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EX P LOR E TRØN DEL AG I N TH E H EA R T O F N O RWAY’ S HISTO RY


This magazine is published in Norwegian, English and German. Combined circulation: 110,000 Editorial work completed in December 2017 Printing: Skipnes Paper: Scandia Cover photo: Jarle Hagen Layout and illustrations: UREDD Designkontor Text “Coastal delights” and “Flock life”: Magne Gisvold/UREDD Designkontor Other text: UREDD Designkontor, Teksteriet and advertisers English translation: Gavin Tanguay Oversetting og språkvasking Publisher: Trøndelag Reiseliv AS Nordre gt. 11, 7011 Trondheim Tel: +47 73 84 24 40 touristinfo@trondelag.com magasin.trondelag.com

We take no liability for subsequent changes or errors.


TRØNDELAG – THE ESSENCE OF NORWAY Trøndelag has played a central role in the development of Norway’s history for more than 1,000 years. The name Trøndelag originates from the Norse words þróndir (people who grow and thrive) and log (district with common laws). The capital of Trøndelag, Trondheim, has been one of the country’s most important cities ever since it was founded by Olav Tryggvason in 997. It was soon called Nidaros and served as the capital of Norway for around 250 years during the Viking Age. After the death of King Olav II Haraldsson at Stiklestad and his subsequent sainthood, the Nidaros Cathedral was built over his burial site. It soon became Christendom’s most important sanctuary in Northern Europe, and people from all over Europe have made pilgrimages to this national sanctuary for almost 1,000 years. To this day, people travel to Trondheim. Trøndelag offers visitors the essence of Norway and everything Norwegian: High mountains and vast mountain plateaus. Deep forests and valleys. Sami reindeer herders who tend to their herds. The Northern Lights, snow and sparkling conditions for skiing. The elongated Trondheimsfjord with kilometre-long sandy beaches, and polished rocks along the coast. Wild animals such as moose, lynxes, reindeer, bears, wolves, eagles and muskoxen. Modern urban life with a rich cultural and commercial life. As Norway’s leading local food region, Trøndelag offers the country’s best culinary experiences and unique accommodation options. And always present is the Trønder, a complex being, who is inventive and renowned throughout history for his wanderlust and courage, while also being peaceful, rounded, hospitable and always willing to give of one’s self. Most people have herd the term “the friendly Trønder”. When you visit Trøndelag, you will be warmly received and, if you wish, challenged to experience something completely new!

WELCOME TO TRØNDELAG – THE ESSENCE OF NORWAY

Photo: Jarle Hagen


TRØ NDE L AG REGIO NS

T RO ND H E I M 63° N

B ERG EN O S LO

N AM DALEN

IN N HERRED COA S TA L N O RWAY

T RO N DHEIM

O R K L A DA L A N D G AUL DA L

THE VÆRN ES REG ION

O PPDA L AND R EN N EB U

RØ RO S

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CO NTE NTS

COASTAL D E LIG HT S - COASTAL TRØNDELAG

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A nc i ent f i s hi ng vi l l ag es an d ro r b u ( f i s h e r m e n’ s c ot t a g e s ) , n a r ro w s t r a i t s , pol i s hed i s l et s , di vi ng , s no r ke l l i n g a n d t h e w o r l d ’ s b e s t s e af o o d . Thi s s u ms u p t he c oas t of Trø n d e l a g .

A MILLENNIUM OF TOURISM - HISTORICAL TRØNDELAG

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W hat do w e know abou t h i s t o r i c Trø n d e l a g ? T h e w e l l - k n o w n h i s t o r y of t h e reg i on revol ves arou nd V i k i n g r a i d s , c o nf l i c t s , a h o l y k i n g a n d a l e g e n d a r y c at hedral . Ju s t as i m port a nt a re t h e s t o r i e s a b o u t f re e d o m - l o v i n g a n d c a l m farmers and an em erg i ng d e m o c r a c y.

F LOCK LIF E - CULINARY TRØ ND E L AG

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W hen peopl e mi g rat ed no r t h t h o u s a n d s of ye a r s a g o i n s e a rc h of f o o d , t hey f ou nd fert i l e l and i n t h e c e nt re of N o r w a y. Trø n d e l a g i s n o w re g a r d e d as t he food reg i on of N orw a y – a n d t h e l o c a l m e n u s f e at u re s o m e of t h e fi nes t produ c e i mag i nabl e .

CRACKLING ATMOSPHERE - WINTER IN TRØNDELAG

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Few things describe “winter” better than frozen snow crackling under your feet. If you visit Trøndelag in winter, you will encounter reindeer, dog sledding, i c e f i s hi ng and w onderf u l s k i t e r r a i n .

G OLD E N L AN DSCA PE - OU TD OOR E X P E RI ENC ES

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From fj ord t o mou nt ai n an d d e e p f o re s t s t o e x p a n s i v e m o u nt a i n p l at e a u s , s al mon bi t i ng and t he w ar mt h f ro m t h e c a m p f i re . T h e Trø n d e l a g l a n d s c a p e i s t he es s enc e of N orw ay.

Leka (Søderholm - Steen)

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COASTAL DELIGHTS “Between cliffs and the billowing breakers The Norwegian of old found his home A foundation he laid in these acres His own hands raised his house from the loam.” Ivar Aasen

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Intelligent life has existed on the outermost naked isle in the archipelago off the coast of Trøndelag ever since the Stone Age. Apart from finds from 11th century farms, we know very little about the people who lived there all those years ago. However, it’s highly likely that the basic way of life at this isolated outpost, exposed to the elements and only a stone’s throw from the edible treasures of the sea, has changed little over the past 10,000 years. “We cannot live by the sight of the sea,” says Berit Akseth. She keeps the boat steady while her husband Gustav Gjevik drags a crab pot up over the side of the boat. Not that there’s anything wrong with a clear view of the sea, islands and horizon. But the very essence of life in the fishing village of Mausundvær – the largest fishing village south of the Lofoten Islands – is access to food from the sea. The uninterrupted view of the horizon in all directions is a pure bonus. This outpost of society offers something even most Trønders are not familiar with: Trøndelag’s own archipelago with thousands of polished islets and great fishing for anyone who makes the effort to cast a line.

It’s packed inside the pot. Out of his faithful pot, Gustav pulls five, six, ten, twelve mature crabs, lured in by some remains of a halibut carcass. “When we set a pot, and leave it a day or two, it’s usually full when we pull it up,” says Gustav. He pulls up the second pot and once again a dozen edible crabs find their way aboard. Three or four smaller specimens are thrown overboard and left to grow even bigger. Berit shows us how to hold the crabs to avoid being pinched, and the best way to put them in the bucket to avoid damaging any of their many limbs. When the crab fishing is over, we continue by boat between the skerries to their private islet. We go ashore, grab the rope thrown to us and receive help to moor the boat.

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FROM SEA TO MOUTH

They have erected a simple wooden lavvu on their islet to provide shelter and accommodation. There is also a large barbecue, and they put on scallops harvested by local divers to grill in their shells. The pomp and ceremony of the urban kitchen has not reached this isolated spot yet, apart from a few nice pictures in magazines. The focus is exclusively on the produce. A little later, back in the fishing village, we stand on the quayside by the fish landing centre and greet the local crab fishermen; people who live by the sea. On the boat is a chap in orange who works at sea, while on land is one of the centre’s four employees – his wife. Few words are exchanged while one crate of crabs after the other is taken ashore, ready to be transported from the island community to supermarkets and gourmet restaurants on the mainland.

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TRØNDELAG’S ARCHIPELAGO

A little later, we are back in Gustav’s boat heading in the direction of Frøya. However, we are not going to this large island with few trees. We stop a little over halfway on one of the many small islands in the Trøndelag archipelago. Gustav reduces speed and navigates into a narrow bay with cliffs on both sides. We spot a sandy beach at the end of the bay. We jump ashore, while Gustav anchors the boat. We put on our wetsuits – a necessity if you plan to stay in the water for some time – and then attach our diving masks and snorkels. The area is a paradise for swimmers, free divers and scuba divers – not to mention the area’s commercial scallop divers. However, our mission on this afternoon is fun, not food. We wade out into the shallow green water and dive underwater to explore.

“We cannot live by the sight of the sea.”

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Snorkelling in one of the archipelago’s many gems 12


Trøndelag offers many excellent areas for diving and snorkelling, from the shore or boat. You will find everything from wrecks, kelp forests and teeming marine life to walls, overhangs and not least the chance to harvest the world’s best scallops.

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TRØNDELAG ARCHIPELAGO Mausundvær is not alone in offering outstanding opportunities for outdoor recreation, including berry picking and fishing. The Trøndelag archipelago consists of thousands of islands, islets and skerries. Local ferries, passenger boats and bridges take you from island to island, where you can visit ancient fishing villages, eat local food and enjoy a beer at the local brew pub.

in search of more physical activities, you can try sea rafting by rigid-inflatable boat (RIB) or seek out a local diving and kayaking club for an exciting course, to rent equipment or go on a guided adventure.

Live the simple life. You can stay in a traditional rorbu (fishermen’s cottage) or a solitary lighthouse amongst the waves. Many a German find their way here to fish the summer’s night away, while others come to watch the white-tailed sea eagle dive for fish and capture a memory of a lifetime with their camera. If you are

Explore the coast the way you want to – fast paced or pure peace and tranquillity.

If you rent a boat, you can visit one or more of the many small islands and islets in the archipelago or see if the fish are biting.

Photo | Pages 6-14: Jarle Hagen

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S T O K K Ø YA Minimalist, modern and down to earth. Or should we say “down to sand”? Located on one of Norway’s finest sandy beaches, Stokkøya Sjøsenter offers a unique coastal experience! Right at the end of a long and isolated road, the founders of the sea centre have built up a beachfront gem. You will find a variety of architecturally distinctive beach houses, not to mention a wonderful beach bar renowned for fantastic seafood. This attracts a steady stream of Norwegians and tourists from every corner of the globe. Whether you are attracted by a relaxing weekend in an idyllic setting with the indescribable tranquillity and views of the beach bar or activities like sea kayaking, wind surfing and swimming, you are unlikely to find a better spot than Stokkøya.

Read more at www.stokkoy.no

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C O A S TA L N O R W AY WHERE SEA MEETS SKY

The coast of Trøndelag is wild, yet charming, offering adventures on the cusp between the authentic and unspoilt and the modern. For the people living on the coast, respect for nature has not been an ethical ideal, but rather a necessity for survival. The unpredictable weather in the Trondheimsleia strait and further out to sea has tested many throughout history. An encounter with the moods of the sea, from untameable forces of nature to never ending stillness, is an encounter you will never forget. The coast of Trøndelag boasts a teeming bird and animal life, magical light conditions and a varied and beautiful landscape. You will discover a coastal culture with vibrant communities where the basis of existence is in the sea. Local culinary traditions live on in tandem with the modern kitchen, and the residents of the coast are keen to share them. You can travel from one lighthouse to the next – and out here on the coast every lighthouse has its own story. Ever since the 17th century, lighthouses have served to guide sailors safely along the coast and inshore. Many a dramatic story has played out along the coast, some

ending in joy and others in tragedy. Along the way, you can stop at one or more cafés and pubs or simply rent a lighthouse for a unique stay near the open sea. On the coast of Trøndelag, our larder is right on our doorstep. We are proud of the local produce, so there is no shortage of places serving local cuisine. You can taste blue mussels, scallops, salmon, crabs straight from the sea, not to mention delicacies from the land such as wild mutton, venison, cave cheese and many other coastal specialties. Or you can simply harvest your own produce straight from Mother Nature. You can fish, gather mussels, set crab pots and harvest seaweed along the entire coastline. A fisherman’s paradise awaits you, regardless of whether you prefer saltwater or freshwater fishing. You can rent a boat and fishing tackle along the coast and stay in a charming rorbu (fishermen’s cottage) or a high standard local hotel. You can also go deep-sea fishing with a local guide and experience the thrill when the big one bites

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T R AV E L T I P S A L O N G T H E C O A S T Austrått in Ørland is one of Norway’s oldest manors, with a history dating back more than 1000 years. The former residents include Lady Ingerd, a significant personality in Norway during the Reformation, and a source of inspiration for a famous play by Henrik Ibsen. Visit a modern fish farm and watch the salmon leaping in their pens on a quick, safe, and eventful guided boat trip from the Coastal Museum (Kystmuseet) at Sandstad, Hitra. Visit the fishing village of Titran, where the buildings bear witness to its former glory. A magical place where sea meets sky. The Titran disaster of 1899 claimed the lives of 140 fishermen in one night due to a hurricane. Out towards the open sea on Stokkøya is the wonderful Hosnasand and Stokkøya Sjøsenter with its distinctive architecture. Close by is Harbakhula, a huge natural rock cave in the mountain, offering a breathtaking view of the archipelago.

The archipelago north of Frøya is known as “gullrekka”, the Golden Chain. All the islands have their own special character and history, but still have in common the same coastal culture and the sea as their larder. Explore the coastal landscape by bike. You will find one gem after the other in Rissa, from Stadsbygd and the coastal heritage museum (Kystens Arv) and up to Råkvåg, where the quayside warehouses house a fishery museum, art exhibition and several places to eat. Spend the night at a lighthouse with the open sea as your neighbour. Climbing to the top of the lighthouse tower offers a view for miles around. On safari in Froan, Norway’s largest marine nature reserve, you are guaranteed to see white-tailed eagles, cormorants and seals, as well as many other bird and animal species. Visit one of the region’s many festivals, village fairs and pageants.

