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Trojan

Editors Hunter Todd Ginny Roper Savannah Johnson Andrew Legan Emma Caylor Photography Editor Elizabeth Bumpas Design Editor Andrew Legan Business Manager Hunter Todd Circulation Manager Savannah Johnson Reporters Shelby Andrews Nic Berry Lauren Brooks Elizabeth Bumpas Walt Carter Rachel Chaffin Logan Collier Maggie Feith Zach Golson Jackson Lay Aura Mae Northcutt McCord Pagan Shelby Pleasant Tyler Roberts Sam Shankle Sean Stapleton Jacob Stegeman Chris Wagner

Photos contributed by the students of Dyersburg High School and the residents of Dyersburg and Dyer County Articles contributed by the following DHSstudents Kathleen Alford Shelby Andrews Caitlin Armstrong Todd Baker Patrick Barch Brandy Behrens Jade Box Eden Cook Matthew Daily James Decker

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Kayla Dubrule Matt Eaves Cody Escue Jessica Floyd Andriota Gorman Cody Grey Connor Hansford Seth Hinson Anne Marie Hyman Samantha Joergens

Savannah Johnson Sterling Jowers Chelsea King Ashten Maldanado Maryanna McClure Kaytelyn McKee Loren Newsom Deanna Plewa Sam Shankle Joesph Smith

Sydnee Stafford Katelynn Summerset Abbi Tabor Finley White Jayne Anne Wilkerson Shaniqua Williams Alexis Wilson

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Advisors Anna Claire Bradshaw William Bumpas Alex Jacobi Jaylin Gardner Katie Taylor Suzanne Edwards Nancy Speck Trojan Torch Dyersburg High School 125 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 38024


The Flood of 2010

shipped from the Mississipi River and bagged by any willing volunteers. Dyersburg’s tragic flood was recently confirmed by the National Weather Service to be the worst ever. The new record of 31.21 inches tops even the Great Flood of 1937, which was recorded at 30.91 inches. The cost of damage in Dyer County alone are estimated at $12 million. Many believe that multiple levees broke although actually only breaching occurred. The Sorrells Chapel levee was breached and repaired quickly by CNN Railroad. The levee was repaired, but no new improvements were made since very few improvements can be made on any areas that reside in a flood plain. The flood was a destructive force that brought out the best of people in the form of charity drives, voluntary sand bagging and even a Global Youth Concert with all proceeds benefiting the victims of the flood.

Sam Shankle n the late hours of May 2 and the early hours of May 3, Dyersburg began to flood. The flood waters rapidly rose 7 feet in 6 hours. This rapid increase in water began to fill the flood plains of Dyer County. The North and South Forks of the Forked Deer, Mississipi, and Obion Rivers poured in to Dyer County. Although Dyersburg received very little rain, runoff from the counties of Gibson, Madison and Crockett carried the enormous amount of water into Dyer County. The Forked Deer River rose to 30.48 feet above sea level and the flood stage peaked at 22 feet. The water from this river flowed in to the North Fork which wraps around the southern part of Dyersburg. The North Fork was responsible for the flooding of Southtown. The Southtown flooding was devastating, but it showed the strength of the residents from Dyersburg to the banks of the Mississipi River. The sand was

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Todd Baker he news says it was the worst flood in Dyersburg’s history and the highest since 1937. I went around barricaded S. Main St. to see Southtown. It started at Lowry’s Body Shop then Boss Hoss, Dodges, Dairy Queen and Gus’s Chicken. All of Southtown was flooded and it kept rising. On Monday, May 3 at about 2 pm, 412 Highway was closed for the first time ever for water crossing it at two different spots. I rushed home on Monday to get clothes and things and came back to town, so I was not stuck at home. I was the last one they legally let through to go back to town down 412. On Wednesday, I rode my four wheeler down 412 and watched boats ride on normally dry fields that are now 6 to 8 feet deep in water. This was unbelievable. The levee behind Cotton Villa broke on Tuesday, which endangered many houses. I helped move some people’s belongings in that area. On Tuesday morning, the police went door to door evacuating Southtown. Boats were running everywhere, some spectated, but mostly people were pulling together to help the victims salvage what they could out of the flooded houses.

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Jade Box first heard about the flood on Monday when my two friends, Faith and Jessie, were looking for a way home because Highway 412 was about to flood over. I didn’t believe the flood had gotten that bad until that afternoon when I received a picture to my phone. The picture was the damage the flood had caused in Southtown. These days we had off were relaxing, but I still felt really bad about all the people’s houses that were destroyed by the flood. After Wednesday church, my dad, my sister and I went to go see some of the flood. All the roads were blocked, but we still got to see a little bit. Fields were now lakes, and to get to Southtown you now had to use a boat. I guess this is one disaster that will not be forgotten.

