIL

CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX

NEW MAINTENANCE FACILITY AND PARK OFFICES

TRAIL CONNECTING CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX TO STAUFFER PARK

MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE

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3.3

MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE CONNECTING COURSE AND COMMUNITY McCormick Creek Golf Course gives Nappanee an asset that most cities its size do not have in a successful 18-hole municipal golf course. The course is very popular among golfers in the community and is where the high school golf team plays its matches and where other golf events occur. The Parks Department is reviewing maintenance and operations to ensure the course is updated and has the latest technologies, upkeep practices, and equipment to maintain the course. While the course is a great golf asset for the city, the community desires better access to the property. In order to accomplish this goal, there needs to be a way for non-golfers to access the site without interfering with golfers’ play. The course is located between Stauffer Park to the west and Callander Sportsplex and the dog park to the east, so the Parks Department looked into creating a trail connection between the two parks that go through the golf course. There is a fairly wide open area between golf holes that could serve as a safe trail routing. Two tee boxes would need to be shifted to align the trail and minimize any conflict between golf shots and trail users. A new,

separate pedestrian bridge should be constructed over the creek so that the pedestrian trail does not share a bridge with motorized golf carts. The new bridge could also be located farther from the existing golf holes to minimize conflict with errant golf balls. The trail should be a minimum of 10’ wide to allow safe use by both pedestrians and cyclists.

A trail could connect parks, golf course, and community

NEW BRIDGE FOR TRAIL HOLE 18 TEE PRAIRIE GRASSES

HOLE 17 GREEN HOLE 11 TEE

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MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE PROPOSED AMENITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS

MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS An agronomic consulting report was completed in the fall of 2018 to determine the condition of the golf course and identify maintenance strategies to improve the playability and health of the golf course. The consultant looked into the greens, fairways, tee boxes, rough, bunkers, equipment, course setup, communication, strategic planning, and record keeping. Some of the major concerns with the current condition of the greens include high organic matter content which is impacting percolation, contamination of the desired creeping bentgrass with Poa Annua, and some of the greens, have lost their original shape and size. The report outlines some practices to improve the greens such as core aeration and topdressing strategies, as well as adjusting mow heights and hand applied topdressing to return portions of the collars back to the putting surface.

EVENTS PAVILION Another way to give non-golfers an opportunity to access and enjoy the golf course is to construct a four-season events pavilion that overlooks the golf course. An ideal location is at the southwest corner of the parking lot, overlooking the beautiful 18th hole and adjacent pond. The pavilion would be an ideal location for weddings, corporate events, and other events and receptions. The new pavilion would also replace the barn as the location for golf outing receptions. The barn is not accessible and it would be challenging to retrofit the barn to make it both accessible and functional for a reasonable cost. A pavilion overlooking the 18th green is an ideal location for golf course events and receptions. In order to host weddings and larger golf outings, the pavilion should be able to hold 100 to 125 guests, which means the pavilion needs to be around 3,000 to 4,000 square feet.

Tee boxes and fairways have lost some defined edges, and some tee boxes need leveling. Mow heights should be adjusted to provide better definition of the tee boxes and fairways. Pre-emergent herbicide should be applied in the spring to help control weed species such as crabgrass that are invading parts of the course. Irrigation should be examined to be more efficient with watering times and durations to provide better deep watering vs continuous irrgation, which will encourage stronger root growth. There also needs to be better communication between the golf course superintenden, parks department, and pro shop to ensure that operations and maintenance are run efficiently and available resources are maximized. Proper communication will save time, money, and keep the course functioning and looking its best. EXISTING PRO SHOP PARKING PROPOSED EVENTS PAVILION 18th GREEN POND

FUTURE COMMUNITY CENTER

Example of a four-season event pavilion

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PARK OFFICES & MAINTENANCE FACILITY The Parks Department currently has offices at City Hall, maintenance facilities at Stauffer Park & West Park, and additional maintenance facilities at McCormick Creek Golf Course. Some of the facilities are in need of renovations, and park staff has a desire to have offices located at one of the parks. In order to increase efficiencies long-term, the goal is to develop a centralized office and maintenance facility between Stauffer Park and the golf course.

run between the existing and proposed buildings, and golfers would go by several times per round. A large maintenance garage would be part of the facility, with five garage doors and parking bays that could fit all types of maintenance equipment for the parks and golf course. A parking lot with about a dozen parking spaces would service the parks offices, and additional parking and an open asphalt area would be available for maintenance staff parking and parks equipment.

