Page 30

and New Zealand in 1948. During his brief stay at Carrick Hill in February, 1949, Sir Kenneth Clark (1903-83), Director of the National Gallery, London, decided he would rehang their painting collection after dinner.15 Other luminaries to grace the residence included the actor and director Sir Anthony Quayle, CBE (1913-89), South Australia’s own Dame Judith Anderson, AC (1897-1992) and Sir Robert Helpmann, CBE (190986), as well as the actor John McCallum, AO, CBE (1918-2010) with his British wife Georgette “Googie” Withers, CBE, AO (1917-2011). In Australia, many of the Haywards’ circle of artistic friends, including the publisher Sydney Ure Smith, OBE (1887-1949), artist and designer Adrian Feint (1894-1971), sculptor John Dowie, AM (1915-2008), and Charles William Bush (1919-89) were more regular visitors. Nonetheless, the couple’s social obligations in Adelaide often left Ursula Hayward feeling stifled, as she wrote to Nora Heyson, “Adelaide never leaves you anything to yourself and it has somehow made me go to the other extreme – Bill says it makes me seem indifferent which is never the case with people I am fond of ”.16 Born and educated in Adelaide, as a teenager the painter Jeffrey Smart, AO (1921-2013) watched Carrick Hill being built, and later became a close friend of Ursula Hayward.17 He noted that the couple embraced the unconventional and preferred the company of artists, writers, and musicians. It was Smart’s contention that the Haywards owned, “the best private art collection in Australia: two Rouaults, a Goya, Vuillard, Renoir and Gauguins, as well as a lot of Augustus John, Stanley Spencer and various Australian painters”.18 The Haywards’ collection of Australian art is in many ways more intimate and representative of their local ties, “rather than reflect a modern world and a second life overseas, as the French and British works do, the Australian collection instead has its roots in those friendships”.19 Works by Horace Trenerry (1899-1958), Jacqueline Hick (1919-2004), and Kathleen Sauerbier (1903-91) demonstrate the Hayward’s steadfast support of South Australian artists, both at home and abroad.20 They also acquired works from other important national figures such as Sir Russell Drysdale, AC (1912-81), Emanuel Phillips Fox (1865-1915), William Beckwith McInnes (1889-1939), and (Harold) John Baily (1927-2015). The Haywards’ owned three works by Sir Arthur Ernest Streeton (1867-1943) that still hang at Carrick Hill, including The Blue Mountains (c.1920s) and The Australian Alps (nd). Streeton was a leading member of the so-called Heidelberg School of Australian artists, a term coined by the American critic Sidney Dickinson in 1891. More recently ‘Australian Impressionism’ has been used to describe this local manifestation of the International Impressionism movement.21 One of the works in the Carrick Hill collection with a Barr Smith provenance, Streeton’s Venice, Bride Of The Sea (1908), was probably gifted to or inherited by Ursula Hayward.22 This sparkling and evocative painting was produced during a period of great personal fulfilment for the artist. After successful exhibitions in Sydney and Melbourne in 1907, he was finally in a position to marry the Canadian violinist Esther Leonora Clench (1876-1938). They met in London in 1899 while both were trying to establish themselves, and she had encouraged the despondent NEXT SPREAD: Sir Arthur Ernest Streeton, Venice, Bride of the Sea (1908), oil on canvas, 54.1 x 92.1 cm. (Collection of the Carrick Hill Trust, Adelaide, Hayward Bequest.)

BIG Trouble Dec17-Jan18  

BIG Trouble December 2017 - January 2018 FEATURES: EXCLUSIVE FOR A LIMITED TIME - ‘The Archer (after Chuang Tzu)’ by Shaun Gladwell, ‘Play O...

BIG Trouble Dec17-Jan18  

BIG Trouble December 2017 - January 2018 FEATURES: EXCLUSIVE FOR A LIMITED TIME - ‘The Archer (after Chuang Tzu)’ by Shaun Gladwell, ‘Play O...

Advertisement