Read more at www.kystnorge.com Photos (from left): Sula lighthouse (Tove Fasting) | Quayside warehouses in Råkvåg (Marius Rua) Cod fishing (W. Krause) | Austrått Manor in Ørland (Jette Petersen) 17


Photo above: Steinar Johansen | Photos below (from left): Nina Grindvik Sæternes | Linn J. Ofstad

NORVEG – EXPERIENCE 10,000 YEARS OF COASTAL CULTURE More than 10,000 years ago, the first people settled in what would become Norway. They were lured mostly by the resources of the sea and coast. The people along the coast developed a unique and rich culture in harmony with nature. We have exported seafood overseas for more than 1,000 years. The Coastal Museum in Rørvik conveys the coastal culture of the past, present and future. Experience our archaeological exhibition, the old trading post Berggården, stay overnight in a rorbu (fishermen’s cottage) at the listed fishing village of Sør-Gjæslingan or enjoy delicious local food at Restaurant Norveg!

www.kystmuseetnorveg.no | tlf. +47 488 80 024 18


DO LM S UN DE T H OT E LL H IT R A Dolmsundet Hotell on Hitra is a full-service hotel offering nice hotel rooms, large apartments and cosy cabins. The cabins and apartments feature, kitchen, lounge, several bedrooms, private bathroom and outdoor seating area. The hotel restaurant specialises in local cuisine, including scallops, baill, venison and salmon. Welcome to Hitra and Dolmsundet Hotell!

www.dolmsundet.no | tlf: +47 72 44 04 40 | post@dolmsundet.no

FJELLVÆR GJEST EGÅRD Enjoy the coast and coastal culture all year round! Stay in cabins with a sea view. Hire a boat or use your feet to explore our island. If you are travelling by boat, or you have your own cabin and boat, you can dock at the marina and come up for a bite to eat or to participate in some of our events. Taste all the delicious fish and meat dishes we are renowned for, based on Hitra´s fantasticIngredients, including fish from the sea, venison from the land and cheeses and cured meats from our farm food producers. www.fjellvar.no | tlf: +47 72 44 01 32

H IT R A T UR IS T S E RV IC E Hitra and Frøya are the perfect bases for unforgettable fishing adventures. Hitra Turistservice rents holiday houses with boats on the islands of Hitra and Frøya. The holiday is the highlight of a year for most people so a pleasant stay is essential. A fishing trip in pure, fresh sea air and picturesque surroundings combined with social events with family or fishing friends is excellent medicine for recreation.

www.hitraturistservice.no | tlf: +47 400 01 955

COASTAL HER I TAGE MU SE U M Welcome to Trøndelag’s beautiful coastal heritage museum, Kystens Arv, in Fosen! A full-day experience for the whole family with activities and experiences related to traditional boats, crafts and the history of the coastal dwellers. Visit our new museum building, see the exhibitions, learn to row traditional boats, relax in the restaurant or watch the art of boat building. Just one hour from Trondheim. Welcome!

www.kystensarv.no | tlf: +47 73 85 55 60 19


T HE COA ST OF TRØ N DEL AG AC C O M M O D ATI O N 1

DOLMSUNDE T HOTE LL Full-service hotel and event organiser on the outermost part of the coast of Trøndelag. www.dol m s u nde t. n o

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FJE LLVÆ R GJE S TEGÅRD Experience the coast and coastal culture year-round! www.fj e l l v ar. n o

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HI TR A T URIS TS E RV ICE Rents holiday houses and apartments with boats on the islands of Hitra and Frøya. www.hi tr atu r is ts e r v ic e . no

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S TOK KØYA S J Ø S EN T ER Nature - architecture - food - adventures. www. st o k ko y. n o

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S Ø R- G JÆ S L I N G A N Stay overnight in a rorbu (fishermen’s cottage) at a nationally listed fishing village. www. k y st m u se e t n o r ve g . n o

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FY R TÅ R N Stay overnight in a lighthouse. www.t ro n d e la g . c o m

EXPE RI E NC E S / AC TI VI T IES 7

DE E P-SE A F IS HING

12 PA D D L I N G Discover Trøndelag from the water with perfect conditions for kayaking and canoeing. www.t ro n d e la g . c o m

Superb conditions along the entire coast of Trøndelag. www.tronde l ag. c o m 8

SAFAR I S Perfect conditions for eagle and seal safaris. www.tronde l ag. c o m

13 BI R DWATC H I N G Several exciting locations for birdwatching along the coast of Trøndelag. www. k y st n o rg e . c o m

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I SL AND HO PPING Island hopping in wonderful and exciting coastal nature with short distances between experiences. www.tronde l ag. c o m

14 S EA R A FT I N G You will find companies offering sea rafting along the entire coast of Trøndelag. www.t ro n d e la g . c o m

10 GEOLOGY Experience the geology island of Leka, exciting stories from the centre of the earth. www.vi sitnam dal e n . c o m

15 VISIT A FISH FARM Join a guided trip to a salmon farm and learn about modern Norwegian aquaculture. www. k y st n o rg e . c o m / v i si t n a m d a le n . c o m

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DI VI NG Clear water and a rich marine life await beneath the surface. www.tronde l ag. c o m

16 WINDSURFING Hosnasand on the island of Stokkøy is described by enthusiasts as the ideal place for windsurfing. www. k y st n o rg e . c o m

A TT R AC TI O NS 20 H A N D EL S S T ED ET H OP S J Ø One of the largest trading posts on the coast of Trøndelag in the 18th and 19th centuries. www. h o p sj o . n o

17 K YSTE NS ARV Coastal heritage museum with boat building yard. www.k yste ns ar v. no 18 COASTAL M US E UM O F S Ø R-TRØ NDE L AG Exhibitions on coastal culture and aquaculture, trips to fish farms. www.k ystm u s e e t. no

21 BRYG G ER EK K A I N R Å K VÅG Longest row of old quayside warehouses outside a city in Norway. www. k y st n o rg e . c o m

19 COASTAL M US E UM NO RV EG Conveys the coastal culture through permanent and temporary exhibitions. www.k ystm u s e e tno r v e g. n o

22 AU S T R ÅT T M A N OR Renaissance manor dating from 1656. www. n k i m . n o / a u st rat t

Read more at magasin.trondelag.com 20


L EKA 10

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A MILLENNIUM OF TOURISM

What is it about Trøndelag’s history that has led to people making pilgrimages here from all over Europe for hundreds of years – on foot?

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Most people know that due to St. Olav, Christians have travelled on pilgrimages to the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim from the 11th century up to the present day. A lesser known fact is that the customs and traditions of Trøndelag formed the foundations of the current Scandinavian democracy, which is internationally renowned as an extremely well-functioning form of society. Let’s take it step by step from the beginning. The wanderlust of the Vikings, Berserkers on wild rampages and bloody feuds are reasonably well-known both in Norway and abroad. Accounts of Norwegian history are characterized by spectacular events, raids and conquests in Europe, crusading explorers and the mythical demolition of London Bridge. However, behind the brutal facade were peaceful people who built the country with words rather than weapons. A fact that has received little attention in modern times is that Norway is the world’s oldest continuously functioning democracy with a democratic heritage dating back more than 1,000 years.

While Trøndelag was characterized by relative peace, compared with places on the continent and the British Isles, different areas were controlled by powerful and sometimes brutal chieftains. To deter enemies, these chieftains were surrounded by warriors but such men did not come cheaply. Long before the Viking Age, from around 400 A.D., these chieftains travelled south on raids to loot and plunder valuables to pay their forces and thereby retain loyalty. Many warriors pledged allegiance to chieftains because they were renowned for sailing southwards and returning with valuable cargo.

In the 3rd century AD, the Norwegian society transformed from a tribal society into a chieftain society – an elite warrior took political power based on loyalty from allied noblemen and farmers. The society was based on a system of laws and rules, whereby the laws were quoted from memory in the bygdeting (local assembly). People met on the tingplass (assembly site) to make important decisions and resolve disputes. Traces of these sites are dated back to the 1st century AD. While the Migration Period in Europe (400-800 AD) was characterized by chaos and bloody expulsions, Scandinavia was characterized by relative harmony that was unique in a European context.

Several of these chieftains also took on roles as commanders under Roman emperors, returning with gold as well as experience in the tactics and strategy of battle. There were many stories of fearless and bloodthirsty barbarians from the north long before the Viking Age, which were reinforced when emigration accelerated. As most of the Viking battles took place away from home, society in Norway generally progressed peacefully.

Few Europeans travelled northwards, presumably because Norway and Sweden were relatively inaccessible and, even in the 4th and 5th centuries AD, Scandinavians had a reputation as skilled warriors. Consequently, what we know today as the “Scandinavian Model” developed in peace – a society based on laws, rules and customs, where peace was perceived as “sound economics”.

Many settled in Europe for longer periods, before eventually returning home with foreign customs and accounts of foreign people such as the Celts, Goths and Saxons. Culturally, the Trønders did not live in isolation before the Viking Age, as is evidenced by the iron industry in Levanger and Gauldalen. As early as 200 A.D., around 40 tonnes of iron of unrivalled quality was produced annually for the Roman Empire, amongst others.

Photo (right): Tinghaugen in Frosta (Marius Rua) 24


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In line with the growing prosperity, the ting (derived from the Norse word for assembly) system was further developed and larger regional assemblies became more important. Here in Trøndelag, based on Trændalog (Trønder law), all the counties surrounding the Trondheimsfjord were covered by the Frostating. The system of democracy practiced in Norway today – based on fylkesting (county councils) and ultimately the Storting (parliament) – is a direct descendant of these ancient assemblies. Consequently, Norwegians have the world’s oldest democratic tradition.

since Harald Fairhair to rule over a unified Norway. As a Christian, King Olav cooperated with the church politically as well as economically to create a permanent unified nation. Meanwhile, many disliked Olav’s sometimes brutal Christianization of the country, and the King of Denmark, Canute the Great, bought himself an alliance to overthrow Olav.

In the Viking Age, the areas ruled by these chieftains and petty kings became larger. There were conflicts with Danish as well as Swedish clans, leading to gradual nation building through larger kingdoms. This nation building was partly a response to similar larger foreign powers: Threats from outside, combined with new opportunities for trade, led to Norwegians needing larger units that were united. Meanwhile, this era was characterized by constantly shifting alliances.

Olav fled the country to Gardarike (now part of Russia) in 1028, and Canute the Great installed the Earls of Lade to rule the country on his behalf. Two years later, Olav returned to Norway with his men to realize his vision: To unify Norway into a Christian kingdom. Olav sought to gain the support of farmers in Trøndelag to defeat the Earls of Lade. When he reached Stiklestad, Olav was attacked and killed by his opponents. Legend has it that several miracles occurred after his death (which you can read about on pages 30-31). These miracles and Olav’s sainthood mark the most important and decisive stages in the Christianization of Norway; Christianity had secured its ultimate victory among the people, and Olav’s vision was fulfilled.

The list of Norwegian monarchs, and the pretty much stable unification of Norway into one kingdom, is an intricate story of clans and alliances, which is described in detail elsewhere. During the Viking Age, Norway was not one kingdom as it is today, but rather a system involving varying cooperation between the Crown and local kings and earls. The most important for Trøndelag was the position of the Earls of Lade, who ruled Northern Norway, Trøndelag and Western Norway. Olav II Haraldsson (often referred to as Olav the Stout) later became perhaps the most important king of Norway. After defeating the Earls of Lade and the King of Denmark, King Olav II became the first king

Illustration, above: The death of Olav II Haraldsson at Stiklestad (Halfdan Egedius/National Library of Norway) Photo (right): The Nidaros Cathedral's famous Rose Window (Eskil Roll)

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THE PILGRIM PATHS WALKING WITH MEANING AND PURPOSE

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Ever since the death and canonization St. Olav, the Viking King, the Nidaros Cathedral built over his burial site has been Northern Europe’s most important pilgrimage site. To this day, people from all over the world come to Norway to walk the St. Olav Ways - the Pilgrim Paths to Trondheim and Nidaros Cathedral. The longest pilgrim route in Norway is the Gudbrandsdalen Path, which in medieval times was the main route to Nidaros (now Trondheim). Other important routes include the St. Olav Path from the Swedish coast to Trondheim, the Østerdalen Path and the North Path from Gløshaug Church via Stiklestad. A common theme of these and other routes is that they offer locally marked paths through the Norwegian cultural landscape, mountains, forests and many historical sites.

For most people, the walk along the pilgrim route offers time for reflection – a spiritual experience combined with the tranquillity of nature. Many pilgrims say that having plenty of time to think is an important motivation for walking the trail. The pilgrimage offers an opportunity to leave one’s routines and stress behind and experience an inner peace and sense of calmness. While walking these routes, the pilgrims will discover a range of unique lodgings, cultural experiences and an insight into Norwegian history. Pilgrimages are personal and every pilgrim will have their own unique experience. But all of them will have an experience they will remember for the rest of their life – and many return to try other pilgrim paths.

Photos (from left): Pilgrims by the milepost in the Dovrefjell Mountains (David Tett | Pilgrimage sign along the trail (Sigrid Lindstad)

R E C E I V E T H E O L AV L E T T E R

All pilgrims can get a pilgrim passport and collect stamps from churches and pilgrim lodgings along the route. Everyone who walks the final 100 km into Trondheim qualifies for the pilgrim’s certificate, also known as the ‘Olav letter’. PLAN YOUR PILGRIMAGE

On stolavways.com, you will find further information about the St. Olav Ways. This website includes a practical trip planner, which make it easy to create your own itinerary. You will also find recommended walks, itineraries, a packing list and printable maps.

Read more at www.stolavways.com 29


WARRIOR, KING AND SAINT Olav Haraldsson lost the Battle of Stiklestad, but won the battle for the Norwegian soul.

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Photo 1 and 2: Espen Storhaug, photo 3: CH - trondelag.com

Olav II Haraldsson is best known as a saint and the Viking King of Norway. During his life, he was primarily a warrior and adventurer who sought battle, wealth and alliances in Northern Europe.

whose aim was to rule over Norway. Olav Haraldsson was ultimately killed at Stiklestad, which has since been referred to as the Battle of Stiklestad.

Olav’s nickname Olav the Stout indicates that he was a large, heavily built man. Ancient poems and chronicles tell us that Olav participated in the attack on and siege of London in 1009. He was also involved in besieging and plundering Canterbury, ravaging in France and fighting with enemies in Sweden and Denmark. In the spring of 1014, Olav allied himself with King Ethelred II, and Olav and his men joined Ethelred’s army to reconquer England from the Danes.

A farmer at Stiklestad took care of Olav’s corpse. It was later taken to Nidaros (Trondheim) and buried. Colloquially and legend has it that several miracles happened, including that Olav’s hair and nails continued to grow after his death and that the blind recovered their sight after contact with body of the dead king. Reports of the miracles surrounding Olav took hold in Europe, and he was canonized in 1031. The Nidaros Cathedral, which was later built over his grave, has been Northern Europe’s most important pilgrimage site for almost 1,000 years.

The Danish King Canute fled to Denmark, but returned to England in June 1015. Olav then changed sides and supported Canute’s invasion. Olav stayed with Canute until they had conquered Wessex. However, a power struggle evolved with the Danish King Canute,

The Saint Olav Drama (Spelet om Heilag Olav) was written in memory of the battle and the Saint King. The play is a dramatic presentation of the events leading up to the death of the king. The play, which premiered in 1954, is performed at Stiklestad every summer.