The facility would have the main parks office for the public to visit, private offices for some park staff, an employee gathering space, a laundromat, restrooms, and storage. The building would also service the golf course, providing amenities for golfers such as restrooms and concessions. The golf cart path would

1

PARKS STAGING/PARKING

2

MAINTENANCE GARAGE

3

VISITOR PARKING

4

PARKS OFFICES

5

EXISTING BUILDING

6

TRAIL CONNECTOR

7

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

HOLE 10 GREEN

1

3

2

4

6 STAUFFER PARK

5

7

PUTTING GREEN CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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DERSKEN FARM & WETLANDS AREA

OAKLAND AVE. (CR 7)

MCCORMICK CREEK GOLF COURSE DRIVING RANGE

NEW PARKING

NEW PAVILION

ADD LIGHTING ALONG TRAIL

THOMPSON DRIVE CALLANDER SPORTSPLEX 88


3.4

NAPPANEE DOG PARK IMPROVEMENTS FOR FOUR-LEGGED FRIENDS The Nappanee Dog Park is conveniently located near the multi-use trail along Oakland Avenue. It is connected to neighborhoods to the east and north by the trail. However, for users who drive to the park, parking is not available unless you park a few hundred feet to the north at Derksen Farms & Wetlands. A small parking lot should be constructed at the dog park off of the Derksen Farm & Wetlands entrance road that runs west of the dog park. About six to eight parking spaces would be sufficient, with one parking space meeting ADA requirements.

While there are abundant shade trees on site, adding a pavilion shelter would give users a place to sit down in the shade. The pavilion would serve as a gathering space and could be reserved for events or parties. Some other potential improvements include adding amenities such as agility courses, dog-friendly drinking fountains, or more seating for dog owners.

The new parking lot should have a sidewalk that connects to the dog park at a new west entrance, going through the dog park to the current entrance off of the multi-use trail. This sidewalk improvement would allow accessibility through the site from both the east and west entrances.

An example shelter at Central Park in Mishawaka

The Nappanee Dog Park offers a large grass area with an abundance of shade trees CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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PAVED PERIMETER WALKING TRAIL

EXISTIN PLAYGR

PRAIRIE AREA WITH TRAILS

SPLASH PAD

MULTI-USE TRAIL CONNECTOR

INDIANA AVE.

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3.5

RECOVERY PARK

SUMMIT STREET

MAKING RECOVERY PARK UNIQUE

EXPANDED PARKING

NG ROUND

Recovery Park was opened after the tornado recovery effort in 2007. The park has a small playground, a picnic shelter, and an open area for playing ball, flying a kite, or tossing a frisbee around. It serves as a valuable recreation space for neighborhoods on the southeast side of town. Approximately 100 homes are within two blocks walking distance to the park on the north. There are also large businesses adjacent to the park to the north. If the park had a walking trail, perhaps employees of these businesses might use it during their work breaks. Even though there are many potential park users within walking distance, the park is underutilized because it lacks amenities. Providing a unique amenity at Recovery Park that isn’t offered at the other parks in Nappanee will not only bring people from adjacent neighborhoods, but will also bring people from other parts of the city. A splash pad would be a good fit for this park because there is not a splash pad anywhere else in Nappanee.

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RECOVERY PARK

PROPOSED AMENITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS SPLASH PAD There are two main types of splash pads: a recirculating system and a flow-through system. A recirculating system captures the water that goes into the drains and holds it in a storage tank underground. The water is then pumped to a housing where the water is cleaned through UV sanitization or other methods before it is pumped back to the spray features. A flow-through system does not reuse any of the water. All water drains to a nearby storm sewer. Each system has its pros and cons depending on the context of the site, maintenance and operation options, water source, and other factors. Recirculating systems are more expensive to construct, but they save money on water usage. If water costs are high, the return on investment could

92

be worthwhile. If water costs are low, then the cost for maintaining the sanitization system may cancel out any cost savings from reusing the water, and it would be better financially to use a flow-through system. From an environmental standpoint, the re-circulating system has some benefits for water savings. However, there are ways to conserve water in a flow-through system by utilizing an activator button that needs to be pushed every 10 or 15 minutes to turn the spray features on. With this method, water isn’t used if nobody is using the splash pad. It is also important to consider a shade structure because children and parents may want a break from the sun. A shade structure also would make the splash pad safer for children with albinism that cannot be in sunlight very long.


ACCESSIBILITY IMPROVEMENTS

The existing parking area needs to be expanded to offer more parking spaces as amenities are added to Recovery Park. Also ADA-compliant parking spaces must be added with proper pavement markings, dimensions, and signage. An accessible route must be provided to the amenities from the accessible parking space.

RESTROOM BUILDING

A restroom building with two family restrooms should be constructed in conjunction with the splash pad. With families spending more time at the park and with the addition of an aquatics feature, restrooms are necessary. Sufficient space should be provided to allow families to change out of swimsuits after using the splash pad.

