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CONTENTS

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Editors Anna Claire Bradshaw William Bumpas Jaylin Gardner Katie Taylor Section Editors Hunter Todd- News Ginny Roper- Opinion Savannah Johnson- Entertainment Andrew Legan- Features Emma Caylor- Sports

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4 News

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Editorials

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Features

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New Library, New Gym Floor, New Schedule...............................................................................3 Special Olympics, .........................................................................................................................4 Relay for Life.................................................................................................................................5 40th Earth Day,Tiger Woods.........................................................................................................6 Student Discounts, School Spending...........................................................................................8 Exemptions.................................................................................................................9 DECA, Gam Teacher Feature......................................................................................................10 Summit on the Summit.............................................................................................................11 Invisible Children......................................................................................................................12 Tap Project..............................................................................................................................13 Kindle..........................................................................................................................................14 Youtube..................................................................................................................................15 Styrofoam....................................................................................................................................16 Softball, NBA Playoffs..............................................................................................................18 MLB Preview..............................................................................................................................19 Usher CD Review, Oceans..................................................................................................20 MGMT Review...........................................................................................................................21 Drake CD Review.....................................................................................................................22

Sports

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Entertainment

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19 Letters to the editor can be on any topic of any length. They may be edited for length or libelous content. Letters to the editor are accepted in room 220.

20 Check it out! Look at the back cover for a calendar of upcoming events!

Photography Editor Elizabeth Bumpas Design Editor William Bumpas Copy Editors Anna Claire Bradshaw Katie Taylor Business Manager Hunter Todd Circulation Manager Savannah Johnson Reporters Shelby Andrews Nic Berry Lauren Brooks Elizabeth Bumpas Walt Carter Rachel Chaffin Logan Collier Maggie Feith Zach Golson Jackson Lay Aura Mae Northcutt McCord Pagan Shelby Pleasant Tyler Roberts Sam Shankle Sean Stapleton Jacob Stegeman Chris Wagner Advisors Suzanne Edwards Nancy Speck Trojan Torch Dyersburg High School 125 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 38024


Special Olympics teaches sports, lifeskills Maggie Feith Reporter wenty-one years ago, George Hancock, a former teacher and coach at Dyersburg High School, brought Special Olympics to our county. Because of his work, students and citizens in Dyer County who are mentally or physically challenged get to experience a day, three times a year, when focus is on their strengths and successes. “We offer a bowling tournament in the fall, basketball skills in the winter, and track and field in the spring,” Special Olympics coordinator Cindy Jones said. Recently, volunteers and Olympic participants came together for the basketball edition of Special Olympics. About 110 athletes, ranging from ages eight to sixty, competed. “I liked bouncing the basketball off of the wall,” sophomore Olympian Zach Ferebee said. “Bouncing the ball around the cones was my favorite,” junior Olympian Lanita Pearson said. Special Olympics would not be possible if it were not for the help of numerous student and community volunteers.

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Making a Difference: (above) Junior Lauren Lewis helps Mark Zimmerman at one of the many stations at the Special Olympics. (below) Senior Rekissa Pavlovsky assists Joedy Barrett with his dribbling.

“We use about 50-60 student volunteers and 15-20 community people,” Jones said. Also, the Special Olympics could not function smoothly without the financial support of local civic organization, Civitan. “Civitan has always been a tremendous supporter of Dyer County Special Olympics withß donations and volunteers,” Jones said. Special Olympics not only gives its participants valuable lessons in physical activities, but also allows them to connect with their peers. “My favorite part of Special Olympics was spending time with my friends and having a great time,” sophomore Olympian Terra Nichols said. One thing that any student could do to help his or her friends and classmates in Special Olympics is to be supportive. Special education teachers here agree that we do an exceptional job. “I can’t imagine a better support for Special Olympics than what we have in Dyer County,” Jones said.