HISTORICAL EXPERIENCES AND ACTIVITIES EVERY DAY THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER! 23 JUNE - 12 AUGUST 2018 Stiklastadir On a visit to the mediaeval farm of Stiklastadir, you can immerse yourself in the Viking Age and the Middle Ages. Learn about the period before the battle and the new society that emerged. The children can act as archaeologists and find traces of the past, or dress up as Vikings and fight with swords and shields in a “play battle”. You can also experience archery, axe throwing, medieval crafts, historical food and more. Guided tours and storytelling sessions are also offered daily at Stiklastadir. For further info, festival programme and tickets, please visit: stiklestad.no

The Family Silver The folk museum is brought to life in the summer with The Family Silver (Arvesølvet). Three enclosed areas will be brought to life, replicating the years 1890, 1942 and 1959. Exciting stories will be told of everyday life with fun, laughter and sincerity. The folk museum also features a historic café and various family activities. The Saint Olav Festival (Olsokdagene) at Stiklestad 23 – 29 July 2018 A full week of experiences and activities for the whole family. Welcome to evocative concerts, interesting lectures, the Stiklastadir Market and The Saint Olav Drama (on 25, 27, 28 and 29 July at 19.00).


ARCHITECTURE FOR ETERNITY Right in the heart of historic Trondheim, surrounded by a beautiful cemetery and park winding along the river, is the Nidaros Cathedral.

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The cathedral is built over the tomb of St. Olav, the Viking King, who became the patron saint of Norway. Work on the cathedral was started in 1070 by King Olav III and was completed around 1300. The cathedral is under continuous restoration to preserve the virtually infinite details of the architecture. The mythology and culture surrounding St. Olav led to the cathedral quickly becoming the most important sanctuary of the Catholic Church in Northern Europe. Pilgrims from across Europe have walked to Nidaros – the old name of Trondheim – for centuries and to this day it’s one of Europe’s main historical pilgrim destinations. The Nidaros Cathedral is Norway’s national sanctuary and the site of coronations and royal blessings. Architecturally, the Nidaros Cathedral Nidaros is the world’s northernmost Gothic cathedral. Built of greenish and grey soapstone, the foundations were laid by Archbishop Eystein Erlandsson who was inspired by the Canterbury Cathedral in England. The most striking feature of Norway’s mighty cathedral is the West Front, featuring the great Rose Window depicting the Day of Judgement, and the 76 statues and reliefs on the western wall. Restoration and reconstruction of the cathedral has taken place continuously for more than 150 years and is an ongoing project. The major restoration project currently underway is the royal entranceway on the

southern side of the cathedral. When you visit the cathedral, you can also delve into the history and details of the architecture and the continuous work of the buildings and artistic decorations. As well as being used for religious events for the city’s churchgoers, the Nidaros Cathedral hosts concerts and other cultural activities. Curious visitors can spend hours exploring the decorations and details, large and small, inside as well as outside. The highlight for many is climbing the 172 steps of the cathedral tower and enjoying the spectacular views of Trondheim. A R C H B I S H O P ’ S PA L A C E

Right beside the Nidaros Cathedral is the Archbishop’s Palace. Together the buildings play a central role in Norway’s history. Ever since the late 12th century, the Archbishop’s Palace has been a meeting place for powerful men and a venue for important meetings and grand parties. From the mid of the 12th century until the Reformation in 1537, the Archbishop’s Palace was the residence of the Archbishop of Nidaros. No less than 27 archbishops have lived here. After the Reformation, ownership passed to the King and Danish feudal overlords took over the palace and ruled it on behalf of the King in Copenhagen. The building is now home to the Archbishop’s Palace Museum, the Armory and Resistance Museum and the Crown Regalia featuring the Norwegian crown jewels.

Photos (from left): Nidaros Cathedral (Henning Grøtt/NDR) | The Norwegian King’s crown (Lasse Berre) N I D A R O S C AT H E D R A L

The Nidaros Cathedral is open to the public every day of the year. During the summer seasons, guided tours are offered daily in Norwegian, English, German and French. In summer, it’s also possible to climb the tower and enjoy a wonderful view of the city. Adults NOK 100 / children NOK 40 THE CROWN REGALIA

The King’s crown and other items that make up the Regalia of Norway are displayed in the west wing of the Archbishop’s Palace. Adults NOK 100 / children NOK 40 Closed on Mondays in the off-season A R C H B I S H O P ’ S PA L A C E M U S E U M

The Archbishop’s Palace Museum houses the most spectacular finds from the archaeological excavations in the 1980s. Adults NOK 100 / children NOK 40 Closed on Mondays in the off-season. www.nidarosdomen.no 33


HISTO R I CAL TRØ NDEL AG HIST O R I C AL E XPE RI E NC ES IN T R Ø N D ELA G T I N G H AU G EN Norway’s oldest court. www.v i si t f ro st a . n o

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NI DAROS CATHE DRAL The world’s northernmost Gothic cathedral. www.ni d ar o s do m e n. no

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ARC HB I S HO P’S PAL ACE The Crown Regalia, archaeological exhibition. www.ni d ar o s do m e n. no

1 7 S T EI N V I K H OL M C A S T L E Island fortress dating from the 14th century. www. f o rt i d sm i n n e f o re n i n g e n . n o

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KRI STI AN S TE N F O RTRE S S Fort towering over downtown Trondheim. www.fors v ar s b y gg. no

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MUNKHO LM E N Trondheim’s Viking Age execution site is now a popular excursion spot. www.mu n kh o l m e n . no

1 8 COA S TA L M U S EU M N ORV EG A N D S Ø R- G JÆSLI NGAN Coastal heritage centre, exhibitions, historic walks, films and storytelling theatre. www. k y st m u se e t n o r v e g . n o 1 9 N ORW EG I A N S AWM I L L M U S EU M A national technical industrial heritage site. www. sa g b ru k sm u se e t . n o

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R I NGVE M US IC M US E UM Norway’s national museum for music and instruments. www.ri n gv e . no

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THE ARM O RY & RE S IS TANCE M US E UM The Armed Forces’ museum in Trondheim. www.rustkam m e r e t. no

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SVE RRE S B O RG TRØ NDE L AG F O LK E M U S EU M One of Norway’s largest open air museums. www.sve r r e s b o r g. no

2 2 RØ ROS M U S EU M Experience historical Røros with a visit to Olav’s Mine and The Copper Works. www. ro ro sm u se e t . n o

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TRONDHE IM M ARITIM E M US E UM Exhibition on maritime history. www.tron dh e im s jofar t. no

2 3 M EL DA L D I S T R I C T M U S EU M Open air museum with around 20 preserved buildings. www. m e ld a l. ko m m u n e . n o

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EGGE MUS E UM Open air museum with animals. www.eg ge m u s e u m . n o

24 S EL BU FOL K M U S EU M Experience Selbu’s rich cultural heritage of handicrafts. www.v i si t se lb u . n o

STI KLE S TAD NATIO NAL CULTURE CE N T R E

2 5 OR K L A M U S EU M OF I N D U S T RY Experiences for the whole family based on the Thamshavn line and the Gammelgruva mine. www. o i . n o

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2 0 OP P DA L M U S EU M The history of Oppdal from late 16th century to 1950. www. o p p d a lsm u se e t . n o 2 1 V I K I N G BU R I A L FI EL D AT VA N G Norway’s largest Viking Age burial field. www. o p p d a lsm u se e t . n o

Battleground where King Olav II fell and museum. www.stikl e s tad. no

11 THE FALS TAD CE NTRE National centre for human rights. www.fals tads e nte r e t. no

2 6 BJ U G N BYG DAT U N M Ø L N A RG Å R D EN

12 SAE MI E N S IJTE

2 7 COA S TA L M U S EU M OF S Ø R T RØ N D EL AG Exhibitions on coastal culture and aquaculture. www. k y st m u se e t . n o

Open air museum with 18 buildings and 39 boats. www. m o ln a rg a a rd e n . n o

Conveys Southern Sami culture history. www.sa e m ie n s ijte . n o 13

HEGR A FO RTRE S S National memorial and vibrant fortress. www.heg r afe s tning. n o

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MUNKE BY M O NAS TE RY RUINS

2 9 AU S T R ÅT T M A N OR

Ruins of 12th century monastery. www.fortids m in ne fo r e ninge n. no

K Y S T EN S A RV Coastal heritage museum with boat building yard and one of the country’s largest collections of traditional clinker-built boats. www. k y st e n sa r v. n o Renaissance manor dating from 1656. www. n k i m . n o / a u st rat t

15 TAUTR A M O NAS TE RY RUINS Monastery ruins from 1207 side by side idyllic Klostergården. www.fortids m in ne fo r e ninge n. no

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Read more at magasin.trondelag.com 34

AU S T R ÅT T FOR T German World War II coastal artillery site. www. n a sj o n a le f e st n i n g sve rk . n o / a u st ra at t


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R Ø R OS


TRONDHEIM - THE CITY IN THE MIDDLE When you arrive in Trondheim, the city’s 1,000-year history is obvious. The natural harbours of the Nidelva river formed the basis of what was once the country’s most powerful city. With the mighty Nidaros Cathedral on the riverbank, Trondheim has held the position as Northern Europe’s most important church town ever since the death of King Olav II in 1030. The Nidaros Cathedral, which is one of Norway's most important cultural buildings, towers over the city’s other buildings and is visible from virtually everywhere in the city.

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You will find contrasts in the narrow alleys and small house settlements that are reminiscent of poor conditions, just a stone’s throw away from wide Frenchlike avenues and impressive buildings of the city’s former notables. The intimate city centre of pedestrian streets, cobblestones and wooden buildings help make Trondheim an inclusive city, while the its cultural and commercial offerings compare favourably with larger European cities. The shopping and cultural scene is surrounded by city parks, and adjacent to the city is a large outdoor recreation reserve with endless opportunities for hiking and cross-country skiing. Whether your heart desires culture, food, biking or shopping, Trondheim has something to suit virtually everyone. Trondheim is a mecca for foodies with an annual food festival, the regular Farmers’ Market, small-scale breweries and coffee roasters, and several restaurants that rank among the best in Scandinavia. Local cuisine – traditional as well as contemporary – can be found at most venues where people meet, while at the recently established Trondheim Food Hall (Mathallen) you can enjoy the full taste of Trøndelag gathered under one roof.

Exciting and diverse shopping is on offer in the central city – or “Midtbyen” as it’s known - with clothing and interior from national, international and local brands and designers, various pop-up concepts and niche stores such as Seams, Bakklandet Blomster and the design collective Sukker. With a population of over 190,000, Trondheim ranks as Norway’s third largest city. This provides the basis for a rich cultural scene, including the flagship St. Olav Festival, the country’s largest religious and cultural festival. Specific festivals are devoted to most musical styles, including jazz, blues, chamber music, electronic music and world music. The main sites in Trondheim include the Nidaros Cathedral, the Archbishop’s Palace, Ringve Music Museum and Rockheim – the national museum of popular music. In addition, there is a unique creative power in the city in the form of the strong business sector, exciting start-up milieu, the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) with more than 36,000 students, a world-leading research environment at SINTEF and Nobel Prize winners May-Britt and Edvard Moser, who represent the spearhead of the city’s strong specialist environment. Trondheim – a small city with big experiences! www.visittrondheim.no

Photos (from left): The Old Town Bridge (Jan Ove Iversen - overpari.no) | Rockheim (Harald Øren/Rockheim) Biking at Skansen (Marius Rua) | Sukker in historic Bakklandet 37


The historic wharves in Trondheim (Jan Ove Iversen - overpari.no) 38


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Photos, above: Kristiansten Fort (Jarle Hagen) Coffee walk (Fjørtoft & Five) Gourmet walk (Fjørtoft & Five) Lademoen Church (Jan Ove Iversen - overpari.no)


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EVENTS IN TRØNDELAG

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The residents of Trøndelag love to gather! Regardless of the season you visit, there is bound to be an outdoor theatrical performance, festival or market taking place somewhere in the region.

The most popular events include the St. Olav Festival (Olavsfestdagene), the Trøndelag Food Festival and the Pstereo Festival in Trondheim, The Saint Olav Festival (Olsokdagene) at Stiklestad featuring The Saint Olav Drama (Spelet om Heilag Olav), the annual winter market Rørosmartnan and the Steinkjer Festival. The St. Olav Festival in Trondheim is Norway’s largest church and cultural festival, each year presenting concerts by a mix of regional, national and international stars along with lectures, meetings and a historical market. This coincides with the Trøndelag Food Festival, featuring a wide range of food stalls, culinary courses and restaurants. You will find traditional music festivals in virtually every municipality throughout the region, while the locals of Fosen, Hitra and Frøya hold fishing festivals renowned for their great atmosphere.

During the annual Saint Olav Festival at Stiklestad, the area around the Stiklestad National Culture Centre is full of activities for the whole family in the daytime and The Saint Olav Drama in the evening, as well as wonderful concerts and exciting lectures. The Saint Olav Drama takes place on the actual battlefield where Olav Haraldsson fell in 1030. Other outdoor theatrical performances worth noting include “The Karolinerspel” in Tydal, “Pe-Torsa” in Lierne and “Elden” in Røros. There is also a strong tradition of markets in Trøndelag, as reflected by the annual Rørosmartnan, Rennebumartnan and Christmas markets in Trondheim and Røros, the regular Farmers’ Market and several other local markets. These are excellent places to look for local food, decorative arts and crafts, and increasingly more markets are focusing on local quality goods.