Current playground access from the parking lot

TRAILS

A sidewalk around the perimeter of the park creates a walking trail that is 1/4 of a mile long. There are also proposed trails through the prairie area that could be crushed limestone or mowed grass. The city is planning a multi-use trail system that would connect the parks. The plan is for the trail to run along Indiana Ave and go through the south side of the park.

Example of a restroom building with two family restrooms

NATIVE PRAIRIE

Planting a native prairie for the open space will give an opportunity for park users to explore a natural setting while providing habitat for butterflies, bees, and other insects. It is critical to maintain native plantings during the first two years to eradicate weed species and enable the native species develop. Once established, the native prairie should be easy to maintain; however, it would be wise to contract the maintenance of it during the first two years because it takes some expertise and equipment to get prairie to establish itself.

A mowed trail through a native prairie

PLAYGROUND

Eventually, the playground should be renovated to provide accessible and poured-in-place surfacing. When this occurs, the playground equipment should be analyzed to see if it should be replaced or if additional equipment could be added. Mulch is not wheelchair friendly and requires replacement annually or even more frequently in heavily trafficked areas. While poured-in-place surfacing is expensive to install, maintenance is minimal.

Current playground and access from the parking lot CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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REED STREET EXPANDED PARKING WITH ADA SPACE RESTROOMS

SOCCER & MULTI-USE FIELD

BASKETBALL COURT

UNIVERSAL PLAYGROUND

PICNIC SHELTER

NEW PARKING MULTI-USE TRAIL

HIGH STREET

FUTURE POTENTIAL PARKING

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3.6

BUILDING A SOUTH SIDE ASSET South Park was mentioned heavily during the community engagement process. Many people were concerned about the condition of the park and wanted to see improvements made. Very few people visit the park because it is in poor condition and lacks amenities. The park has an open field for various uses and a small shelter that needs some maintenance upgrades. The park is surrounded by neighborhoods and could be a valuable recreational asset to the southwest part of the city. The city could acquire and develop an open parcel of land south of the park. The city could initiate discussions with the homeowner to gauge interest in selling. This property could be used as open space or the park could add amenities such as a picnic shelter, community garden, or lawn games. This space could also allow for more parking off of Clark Street. Nappanee has a large playground at Stauffer Park, but the city does not have a playground that has been constructed to universal design standards. The neighborhood could benefit from adding one as would visitors from throughout the city. It would also benefit those with disabilities. Utilizing accessible safety surfacing and play equipment designed for all users, this playground could become a distinguishing asset for Nappanee.

SOUTH PARK REED ST

SOUTH PARK

HIGH ST ADJACENT OPEN AREA

Potential adjacent parcel for acquisition

Because the south side of town does not have a basketball court, adding one to South Park would give kids in adjacent neighborhoods the opportunity to walk to a court with friends and play ball. The existing backstop in the open law area should be removed so that two soccer goals can be installed. The parking area on Reed Street should be renovated to make the parking spaces deeper and meet ADA requirements. Additional parking could be developed on Clark Street and High Street on the south side of the park.

Example of a playground with poured safety surfacing

A multi-use trail is planned to go through the park connecting Reed St with High St. There is also a sidewalk that encompasses the eastern perimeter of the park. The trail and sidewalk combine to create a walking loop in the park that is 1/5 mile long.

Example basketball court installation CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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SHELTER SHELTER

PARKING LITTLE PAWS PLAYGROUND EXISTING TRAIL

RESTROOM

PARKING ALLEE

RESTR

EXISTING DRIV BIKE/PED ONLY

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3.7

STAUFFER PARK

PROPOSED OFFICE & MAINTENANCE FACILITY PARKING

PARKING

BASKETBALL COURTS

SHELTER

VOLLEYBALL COURTS

ROOMS

VE Y

PARKOUR PARKING AQUATICS FACILITY SKATE PARK & TRAIL PICKLEBALL COURTS

PARKING

LITTLE LEAGUE FIELD

PARKING MULTI-USE TRAIL

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STAUFFER PARK

PROPOSED AMENITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS AQUATICS FACILITY Stauffer Park is home to the Nappanee Pool, which offers open swim as well as swim lessons. Swim lessons are available for ages 3-14, and children under three can take part in the Mommy & Me class. There is also open swim from 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. each day from mid-May to midAugust. The pool is a popular recreational amenity in the community as evidenced by the public survey; however, attendance has decrease in recent years. Many communities have seen higher attendance at splash pads than traditional pools. While both serve a purpose as a recreational amenity, being able to offer multiple aquatics experiences in one facility is beneficial. The existing pool facility at Stauffer Park could be upgraded to include a renovated pool, a zero-depth entrance to the pool, and a splash pad that would be

98

adjacent to the pool area. Combined, these amenities would give kids of all ages more opportunities for playing in water. It is also cost-effective to have these amenities in the same location, so that they can share equipment, access, support facilities, etc. Having additional amenities in the pool facility could warrant a higher cost for seasonal or day passes to the pool. While parks departments need to keep programs and fees affordable, residents can expect to pay more for higher quality, unique amenities. The pool building should also be renovated to provide more accessibility, functionality, and aesthetically pleasing features.


