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To Our Friends and Supporters

summer 2013 eNewsletter In This Issue: Announcing Clinic Opening

TropicalClinics Mission Founder’s Corner Upcoming Events TCRH Collaboration Princeton University Internship Program Acknowledgements Become a TropicalClinics Ambassador

Our Clinic is Open

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e are very pleased to announce that the TropicalClinics Pharmacy & Treatment Center in Kakamega is now open and fully operational! We currently have 12 welltrained staff members, including seven medical professionals. Our facilities include consultation rooms, a pharmacy, and a lab.

We are located in the center of Kakamega Town, and serve patients from the larger Kakamega County region. We currently treat around 15 patients a day.

Clinic Ob/Gyn Care •  UTI/STI Screening •  Breast Exam •  Cancer Screening •  Pregnancy Test •  Prenatal Care •  Ultrasound Women’s Wellness •  Pap Smear •  Blood Pressure •  Lipid Profile •  Contraceptives •  Anemia •  Nutrition Care

Pediatric Care •  Immunizations •  Check-ups •  Malnutrition   Reduction Male Wellness •  Prostate Cancer •  Gout •  Blood Pressure •  Lipid Profile •  Circumcision •  Semen Analysis •  Paternity Test

Our clinic is fully equipped with examination tables, hospital beds, computers, and medical supplies for all necessary vital signs. Our lab contains reagents, testing kits, and panels, in addition to a microscope, autoclave, and centrifuge. TropicalClinics Pharmacy is currently installing an electronic medical record system for efficient inventory tracking. We are excited to see the progress that the clinic has already achieved, and we look forward to a bright and successful future!

Pharmacy

Laboratory

We Treat and Dispense: •  Malaria •  Allergies •  Hypertension •  Dewormers •  HIV/AIDS •  Diabetes •  Bacterial Infection •  Viral Infection •  Fungal Infection •  Seizures •  Ulcers •  Analgesics

Lab Tests •  Malaria •  HIV Testing and Counseling •  TB Test •  Hepatitis B and C •  Stool and Urine Analyses •  Anemia Test (HB) •  Typhoid Test (Widal) •  Arthritis (Rheumatoid Factors) •  Ulcers (H. pylori Test) •  Influenza A and B •  Lipid Profile (Heart Disease) •  Diabetes Prevention (A1C) •  Liver Function (LFT, Bilirubin) june 2013 1 •  Culture and Sensitivity


Mission TropicalClinics’ mission is to rehabilitate children from extreme malnutrition and vaccine-preventable diseases; treat and nurture HIV/AIDS patients to become productive members of the community; prevent mothers and newborns from dying in childbirth; and offer preventive screenings to over 50 people per day through state-of-the-art medical centers in rural regions of developing nations, starting in Kakamega, Kenya. The Clinics present a unique model of providing access to affordable medical and preventive care to the impoverished rural poor. Our centers are filled with high quality medical equipment, stocked with essential medicine and nutrients, and staffed with well-trained health care providers.

tropicalclinics

By the numbers patients seen per day

90%

of patients can afford our care ($4 consultation)

75 : 25

women:men treated

200

analgesic tablets given / day

3 in 5

patients entering the clinic suffer from malaria

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Founder’s Corner

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Dr. Margaret Kilibwa, the founding executive director of TropicalClinics, has a simple but functional philosophy:


annual gala, with meera Gandhi

Meera Gandhi

Sunday, October 20th, 5:00PM - 9:00PM Carl A. Fields Center, Princeton University •  Keynote Speaker: Humanitarian Meera Gandhi, founder and CEO of the Giving Back Foundation •  Presentation by Dr. Margaret Kilibwa, founder and director of TropicalClinics •  Remarks by Dr. Bruce Charash, founder and Chairman of the Board of “Doc to Dock” •  Silent Auction •  African Dance Performance