Photos (from left): Elden in Røros (Elden) | The St. Olav Festival (Cathrine Ruud) Pstereo Festival (Marius Rua) | The Farmers’ Market (Torleif Kvinnesland) | The Saint Olav Drama (Espen Storhaug) 43


2.-4. August 2018

#oifølelsen

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oimat.no

Photo: Torleif Kvinnesland / Oi! Trøndersk Mat og Drikke AS

Probably your favourite food festival


WH AT ' S ON ? K A RO L I N ER S PEL ET

| Tydal

| karolinerspelet.no

F EM UN DLØ PET S L ED DOG RACE

| Røros

| femundlopet.no

RØ RO S M A R T N A N

| Røros

| rorosmartnan.no

S A LT DA L S H Y T TA S K IEN ERN

| Oppdal

| enern.com/skienern

MARSIMARTNAN

| Levanger

| marsimartnan.no

15.-18.Mars |

S K R EI ( CO D) F ES T I VAL

| Rørvik

| skreifestivalen.no

15.-18.Mars |

WINTER CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL

| Røros

| vinterfestspill.no

09.-13. May |

TRONDHEIM JAZZ FESTIVAL

| Trondheim

| jazzfest.no

TO U R DE F RØYA ( C YCLIN G RACE)

| Frøya

| tourdefroya.no

VØ M M Ø L F ES T I VA L

| Verdal

| vommol.org

I N DERØY F ES T

| Inderøy

| inderoyfest.no

22.-23. June |

S T EI N K J ER F ES T I VA L

| Steinkjer

| steinkjerfestivalen.no

29. juni-30. June |

S TO K KØYA F ES T I VA L

| Stokkøya

| stokkoyafestival.no

29. juni-30. June |

S UL A F ES T I VA L

| Sula

| opplevsula.no

2.-3. July |

T RO N DH EI M RO C K S

| Trondheim

| trondheimconcerts.no

4.-8. July |

U T I H AV ET F ES T I VA L

| Mausundvær

| utihavet.no

13.-14. July |

T Y DA L F ES T I VA L

| Tydal

| tydalsfestivaln.no

13.-15. July |

B ES S A K ER F I S H I N G FES TIVAL

| Bessaker

| feskfestival.no

20.-21. July |

H O PS J Ø F ES T I VA L

| Hitra

| hopsjo.no

EL DEN

| Røros

| elden-roros.no

S A I N T O L AV DR A M A

| Stiklestad, Verdal

| stiklestad.no

26.-28. July |

H EI M F ES T I VA L

| Stadsbygd

| heimfestival.no

26.-29 July |

R Å K VÅG A N N O 1 9 3 0

| Råkvåg, Rissa

| raakvaag.no/anno-1930/

S T. O L AV `S F ES T I VA L

| Trondheim

| olavsfestdagene.no

O I T RØ N DEL AG F O O D AN D

| Trondheim

| tronderskmatfestival.no

COA S TA L C U LT U R E DAY S

| Bjugn

| stiftelsenfrohavet.no

10.-12. August |

R EN N EB U M A R T N A N

| Rennebu

| rennebumartnan.no

16.-18. August |

NAMSOSMARTNAN

| Namsos

| namsosmartnan.no

16.-18. August |

PS T ER EO F ES T I VA L

| Trondheim

| pstereo.no

23.-26. August |

PE-TO R S A PL AY

| Lierne

| pe-torsa.no

H EL L B LU ES F ES T I VAL

| Hell, Stjørdal

| bluesinhell.no

01. September |

DYNAFIT TROLLHEIMEN FJELLMARATON

| Oppdal

| enern.com/fjellmaraton

5.–7. October |

FÅ R I K Å L F ES T I VA L

| Oppdal

| fjellogfaarikaalfestivalen.no

7.–11. November |

H I L M A R F ES T I VA L

| Steinkjer

| hilmarfestivalen.no

A DV EN T AT EG G E M US EU M

| Steinkjer

| eggemuseum.no

6.-9. December |

RØ RO S C H R I S TM A S M ARK ET

| Røros

| julemarkedroros.no

8.-9. December |

C H R I S TM A S M A R K ET AT S TIK LES TAD

| Stiklestad, Verdal

| stiklestad.no

T RO N DH EI M C H R I S TM AS M ARK ET

| Trondheim

| julemarkedet-trondheim.no

18.-20. January | 9.-4. February | 20.–24. February | 24. February | 28. February -3. Mars |

26. May | 31.mai-2. June | 7.-10. June |

25. July-4. August | 25., 27.-29. July |

28. July-04. August | 2.-4. August |

B R EW ERY F ES T I VA L 3.-5. August |

30. Aug. - 02. Sept. |

2. December |

Mid December |

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TRULY TOUCHING EXPERIENCES Save the date. This is something you don’t want to miss.

28 JULY - 4 AUGUST

TICKETS & INFO

FOLLOW US

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THE MILLENNIUM CITY OF TRONDHEIM A journey in time in the Suhm building Over the centuries, fires and rezoning in Trondheim have erased most traces of the medieval town, so archaeological finds of houses and streets provide an exceptional starting point for recreating the townscape of 7-8 centuries ago. Archaeologists have been undertaking excavations in Trondheim for more than a century. Houses and streets from the city’s 1,000-year history have been uncovered, and many ancient artefacts have been carefully excavated and interpreted. Besides archaeological finds, written sources and pieces of information from buildings that have survived the ravages of time elsewhere have also proved useful. While the archaeologists are continually providing new material about Trondheim’s history, it’s worth noting that just 4-5 per cent of the urban area has been systematically surveyed. Consequently, we can expect many exciting developments in the years ahead. In some cases, the results of the archaeological excavations will lead to new conclusions and assessments about the city’s history! The Medieval Trondheim exhibition enables you to stroll through the city’s history. Starting in the Viking era, you can go on a journey through more than 1,000 years! Follow the city’s development from the very beginning at Kaupangen by the mouth of the river Nidelven to the ‘’great’’ medieval town of Nidaros. The exhibition presents items used in everyday life in medieval Nidaros, most of which date from the 13th and 14th centuries. Entire streets have been recreated, providing a unique glimpse into the everyday life in medieval Nidaros. Join us on a journey back in time!

RINGVE BOTANICAL GARDEN N T N U’s blo om i n g at t rac t i on i n Lade Beautiful plants, crops, historic garden culture and evolution. Ringve Botanical Garden contains all this and more. The university’s botanical garden has a wonderful elevated location overlooking the city and fjord. The garden surrounds the historic Ringve manor house, and one of its many highlights is the Historic Park, which was originally planted in English landscape style in the 1860s as the manor house garden. Colourful flowerbeds bloom in the springtime before the green leaves return on the majestic deciduous trees during the summer. Beautiful and scientific complement each other at a botanical garden. The Systematic Garden is designed so visitors can experience some of the oldest groups of plants on earth, such as ferns and cryptogams, and follow the evolutionary paths

towards the flowering plants’ intricate adaptations to bees and the other insects which pollinate them. Equally fascinating is a stroll around the large pond at Ringve. Representing the Arctic Ocean, the path around it leads you through changing forests planted to correspond with their geographic distribution. From April to October, you can stimulate your memories and senses while walking along the path in the Old Perennials, which features collections of colourful and fragrant traditional garden plants from Trøndelag. The refined Renaissance Garden is also well worth a visit. You can combine your trip to the Ringve Botanical Garden with a visit to the Ringve Music Museum in the historic Ringve manor house, and grab a bite to eat at Café Victoria.

Ad re s s e : Erli n g S ka k ke s g t . 4 7, Tro n dhe i m | ntnu.no/v ite nska psm use e t Photo Suhm: Trond Sverre Skevik | Photo Ringve: Åge Hojem

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TRØNDEL AG F O R C HI LD RE N OASEN S VØMMEO G MILJØS ENT ER

DO KTO RTJ Ø N N A F R ILUF T S PA R K

Northern Europe’s largest water park in a mountain, with water slides and a diving tower.

Perfect for summer family fun. Children can try paddling, log rafting, nature trails and more.

www.oasen-namsos.no

NAMSOS

www.rorosmuseet.no/doktortjonna

RØROS

EGGE MUS EU M

N A M S S KO G A N FA M ILIE PA R K

Open air museum with animals and exhibitions in a child-friendly area.

One of Norway’s largest and best wildlife and activity parks.

www.eggemuseum.no

STEINKJER

RYPETOPPE N ADVENTUREPARK Climbing park, canoe and SUP rental, zip-lines. www.familieparken.no

NAMSSKOGAN

H ØY T O G LAV T www.rypetoppen.no

Climbing park near Trondheim city centre. Experience an exciting world from the treetops!

MERÅKER

www.hoytlavt.no

TRONDHEIM

O PPLEV OP P DA L Children’s rafting, wilderness camp and outdoor tournament. www.opplevoppdal.no

S T IKLE S TA D S UM M E R Exciting activities for young and old. Be a Viking for a day and learn what life was like in the Viking Age.

OPPDAL

BA RNAS NAT U RVERD EN In the realm of the Jutul – north of the Dovre Mountains and east of Trollheimen – you will discover The Children’s Natural World, a whole universe for young hiking enthusiasts! www.tt.no/barnas-naturverden

RENNEBU

www.stiklestad.no 48

VERDAL


TRØNDE L AG F OR C HI LD RE N S VERRE SB ORG FOLK EMU SEU M

T R O N DH E IM M A R IT IM E M US E UM

Be a knight for a day, meet the animals and go on a guided historic walk.

Take the ship rat Sivert’s seamen’s test and check out exhibitions on the steamship and sailing ship eras. www.trondheimsjofart.no

TRONDHEIM

V IT E N S E N T E R E T Have fun with science and technology. An oasis for explorers of all ages and the place for aha experiences!

www.vitensenteret.com www.sverresborg.no

TRONDHEIM

TRONDHEIM

NIDAROS CATHEDRAL AND THE ARCHBISHOP'S PALACE

NTNU VITENSK A P SMU SEET

Go exploring at the Nidaros Cathedral and see Trondheim from the top of the tower (min. age 8) then see the King’s Crown at the Crown Regalia!

Museum of natural and cultural history with exhibitions on science, archaeology and cultural history.

www.nidarosdomen.no

www.ntnu.no/vitenskapsmuseet TRONDHEIM

TRONDHEIM

PIRBAD ET

R O C KH E IM

Norway’s largest indoor water park with proximity to and view of the fjord, weather and wind.

An exciting place for the whole family with musical activities for young and old.

www.pirbadet.no

TRONDHEIM

BARNAS RI N GVE Instrument workshop, courses and guided tours for children in wonderful surroundings at the Ringve Music Museum. www.ringve.no

TRONDHEIM

www.rockheim.no 49

TRONDHEIM


Orkla Industrimuseum www.oi.no

Norsk Døvemuseum www.norsk-dovemuseum.no

Sverresborg Trøndelag Folkemuseum www.sverresborg.no

Rørosmuseet www.rorosmuseet.no

Museet Kystens Arv www.kystensarv.no

Kystmuseet i Sør-Trøndelag www.kystmuseet.no

Trondheim kunstmuseum www.trondheimkunstmuseum.no

Photo:

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Trondhjems Sjøfartsmuseum www.trondheimsjofart.no

Ringve Musikkmuseum www.ringve.no

www.nkim.no


UNIQUE CULTURAL EXPERIENCES

Rockheim National museum of popular music www.rockheim.no

Experience the past Live in the present Dream of the future

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ON TRACK TO SPECIAL TIME

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Some people want to experience the sunset over the Trondheimsfjord and the bountiful cultural landscape of the interior. Others seek deep forests and river valleys. Or perhaps you want to travel slowly through Trondheim? Regardless of where you are going, a train journey offers you time to relax and enjoy.

Apart from being disconnected from the tasks and rhythm of everyday life, what does having a “holiday” entail? For many, it’s about being free; free to rediscover the time and rhythm you want – right here, right now. Consequently, for many people, their trip to Trøndelag starts and finishes on the train. With train services from Røros and Oppdal via Trondheim to Steinkjer and Storlien, the Trøndelag and Røros lines take you through much of Trøndelag, with a wealth of interesting places to stop at along the way. During the journey, you can look out the window and enjoy the constantly changing panorama, light and moods.

If you have seen enough and want to digest your experiences, you have plenty of time to read a good book or the newspaper, listen to your favourite music, play a game, chat with your travel companion or continue an unfinished knitting project ... The list is endless and it’s your time. For many, travelling by train is the most convenient option – if you can’t or don’t want to drive – and the environmental footprint is minimal. Trains allow you to travel effortlessly from village to city centre and fjord to mountain – and back again or continue to your next destination. Allow time. Take the train!

Read more at www.nsb.no

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FLOCK LIFE

When the first Norwegians came to Trøndelag in search of food, they found life in the sea, fjords, lakes, forests and mountains.

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A flock of sheep is grazing on a hilly headland on the coast of Trøndelag. The lambing season has just finished and a few dozen small, grey lambs have joined the flock of wild sheep. They stay close to their mothers and bask in the sun as they get some food. A huge golden eagle watches on from a rocky outpost just a stone’s throw away from the flock. The king of the air sails toward the flock and hones in on the nearest lamb. It hangs there, floating on the air currents just a few metres above the defenceless animal. It assesses the size and weight, decides and soars towards the next lamb, before pausing to reconsider. “That freaked me out,” says the wild sheep farmer Eskil Sandvik from Frøya. He saw the entire chase unfold. “My stomach dropped. This was a young eagle. There are two types; they are either sceptical or a daring buffoon. A buffoon can go berserk among the young lambs and eradicate an entire litter within a short time, without getting any food. Consequently, it’s hard to keep one’s cool and not try to chase the eagle away. Nature will also take its course,” says Sandvik.

lambs. If the ewes feel threatened, they are willing to leave their lambs to fend for themselves,” explains Sandvik. He explains how the wild sheep help to maintain the natural vegetation on the relatively treeless island. “The Sitka spruce that grows here was introduced, and the tree planting has threatened to displace the original vegetation. The flocks of sheep help to battle the spruce trees by eating the budding trees and allowing the island to preserve its the unique bare and windswept landscape.”

Sandvik is not alone in letting nature take its course, as Norwegians have done for thousands of years. No less than 3,800 wild sheep graze on the rugged island of Frøya on the coast of Trøndelag, summer and winter. These reclusive sheep are of an ancient lineage, which has survived world wars and industrial agriculture. Sandvik guides us across the overgrazed pasture on the way to one of his flocks. As we approach the sheep, we soon realise that these are not ordinary clads of wool. “If we walk with the wind behind us, we won’t get close to them,” explains the sheep farmer. “They will run away.” Sheep can certainly run. Even without getting wind of people, the flock keeps its distance. The sheep run around us, before stopping to glance in our direction and then running past us at full speed. The photographer also moves quickly, as the term photo chase takes on a new meaning. “Wild sheep prefer to be left alone in peace. If we interfere with them, they are unable to eat, give birth and feed their

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“If we walk with the wind behind us, we won’t get close to them.”

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“We have a legacy that cannot be described or taken from us, even though throughout history many have tried.”