ALLEE

An allee is a walkway lined with trees that gives a formal appearance. The proposed allee runs along the east edge of the parking lot and connects to the center of the park. When the trees grow to maturity, the allee would give a sense of pedestrian scale to the large open park area. Including benches in the shade of the trees would give people opportunity to rest, read a book, or take in the views. The location of the allee on the eastern edge of the parking lot will create a quiet, beautiful spot to park, eat lunch, or take a break from a hectic day.

Example of an Allee

PICKLEBALL COURTS

Currently, a skate that utilizes half of the tennis court facility. The skate park needs improvements and isn’t heavily used. Creating a new alternative sports area in the park frees up this space to transform it into six or eight pickleball courts. Pickleball is one of the fastest growing sports in the nation, especially among seniors. Many tennis courts and basketball courts in gyms are being used for pickleball part-time. Having six or eight designated pickleball courts would allow for increased programming and tournaments, as well as open play.

Example of Pickleball Courts

ALTERNATIVE SPORTS - PARKOUR

Parkour has its roots as a training discipline for French Special Forces, and it has spurred a movement otherwise known as “freerunning.” Parkour is essentially an obstacle course that is open to the user’s interpretation for how to navigate or use each obstacle. Parkour courts can be used for races, tag, freestyle competitions, or just as a fitness playground. Parkour classes and competitions are becoming more prevalent throughout the county as the alternative sport rises in popularity.

Example of a Parkour Facility

ALTERNATIVE SPORTS - SKATE PARK & TRAIL

Teen recreational opportunities are important, but you need amenities to attract teens and to get them to try them. A skate park should integrated new challenges and creative uses. Going beyond a flat ground with ramps, rails, and boxes by adding slopes, short walls, rails, and other elements will inspire creativity and use. Nodes with seating and wi-fi access will make a new skate park appealing to the teen population. Example of a Skate Trail CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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EXISTING SOCCER FIELDS

PARKING LOT IMPROVEMENTS UNDER CONSTRUCTION FUTURE MAIN BUILDING FUTURE PARKING FUTURE SOCCER FIELD

SYNTHETIC FIELD UNDER CONSTRUCTION

FUTURE PARKING

FUTURE SOCCER FIELD FUTURE U-10 FIELD


3.8

WELLFIELD PARK THE NEWEST RECREATIONAL ASSET In 2002, Nappanee purchased approximately 30 acres of agricultural land bordering the city’s northwest side to supplement its existing well field at West Side Park. Nappanee decided to use the real estate to develop a fitness complex with soccer fields, trails, and open space. Soccer fields and a large parking lot were developed on the north side of the park. Nappanee and WaNee Schools collaborated to develop a premier synthetic turf soccer field at Westfield Park. It can be utilized by the Parks Department, the NorthWood High School boys and girls soccer teams, and for IHSAA soccer programs. This facility is under construction and will be completed in spring or summer of 2019.

ENTRY DRIVE

Future development of the park includes additional athletic practice fields, restrooms, and other amenities. In addition to the soccer fields, trails in and around Wellfield Park will allow for walking, jogging and biking. Future plans include a pedestrian bridge over the Berlin Court Ditch to tie into a trail to West Side Park and a connection to the trail along Main Street that will eventually tie into Stauffer Park.

BERLIN C OURT DIT CH

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102

FITNESS PODS

SHELTER

PLAYGROUND UPDATES

PATIO WALKING TRAIL

WEST PARK PAVILION

D

DISC GOLF COURSE

MULTI-

COMMUNI GARDEN

VAN BUREN


D

PARK DRIVE

NAPPANEE ST

WEST PARK

PARKING

PARK SIGN

-USE TRAIL

N ST

EMBRACING HISTORY AND CREATING NEW COMMUNITY AMENITIES This seven-acre park on the northwest side of Nappanee is rich with history. It is home to the historic pavilion structure and a historic bell that was used by the fire department in the 1890s. Though the pavilion has historic value, it is not used often and it needs some upgrades. The playground is heavily used, and the park offers some great shaded areas for picnics and gatherings. The parking and entrance to the historic pavilion should be improved by creating a drop off area. This would create a shorter distance to the pavilion from the parking lot, aiding the mobility impaired visitors and those who wish to take supplies into the pavilion. A drop off would also create a central area for a park entrance sign and landscaping. Although adding a drop off drive would cause some existing parking spaces to be lost, parking could be stretched along Nappanee Street. The spaces could be transitioned into perpendicular parking spaces which uses space more efficiently. Since the traffic is two way, perpendicular parking would work better than the current angled parking. By adding the drop off drive and updating the parking layout, about five to seven spaces could be gained.