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Anonymous he flood of 2010 brought out the best and the worst of people. Many people used the opportunity to do all they could to help those affected. On the other hand, some people haven’t even paid attention to what’s going on around them. They haven’t seen the devastation so they don’t have the feeling that it actually happened. Many people have been hurt by this incident, from those whose houses were damaged to those who were trying to help those in need. A few people had a wreck in the process of helping pack sand. Also, a few people were trying to help out their friend get stuff out of his house, among things a bunny in a cage on his floor. While he was trying to get to his house, the current got too strong and they had to turn back and couldn’t save his stuff.

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Connor Hansford ell, the first thing that came to my mind when they talked about the Forked Deer River flooding was the possibility of school being out. I was so excited when it was announced that Dyersburg City Schools would not be in session Tuesday or Wednesday. That changed when I got on the internet Tuesday night to check out some of the news about the flood situation. When I read the article on the State Gazette website and saw the video of all the homes, businesses and a church affected by the flood, it started to make me feel guilty for being excited for something that changed people’s lives in a negative way. Instead of being excited about not being in school, I started to pray more for the individuals affected by this tragic event. Many of the people who were not affected by the flooding still probably do not realize the gravity of the situation Dyer County is facing. I just hope that everyone will come to realize what is going on and do their best to help in any way they can.

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Kayla Dubrule hen I first heard about the flood, I did not take it seriously. I didn’t realize how bad it was until I got a chance to see it first hand. We went in the boat to Southtown to see the damage and volunteer any help we could. It was devastating to see so many houses and businesses flooded. I personally was not affected by the flood, but my heart goes out to the people who were. Like many people who weren’t affected, I was just glad to be out of school. But after seeing the damage, you wonder how can someone enjoy being out of school when we have classmates who have lost everything they own. It’s nice to know that we live in such a loving community that is trying to help. It was very encouraging driving downtown this week and seeing so many people sandbagging. I also think it’s a great idea that our school is taking up money and canned goods for the flood victims. It is very important that we do all we can to help.

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Anonymous never thought something like this would ever happen so close to home. Although my house was not affected, this flood effected me emotionally. I am so grateful that the water never reached our home, but I truly feel sorry for the people who lost everything. Once I heard and realized the magnitude of the evacuations in Dyersburg, I knew this was the biggest natural disaster that I had and probably will ever go through. I just cannot believe that people have lost everything. Our area is known for devastating tornadoes, but not floods. As the rivers continue to rise and the waters continue to drain in our direction, this flood will continue to affect the lives of many people. Now is the time that our community really needs us, emotionally and physically. We all need to put ourselves in others’ shoes and help to put the pieces of are community back together.

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Sydnee Stafford feel guilty and thankful at the same time. Is that even possible? I was not directly affected by the flooding; however, I did know people who were. Memorabilia, precious valuables and old pictures are a few things that can never be replaced again and so many people lost it all. It breaks your heart to wonder if those people will have a place to lay their head down at night, while you are lying in your bed. Yes, we can offer food, shelter, clothing and other resources, but these people’s lives have been changed forever. Even people who do not have homes in the flooded area of Dyersburg have been affected. Many acres of farms and big businesses, such as UPS and Budweiser, have been severely damaged. It has even affected people who commute from Dyersburg to Jackson every day for a job. Now, take a step back and put yourself in their shoes. What would you do? How would you move on with your life? Everything you could not carry out with you would be lost, gone forever. What would your reaction be? I know that would not go over too well for me. Volunteers have been working around the clock to aid flood victims and are doing a great job. It is times like these when communities pull together and all become focused on the well being of others. It makes you proud to be from Dyersburg.

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Eden Cook n Monday, May 3, 2010, news of the massive flooding in Dyersburg reached Dyersburg High School. Many students were panicked to find out whether or not they would be able to get home that afternoon—or if they made it home, would they have to evacuate? I, on the other hand, went home and helped my mom in the yard. I did not sandbag entranceways to houses or help people pack up valuables. In fact, I dug a hole for my mom and put a big rock in it, for she wants to make stepping-stones up my sloping backyard. On Tuesday, May 4, 2010, school was cancelled. Many houses and other families suffered through the flooding. I was able to sleep late and watch TV. As smart as it would have been for me to work on a belated project in Business Law, I, instead, sat around eating ice cream. On Wednesday, May 5, 2010 school was once again cancelled. Another levee broke, volunteers continued their campaign, and I lazily basked in the sun after waking up well-rested again.