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CLINIC OPENING CEREMONY

July 12th, 9:00AM TropicalClinics, Kholera House, Kakamega, Kenya •  Speech by Governor Wycliffe Oparanya Ambetsa of Kakamega County •  Presentation by Dr. Margaret Kilibwa, founder and director of TropicalClinics •  Remarks by TropicalClinics staff •  Tour of the clinic

e passionate about rural health care and empower women and their families to create healthy communities. This is what TropicalClinics medical center means for the larger Kakamega region - that a wellstocked and state-of-the-art treatment center supports not only access to quality health care but also the organization’s core mission of community service. There is no better example of that mission than an investment in the wellbeing of women, children, and their families.

pharmaceutical inventory tracking, evaluating oral and eye health care, offering consultations on women’s and men’s health, tracking public health outreach campaigns, and providing nutritional and social work counseling. We expect to significantly impact the health of these rural communities and allow the residents to actively participate in the development of economic efficiency in their local communities, standing as care models for the rural regions of other developing nations.

This rural region was selected for three major reasons: (i) there is a serious shortage of medical supplies, equipment and medicine at public medical facilities in the Kakamega region – 90% of the facilities do not have HIV-testing kits; (ii) only 20% of women in need of antiretroviral therapy (ART) receive this treatment compared to 60% of men needing the same treatment; (iii) TropicalClinics is unique in providing most of the pharmaceutical and treatment services at affordable fees for the rural community.

TropicalClinics’ community value will ultimately be measured by its ability to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality, create jobs at the health center, decrease prevalence of preventable diseases and spread of HIV infection, and bolster the local economy. In addition, TropicalClinics is building and maintaining strong bonds and relationships with the community-based organizations of the rural communities in Kenya, as well as the country’s health agencies, to help deliver a multiplicity of health programs and services to the residents of the rural regions of Kenya. This creates a new paradigm of medical services, training, and local empowerment welcomed by local governments, communities, and healthcare providers.

Our main tools for effective preventive and palliative care are realized through outcome measures of our rural health efforts. We are keeping electronic patient medical records, implementing HIV/AIDS awareness and care programs, providing specialized diagnostic services, managing the

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college Chaptership

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Princeton university

ropicalClinics is proud to introduce its student chaptership program, TropicalClinics for Rural Health (TCRH), starting with its founding chapter at Princeton University. Princeton TCRH has offered immeasurable support by spreading TropicalClinics’ mission and organizing fundraisers to provide financial support for the clinic’s efforts. Princeton TCRH consists of five committees -- here are updates from the leaders of each committee!

This year, the Special Events Committee held TropicalClinics’ first ever 5K race! It wound through campus and was a great success, with about 100 total attendees. The committee worked hard throughout the spring to get some great sponsors for the event. The 5K was a great way to bring the community and the university together to raise awareness for the cause of TropicalClinics. In the fall, we are looking forward to helping plan a Gala and also to planning our next 5K. Theresa Meyer, Chair of Special Events

The Rural Health Activism Committee plans a variety of events to raise awareness about various pertinent rural health issues. This past semester, the committee planned documentary screenings of Sinesipho: Why must I die? and Lazarus Effect, dinner discussions with prominent scholars in Princeton's Global Health Program, and an art project to address rural health issues. These projects and events have given TCRH members the opportunity to learn about issues in a proactive manner and become better acquainted with the mission of TropicalClinics. Akshata Shirahatti, VP of Rural Health Activism

This year, the Chaptership Expansion committee contacted the Health Professions Offices of over 80 colleges around the United States and abroad. We received several responses from interested students and currently have an established an Executive Board for Santa Clara University as well as developing Executive Boards for Johns Hopkins University, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and New York University. We are very excited about the progress that has been made thus far and look forward to expanding further. Christine Hildreth, VP of Chaptership Expansion

The Outreach and Publicity committee has been integral in expanding the original six-person executive board to a fully-fledged chapter with over thirty active members. Outreach and Publicity has increased awareness of rural health issues on campus through documentary screenings and dinner discussions. O&P has also spearheaded the recruitment of new members through various advertising venues and social media such as the chapter blog and Facebook page. Patricia Yeh, VP of Outreach and Publicity