DROP OFF

PARKING

NAPPANEE ST

ITY N

3.9

The city is also working on developing a trail system that connects its parks and other community assets. It is anticipated that the trail will run through the park along Nappanee Street. There is also a proposed walking loop around the perimeter of West Park. Combined with the section of the multi-use trail along Nappanee Street, the trail loop is 1/3 mile in length.

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WEST PARK

PROPOSED AMENITIES AND IMPROVEMENTS FITNESS PODS

A current trend with many city parks is the addition of fitness equipment. Usually the equipment is along a walking trail or adjacent to a playground. When combined with a walking trail, it allows users to get a strength and cardio workout. It is also beneficial when located near a playground so parents can have a fun workout while the kids play on the playground. The fitness equipment ranges from standalone machines to simple bars and benches that rely on body weight, to more complex equipment with multiple functions in one assembly. West Park has a great opportunity to install some fitness pods near the playground along the walking trail.

Example of a fitness pod

PLAYGROUND IMPROVEMENTS

The playground at West Park is very popular with families in Nappanee, as evidenced by the elementary school survey. While the playground is fun and functional in its current condition, improvements could be made in the future, including access to the playground, poured-in-place safety surfacing to improve accessibility and fall height safety, and new equipment that allows for equitable and imaginitive play. Example of simple fitness equipment along a trail

Example of a universal design playground with poured in place safety surfacing


DISC GOLF

Disc golf continues to increase in popularity, and courses are being installed throughout the country. Because it is inexpensive to build a course and to play the sport, disc golf is reaching more people every year. West Park has enough space to develop a ninehole disc golf course. The course could contain a mix of experiences, with some holes being in the open field and others entering the area of the park with many large shade trees. Having a disc golf course in Nappanee would open up opportunity for disc golf tournaments, leagues, and programs.

Example disc golf course

PAVILION IMPROVEMENTS

The historic pavilion at West Park can be reserved for events and gatherings. There is a main room, a smaller room that is currently used for Parks Board meetings, a kitchen, restrooms, and storage. In order to be able to make the facility more functional and attractive, some upgrades are needed. The building needs some accessibility upgrades, improvements to the acoustics in the main room, restoration of some finishes, and some new furnishings.

Historic West Park Pavilion

PAVILION PATIO

In order to make the pavilion more desirable for receptions and events, an outdoor patio off the back door of the building could be constructed. The patio could be open or enclosed by a seat wall or railing, depending on the desired function and if alcohol will be allowed in the pavilion for events. If it is enclosed, a gate or opening must be provided for egress and the ability for the public to use the patio during nonrental times. Lighting, including overhead string lights, would allow the patio to be used later in the evening and provide a warm, inviting atmosphere.

COMMUNITY GARDEN

An open area on the south side of the park near the parking lot would be a great location for a community garden. Some types of community gardens that are popular include: • An open garden that anyone can take care of or harvest • A garden with individual plots that are maintained and harvested by an individual, family, or group • A hybrid that includes both an open garden and private plots Typically an open garden will have a group that takes on leadership with planting and maintenance but encourages community participation.

Outdoor patio with overhead string lighting

Example of a community garden with raised beds CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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Wellfield Park/ Soccer Complex

Stau

West Park

South Park

Recovery Park


uffer Park

Derksen Farm & Wetlands

3.10

ACTION ITEM MATRICES Nappannee Dog Park

Callander Sportsplex

McCormick Creek Golf Course

k CITY OF NAPPANEE PARKS AND RECREATION 2019-2023 PARKS MASTER PLAN

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Prioritization and Implementation Matrix Strategies and Action Items