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Loren Newsom t is sad to see people treat a disaster like a party. Tuesday afternoon, my family and I drove down Highway 51 to see the destruction. As we neared the disaster area, I was shocked with what was only the beginning. There were families standing outside their homes crying and praying for help. All the devastation made me feel bad for everyone who was affected by the flooding. But suddenly, as we neared Southtown, my emotions started to change. Fat, redneck idiots were driving around in their johnboats drinking beer. That’s just pathetic. It really [ticked] me off. They should have been down the street helping with sandbags; they could really use the exercise. Near the Budweiser plant, an idiot sat in the nasty (possibly toxic) water bathing himself; just trying to get on TV. Leave it to the scum of society to try and make a personal gain off this accident. People were parking their cars down by Southtown so they could claim flood insurance on them. Some people are so pathetic.

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Kathleen Alford

Water rises all around, A deep and dark and dirty brown, The rivers have all jumped their banks, The forests have all broken ranks, The creatures flee to higher ground, As water rises all around. Water rises all around, With a quiet, deadly rushing sound, Cars abandoned, homes stripped bare, It seems their owners no longer care, They also flee to higher ground, As water rises all around. Water rises all around, Seeking ever higher ground, Taking, eating, ever feeding, It doesn’t care who it sends reeling, It reaches to ever higher ground, Rising, rising, all around. Water rises all around, A deep and dark and dirty brown, With a quiet, deadly rushing sound, Seeking ever higher ground, Rising, rising, all around, Water rises all around.

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Poem by James Decker

The rain starts The lightning flashes The thunder roars The water rises. The creeks fill The streams rise The rivers swell Nowhere to hide. The creeks overflow The levees overtop The roads are overwashed The rain doesn’t stop. The floods recede The devastation reveals Nothing remains. Savannah Johnson e are lucky. This statement comes to my mind first because it was spoken numerous times between my parents and me. Although our backyard looks like a newly formed lake and we had to relocate our golden retriever, Chief, for a few days, the waters never reached our house. However, this is not true for our entire neighborhood. A few streets over, families were evacuated and are suffering from flood waters reaching their homes. I was so thankful for all of the people who offered to help our family if the waters continued to rise. People we knew and strangers as well showed up at our house asking if we needed assistance or sandbags. Even though our house was fine, knowing that so many people cared was reassuring. When our family was certain that our house was in the clear, I knew I wanted to help the families who were not as lucky as mine. Downtown a group of volunteers were making sandbags to help prevent the quickly rising waters from reaching people’s homes. Although I could not lift the bags, I plugged into the group by simply tying the bags after they had been filled with the sand. The best part about helping with a group of volunteers is that everyone wants to be there. Everyone is positive and willing to do whatever needs to be done. I interacted with so many kind people, and I met a lot of new people from the area. I have a whole new understanding of what a community is, and what must be done to help each other. On Tuesday, my friends and I went back to the sandbag making. It was very hot, but the Fire Department provided water bottles and chips for the volunteers. At lunch, we were fed barbecue by a group from the community. It was great to see so many different groups of people come together as one. The flood definitely hurt Dyersburg, but in a way, it also brought a community together like never before. Global Youth put on the Benefit Concert for flood victims, and it let the youth of our community use their talents to help. It was a beautiful thing to be a part of. There is a thread of hope sewn through everyone who was affected. The recovery will be long, but Dyersburg has already proven that we can come together and overcome. I have faith in this community.

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Brandy Behrens fter sandbagging, we had a flood party. We sat on a friend’s front yard in Cotton Villa with lawn chairs set up, and a gigantic cooler filled with beer and sodas. We had a grill set up and had a good time. Sightseers that drove by gave us dirty looks, but we didn’t care.