Sandvik and the locals of Frøya are but a few of the many Norwegians who live right beside their pantry. Proximity to the cycle of nature and a respect for the food has been passed down through generations and has become part of these farmers’ soul. In a country where just five or six per cent of the landscape is suitable for cultivation, it goes without saying that those who have survived here never give up and can exploit the natural resources to their fullest. The combination of stubbornness and moderation has become a part of the Norwegian national soul, just as the image of small farms on mountainsides has become the symbol of the nation. In places like Frøya, small-scale production, local produce and traditional food is more than a trend. “We have traced records from relatives right back to the oldest church register for Røros, dating from 1540,” says Eva Nordfjell. Eva is a Sami reindeer herder, with her own processing facility in Røros. “But my relatives have lived off reindeer since time immemorial,” she says. Archaeological finds show that the Sami have lived in Norway for 2000-2500 years. The earliest written records of the people were made in 98 A.D. by the Roman historian Tacitus. The Sami originally hunted

reindeer, and it was not until the 17th century that they began to tame large herds and follow them many hundreds of kilometres from summer pastures to winter pastures then back again. They practiced a semi-nomadic existence, moving their place of residence when the food source moved. Today, most of the Sami live in the same houses year-round and use modern means of transport to herd their reindeer. “We have a legacy that cannot be described or taken from us,” says Eva Nordfjell. As with all traditional production of food, the ancient methods of preserving and storing food have played an important role in the Sami culture. Drying, salting, curing and smoking of meat all take place in the production and retail building of Nordfjell’s company, Rørosrein. People come here from afar to buy fresh and preserved reindeer meat. The concept of eating reindeer meat is quite natural to most Norwegians, but can often pose challenges for Americans. The key word is “Rudolf”. “Reindeer are not for decoration, but for food. People get an a-ha experience when they realize they can eat something they have a close relationship with – that we ‘know’ the food.”

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SUPPLEMENTING ONE’S INCOME

On the other hand, Americans love reindeer. Eva was once visited by a top general from across the Atlantic. He was accompanied by a large entourage including security guards. He was extremely keen to experience reindeer up close, and changed the official itinerary for his visit to Norway so he could travel to Røros. Eva harnessed the reindeer to the sled, and took him on a sled ride from right outside the gamma (turf hut) set up to receive visitors. Midway into the trip, a cross-country skier approached at full speed in the adjacent ski trail. “This frightened the buck, who raced up to the icy ski trail at a wild pace! I thought to myself ‘This won’t go well and I will end up being sued’. The buck suddenly stopped and turned around. The herd instinct kicked in and he wanted to return to the herd. He raced straight back towards the herd at 50 kilometres per hour and crashed straight into the gate, causing the general to fly off the sled,” says Eva. But the general shone like a star and described it as a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Instead of being sued, Eva received a hand-written thank you card from the general in the post.

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Like many others who live by animal husbandry, Eva cannot support herself solely by selling food. Most people buy affordable food at the supermarket. This explains why Eva supplements her income by offering Sami cultural experiences. It’s worth noting that “domesticated reindeer” are not particularly tame. Each autumn the reindeer are domesticated, but as soon as they return to their summer pastures their natural instincts take over and the reindeer become wild again. “Building trust takes time and patience, so we take our coffee down to the enclosure and sit there with the reindeer who are about to be domesticated,” says Eva. Although she is the first to admit that her chosen occupation requires work from morning to night all year round, she says the lifestyle is worth the toil. “We can convey the experience of the sounds of nature, the sound of the hooves in the snow the calm – and almost wild – animal; the tranquillity of nature.”

Photos (from left): Eva Nordfjell | Domesticated reindeer Dried reindeer heart | Photo (p. 54-59): Jarle Hagen


CULINARY KINGDOM

It’s no exaggeration to say that a region right in the heart of Norway was extremely fortunate when Mother Nature allocated her resources. This region stretches from mild, humid coastal landscapes to cold, dry plateaus and mountains. There is something extremely special about the soil, climate and sea currents, not to mention the long, bright summer nights. Throughout history, people have cultivated, gathered and learned what the soil and the sea will provide. This region offers perhaps the world’s best locations for Norway lobster, crabs, scallops and blue mussels. The fish and seafood harvested here is exported worldwide. Specialties from the land include free-range pork and pigs fed on a diet of mushrooms, chicken, wild sheep and organic beef. Don’t forget the vegetables, berries and game, and everything else you can imagine from the sea to the mountains. You will discover world-class produce and proud food traditions here, with more than 200 producers of food and beverage specialties alongside processing on a larger scale. Trøndelag is referred to as Norway’s leading food region, not least as a pioneering region for organic milk and meat. Chefs and restaurants are proud of the local produce and use it in new ways.

Trøndelag boasts several world-class chefs and restaurants (see page 63). For visitors with a curious palate, Trøndelag will offer one highlight after the other. Focus on food Visitors to the region will soon see that food plays an important role for many in Trøndelag. You will discover a multitude of culinary experiences – at restaurants and cafés, farm shops and accommodation providers. Culinary experiences often add that little extra to the journey, and put Trøndelag in a different class from other destinations. Whether you go on a local food safari in Røros, rent a bike and ride from one farm-food outlet to another on The Golden Road (Den Gyldne Omvei), stay overnight in a lighthouse with a picnic basket, attend the cod festival or go crab fishing – a whole host of culinary experiences await you in Trøndelag.

Photos (from left): Trøndelag Food Festival - Grindal Ysteri (Wil Lee-Wright) | Local food (Marius Rua) Trøndelag Food festival - Mosbøen Gård (Wil Lee-Wright) | Sea urchins (Jarle Hagen) 60


t

FOOD IN TRØNDELAG

Trøndelag has more than 200 local producers of food and beverage specialties. The Trøndelag Food Festival and Brewery Festival in Trondheim on 2-4 August 2018 is the highlight of the year, with 150 exhibitors and around 200,000 visitors. Craft brewing is extremely strong with more than 30 breweries. The Farmers’ Market Trøndelag is the largest in Norway (based on turnover). Trøndelag accounts for about 80 per cent of Norway’s scallop exports. The world’s best areas for Norway lobsters, crabs, scallops and blue mussels can be found here. Grøntvedt Pelagic in Ørland ferments more than 90 per cent of all the herring consumed in Scandinavia. Røros and Rørosmat are among the country’s strongest brands when it comes to local food. Trøndelag is a leading region for organic milk and meat, accounting for 27 per cent of the organic farmland in Norway and 37 per cent of the country’s organic dairy cattle. Norwegian Salmon is internationally renowned for its high quality. Six of the 10 largest aquaculture municipalities in Norway are in Trøndelag. Trøndelag accounts for about 25% of Norway's agricultural production.

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PLATE TALK

Photo previously published in the food magazine NORD

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By now, you probably appreciate that there is no shortage of good produce and local products in Trøndelag. The food producers work closely with Trøndelag’s restaurant and hotels, and many of the best meals in Norway are served in Trøndelag. The prestigious restaurant guide, White Guide Nordic, features no fewer than six restaurants from Trøndelag:

T H E C R A F T B R E W E R S H AV E A R R I V E D

In Trondheim, you will find long timers such as Credo and To Rom og Kjøkken, along with newer additions to the city’s food scene such as Røst Teaterbistro, Folk & Fe, Bula Bistro and Fagn. Outside Trondheim, Buøy Gård at Salsbruket in Nærøy has gained a place on the list. A visit to any of these will virtually guarantee a culinary experience to please even the most discerning of diners. The Head Chef at NordØst in Trondheim, Håkon Solbakk, was in the Norwegian Culinary Team that won the gold medal in culinary art at the Culinary Olympics. The Norwegian team won the competitions for both hot and cold dishes in 2016, meaning you are in safe hands with Solbakk as your chef.

The trend of craft beer has long since reached Trøndelag. You can enjoy quality beers from more than 30 local brewers on tap or by the bottle. Those that stand out from the pack include Klostergården on the island of Tautra and Austmann in Trondheim, Munkebyøl in Levanger, Røros Bryggeri og Mineralvannfabrikk (pictured above) and Stjørdalsbryggeriet. The latter is famous for preserving the Viking tradition of brewing beer in smoked malt. Trondheim pubs that serves beer brewed on site: The pioneer Mikrobryggeriet, EC Dahls Bryggeri and newcomer ØX Tap Room in the basement of the restaurant Frati on the main square.

Photos (from left): Soup from Røst (Jarle Hagen) | Craft beer from Røros Bryggeri og Mineralvannfabrikk (Tom Gustavsen)

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R ES T A U R A N T S IN T R Ø N D ELA G C R ED O Serves multi-course menus based on the best local produce from Trøndelag. www. re st a u ra nt c re d o . n o FAG N Inspiration menu and fine dining on the ground floor, and restaurant and cocktail bar upstairs. www. f a g n . n o FOL K OG FE Serves tasty and rustic bistro meals based on local produce. www. f o lko g f e - b i st ro . n o RØ S T T EAT ER BI S T RO Serves set menus designed with your experience in mind and with respect for the produce and producers. www. ro st b i st ro . n o TO ROM OG K J Ø K K EN A wealth of quality produce from Trøndelag prepared with inspiration from the Mediterranean. www.t o ro m o g k j o k ke n . n o A N S N ES BRYG G ER An exciting menu based on the best seasonal produce. www. a n sn e sb r y g g e r. c o m BU ØY G Å R D Tasty local food in wonderful surroundings. www. b u o y g a rd . n o KON G S VOL D FJ EL D S T U E Culinary experiences in the realm of the senses. www. ko n g sv o ld . n o R ES TAU R A N T N ORV EG Serves meals based on local produce from fishermen, meat producers and farm-based cheese producers. www. k y st m u se e t n o r ve g . n o S TOK KØYA S J Ø S EN T ER Distinctive restaurant serving first-rate meals, especially seafood and shellfish. www. st o k ko y. n o V ER T S H U S ET RØ ROS Gourmet restaurant and brewery in historic surroundings. www.ve rt sh u se t ro ro s. n o ØY N A Serves local food accompanied by panoramic views of the Trondheimsfjord. www. o y n a . n o

Photos (from left): Berkel og Bar (Marius Rua) | Credo (Geir Mogen) Credo (Geir Mogen) | Scallops (Hyggelaget) 65


THE GOLDEN DRINK We are greeted at the Inderøy farm, Berg Gård, by Svein Berfjord, a sturdy chap with a special interest in traditional food and drink. He shows us around the farm, where his family has long raised lambs and freerange pigs, produced cured meats and honey and much more. He shows us the farm shop where they sell their products. The next stop is the on-site restaurant serving food produced on the farm. He then takes us into the darkness, to the distillery and maturation room, where we taste self-produced aquavit and distillates of rowanberries and spruce shoots. “We have produced caraway here since 2001, virtually all of which is sold for aquavit production. Back in 2003 we had the idea of producing our own aquavit.

We produce all the food we serve on the farm, but did not have our own spirit. Since the production of aquavit and caraway has strong traditions in Inderøy, we thought it was time to put back on Inderøy back on the aquavit map,” says Berfjord. Inderøy Brenneri (distillery) was founded in 2015, aquavit formulas tested and spirits were produced. After achieving success with their “Inderøy Aquavit No. 1” and “Inderøy Taffel Aquavit”, Berfjord now has a new goal: “We want to develop a ‘pure’ Inderøy aquavit, flavoured exclusively by plants from Inderøy, such as dandelions, spruce shoots, bird cherry blossom and rowanberries. It will offer tastes you have never experienced,” says the farmer and distiller enthusiastically.

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A F E W FA C T S A B O U T A Q U AV I T

Aquavit has been a traditional spirit in Trøndelag for MEL L Oearliest M O V Ewritten R S K R Iaccount FT centuries. The of aquavit dates from 1531, and describes an aquavit sent from Bergen to Norway’s last archbishop, Olav Engelbrektsson, at Steinvikholm Castle near Stjørdal. Aquavit’s distinctive flavour comes from herbs and spices added after being distilled from potatoes or grain. The main spice is always caraway, while other spices include anise, star anise, dill, fennel, cardamom, vanilla, coriander and lemon peel. For an aquavit to be called Norwegian aquavit, it must be matured in oak barrels for at least six months. Linie aquavit is named after the tradition of sending oak barrels of aquavit by ship to Australia, crossing the equator (“linie”) twice before being bottled. Photos p. 66-67: Inderøy aquavit | Svein Berfjord Above: Aquavit barrel | Below: Aquavit ship | Right: The distillery (Photo: Jarle Hagen)

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FO OD REGION FOOD H AL L S / F O O D SAL ES O U T LET S 1

R AVNKLOA F IS K E HALL Trondheims traditional fish market, with a wide range of fresh seafood. www.ravnkl o a. n o

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SMØR E HALLE N Food hall with local produce and an eatery. www.fa c e b o o k. c o m / s m o r e h al l e n

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S M A K OG BEH AG OP P DA L Traditional tastes with a new twist. www. o p p d a lsm at . n o

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C H EF M AT H A L L S T EI N K J ER The focus is on great culinary experiences. www. c h e f st e i n k j e r. n o

H I T R A G Å R D S M AT Cheese factory and farm shop with gourmet meat and award-winning cheeses. www. h i t ra g a rd sm at . n o

FARM SH O PS 5

FARME R S ’ M ARK E T ( B O NDE NS M ARK E D ) Local food from small-scale producers. www.bo n de ns m ar ke d. n o

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THE GOLDE N ROAD ( DE N GYLDNE O MV EI ) Farm shops in a beautiful cultural landscape in Innherred. www.dg o . no

1 0 OR K L A DA L Y S T ER I Cheese factory and farm shop with award-winning cheeses. www. o rk la d a ly st e ri . n o

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GAL ÅVO LDE N GÅRD Farm food from Røros. www.g alaav o l de n . no

1 1 K LOS T ERG Å R D EN Farm shop with wide selection in beautiful surroundings at Tautra. www. k lo st e rg a rd e nt a u t ra . n o

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KALSA GÅRDS B AK E RI Farm bakery with character. www.k als a. n o

12 VA L BERG S L EK T S G Å R D Self-service shop selling seasonal vegetables. www.vi si t v a lb e rg . n o

BE E R AND BR E W E RI E S 13 AUSTMANN www.a ustm ann. no

21 T EV ELT U N ET FJ EL L BRYG G ER I www.t e v e lt u n e t . n o

14 E .C . DAHLS B RYGGE RI www.ec d ah l s . n o

22 N A M DA L S BRYG G ER I ET www. n a m d a lsb r y g g e ri e t . n o

15 GUL ATI N G Ø LUTS ALG www.g ulatin g. n e t/ tr o ndh e im

2 3 S K J EN K ES TOVA www. sko ro va sm at . n o / sk j e n ke st o va

16 TRONDHJE M M IK RO B RYGGE RI www.tmb . n o

24 OP P DA L BRYG G H U S www. o p p d a lb r y g g h u s. n o

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STOKKØY B RYGGE RI www.stokko y b r ygge r i. no

25 R EI N S K LOS T ER www. re i n sk lo st e r. n o

18 I NDE RØY GÅRDS B RYGGE RI www.i g b . no

26 RØ ROS BRYG G ER I OG M I N ER A LVA N N FA BR I KK www. ro ro sb r y g g e ri . n o

19 KLOSTE RGÅRDE N HÅNDB RYGGE RI www.k l o s te r gar de ntau tr a. n o

2 7 S K A N C K EBUA www. b e rg st a d e n sh ot e l. n o

20 STJØR DALS B RYGGE RIE T www.stj o r dal s b r ygge r ie t. no

28 BER K EL & BA R www.ve rt sh u se t . n o

Read more at magasin.trondelag.com 70


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THE INNER LIFE CULTURAL HERITAGE, NATURE AND FOOD IN INNHERRED Rolling pastures and fields surrounded by gently rounded hills and mountains. The interior of Trøndelag is often compared with the Trønder himself: friendly, welcoming and at times dramatic.