This year, the fundraising committee hosted a pizza eating contest sponsored by Naked Pizza. An event with Cheeburger Cheeburger was our most successful fundraiser of the year! Our communiversity event, where we painted the faces of Princeton community members, increased awareness of TropicalClinics’ mission and raised funds for the clinic. Overall, the committee contributed significantly to TropicalClinics this year through our events! Max Silver, VP of Fundraising

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Internship Program

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ropicalClinics is currently hosting four interns (Ryan Elliott, Edwin Carbajal, Stephen Cognetta, and Jean Choi) from Princeton University through the Princeton International Internship Program. Our program participants receive individual mentorship and support during the course of their stay in Kakamega. They also have the opportunity to experience life in rural Kenya and see the country’s many attractions through the program’s biweekly Friday Outings to locations such as the Kakamega Forest Reserve. We are excited to offer our interns both insight into our clinic and an immersive cultural experience in Kenya. Ryan is aiding the clinic in its outreach efforts to community leaders and the rural population of Kakamega. He is working alongside TropicalClinics’ Social Worker to collaborate with community health workers and community leaders who can raise awareness of major health issues and the services provided by TropicalClinics. He has already helped the clinic to establish relationships with the Salvation Army of Kenya West Territory, the Masinde Muliro University of Science & Technology, and Standard Chartered Bank.

Edwin is participating in the pathological and diagnostic services internship. He has had a chance to test the equipment in the laboratory for calibration and accuracy, to qualify diagnostic images and test results, and to automate specimen collection, preparation, and final reporting. By continuing to review test methodologies and new tests in relation to current diagnostic clinical medicine, he provides support for accurate diagnostic services necessary for appropriate risk assessment and therapeutic monitoring. As a result, patients can make decisions to improve their health and well-being. Stephen and Jean are working on the pharmaceutical inventory tracking system for the clinic. This involves cataloguing, describing, and organizing pharmaceuticals, nutrients, and medical supplies using inventory tracking systems that are utilized in developing nations. This will allow TropicalClinics Pharmacy to track outgoing prescriptions, and ensure it is fully stocked.

Our Summer 2013 interns: Stephen Cognetta ‘15, Jean Choi ‘15, Edwin Carbajal ‘14, Ryan Elliot ‘14

1. The winner of a pizza-eating contest hosted by the Princeton TCRH Fundraising Committee. Taken by a TCRH volunteer. 2. Participants in TropicalClinics’ first annual 5K. Taken by Ann Pregner. 3. A visitor to TropicalClinics’ face-painting fundraiser booth at Princeton’s Communiversity festival. Taken by Michael Chang ‘16.

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ropicalClinics’ supporters help make its mission a reality. Without the help of our partners and individual benefactors, we could not have achieved what we have until today, and we hope that with your continued support, we can expand our services and facilities to better serve the rural population of Kenya.

Special thanks to

Major Contributors: Bruce Charash, Meera Gandhi and The Giving Back Foundation Contributors: Michael Evers, Juan Navia, Elena Zezima, LaGrangeville Freedom Plains Church, Princeton Alliance Church, and the members of the Princeton TCRH Chapter for their continued support and dedication to the TropicalClinics cause.

BECOME AN AMBASSADOR

http://www.facebook.com/tropicalclinics Would you like to be a TropicalClinics Ambassador? Tell others about TropicalClinics and become a fan on our Facebook page (link above). Just visit our page, log in to your Facebook account, and at the top corner click the “Become a Fan” link. Fans will receive a t-shirt from TropicalClinics!

Donate now

http://tropicalclinics.org/donate_now.shtml The people of Kakamega need effective medical care. You can help save lives.

Phone: 0711 742 018 / 0721 914 979 Email: info@tropicalclinics.org Website: http://www.tropicalclinics.org

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TropicalClinics Summer 2013 eNewsletter  

Please enjoy our summer eNewsletter!

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