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Samantha Joergens riday, April 30th was the start of the severe storms. I stayed up every night that weekend watching the weather channel. The storms pounded us with heavy amounts of rain and wind. Sunday, May 2nd was the final day for the storms. We were left with the worst flood in Dyer County in history. I didn’t think it was that bad because we’ve always had flood warnings in the past, and we came out perfectly fine. This time was much different. I woke up on Monday morning and went to school as normal. I took my normal route through Southtown as usual and noticed the side streets were a little flooded. I didn’t think much about it since we did receive a lot of rain that weekend. When I got to school, first hour was a normal class and no one talked about the rain. When I got to second hour at the Intermediate School, they got a call saying Southtown was being evacuated. I thought that was sad and a bit weird since I drove

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through there only an hour before. The severity of the flood still hadn’t hit me until I went to 5th hour where Mrs. Houston showed us a picture on an e-mail she had. It was of Dairy Queen. The building was underwater almost to the roof. I then became a little scared. I checked my phone, and I had a text message from my mom saying the McDowell center was being evacuated because of the flood. I was terrified then because that was my only other way home. So, I thought of how I could go home, and I remembered I could take Highway 412 home. The bad news for me was that 412 was closed. I then went outside and called my mom to ask her what I should do. She told me to leave, take my sister and take the by-pass before it closed. We headed home because the by-pass was clear. We got home safe and sound, and our house was untouched. We were one of the fortunate families in Dyersburg. For others, their worst nightmare had come alive.

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Jessica Floyd left on Friday for New York City, just for a weekend trip with my family. While we were gone, all that anyone at home would talk about was the rain and flooding. We checked it out on Facebook and looked at our friends’ pictures and comments. We began to worry about getting home in time for Monday morning school and work because we were flying back into Memphis, and had to drive from Memphis back to Dyersburg. From what we had heard, Dyersburg had been blessed by having only a lot of rain, but no severe flooding like the surrounding counties. So, we were not too worried. We arrived safely, on time, and without any problems; however, Monday was a different story. I was in a rush on Monday morning to get to school, and I left at the last minute possible. I usually take Beaver Road, get on 412, and then head into town, but when I turned off my road and onto Beaver Road, I saw a “ROAD CLOSED” sign. Nevertheless, being the defiant, adventurous person I am, I went anyway, thinking it was just a sign someone put up over the weekend and forgot to take down. So, I kept going. I got to the top of the hill, stopped, and looked over just in time to keep myself from driving into a newly formed lake. I turned around and made it to school in time, but with none to spare. We were dismissed from school about fifteen minutes early that day because of the flooding. I drove home and didn’t see any flooding, but I had heard all about it. I checked out the area that I tried to drive through that morning. The water was all the way up the pole of the “STOP” sign. All of Beaver Road had become a lake, and the water was rising further and further up my road. Houses were being invaded with water, the air smelled like fish, and there were ducks roaming the roads and yards.

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Matt Eaves was in the flood, and it was a very bad experience. It came so fast and so unexpectedly. I got a knock at my door saying we had to leave our home due to flooding. There were a bunch of people needing help. Families lost everything they have ever owned due to flood water. Just seeing your friends and family go through that is devastating.

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Jayne Anne Wilkerson think it is crazy how the flood is separated. Like, I live on one side of my neighborhood. It is hard to fathom that just three blocks away from me the flood is really there. A friend and I sat outside the house with another friend who lives on River Ridge (a few blocks from my house), and watched the water move closer and closer to his house. We could see that on the next street over, a family’s house had already been flooded, and they were moving as quick as they could to move their most prized possessions out of danger. We were all amazed at how many volunteers from around the community were willing to help put up sandbags in people’s yards. I work downtown at my granddad’s law office. We were all talking about how strange it was that just down the street, Dairy Queen was flooded up to the roof, and we had no sign of water at the office. (You couldn’t see the water from the office or anything.) It just blows my mind to think that it is just right there, but I can’t see it. As curious as I am to see it, I am abiding by my mother’s words to not get close to it. An older man at church made a comment about how people’s houses and belongings could be replaced, but I just sat and thought about how these are people’s homes getting destroyed. You cannot just rebuild your home again: that takes years and years. As awful as the flood is, I love to see the sun set on the sparkling water. Also, the flood has brought people closer together. My house has gotten many calls from people around the community asking if we are okay and if we needed a place to take our things or stay. It is so nice to be reminded of how you have so many people that care about your family. All I can think about this flood is to make lemonade out of lemons.

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Sterling Jowers iver water ravaged through neighborhoods on all borders surrounding Dyersburg this past week. Aside from the multi-million dollars’ worth of damage, the flood aided a single event-unification. Aid started by giving victims basic necessities, and these needs are the only aspect of life each individual, worldwide, has in common. And because of the generosity of the people, the flood created a common tie throughout the area - a sense of Community.