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“No, these are the best mountains in the north, perhaps in the entire country. They are huge, they are rich, there are fjords and landscape in the most delightful interaction.” (Aasmund O. Vinje following his visit to Inderøy in 1860.)

The area Vinje visited is on the shores of the Trondheimsfjord, with fertile soil and a favourable climate. The farmers cultivate and nurture the soil, as they have done for more than 1,000 years. Innherred’s beautiful cultural landscapes warmly welcome you to sweeping views of the rolling cornfields, world-class culinary experiences and an opportunity to relive the Viking Age. The distances between fjord and mountain, town and wilderness are short. The area is popular for cycling, hiking, canoeing and fishing – and perfect for anyone who wants to explore deep caves and forests. S H O R T C U T T O G R E AT TA S T E S

With its proximity to wonderful produce, The Golden Road (Den Gyldne Omvei) in Inderøy is a popular destination for visitors from near and far. This picturesque detour from the E6 highway will top up all your senses. Along the scenic route through golden corn fields, recognized food producers offer farm produce such as free-range pork and lamb and an abundance of fresh vegetables. You will also discover award-winning cheeses, jams, cured meats, meat products, bread, cakes and much more. You can also buy something to quench your thirst, such as kombucha (fermented tea), craft beer and Inderøy aquavit based on local production of caraway and other herbs. Several of the farms on this route have on-site restaurants and cafés serving the food they have produced with a combination of tender love and care and knowledge. As well as food and drink, this route also features a host of art and craft galleries. Art enthusiasts should not miss the Nils Aas Kunstverksted (art studio) in the village of Straumen.

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THE SAINT KING

Many a significant event in Norwegian history has occurred in Innherred. The best known is obviously the Battle of Stiklestad in 1030, which claimed the life of King Olav the Holy. The battle is re-enacted every year in The Saint Olav Drama (Spelet om Heilag Olav) during The Saint Olav Festival (Olsokdagene). The Egge Museum conveys the history of the chieftains and some of Olav Haraldsson’s worst rivals, while the monks of Munkeby represent the ensuing religious transition. The history is kept alive. Like elsewhere in Trøndelag, Stiklestad offers wonderful culinary experiences in a historic landscape. If you are seeking an exciting inner and outer journey, you can go on a pilgrimage on the St. Olav Path from Selånger in Sweden to the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim. Along the route, you will find local food and lodgings in historic surroundings.

Photos | p.72-75: Husfrua Farm in Inderøy (Jarle Hagen) From left: Bedroom at Husfrua (Jarle Hagen) | Eggen Summer Mountain Farm (Eggenseteren) | Viking (Espen Storhaug) Cycling (Tom Gustavsen) 74


T R AV E L T I P S Stiklestad – the cradle of Norwegian history. Pay a visit to the site of the battle in 1030 and learn why the battle took place specifically here. Levanger – the town of wooden architecture. Experience Art Nouveau in Trøndelag’s first mercantile town after Trondheim. Pick Up Café – Discover this pastel-coloured retro gem par excellence in the Vuddu Valley featuring old cars and a candle factory. The Falstad Centre – Originally a children’s home, later a World War II prisoner-of-war camp and now a national centre for human rights. The Golden Road (Den Gyldne Omvei) – Take this charming detour off the E6 and visit distinguished local food and beverage producers, Nils Aas’ Art Studio and choose between accommodation options with character. Sami culture – You can experience authentic Coastal Sami impulses at Saemien Sijte in Snåsa. The Bøla reindeer – See the famous 6000-year-old rock carving. Visit a summer mountain farm – From June to August, you can choose between 20 or more open summer mountain farms in the municipality of Snåsa. Biking and hiking – Follow the gravel road to the world’s largest garden chair at Oftenåsen and be rewarded with a spectacular view of the Trondheimsfjord and Steinkjer, or experience genuine wilderness in the Blåfjella-Skjækerfjella National Park. Ride round the Borgenfjord – Rent a bike or an e-bike from Innherred Tourist Information Centre and experience the Golden Road on two wheels. Festivals – The Steinkjer Festival in June, The St Olav Drama in July and the Hilmar Festival in November. Bathing – Choose between the Dampsaga Bad water park and the town beach in Steinkjer or one of the many beaches by the fjord or sea.

Read more at www.visitinnherred.com 75


Photo: Jarle Hagen 76


“ A d e t our can gi ve yo u th e v e ry b e st i n l i fe …”

(DEN GYLDNE OMVEI)

TH E G O LDEN ROAD INDERØY

Art, crafts, accommodation, dining, attractions, cycling, hiking, shopping, marine life and fjord fishing

www.dgo.no 77


Reindeer in SnĂĽsa (Olgeir Haug) 78


CRACKLING ATMOSPHERE

The frost mist seeps through the air and dissolves to the sound of leather soles creaking against the hard snow. A lasso takes aim and then surrounds a set of frisky reindeer antlers. The eternal battle between man and animal is underway again.

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“Although many have a relationship with Rudolf, reindeer are not for decoration.� 80


Having reindeer as their livelihood has developed and shaped humans for thousands of years. For the Southern Sami in Røros, Snåsa and Røyrvik, the year involves cycles. The reindeer are moved from one pasture to another, herded and eventually slaughtered to create food, tools and clothes. That was the case 3,000 years ago, before thoughts of lifestyle choices evolved, and it’s still the case today. “My relatives have lived off reindeer since time immemorial,” says Eva Nordfjell from Røros. Eva comes from a Southern Sami family. She and her husband run Rørosrein. In addition to living off reindeer husbandry, they offer visitors a glimpse into life as a Southern Sami. “Although many have a relationship with Rudolf, reindeer are not for decoration. They are primarily for food, which we have learned to live with to survive,” says Eva. They sell processed products of reindeer in their farm shop, while in their gamme (turf hut) they offer unique experiences combining storytelling and food. The focus is on reindeer husbandry and the Sami culture – or more specifically the Southern Sami culture. It’s fascinating to hear first-hand about a lifestyle that on the one hand is so rooted in history, but on the other hand is so vibrant. The leather soles may have been replaced by thermo boots, but the annual cycle remains largely unchanged.

Photos (from left): Eva Nordfjell from Rørosrein Old houses near Slegghaugan in Røros (Jarle Hagen)

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ALL THAT GLITTERS IS NOT GOLD

The year is 1644. The farmer’s son Hans Aasen from Härjedalen, which at the time was part of Norway, owned neither land nor property and was on his way to Trondheim to seek work. He had reached Brekken when he encountered a herd of reindeer. Driven by hunger, he shot one of the reindeer. In its death struggle, the reindeer kicked the moss to uncover what turned out to be copper ore. There were huge deposits of the ore. Within a short time, large-scale mining operations were underway and there was a huge demand for labour. The mining town of Røros grew slowly but surely and for the next 333 years mining was the lifeblood of the people of Røros. Just as nature formed the basis for the Sami and reindeer husbandry, it also lay the foundation for establishing a town in the wilderness, high up in the mountains. The most characteristic feature of Røros today is the more than 100 listed wooden houses. Most of them were built in the 18th and 19th centuries by miners with limited funds, whose aim was as much functionality in the least possible space. Domesticated animals were a natural part of everyday life, so many of the houses have backyards and some even have stables. The houses are now home to cafés, galleries and shops selling local quality food, art and crafts. A few families still live in the old houses, which is reminiscent of times gone by. The place on UNESCO’s World Heritage List is today taken for granted, but a pulse is beating under the skin than can make Røros the envy of many a larger place. The business community and tourism sector in Røros have paved the way for sustainable tourism, which has brought international recognition to the small town. Those working here have completed courses in local history and world heritage, so most people you meet can “guide” you through your visit to Røros.


THE BLUE HOUR IN

RØROS

It’s February and it’s freezing. We head out into the Røros cold to experience the legendary winter light. As we wander up to the huge slag heaps, we have on more than one occasion gazed half envious through windows and caught a glimpse of the warming light from the fireplaces and candles. As we reach the top of one of the slag heaps (known locally as Slegghaugan), a blue light suddenly colours the snow, the rooftops and the church... the entire mining town is now a magical tone of blue. We are experiencing the evocative Blue Hour, which occurs daily at dawn and dusk. Neither dark nor light, Røros has a bewitching expression in the blue light. It’s like we are entering another world, where the cold no longer matters, when the silence is broken by the bells ringing on a passing horse-drawn sleigh. Anyone who experiences this while wrapped up in a sleigh can really discover the delights of this winter wonderland.

Some days are like an everlasting transition between sunrise and sunset, as you catch a glimpse of the red sky on the horizon in the east, then later in the west. After a cold day of adventure in the winter landscape, many head inside to the hottest of the hot: Røros Bath & Wellness (Bad og Velvære). Indoor and outdoor pools are accompanied by a Jacuzzi overlooking the church. The water temperature is 38°C, and the spa offers treatments to sooth cold bodies. If you are in Røros to experience winter cold and legendary light – or the joys on offer in summer – wander the streets and discover the many historic buildings. You will find warmth in the many cafés, restaurants and shops, where you will sense the mining town’s historic life oozing from the timber walls.

Photos (from left): Slegghaugan and Røros church (Geir Tønset/Destinasjon Røros) | Kaffestuggu (Tom Gustavsen) Kalsa Gårdsbakeri (Tom Gustavsen) 82


WORTH KNOWING ABOUT RØROS The Røros region stretches from Nord-Østerdalen in Hedmark County to the south of Trøndelag. It also borders Sweden. The region includes the Femundsmarka and Forollhogna national parks, and is an eldorado for nature-based experiences such as hiking, fishing, cycling, horse riding and dog-sledding – genuine nature-based experiences year-round. We offer cultural events and activities in summer as well as winter, proud hosts, world-class local food, historical attractions and the Mining Town of Røros as a UNESCO World Heritage site. Go on a guided tour of Røros town centre, ending up at the national landmark Røros Church – Bergstadens Ziir or into the Olavsgruva mine, where you will be taken 50 m down and 500 m into the mountain. Visit the farm animals at Dølmotunet and enjoy a freshly baked waffle at this historic summer mountain farm. For a day on the ski slopes, head to Ålen Skisenter or Røros Alpinsenter Hummelfjell The region is known for its wonderful produce and food products, covering everything from reindeer meat to award-winning cheeses. Join a local food safari to food producers and restaurants or attend the Norwegian Spekemat (Cured Meats) Festival at Tynset. Don’t miss the local gastro pubs Berkel & Bar and Skanckebua, with 200 varieties of beer to choose between and even local draught beer on tap. Experience lake Femund on board the historic steamship Fæmund II. Meet Solan and Ludvig at the Aukrust Centre. Visit the Christmas Market in Røros in December.

Read more at: roros.no

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WINTER AIR FOR EVERYONE Some of the best winter experiences occur on the beaten path.

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A lead dog with its tongue hanging out of the corner of its mouth, a panting sound, trees and an everchanging hilly terrain; there are many impressions to take in during a dog sledding trip. The dogs know where to go and, if you dare to trust them, you will have a nature-based adventure that is out of the ordinary. You your senses will have undisturbed interaction with the surroundings. If you prefer more speed, several places offer snowmobile safaris. The fresh air blowing in your face and the need to constantly cooperate with the snow conditions and terrain mean the nature-based adventure soon becomes more important than reaching your destination quickly. SKIING PARADISE

When the snow settles, ski enthusiasts converge on Oppdal. The ski resort is one of the country’s indisputable best, offering downhill slopes to satisfy most, a fun park for snowboarders and – if you are lucky with the weather and timing – powder snow. Just beyond the ski lift area, you will find cross-country ski

trails and pristine mountainsides to complement one other. With more than 80 km of ski trails to choose between, the silence may only be broken by the sound of your pole hitting the ground. The Dovrefjell and Trollheimen mountain ranges both have an abundance of rivers and lakes full of fish, and many choose to combine their ski trek with ice fishing. URBAN OUTDOOR RECREATION

The Bymarka outdoor recreation area near downtown Trondheim is criss-crossed by hiking paths, which in winter transform into a fantastic network of cross-country ski trails. Having an 80 km² nature reserve just a 15-minute tram ride from the city centre is quite unique and something that the locals know how to take full advantage of. You can buy a hot drink and snack at several serviced cabins throughout the reserve, the best known of which is the popular Skistua. With more than 120 km of prepared ski trails to choose between, you can experience a new one on each ski trip throughout the winter.

Photos (from left): Dog sledding in Røros (Terje Rakke) | Ice fishing (Bernartwood) Reindeer sledding in Røros (Tom Gustavsen/Røros Hotell)

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Musk oxen in the Dovrefjell Mountains (Sigbjørn Frengen / Oppdal Safari) 86


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THE CALL OF THE M O U N TA I N K I N G

In comparison with the geological era, human time pales into insignificance. Most things are put into perspective by the majestic mountains and vast plateaus. There is rarely enough time. We become impatient and fill up our holidays and days off. We have so much to do. Although time does not stand still in Oppdal and Rennebu either, you can really appreciate the human impermanence in the face of the slow passage of time. Every moment counts. The majestic Dovrefjell mountains The 40,000 or so sheep that graze in the mountain areas every year do a very good job of maintaining the network of hiking trails. Snøhetta is the highest mountain in the Dovrefjell range, and each summer several thousand hikers conquer the highest summit, Stortoppen (2286 m above sea level). A short walk from the E6 highway will bring you to perhaps the world’s most elaborate heated shelter, the Viewpoint Snøhetta. This award-winning building offers panoramic views of the magical mountain and, if you are lucky, you will spot the King of Dovre – the musk ox.