General Park System Improvements Promote Parks Identity/Awareness Expand Website and Social Media Develop a Programs and Activities Calendar Identify Funding Sources Callander Sportsplex Construction of Recreational Center Paved Parking for Recreational Center Paved Parking for Ball Fields New Restroom Building by Amphitheater Ballfields Concessions/Restrooms Building Improvements Dugouts/Ballfields Improvements 10' Sidewalk Along Parking Lots East Side Sidewalk Connection to Ball Fields from New Parking 5' Wide Concrete Sidewalk New Playground at Ball Fields Amphitheater Tubing Hill Asphalt Trail Connection (Amphitheater to Golf Course Parking) Ice Cream/Coffee Shop Seasonal Shops with Outdoor Area Lighting Improvements on Trail Trees/Landscaping/Seed/Sod Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Total Stauffer Park Aquatics Facility Improvements West Parking Lot Expansion Middle Parking Lot Resurfacing/Improvements Aquatics Parking Lot Resurfacing/Improvements Road and Roadside Parking Basketball Courts Parkour Area Skate Park/Skate Trail Area Sand Volleyball Courts Large Restroom/Concessions Building Small Restroom Building Picnic Shelters (3) 5' Wide Concrete Sidewalk 10' Wide Concrete Sidewalk 10' Asphalt Trail Pickleball Courts - Resurface Existing Skate Park Pad Park Lighting & Security Trees/Landscaping/Sod/Seed Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Total West Park Paved Drop-off Area Parking Area Expansion & Improvements New Picnic Shelter 5' Wide Concrete Sidewalk/Walking Trail 10' Wide Asphalt Trail Trees/Landscaping/Sod/Seed West Pavilion Interior Improvements West Pavilion Patio Disc Golf Course Playground Surfacing & Equipment Improvements Adult Fitness Pods Park Entry Sign Community Garden Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Total

Estimated Cost

Timeline (in years)

Potential Partners/Funding

Short

N/A 1,000.00 N/A N/A

Park Board, Chamber of Commerce, Community Groups Park Board, Parks Dept Park Board, Programs Director Park Board, Parks Dept, City of Nappanee

1-2 1-2

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

9,000,000 250,000 85,000 75,000 200,000 40,000 85,000 15,000 100,000 75,000 200,000 75,000 35,000 250,000 250,000 50,000 85,000 1,000,000 11,870,000

Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, Bond Issue, Private Funding Park Board, Bond Issue, Private Funding Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,000,000 35,000 75,000 90,000 200,000 65,000 75,000 250,000 25,000 200,000 75,000 120,000 85,000 45,000 25,000 35,000 100,000 75,000 300,000 3,875,000

Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

15,000 30,000 40,000 70,000 30,000 25,000 50,000 35,000 40,000 150,000 75,000 10,000 15,000 60,000 645,000

Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue

$

1-3 1-3

1-3 1-3 1-3

Medium Ongoing

Ongoing

4-6

1-3 1-3 1-3

1-3

1-3 1-3

1-3

1-3

7-10 7-10

4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6

1-3

1-3

Long

7-10 7-10

4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6

4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6 4-6

4-6

7-10 7-10


Prioritization and Implementation Matrix (Continued) Strategies and Action Items

South Park General Park System Improvements Basketball CourtIdentity/Awareness Promote Parks North Parking Improvements Expand Website and Social Media New Paved Parking Areas on SouthCalendar Side of Site Develop a Programs and Activities New Accessible/Universal Identify Funding Sources Design Playground Soccer/Multi-use Field Improvements Callander Sportsplex New Restroom Building Construction of Recreational Center New Picnic Shelter Paved forSidewalk Recreational Center 5' WideParking Concrete Paved Parking 10' Asphalt Trailfor Ball Fields New Restroom Building by Amphitheater Trees/Landscaping/Sod/Seed Ballfields Concessions/Restrooms Improvements Architecture/Engineering (Total for Building all projects) Dugouts/Ballfields Improvements Total 10' Sidewalk Along Parking Lots East Side Recovery Park Sidewalk Connection to Ball Fields from New Parking New Splash Pad 5' SidewalkTrail 5' Wide Wide Concrete Sidewalk/Walking New Playground 10' Asphalt Trail at Ball Fields Amphitheater Restroom Building Tubing Hill Improvements Playground Asphalt Trail Connection Prairie Plantings & Trails (Amphitheater to Golf Course Parking) Ice Cream/Coffee Shop Parking Expansion/Improvements Seasonal Shops with Outdoor Area Trees/Landscaping/Seed Lighting Improvements on(Total Trail for all projects) Architecture/Engineering Trees/Landscaping/Seed/Sod Total Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Derksen Farm and Wetlands Total Natural Elements Playground Stauffer ParkCampsites Area for Tent Aquatics Facility Improvements New Picnic Pavilion West Parking Lot Expansion New Restroom Building Middle Lot Resurfacing/Improvements ParkingParking Lot Improvements Aquatics Parking Lot Resurfacing/Improvements 5' Wide Concrete Sidewalk Road and Roadside Parking Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Basketball Courts Total Parkour AreaCreek Golf Course McCormick Skate Park/Skate Trail Area Tee box relocations Sand PrairieVolleyball PlantingsCourts Large Restroom/Concessions Building Trail Bridge Small Building EventsRestroom Pavilion (Four Season) Picnic Shelters (3) Trail Connection from Callander to Stauffer Park 5' Wide Concrete Sidewalk Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) 10' Wide Concrete Sidewalk Total 10' Asphalt Trail& Maintenance Facility Parks Offices Pickleball Courts Demolition - Resurface&Existing Skate Park Pad Existing Building Renovation Park Lighting&&Garage SecurityFacility New Offices Trees/Landscaping/Sod/Seed Parking Lot and Paved Staging Area Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Site/Landscape Improvements Total Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) West Total Park Paved Drop-off Nappanee DogArea Park Parking Area Expansion & Improvements New Pavilion New Picnic Shelter Asphalt Parking Area 5' Wide Concrete Sidewalk/Walking Sidewalk from Parking Lot to ShelterTrail 10' WideBetween Asphalt Trail Lighting Dog Park and Trail Trees/Landscaping/Sod/Seed Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) West Total Pavilion Interior Improvements West Pavilion Patio Disc Golf Course Grand Total Playground Surfacing & Equipment Improvements Adult Fitness Pods Park Entry Sign Community Garden Architecture/Engineering (Total for all projects) Total