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age had occurred to my neighbors. Their house was obviously flooded by what we observed. When I had seen enough I went inside. I logged onto Facebook to see that someone posted a video of the flood. I viewed the video and saw that Dairy Queen was ruined. Dyersburg’s Southtown seemed to have disappeared. I hope and prayed that everything would get better the next day. Unfortunately, things were slightly worse when I woke up. The water in my backyard barely rose; however, it rose immensely in my neighbor’s yards. My family didn’t let this get us down. We acted as if the flood was not there. We stayed productive and looked for positive things we got from the flood, such as: a couple days to rest and be together; and we got to see our whole community come together to help one another. Tuesday and Wednesday passed quickly, and Thursday morning the water began receding. I was enabled to see my town again, and I had never felt so privileged to be able to do this.

Shelby Hubbard t all started with vicious storms. Little did Dyersburg know that our small town was going to undergo an unfortunate situation. The effect of the flood hit Monday afternoon. Everyone around me that day was very unaware of what was going on. The students were let out early. We all were so ecstatic about getting out. I went to Sonic with some friends, and then I went to play soccer. As my friends and I were careless playing around, we got some news. School would be out tomorrow – more excitement. It all was a big joke to me. I asked myself, seriously? There is nothing remotely unusual around me. My thoughts were interrupted. I suddenly saw my mom pull up. I walked over to the car, something was wrong. I had an uneasy feeling in my gut. My mom immediately drove me home. She wanted everyone to be together. I live in the Cotton Villa area of Dyersburg. The damage I saw was shocking. My backyard was half way flooded, but that wasn’t the main damage. The main dam-

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Chelsea King he flood that our city is experiencing right now is the worst thing I have seen in my life. This flood has affected so many people from Southtown to Cotton Villa, and no matter where your house is, everyone is affected. This flood has especially affected my family because of my aunt. She lives less than a mile away from Dodges, and on Monday she had less than three hours to collect all of her things. When she finally left, the water was up to her first step leading to her porch. On Tuesday she received the news that the water was in her house and by Wednesday the water was halfway up the windows. To make matters worse, everyone in her community got the news that the flood insurance only covered the house, and not the contents. This was the last thing she wanted to hear. The flood also hit home with the farmers. Some of the farmers in our community had their farmland ei-

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ther near Southtown, Finley or Evansville. The farmers had begun to plow the land for their crops, and some had already planted their crops. These crops are their main income, and for some of them, they have put their life savings into it. The farmers will have to start all over when it eventually dries out, and many of them do not have the money to do so. This flood has also affected the animals. Many people got out of their houses with just the clothes on their backs. Now all of their family pets have either had to be be rescued or sadly did not make it out. This especially makes me sick to my stomach because of my love of animals, but I do understand trying to save yourself and your family first. I hope that this tragedy will bring this town and community together, not only for canned food drives and giving money, but also for simple love and support.

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Shelby Andrews he past few days have been crazy. Monday, everyone came to school hearing about floods in places like Nashville and Tipton county. By the end of the day, we heard that Southtown was flooding...fast. The first time I heard about Southtown, I heard Dairy Queen was flooding, and a few hours later, all that was left was the roof. Now everyone I talk to is craving a Blizzard. We ended up getting out of school 20 minutes early for “being very cooperative today.” Once we got out, we had softball practice for about 30 minutes with a total of 8 people. We kept hearing Sydney McNeill’s neighborhood was about to go under and rode over to make sure everything was okay. Alyssa Wells’s house had water in the backyard. She was the only one on her street with flood insurance. People down the street from her were under water, and it was surrounding her house. We were out of school for two days; however, we had a softball game Tuesday against Halls. Our catcher, Shawna Weed, couldn’t get there so we had to play without her. After the game, the team decided to go bag sand because the river was still rising and a second levee had broken. We were at school today and from what I hear, most students came. One reason might be to get away from all the tragedies and emotions they have experienced in the last few days. We are hearing that this flood is the flood of the century, even bigger than in 1937. The Nashville flood is said to be a flood of 1,000 years. Supposedly they’ve had 17 inches of rain. World Color is shutting down, so several people are losing jobs as well as their houses. This is really going to and has brought our community together. We always see these floods on the news, but it’s never been us before so this is so surreal. It’s scary and sad.

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Joseph Smith he flood of 2010 was an enigma to this community. It seemed to creep up on us without any warning. By Monday morning, we were all cornered. In the evening, we had become prisoners of its merciless terror. However, a decision was quickly made to revolt; we had no other choice. After days of war, (emotional more than physical) we gained momentum. Before long, it was over! We showed it the door and said, “Get outta here!” A blinding revolution.