The home of the trolls The Trollheimen mountain range is full of “friendly” peaks that rise to 1,800 m above sea level. The Trollheimen Triangle, which connects the cabins of Jøldalshytta, Trollheimshytta and Gjevilvasshytta, is one of Norway’s most popular hiking routes. It enables hikers of virtually every level to experience the magnificent and varied nature. A bonus in summer, you can take a break at the sandy beach of Rauøra in the Gjevilvassdalen valley. It’s an exotic place to have a refreshing swim before continuing your hike. Visit a summer mountain farm Oppdal and Rennebu are also home to many summer mountain farming valleys. Allow time for a stop at one of the summer mountain farms selling fresh sour cream. Perhaps you will get to taste the milkmaid’s waffles.

Photos (from left): Viewpoint Snøhetta (Ketil Jacobsen) | Off-piste in Oppdal (Martin I. Dalen) 88


T R AV E L T I P S Barnas Naturverden (The Children’s Natural World) In the realm of the Jutul – north of the Dovre Mountains and east of Trollheimen – you will discover The Children’s Natural World, a whole universe for young hiking enthusiasts. To get there, catch a train to Berkåk or drive to Ulsberg. www.tt.no/barnas-naturverden/ Pulse year-round Take part in the popular Enern sports events in Oppdal, with races spanning skiing, cycling, vertical running and mountain marathon. Read more at enern.com Sheep farming galore. Oppdal is the country’s largest sheep farming municipality, which is celebrated during the Mountain and Mutton Festival (Fjell- og Fårikålfestivalen) in October. www.fjellogfaarikaalfestivalen.no The tram lines of the mountain With around 200 km of prepared cross-country ski trails in wonderful mountain terrain, you are assured of finding a ski trail nearby. Norway’s best ski area Oppdal’s ski lift area is legendary. If you are searching for a varied ski destination where you can combine off-piste skiing with racing down groomed trails, acrobatics in the terrain park and powder fun in the forest, then head to Oppdal. www.oppdalskisenter.no Ride in the mountains. This area offers cycling routes to suit every level: children, novices and experts. You will discover many marked trails, offering great trail-riding in wonderful mountain terrain. Off-piste skiing You will find everything from short ski treks to big adventures. Ski down snow-covered mountainsides where you risk getting powder snow in your moustache. Don’t forget the expansive mountain plateaus, where you can glide on your mountain skis across Snøhetta or Kringlehøa. Taste sensation. Food produced in Oppdal and Rennebu offers the taste of the mountain. Allow time for a gastronomic experience. Visit the Smak & Behag food hall or Bakeriet SPRØ, where Norway’s best bakers serve you delicious, freshly baked treats. Read more at:

visitnorway.no/reisemal/trondelag/oppdal

OPPDAL AND RENNEBU


CHRISTMAS MARKETS Expectations are half the delight! The traditional Christmas markets in Trøndelag provide the opportunity to fill your present bag and discover the typical Norwegian Christmas spirit.

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December is the time for traditional Christmas markets throughout Trøndelag. The largest Christmas market is in Trondheim: The city centre fills up with old-fashioned stalls, wonderful live music, a Farmers’ Market tent full of local food, a café tent serving refreshments and performances for the youngest visitors. Keen shoppers go from stall to stall as the relaxed Christmas spirit sinks in. The focus is not on liquorice and candyfloss, but rather handicrafts, baking and Christmas decorations made from old patterns and recipes. The Christmas market in Trondheim was rated by The Telegraph as one of the 16 best Christmas markets in Europe! Røros is another place you will discover strong traditions surrounding the Christmas market. When the historic mining town is covered in snow and the narrow streets are filled with stalls, it’s hard not get into the Christmas spirit. The air is filled with the sound of pleasant conversation (often in a variety of languages) about the high-quality goods. The local church, Bergstadens Ziir, hosts a concert every evening, while the activity in the streets lasts well into the night. Along The Golden Road (Den Gyldne Omvei) in Inderøy and at the Stiklestad National Culture Centre in Verdal, you will also find markets where you can enjoy the good, old-fashioned pre-Christmas spirit. After visiting Christmas markets in Trøndelag, you will return home with a much shorter present list, in the Christmas spirit and full of expectations. Photos (from left): Christmas market at Røros (Thomas R. Skaug) | The Christmas market “Jul Igjen” at Stiklestad (Øyvind Malum) | Christmas market in Trondheim (Midtbyen Management)

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WINT E R EXP E RIEN CES IN TRØ N DEL AG AL PINE SK I RE SO R TS 1

VASSFJELLE T S K IS E NTE R www.va s s fje l l e t. n o

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M ER Å K ER A L P I N S EN T ER www. m e ra ke ra lp i n se nt e r. c o m

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OPPDAL S K IS E NTE R www.op p dal s kis e nte r. no /

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G RON G S K I S EN T ER www. g ro n g - sk i se nt e r. n o

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RØROS A LPINS E NTE R www.ror o s al p ins e nte r. no

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V I S I T BØ RG EFJ EL L www.vi si t b o rg e f j e ll. c o m

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14 N OR T H ER N L I G H T S S A FA R I See the Northern Lights dancing over Trondheim. www.vi si t t ro n d h e i m . n o

ARC TI C TRAINING Wild Norway trains you for the challenging ski treks. www.wi l d- no r w ay. c o m

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C URLI NG Try this sport on the slippery ice. www.op p dal . c o m

15 R EI N D EER S L ED D I N G Reindeer sledding in downtown Røros. www. ro ro sre i n . n o

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16 P R EDATOR C A M P AT N A M S S KOG A N FA M I LY PARK Stay in a wooden lavvu in the park among predators. www. f a m i li e p a rke n . n o

Read more about ice fishing in Trøndelag at www.tronde l ag. c o m

17 S N OW S H OEI N G Guided snowshoeing trek in wonderful terrain. www.vi si t i n n h e rre d . c o m

10 I C E C LI M B ING Oppdal is one of Norway’s top places for ice climbing. www.op p dal . c o m 11

18 M U S K OX S A FA R I Oppdal Safari www. m o sk u ssaf a ri . n o

HOR SE-DRAWN S LE IGH RIDE S Explore Røros by horse-drawn sleigh. www.ror o s . n o

Kongsvold Fjeldstue www. ko n g sv o ld . n o

12 DOG SLE DDING Norway Husky Adventure www.hus kyadv e ntu r e . n o

Wild Norway www.wi ld - n o rway. c o m

Huskypoint Røros www.hus kyp o int. n o

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13 KI TI NG Several places in Trøndelag offer great conditions for kiting www.tron de l ag. c o m

ACTIVE WINTER ADVENTURES WITH TUNDRA TOURS Ski expeditions, Arctic training, Winter camp, Snow caving and Snow kiting. www.t u n d rat o u rs. n o

CHRIS TM AS MAR K E TS 20 TRONDHE IM CHRIS TM AS M ARK E T Pre-Christmas festival in the heart of Trondheim. www.j ule m ar ke de t- tr o n dh e im . no

22 “J U L I G J EN” C H R I S TM A S M A R K ET AT S T I KLESTAD Good old-fashioned Christmas spirit with Christmas preparations, experiences and market. www. st i k le st a d . n o

21 RØROS C HRIS TM AS M ARK E T Røros’ charming streets are filled with market stalls, Christmas food and pre-Christmas activities. www.j ule m ar ke dr o r o s . no

23 P R E- C H R I S TM A S A LON G T H E G OL D EN ROAD Quality products, beautiful cultural landscape and Christmas spirit in every building. www. d g o . n o

Read more at magasin.trondelag.com 92


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White-tailed sea eagle (Svein Wik) 94


GOLDEN LANDSCAPE

Some animals hunt prey and others graze. Mountains, fjords, rivers and unobstructed views. Some seek great photos and others a tasty meal. Both will be rewarded with a successful chase.

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A bird with a huge wingspan flies down towards the surface at a tremendous speed and grabs its meal with razor-sharp claws. Four excited faces confirm the moment was captured on camera and in their memories. An hour before the fish become eagle food, an alarm clock rings 10 minutes before the rooster crows. That’s a necessity for Ole Martin. He wants his guests to experience an unrivalled closeness to wild animals and experience the way of nature up close and personal. To achieve this, you must obey nature. If you are up early enough, the eagles offer a virtual guarantee: Ole Martin always find eagles. Ole Martin Dahle, or the “Eagle man from Flatanger”, is one Trønder who is just as famous abroad as at home in Trøndelag – at least among nature photographers. Visits from Tokyo and Milan are treated in the same manner as visits from Trondheim and are almost as common.

Most people’s goal is to take great photos of the majestic white-tailed sea eagles that nest in the area. But the Eagle man will gladly guide you to a host of other birds and animals, such as the black grouse, moose and squirrel. If you are in Flatanger and spot a man in a boat with goatee beard and a seagull on his head, it’s almost certainly the Eagle man. After all, eagles are not the only ones he has a close relationship with. “Charlie is my companion on virtually every tour,” says Ole Martin, showing us a photo of the herring gull Charlie, whose specialty is to sample food from Ole Martin’s cup. As soon as he enters the water, Charlie hovers in and settles on his hat – to the great amusement of avid photographers.

Main photo: Flatanger (Søderholm - Steen) Inset: The Eagle Man, Ole Martin Dahle (Wenche Anita L. Dahle)

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“Charlie is my companion on virtually every tour.” The “Eagle man” Ole Martin Dahle

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Halvikhula, Northern Europe’s largest cave

Foto: Bernartwood 98


E N T E R I N G T H E C AV E

Eagles are not the only ones hanging high in Flatanger. The Hanshelleren cave’s giant overhang protects the wall from the weather and allows rock climbing virtually year-round. “The climbing route in the Hanshelleren cave is regarded as one of the toughest in the world,” says Magnus Midtbø, one of the world’s best climbers. Hanshelleren was relatively unknown until recently and many were surprised to learn that this spectacular cave was in Trøndelag. Many are now adding this natural gem to their travel routes. You will find another spectacular cave formation at Halvikhula in Osen (pictured). Although this cave is the largest in Northern Europe, it remains largely unknown to all but the locals.

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W I L D A N D TA M E

Trøndelag is home to nine protected areas; seven national parks and two nature reserves. From Børgefjell National Park in the north to Femundsmarka in the south, you will discover large natural areas filled with silence, great fishing, wildlife and rich flora. While encounters with reindeer and moose are relatively common, these areas are also home to animals few people get to experience, such as Arctic foxes and brown bears. If you want a close-up experience with Norwegian animals, the Namsskogan Family Park is a destination worth noting. Experience Norway’s big four predators: brown bear, wolf, lynx and wolverine, as well as a wealth of other species large and small. You can join the daily guided tour at feeding time. The goats at the Children’s Farm always prove popular with the youngest visitors. “Falling asleep to the sound of wolves snoring and waking up to wolves howling is an exotic experience”, says the park’s manager, Heidi Hestmark. She is referring to the “Predator Camp”, where you can stay in a wooden hut just outside the wolf enclosure. In recent years, more hiking trails throughout Trøndelag have been marked so visitors can also find their way. The most popular routes include the Trollheimen Triangle and Storsylen in Tydal, which both offer hikers and nature enthusiasts landscapes alternating between the steep and dramatic and the flat and calm.

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However, the most accessible walking route is the Gudbrandsdalen Path, a pilgrim route from Oslo to the Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim. Thousands of pilgrims walk this route every year; some motivated by spiritual reasons and others by the chance to experience nature and sensory impressions along the way. Some people even walk all the way from the Christian pilgrimage site of Santiago de Compostela in Spain to Trondheim. BIG FISH AND EAGLE ROBBERY

Leka was voted as Norway’s geological national monument. The island consists of distinctive yellow and red coloured serpentine rock that is otherwise only found on the American north coast. The theory is that the two areas were connected before the tectonic plates cracked and drifted apart. Leka attracts deep-sea fishermen from near and far, like the islands of Hitra and Frøya further south on the coast of Trøndelag. Many come to Leka to fish for halibut, where the record catch was 1.9 m long and weighed 230 kg. Several halibut caught here were so big that tractors were needed to get them ashore. Cycling, hiking, Solsemhula (a 40m-deep cave with Stone Age paintings) and the legends of Lekamøya and the “eagle robbery” also attract people to Leka.


“Falling asleep to the sound of wolves snoring and waking up to wolves howling is an exotic experience.”

Photos page 100-101: View of the Gjevilvatnet lake (Jarle Hagen) | Coffee brewing on the fire (Lilly Husbands) Page 102-103: The campsite at dusk (Jarle Hagen) | Kayaking (Lilly Husbands) | Fun by the water’s edge (Jarle Hagen)

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To this day salmon fishing remains an extremely popular activity, and several rivers in Trøndelag are still considered among the best in Norway. Increasingly more tourists are visiting Trøndelag to paddle canoes and kayaks, particularly in Femundsmarka south of Røros, which has many continuous rivers and lakes. The river Nea, which flows into the Selbusjøen lake, is particularly popular among trout fishermen. You can combine a trip to the Nea with fishing in one or more of the 300 lakes in the Selbu area. This is a land of pure happiness for fishermen, but wilder rivers, including the Driva near Oppdal, have a reputation for extreme sports like rafting and canyoning. FREEDOM ON TWO WHEELS

The temperature, wind and the smells will gain your attention as you glide through the countryside on two wheels. Exploring by bike gives you a completely different sensory impression than travelling by car, bus or train. With pedal power, you can stop whenever you wish to take in the beautiful view, a meadow full of spring flowers or wild berries. You will find plenty of marked cycling paths in the region, everything from city routes in Trondheim to paths through beautiful cultural landscapes in Inderøy or Fosen.

The latter relates to a two-and-a-half-yearold girl who was taken by an eagle and left in an eagle’s nest in the mountains. The incident took place nearly 80 years ago, and its authenticity is still the subject of debate among ornithologists and islanders. SALMON ADVENTURES

Word of the wonderful rivers of Trøndelag first reached England about 150 years ago. English lords with lots of money and few geographic restrictions travelled to Trøndelag to fish in rivers such as the Namsen, Gaula and Orkla. Some returned several times, paying good money to hire the best rowers. The number of lords who came to participate in this salmon fishing adventure grew in line with the favourable stories.