Estimated Cost

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

N/A30,000 6,000 1,000.00 N/A10,000 250,000 N/A 10,000 75,000 9,000,000 40,000 250,000 20,000 85,000 20,000 75,000 25,000 200,000 50,000 40,000 536,000 85,000 15,000 175,000 100,000 40,000 75,000 13,000 200,000 75,000 75,000 100,000 35,000 20,000 250,000 15,000 250,000 20,000 50,000 50,000 85,000 508,000 1,000,000 11,870,000 100,000

5,000 2,000,000 40,000 35,000 75,000 75,000 10,000 90,000 5,000 200,000 30,000 65,000 265,000 75,000 250,000 30,000 25,000 5,000 200,000 80,000 75,000 600,000 120,000 50,000 85,000 80,000 45,000 845,000 25,000 35,000 100,000 100,000 1,500,000 75,000 50,000 300,000 75,000 3,875,000 175,000

1,900,000 15,000 30,000 40,000 40,000 10,000 70,000 5,000 30,000 25,000 25,000 15,000 50,000 95,000 35,000 40,000 20,540,000 150,000 75,000 10,000 15,000 60,000 645,000

Timeline (in years)

Potential Partners/Funding

Short

Medium

Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Groups Park Board, Chamber of Commerce, Community Park Board, IDNR,Dept Bond Issue Park OCRA, Board, Parks ParkPark Board, OCRA, IDNR, Director Bond Issue Board, Programs ParkPark Board, OCRA, IDNR, Donations Board, Parks Dept,Bond City Issue, of Nappanee Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue ParkPark Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Bond Issue, Donations ParkBoard, Board,IDNR, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, OCRA, Park Board,IDNR, IDNR,Bond BondIssue, IssueDonations Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Issue, Private ParkBoard, Board,Bond OCRA, IDNR, BondFunding Issue Park Issue, Private ParkBoard, Board,Bond OCRA, IDNR, BondFunding Issue Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue

1-3 1-3 1-2 1-3 1-2 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3

Ongoing

Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations ParkPark Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Board, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Board, IDNR, Bond Issue ParkPark Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board,IDNR, IDNR, Bond IssueDonations Park Board, OCRA, Bond Issue, Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,Bond BondIssue Issue, Donations Park Board, Park Board, OCRA,Bond IDNR,Issue Bond Issue Park Board, Park Board, OCRA,Bond IDNR,Issue Bond Issue Park Board, Park Board, OCRA,Bond IDNR,Issue Bond Issue Park Board, Park Board, Bond Issue

Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR,IDNR, Bond Bond Issue,Issue Donations Park Board, OCRA, Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, Board, OCRA, OCRA, IDNR, IDNR, Bond Bond Issue Issue Park Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue, Donations Park Board, OCRA, IDNR, Bond Issue

1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3

1-3

1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3

1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3 1-3

1-3 1-3 1-3

1-3

1-3

Long

Ongoing

4-6

7-10 7-10

4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6

4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6

7-10 7-10 7-10

7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10 7-10

4-6

4-6

4-6

4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6 4-6 4-6

4-6

7-10 7-10

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3.11

IMPLEMENTATION & FUNDING FUNDING RESOURCES Recommendations in the action plan section of this Master Plan include operational expenses, maintenance expenses, and larger capital expenses. With a limited annual budget, park systems often need to be creative in finding resources for funding their parks. Whether it is operational expenses or deferred maintenance, the day-to-day costs that parks have typically exhaust much of the budget so there isn’t readily available funding for capital projects. Leveraging as many funding resources as possible will be essential in the board’s efforts to implementing some of these items.