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Shanicqua Williams The water that flows, The water that washes away my belongings Onto its shore. The water with bacteria That kills those among the innocent people. The wind that blows, The water that flows, The tears that flow all down My weary face. Those that go, Those that know, That you’ll never come out alive From this flood so muddy, so wet. A disaster waiting to happen. The doubts of families lost, The injuries, The killings. Why must this disaster go on?

Deanna Plewa uring school Monday, I was shown a few videos and pictures of Southtown in Dyersburg. The sight was unreal. I almost thought they were from a previous flood years ago. This is the type of thing that you see on the news but never believe it could ever happen to you. My first account of the flood happened after school was released early on Monday. Instead of going to the park as planned, my mother called and told me to come look at the field across from my road that was halfway flooded. My mom was freaking out. I really wasn’t sure exactly how close the water was going to come to my house so I packed up my laptop and was on my way. After a few calls to 311, it was discovered that my street should be fine, but the few hours in suspense were terrible. Every 10 minutes, the water in the field was moving closer and closer to my street. We weren’t sure what was to come. Since my house had been clear, we continued our lives not knowing the terrible situation in other areas of Dyersburg. The pictures and video that flooded my Facebook wall were not enough to make me realize the extent of the flood. It wasn't until Tuesday afternoon that my mom told me to drive down 51 towards Memphis to see how bad Southtown had gotten. It hit me as we were driving because I saw many people loading into boats to get to flooded houses. It was horrible. I would say the thing that relieved me the most was the helpful effort of many people. A friend of mine whose backyard is in nine feet of water said that Boy Scout troops drove up and down the roads seeing if anyone needed help. Dyersburg really stepped up in the effort to help their fellow citizens.

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Anonymous yersburg, Tennessee is not invincible. The flood of 2010 has opened my eyes to realize that fact. On Monday, I heard rumors of flooding starting to occur. Well, I thought they were only rumors. I hoped they were only rumors. Monday night at about 11:30 p.m. my brother asked my mom if I could drive us to go see the waters. She let us, but I wish I wouldn’t have. I couldn’t sleep that night because I was so devastated at what all we had seen. It didn’t seem real. How can something like this happen to my hometown and destroy the homes and businesses that it did? Why us? Why innocent people? It didn’t make any sense to me and it still doesn’t. I was determined to do what I could to help. I got up on Tuesday morning and I immediately went through my closet and our house and got clothes,

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food and ended up with ten full bags. I took them to Matthew 25:40 and felt I needed to do more. I saw a bunch of vehicles and people by the fire department downtown. I realized they were loading sandbags on trucks and trailers and taking them off, so that’s where I went and stayed for the majority of the day. That is also where I realized how many people are truly willing to do what it takes to help. There were so many people helping, even people from out of town. I went home that night but still didn’t sleep too well. I knew there had to be more that I could do. I went back to Southtown on Wednesday and stopped at a motel that had many people outside. I went up to a woman who was holding a three-month old baby. I asked her if there was anything she needed, and she simply looked up to me and cried. Through her tears, all I could make of what

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she was saying was that she had just lost everything. She now has nothing. She had stayed at a shelter the night before, but her mom brought them back to the flood site to see if they could get anything from her house. I didn’t have much money on me. What I did have, I gave to her. I have never witnessed a tragedy like this in my life. It makes me feel guilty when I think I need something. I have plenty at my house when others do not even have a home to go to right now. I still am not satisfied with my helping. All I can think about is doing more. Right now is the time for my generation to step up and show our community that we care. This is a disaster, no doubt. With our community and the help of others, we will rebuild it and make those families and businesses have a home again.


Abbi Tabor o one ever thought anything like this would happen to Dyersburg. When you think about natural disasters, you don’t think about small towns being affected. When Dyersburg was hit, all the town came together and helped out as much as they could. When I went over to Alyssa Wells’ neighborhood, I saw the most incredible thing. This neighborhood was being evacuated and I saw the whole neighborhood working together to get everyone moved out. Churches had people, friends and family all come out to help. In Alyssa’s neighbor there was a single mom with two kids and no flood insurance. She had had flood insurance for 20 years and the one year she didn’t have it, this flood came. She had already lived through Katrina and it ruined her last home. She didn’t know what she was going to do. I was standing outside in the driveway and I saw truck after truck come by. This lady worked at Ford and her co-workers brought lots of new trucks to help her move all of her stuff out of her house. Seeing all these people coming together was a very moving sight. As I was walking down the road, I felt like I was in a movie. It felt so surreal. You always see this kind of stuff on the news, but you never really think about how bad it is. It was like everything was in slow motion and it just made me feel like I needed to help.

