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who at that time had not had a public commission for twenty years, in London in 1948. Epstein’s interpretations of the human form, several now grouped in the main entry hall at Carrick Hill, serve to offset the imposing formality of the heavy oak panelling and furniture. The couple would purchase twelve Epstein works, including a bust of Albert Einstein, the full-length sculpture Standing Mother and Child (1911/1960), and the painting Lillies (1936), making him the most represented artist in their collection. This private fascination for discovering and collecting art infiltrated Hayward’s business endeavours. Under his auspices, John Martin’s also opened an Art Gallery at the Rundle Street store in 1945. For many years it was the only commercial gallery in Adelaide, from which the then National Gallery of South Australia (now the Art Gallery of South Australia) bought many works. Along with the Royal South Australian Society of Arts Gallery in Kintore Avenue, these were the chief venues at which contemporary works were available for purchase during that period.14 Hayward’s widely acknowledged patronage of the arts and support of cultural organisations made him an obvious choice for the later role as a founding member of the Adelaide Festival of Arts (1960-66). Hayward’s duties at John Martin’s did not preclude his involvement in other civic and business concerns. He joined the South Australian Centre of the St. John Ambulance Association committee in 1947, and served as inaugural chairman of the St. John Council for South Australia (1950-76). In 1951, Hayward arranged for the council to take over the State’s ambulance services, and served as president of the council from 1976 up to his death in 1983. He was appointed a Knight of the Most Venerable Order of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem (K.St.J.) in 1959. Hayward was also a board member of the Bank of Adelaide (1970-78), and of Bennett & Fisher Ltd (1962-83), the livestock, wool and produce brokers. Other roles Hayward took on included the chairmanship of South Australian Telecasters Ltd. (1966-70), South Australian Insurance Holdings Ltd (1972-75), and as deputy chairman of the Finance Corporation of Australia Ltd (1963-78). Recreational pursuits were also acknowledged: Hayward continued to play in the State polo team until middle-aged, and was president of both the South Australian Polo Association (1956-60) and the Adelaide Polo Club (1958-60). His polo boots, mallet and riding paraphernalia are still displayed at Carrick Hill. For his contribution to business and philanthropy in South Australia, Bill Hayward was knighted in June, 1961. The Haywards’ wealth and social position, coupled with their reputation as cultural arbiters, meant that they entertained many famous visitors to Adelaide. The Czechborn conductor and composer Rafael Jeroným Kubelík (1914-96) was welcomed in 1946, two years before the Communist coup in his homeland led to his defection while on a visit to Britain. A soirée for the Chilean concert pianist Claudio Arrau León (1903-91) in 1947 gave Hayward the opportunity to show off his amateur drumming skills and fondness for jazz. Sir Laurence Olivier (1907-89), and his then wife Vivien Leigh (1913-67), were guests during the six-month Old Vic company tour of Australia

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