General Obligation Bonds General Obligation Bonds provide a funding source for larger projects that typically exceed funding available by other grants. Public hearings must be held and City Council needs to approve any bonds that are issued. Recreation Impact Fees Recreation Impact Fees allow for new housing developments to assist in the funding of facilities to serve that particular population growth. These funds are not to be used for maintenance or repairs on existing facilities.

Non-Reverting Operations Funds Non-Reverting Operations Funds are used for appropriations made by the Park Board for operational expenditures. This fund is sourced from program and event fees, sale of merchandise or concessions, user fees, and rental fees. Non-Reverting Capital Funds Non-Reverting Capital Fund Accounts are created for the purpose of acquiring land or making specific capital improvements. This is funded by sale of park property, equipment, or any special user fees established by the Parks Board. Tax Increment Funding (TIF) TIF Funding is a public financing method that is used as a subsidy for redevelopment, infrastructure, or other community improvement projects. TIF funding is intended to fund infrastructure to promote development that would not occur if it wasn’t for the added infrastructure financed by the TIF revenues.

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GRANTS AND FUNDING PROGRAMS Recommendations in the action plan section of this Master Plan include some larger capital expenses that may seem beyond the financial reach of the parks and community resources. Grants and funding programs will be essential in the board’s efforts to implementing some of these items. The Park Board should look for grant opportunities for capital projects. Following are some examples of grant opportunities. IDNR Recreational Trails Program (RTP) RTP provides 80% grant/20% local funding for acquisition and development of multi-use trails. Funding is more limited than TE funds, but can provide grants up to $200,000. IDNR Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) LWCF provides 50% grant/50% local funding for the development of park facilities. The LWCF is best used for projects that involve land acquisition to expand park property. Next Level Trails This grant program from IDNR will provide several rounds of funding over the next few years to create local and regional trails with 80% state funds and a 20% local match. OCRA Quick Impact Placebased (QuIP) Grant This grant funds space enhancement projects that spark community conversation and creativity. It encourages partnerships between local government, residents, and community organizations and agencies. Patronicity CreatINg Places Patronicity partnered with the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority to provide a grant program based on crowd-funding. IHCDA will match the dollars raised by the community up to $50,000. Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST Act) Provides 80% grant/20% local funding for transportation alternative projects. This includes pedestrian and bicycle facilities, recreational trails, historic preservation, and environmental mitigation related to storm water and habitat connectivity. This could include monies for the trail, associated parking, restrooms, and other basic improvements.

IDNR, Division of Forestry These are grants for community and urban forestry programs to assist with street and park tree inventories, management plans, and tree plantings. Grants range from $2,000 to $20,000 and must have an equal cash/in-kind match. Safe Routes to School (SRTS) This provides 80% grant/20% local funding to promote walkability in communities where school facilities are located. CDBG Funding OCRA provides funding for community development projects from Community Development Block Grants. The Historic Preservation Fund offers 50% matching grants for acquisition, restoration, and preservation of historic properties. Lilly Endowment The Lilly Endowment supports facilities and programs that advance the city’s economic revitalization and community recreational opportunities. Lilly Foundation recently created a match grant program with St. Joseph County Community Foundation to match $2 for every $1 donated. Elkhart County Community Foundation This foundation partners with many organizations in the community to support projects related to social services, the environment, and the arts. Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society (IN PAWS) IN PAWS offers small grants to promote the appreciation, preservation, conservation, utilization, and scientific study of the flora native to Indiana and to educate the public about the values, beauty, diversity, and environmental importance of indigenous vegetation. IDNR Lakes and Rivers Enhancement Program (LARE) LARE offers grants to protect and enhance aquatic habitat for fish and wildlife to ensure the continued viability of Indiana’s publicly accessible lakes and streams for multiple uses, including recreational opportunities.


Alone we can do so little; together we can do so much.

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04 APPENDICES

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ASSURANCE OF COMPLIANCE


RESOLUTION ADOPTING THE MASTER PLAN

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9/12/18 PUBLIC MEETING SIGN-IN SHEET


PUBLIC MEETING AND SURVEY ADVERTISING

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9/12/18 PUBLIC MEETING PROOF OF PUBLICATION


9/12/18 PUBLIC MEETING PUBLISHER’S CLAIM

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2/13/19 PUBLIC MEETING PROOF OF PUBLICATION


2/13/19 PUBLIC MEETING PUBLISHER’S CLAIM

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2/13/19 PUBLIC MEETING SIGN-IN SHEET


NAPPANEE ADA GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE

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Profile for Troyer Group

2019-2023 City of Nappanee Parks and Recreation Master Plan  

2019-2023 City of Nappanee Parks and Recreation Master Plan  

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