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Kaytelyn McKee he flood was very tragic. I have a friend that lost everything he had when it began to flood in Southtown. He lost his things in order to help his grandmother. At the church I attend, Southside Baptist, the pastor went to her house and tried moving things upstairs. There was no saving the first floor of the church. The past two days that school was out, I was worried every second. I wanted to do everything I could to help the people that had lost everything

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Brandy Behrens have friends in Cotton Villa, so my boyfriend, his family and I went to help sandbag. We loaded up in a truck and went to pick up sand. It was a sight to see. There were about 30 people filling up sandbags and loading them. We loaded 100 sandbags to take to Cotton Villa at a time. The extra weight in the back of the truck pushed the bed so far down that there was only about an inch clearance between the wheel and the fender. I never in my life thought sandbags could weigh so much. Every muscle in my body was sore. There were lots of sad stories. I met an elderly couple in Cotton Villa. The man had a nerve problem and could barely walk, and the woman was very upset. She said she had many antiques that would be ruined. Also, the man had just gotten a motorized chair that was stuck in his house. The woman told us that both of her sons lived in Nashville, and she had no help. She was so happy after we sandbagged that she tried to pay everyone $100 a piece, but no one would take her money. Later I saw some aerial coverage and her house got about two feet of water. Sandbagging is hard work, and I now understand how devastating a flood can be.

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Matthew Daily don’t know anyone personally that was affected by the flood, but I saw a lot of damage the flood waters caused. Monday right after school, my father and I did our job with the Humane Society to go rescue animals from the flood. While we were over there searching for animals, I saw first hand the damage the water had caused to many of the houses. Not only did the people lose all of their stuff, so did the rescued animals. It was very heart breaking to see all of the damage that was done.

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Finley White he flood of 2010 has affected so many people in our area in West Tennessee. Even people whose homes are far from the danger of the water have seen the effects first hand. One of my friends told me about when they saw a husband and wife getting groceries. The two of them loaded up into a 10-foot boat with one paddle. He dropped his wife off at the “shore” so she could get groceries, and he came back to pick her up when she was finished. Then he paddled both of them and the load of groceries back home. Another story came from Dyersburg Primary School. My mom

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was in the office when a mother came rushing in, choking back tears. Through her sobs she said she needed to check her child out. She told the women in the office what happened. A few weeks ago, she borrowed $4000 from the bank in order to redo the floors in her home. Very soon after the work was done, the water came rolling in. She has no insurance or money to fix the damage done to her home by the muddy water. People are saying this flood will be the end of many people’s savings and businesses because they will have to spend what they have earned just to get back on their feet.

Andriota Gorman y weekend was very scary. I was in Nashville, Tennessee, when it first flooded. It rained for almost three days straight. I remember Saturday when it really started flooding: the highways had cars covered with water, and I saw one long building floating down the highway. Then it just started to crumble up. There were all kinds of houses floating around and people trying to get out of houses into a boat. There were also police in trees trying to get away from the water. Since the highways were flooded, we had to take the back roads to get back to Dyersburg.

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Anonymous he flood of 2010 is a heartbreaking event, but it has shown the caring side of the citizens in the area. As the flood waters rose, people were bagging sandbags, getting out their boats and moving valuables out of houses that were soon to be consumed by the flood waters. Over 400 homes were affected, which leaves over 400 families in loss and devastation. My house was not affected by the flood, and it is almost impossible to imagine the damage that is done. It is unreal to see Dyersburg on the news and to see the footage and live broadcasting that pops up. It breaks my heart to know that people are out of their house or don’t have jobs because of the damage from the flood. I know many teenagers were out trying to help, which proves that we care about other people and our community. A few were helping pack sand and, as they were driving, someone pulled out in front of them. The truck flipped three times. All were okay, but the person who caused it did not even stop to check on them. Most people trying to help have bad things happen to them, but they keep going. God works in crazy ways, but you just have to go with the flow because He knows what is happening.

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Patrick Barch ome of my sister’s friends had to stay the night with her because they couldn’t get home. Then, I had to check on one of my friends because I knew he lived in Friendship and was worried about him. After that, I heard school got cancelled for Tuesday. Then, come to find out, my other friend’s house was just about completely underwater. My parents’ friends house was also underwater and the only thing they have now is their clothes and their car. Next, I heard school was cancelled for Wednesday. But before I heard school got cancelled for Wednesday, some friends of my sister got in a car accident.

