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When I was around 14 years old I learned people created lures by tying feathers to hook. The revelation that I could do the same sparked my interest for fly-fishing. Before I bought my first fly rod I had already tied at least a hundred flies with hooks, feathers I found while hiking, sewing thread and my own two hands - no vise. I couldn’t buy one, though that didn’t keep me from tying all the flies I needed to learn how to fly-fish. In 2011 I spent two months in a mountain village in Japan, and that’s when I met Mr. Amano. At that point I learned that some people also didn’t use vises to tie flies. After a day of fishing, a group of us hung out at an

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inn by the river. We drank a lot of sake and tied flies. In the corner of the room Mr. Amano had a tiny box with all he needed to tie flies. A few pheasant feathers (which he had hunted himself), a spool of thread, and hooks. While holding the hook with one hand he wrapped thread around the hook and spun the feather around it until it took the shape of a “sakasa kebari,” or reverse-hackle fly.

The simplicity of tenkara was inherent to every element of the method, even the creation of the lure.

Profile for Tenkara Angler

Tenkara Angler - Summer 2016  

Tenkara Angler Magazine chronicles the tenkara lifestyle through entries about community, destination, tactics, gear, and creative essays. A...

Tenkara Angler - Summer 2016  

Tenkara Angler Magazine chronicles the tenkara lifestyle through entries about community, destination, tactics, gear, and creative essays. A...

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