Gjevildalen, Oppdal (Jarle Hagen) 104


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NAMDALEN FISHING, OUTDOOR LIFE AND TOGETHERNESS

Namdalen stretches from coastal landscapes to Norwegian highlands with rivers teeming with fish, picturesque mountain lakes and hunting terrain with an ecstasy guarantee. Long renowned as one of the country’s best rivers for salmon fishing, the river Namsen meanders through the mighty forests and mountains of Namdalen. English lords visited Namdalen as early as the 19th century to experience salmon fishing in the Namsen. Suitable for novices and experienced anglers alike, the Namsen attracts visitors from near and far. The idyllic fishing village of Sør-Gjæslingan south-west of Rørvik is a listed holiday paradise. You can enjoy peace and tranquillity here while spending the night in a charming rorbu (fishermen’s cottage) or the historic manor house. Explore life as it was at the time when the seasonal Lofoten fishery provided the main source of income for people along the coast of Namdalen. In the far north-west of Trøndelag, the saga island of Leka breaks the surface of the sea with its characteristic yellow-red serpentine mountains. Leka is Norway’s national geological monument, and is a popular destination for outdoor recreation enthusiasts young and old. You can bike and hike in an adapted but exciting terrain. But Leka’s main drawcard is the great fishing, especially halibut. Some of the largest halibut in Norway has been caught on rods in the waters off

Leka. Giant halibut are not caught every day, but the opportunity always exists, including for you. Namdalen’s three national parks – Lierne, Børgefjell and Blåfjella-Skjækerfjella – offer wonderful nature-based experiences all year-round. You will discover good opportunities for hunting, fishing and other outdoor recreational activities in the national parks as well as other areas. The district is known for events such as the Flyktningerennet cross-country ski race, the Li-martnan market and the open-air theatre production Pe-Torsa, as well as its local food specialties. The Namsen is surrounded by large, deep forests and the river is a historically important as a transport route for floating timber down to the sawmills in Namsos, where it was processed and shipped to markets in Norway and overseas. Visit the Norwegian Sawmill Museum (Sagbruksmuseum) at Spillum near Namsos. You can see the well-preserved historic sawmill firsthand and hear what it was like to be employed at one of Norway’s most dangerous workplaces. You can also visit the Namdal Museum, Art Museum Nord-Trøndelag and Rock City. The latter provides an insight into the famous history of Trønder rock music.

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T R AV E L T I P S Go on a bear safari in Lierne National Park. Join us at the bear camp, spot traces of bears or have a close-up experience. Create memorable adventures with a horseback riding trip including an overnight stay in one of the three national parks. Join the Eagleman Ole Martin Dahle on a trip out to sea in Flatanger and experience close-up contact with the white-tailed sea eagle. Visit Grong Ski Centre. With the mountain Geitfjellet as the main arena, an outstanding winter experience is assured, also for cross-country ski enthusiasts. The area is also ideal for mountain hiking in the summer and autumn. Fish for salmon in the Namsen – the “Queen of Rivers”. Several companies along the river offer packages comprising accommodation, delicious culinary experiences and access to exclusive salmon beats. Take part in nature-based activities like a guided fishing trip in the mountains, beaver safari, paddling trip or hunting for the famous "Dærga Troll". Go island hopping on the Namdal coast, the fairytale coast of wild and wonderful Folla, the realm of a thousand islands. Call at Namsos, Jøa, Sør-Gjæslingan, Nordøyan, Rørvik and Leka. Catch the scheduled passenger boat, spend the night in an authentic rorbu (fishermen’s cottage) and enjoy the atmosphere. Combine island hopping with cycling and hiking. The ‘Ale dorado’ of Skorovatn. The Skjenkestova inn is one of Norway’s most distinctive pubs, serving over 500 different beers from all over the world. Combine your visit with a hike on a marked trail in the scenic Skorovas Mountains. Visit a branch of Museum Midt: The Namdal Museum, the Norwegian Sawmill Museum at Spillum, the Art Museum in Namsos or Norveg – the Centre of Coastal Culture and Industry in Rørvik. At Rock City experience centre in Namsos offers an insight into the history and significance of Trønder rock. Try to write your own song, test your lyrics and tones in the studio and immerse yourself in the history of Trønder rock. Photos (from left): Lynx (Kristin Smedstad) Avandsdalen (Steinar Johansen) Train (Namsen Salmon & Train Experience)

Read more at www.visitnamdalen.com 107


NAMSSKOGAN A FOREST OF DREAMS

Mention Børgefjell and many a grouse hunter becomes dreamy eyed. The same goes for beer enthusiasts when you mention Skjenkestova in Skorovas. Namsskogan is an area for dreamers. Some have dreams here, while others live them. Nature-based experiences You could be excused for thinking that Namsskogan was designed by an intelligent being with a sense for nature-based experiences. As soon as you get a few metres away from the E6, Norway’s main highway, you will discover infinite amounts of valleys, rivers and mountain plateaus filled with fish, wild animals, berries and fresh air. The local mountain board, Namsskogan Fjellstyre, has 17 cabins for rent and administer large areas for hunting and fishing. The mountain board also has many rowboats for rent, some near roads and others up at mountain lakes. The Namsen, the “Queen of Rivers” in Trøndelag, runs more than 70 km throughout the entire municipality. Although there are no salmon in this part of the river, it’s famous for trout fishing and fish of 1-3 kg are not uncommon. Skjenkestova in Skorovas Skjenkestova, a beer paradise in the middle of the forest, ranks as one of Norway’s most distinctive pubs. In the

tiny village of Skorovas, beer enthusiast Inge Staldvik has created a pub serving more than 500 varieties of beer, 160 aquavits and 70 types of whiskey. This popular pub attracts drinkers from all over the world. With a permanent population of less than 40, many though Inge would be up against it when he decided to open a pub. However, interest continues to grow by the year, and the guest book shows visitors from 10 countries in Europe as well as one in Africa. Rooms are available nearby for those keen to stay the night. Namsskogan Family Park Namsskogan Family Park is situated at Trones in the south of the municipality. The park attracts more than 50,000 visitors per year, making it one of Trøndelag’s leading tourist attractions. The park is home to more than 150 animals, including the four big predators – brown bear, wolf, lynx and wolverine. Visitors can also climb one of Europe’s highest climbing towers, glide across the lake on the zip-line, drive bumper boats or see the family show featuring the rock witch Rebella Hex. 108


GOOD TO KNOW: Namsskogan municipality is in Namdal in the northern part of Trøndelag County. The population is approx. 920 and the municipality’s 1417 km² is full of lakes, rivers and valleys. Inge offers his guests a choice of 500 beers, 160 aquavits and 70 whiskies.

From north to south are the villages of Namsskogan, Brekkvasselv, Trones and Skorovas. The first three are on the E6 highway, while Skorovas is east of the E6 with the turnoff south of Trones. Hunting licences, maps and other info are available at Inatur.no. For fishing licences, you can choose between the Namsskogan card and the Børgefjell card. You can fish in a choice of 800 lakes and 35 rivers. Use the district’s flexible transport service (Tilbringertjeneste). If you catch the train to Lassemoen station, if you book 24 hours in advance (tel. 07417) you can take a taxi to Trones or Skorovas and pay the same as the bus fare.

You will discover more than 150 animals at Namsskogan Family Park.

Photos (from left): Namsskogan (Kristian F. Nesser) Inge Staldvik Beer sign (Erlend Angelo) | Brown bear (Kristin Smestad)

Rebella Hex Hex is a magical rock theatre at Namsskogan Family Park every July, which is perfect for children (from six and up).

For more info, please check www.visitnamsskogan.com


NAMSSKOGAN FAMILY PARK

– best for Norwegian wild animals

NAMSSKOGAN FAMILY PARK - best for Norwegian wild animals

BODIL: | Photo: Kristin Smedstad / Tore Viem / Andreas Buarø BODIL || Photo: Foto: Kristin / Andreas Buarø BODIL KristinSmestad Smestad/ Tore / ToreViem Viem/ Robert Selfors

THE BEST DAY OFBESTE SUMMER! SOMMERENS DAG Like will vedfiE6 midtofmellom Trondheim og Mo i Rana - ligger enby You nd- one Norway’s biggest experience parks right av Norges størstebetween opplevelsesparker. the E6 – midway Trondheim and Mo i Rana! Kjenn and på roen når du går blant dyrene! Opplev fart og spenningBei aktivitetene! Relax and enjoy the animals! Try exiting andthrilling thrilling activities! enjoy the animals! Try exciting and activities! charmed by magical Rebella Hex! Join us inside the enclosure and meet the Arctic foxes! Stay overnight among predators! F A M I L I E P A R K

Åpentfrom fra 2.32juni June Open from June

familieparken.no | 7892 Trones 7433 3337370000 familieparken.no | 7892 Trones | +47| 74

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RYPETO P P EN A DVENT U R E PA R K - TE S T YOUR BO UNDA RI ES !

Perfect for families, friends, companies and teams with a common goal – let’s have fun together! 100 platforms in the trees – 20 zip-lines (up to 230 m!) – 25 m above the ground – 12 km of wire – 17 exciting trails!

www.rypetoppen.no

Photo: Dynamis / Fotograf Eidsmo

Welcome to Rypetoppen Adventure Park in Meråker. Norway’s only climbing park combining rocks and trees. Free admission to the park. You will find a map and prices for climbing and canoe hire on our website.

W ILD N ORWAY - A SEL EC T IO N O F T H E N O R WAY ’ S BE ST NAT U R E-BASED A DV E N T U R E S IN N O R WAY Dog sledding, Arctic Training & Expeditions, Wilderness living & Survival, Guided hikes and ski treks, Kayaking, Climbing, Musk ox, bear and whale watching safaris, Northern Lights chases, Photography tours, Family adventures, Corporate tours and much more... Life changing moments! www.wild-norway.com


N AT UR E-B A SED E XPERIEN CES IN TRØ N DEL AG HIK IN G

S A F A R IS

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TRONDHJE M S TURIS TF O RE NING Hike from cabin to cabin in the Triangle and Sylan. www.tt.n o

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THE PI LGRIM PATHS TO TRO NDHE IM Historical walks through natural and cultural landscapes. www.pi le gr im s l e de n . no

14 N ORWAY N AT U R E White-tailed eagle and moose safaris. www. n o rway - n at u re . c o m

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VI SI T NAM DALE N Hiking, fishing, hunting, kayaking and canoeing. www.vi s itnam dal e n . c o m

1 5 M AU S U N D G LØT T White-tailed eagle and seal safaris. www. m a u su n d g lot t . n o

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NORWAY’S GEO GRAPHICAL M IDPO IN T Enjoy nature’s silence in the middle of Norway. www.no r ge s m idtp u nkt. no

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RIDING

OP P DA L S A FA R I Musk ox and moose safaris, guided hikes. www. m o sk u ssaf a ri . n o

N A M S S KOG A N FA M I LY PA R K See the four big predators: bear, wolf, lynx and wolverine. www. f a m i li e p a rke n . n o

CLIMB IN G

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DYRHAUG RIDE S E NTE R Mountain riding on Iceland horses in Sylan. www.dyr h au g. no

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C L I M B FL ATA N G ER Climbing for amateurs and professionals. www. c li m bf lat a n g e r. c o m

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PATRUSL I GÅRD Riding tours in the forest and mountains. www.patr u s l i. n o

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FOL L A A K T I V Guided adventures from sea to mountain. www. f o lla - a k t i v. n o

B ULI A , L ANGK LO PP AND TRO LLHE IM I N NE R S KO GE N Riding tours in wonderful mountain landscapes. www.op p dal . c o m

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RY P ETOP P EN A DV EN T U R EPA R K Fun climbing activities for the whole family. www. r y p e t o p p e n . n o

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M U N K S T I G EN K L AT R ES T I Via Ferrata – great nature-based experiences. www. m u n k st i g e n . n o

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W E STUM S TURRIDNING Mountain tours in beautiful Lierne. www.we s tu m s - tu r r idn ing. n o

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F IS H IN G

VI SI T I N NHE RRE D Ride in beautiful culture landscapes in Innherred. www.vi sitin nh e r r e d. c o m

2 1 S A L M ON FI S H I N G Gaula, Namsen, Orkla and Stjørdal rivers. www.t ro n d e la g . c o m

10 DE STI NAS JO N RØ RO S Ride in UNESCO listed Røros. www.ror o s . no

2 2 D EEP -S EA FI S H I N G Ideal conditions along the entire coast of Trøndelag. www.t ro n d e la g . c o m

11 VI SI T OPPDAL Ride on roads or paths in beautiful nature. www.op p dal . c o m

2 3 FR ES H WAT ER FI S H I N G Enjoy the best of nature while fishing in Trøndelag’s lakes and mountain lakes. www. i n at u r. n o

12 COASTAL NO RWAY ( K YS TNO RGE ) Take your bike and go island hopping. www.k ystno r ge . c o m

24 FJ OR D FI S H I N G See if the fish are biting in Norway’s third longest fjord. www.t ro n d e la g . c o m

Read more at magasin.trondelag.com 112


NATI ONA L PARK S AND PROTECTE D ARE AS

B ør g ef jel l Nat ional Par k LEK A BØ R GEFJ EL L N A M S S KOG A N

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Namsen

LI ERNE

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SNÅSA

B E SSAKE R Snåsavatnet

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S T EI N K JER MAU SUNDVÆR

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VAN V I KAN

H ITRA

Tr ond h ei m sfj or d en

Stjørdalselva

T RO N DH E I M

M ER Å K ER

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SkarvanR o lt d a le n

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Or kla

T YDAL G au la

RE N N E B U Tr ol l hei men

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F o r o l l h og n a N atio nal P a rk

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Dovrefj el l -Sunndal s fje l l a Nati onal Park F e m u n d sm a rk a N at i o n a l P a rk

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L ier ne Nat ional Par k Blåf j e lla -S k j æ ke rf j e lla N at i o n a l P a rk


TROMSØ

T R O N D HE I M 63°N

BE R G E N OSLO

TABLE OF DIS TANCE S Oslo - Trondheim 496 km Bergen - Trondheim 657 km Stavanger - Trondheim 837 km Kristiansand - Trondheim 824 km Bodø - Trondheim 721 km Tromsø - Trondheim 1152 km Nordkapp - Trondheim 1623 km

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magasin.trondelag.com

Profile for Trøndelag Reiseliv

Journey 2018  

Travel magazine from Trøndelag, Central Norway

Journey 2018  

Travel magazine from Trøndelag, Central Norway

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