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Alexis Wilson ver our “break” I’ve seen the horrible footage from houses halfway or completely flooded. People are having to leave their homes. When I saw Dairy Queen under water, I wanted to cry. I wish I could’ve helped, but I was stuck at home. My sister, brother and their mom were out helping the police with sandbags the whole time. I went down my street and saw fields that could’ve been mistaken for lakes. You never think it will happen to you til’ it does. I’ve seen friends’ houses that I could swim in. All of it was horrible. I’m so glad it didn’t happen to me. I wish it hadn’t happened to anyone!

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Katelynn Summerset believe this flood has brought Dyer County closer together. Many people have lost everything, but this community has lent a helping hand and still continues to help. People are donating money, clothes and food. They are also bringing their boats to help the families salvage what they can. I don’t think Dyersburg was prepared for what happened, but our reaction has touched many lives. Even through the aftermath, this community will join together to help Dyersburg get back up and running.

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Anne Marie Hyman lthough I was not directly affected by the flood, it has made a major impact on me. I feel guilty about the whole situation. I live way out in Newbern where there are no bodies of water close by. As I began to hear about the flooding and people being evacuated from their homes, I knew we were safe. I then began to think about all the people who had been told to prepare to evacuate and the stress and worry they must be under. I felt guilty for feeling safe and worry-free. I now wish there was more I could do for every person affected by the floods. I know things may eventually go back to how they were, but life experiences don’t go away. These people won’t forget the loss and sadness caused by the flood. Also, a part of our town will never be the same. Southtown is going to end up torn down because of the water that has been standing inside its buildings for so long. It has already been three days, and water levels aren’t going down yet. Many people will be without a home for weeks to come. I will do whatever I can to help out.

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Cody Gray e were all sitting in class when the principal walked in the classroom and asked who lived in the county. I raised my hand, and he told me to check out and go home. When I asked him why, he told me the water was rising close to a foot an hour, which is really fast. When I was driving home, I saw the water rising about to cross the Evansville bridge. So I hurried on home. When I got there, I could see a little water, so I went down to look at it. I parked about fifty feet from it, and it got under me. But it didn’t get to my house, so I am thankful.

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Ashten Maldonado never knew water could do so much damage to a small town, and I never expected it to happen to Dyersburg. It upset me when everyone was so excited that we were let out, but didn’t realize that half our town was underwater. I was in shock driving by Evansville on my way home Monday afternoon. I didn’t know that much water existed! As I drove by families were rushing their valuable items out of their homes and being forced to leave. I felt guilty because I only lived two miles away and my house was fine. The following day, Tuesday, the road was blocked off and water was still rising. I felt bad turning around, but I had to get to my softball game. As soon as I walked into the dugout we immediately started talking about the flood. As a team we decided to help. After our game ended we all rode over to the fire department to put sand in bags. Once we arrived it was too late, but we still had to do something. So, we volunteered to load the bags into the trucks. It wasn’t much, but I was glad I actually helped and did something good for our community.

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Anonymous he flood of 2010 brought out the best and the worst of people. Many people used the opportunity to do all they could to help those affected. On the other hand, some people haven’t even paid attention to what’s going on around them. They haven’t seen the devastation, so they don’t have the feeling that it actually happened. Many people have been hurt by this incident, from those whose houses were damaged to those who were trying to help those in need. A few people had a wreck in the process of helping pack sand. Also, a few people were trying to help their friend get stuff out of his house, and the current got too strong, and they had to turn back around and couldn’t save his stuff.

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Seth Hinson he Flood of 2010 destroyed The Plaza Food Center. My grandfather, Van Hinson, and my dad, Kenny Hinson, owned The Plaza. They had been working there for the last 44 years. It was not only a grocery store, but it was a place where anyone could go if they needed help. My grandfather and dad are great people. They would help people out by buying or giving them supplies that they needed, but that stopped the day the flood hit. The flood hurt more than my grandfather’s and dad’s business. It hurt all the people who needed assistance with everyday goods such as food and drinks. There is no other grocery store that will help out people the way in which The Plaza did.

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Want to help? Dyer County Union Mission 213 West Cedar St. Dyersburg, TN Phone: (731)285-0726 dyersburgmission.com

Dyer County Disaster Relief Service 120McGaughey St. E Dyersburg, TN Phone: (731)285-3155 or (731)286-2722

The Salvation Army 328 Mill Ave. S Dyersburg, TN Phone: (731)286-5117

Issue 8 09-10  

Issue 8 09-10

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