“My favorite part of Special Olympics was spending time with my friends and having a great time.” -Terra Nichols Photos contributed by Abbi Tabor

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School has new plans for library, gym McCord Pagan Reporter his summer, while many students will be enjoying the beach or spending time with relatives, DHS will be undergoing some important and longawaited renovations to its library. “This building has stood here for over 40 years, longer than the old school up by the YMCA, and we have still never done any serious renovations to it,” principal Jon Frye said. “The library here will be made more accessible, more usable, more tech-friendly and is going to be brought into the 21st century.” “This is our greatest need, to have a new library, and we finally had the money to do it,” business manager Neel Durbin said. The new library, currently scheduled to be completed by the start of the new school year, will be doubled in size. The classrooms of history teacher Jeff Golson and English teacher Sarah Morris as well as librarian Patricia Twilla’s office, will be incorporated into the library after the walls are taken down. The north hallway will be closed for the new library, and student traffic will be re-routed. The library will extend across the top floor to the south hallway, where a glass wall will be built to further partition the library. “The idea is for it to be enclosed

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and a place that is more inviting, and hopefully kids will have more time in the morning to go to the library,” Twilla said. “The library needs to be updated; we want a place students can use.” “The whole idea is a more pleasant space to be in as well as a more efficient academic space,” Frye said. The library is planned to be more open and inviting than before, with new furniture, a reading area and, if there are sufficient funds, a coffee bar. “The new library will have an expansion of technology such as laptops and projectors,” Durbin said. Another facet of the library renovation will include a face lift on the outside of the school. The brick and glass windows directly outside the classrooms of Morris and Golson will be torn out and replaced with a glass wall looking out to the by-pass. In addition to a new library, the school recently added a new design, created by basketball coaches Randy Coffman and Blaine Mahaffey to the gym floor after its annual resealing. The gym regularly needs to be resealed, and the school took the opportunity to repaint the floor and give it an updated look. “The gym floor had started to curl up at the very ends, and we went ahead and sanded it down before we painted it,” Frye said

Photo contributed by Neel Durbin

A New Look at the Future: The new library will have a much more modern look and updated technology.

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Photo by Hunter Todd

Diligently Working: Counselor Connie Wright works on next years schedules to try to avoid scheduling conflicts.

Counselors work to rid scheduling problems for upcoming year Hunter Todd Business Manager ith the school year coming to an end, the focus has begun to shift towards next year. Students have already started to prepare for the upcoming school year by choosing classes and turning them in to the counselors for scheduling. With the new trimesters and weeks of scheduling difficulties of the past year, student anxiety has increased. “All of the scheduling changes are annoying,” junior Kalli Parr said. “You never know what order your classes are in.” Our guidance counselors have a plan to stop the scheduling problems from repeating in the future. They have already started the scheduling process which will allow them to make schedules, fix corrections early and minimize the weeks of confusion at the beginning of the next school year. “We hope to give out the schedules on the last day of

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school,” counselor Connie Wright said. “Our plan is to have them ready by next year.” Creating schedules for students can be a long process. “The major challenge of scheduling is giving the students what they want with the resources we have,” Wright said. The scheduling process can take months to complete and requires the use of both the computer to calculate schedules and the counselors to manually fit in students’ classes. To lighten the load, the counselors have each taken on the scheduling of the different classes. Jeremy Hinson, one of the middle school counselors, is responsible for the upcoming freshmen; Connie Wright is responsible for the upcoming sophomores; Jan Holder is responsible for the upcoming juniors and Harry Ferrell is responsible for the upcoming seniors. “We are way ahead of the game,” Wright said. Trojan

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Relay for Life

illuminates path to cure

Katie Taylor Editor very year since 1995, citizens of Dyer County have come together to celebrate hope amidst the devastation of cancer. This event is known as Relay for Life. On April 30, 2010, Dyersburg State Community College will host the event on its grounds from 5:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. In 1986, one man jump-started the first Relay for Life event in Tacoma, Washington, in collaboration with the American Cancer Society. Nearly 25 years later, the event has stemmed from one local fundraiser to over 4,800 community gatherings nationwide. Many only know the event as one of the few times during the year that a traffic jam in Dyersburg is expected. Families flood the track with friends, and lights can be seen from quite a distance. Relay for Life is meant to make a different impression. The Relay for Life website describes the event as an opportunity to “honor cancer survivors, pay tribute to the lives lost to the disease, and raise money to help fight it—all right in our community.” Although the event only lasts a matter of hours, diligent workers spend months in the planning stages. “A lot of time is spent preparing for Relay for Life. Committees are set up to divide the events, and we work with teams on fundraising. We also start outlining ideas in September and host a kickoff in November,” Megan Madden said. Madden is the Relay for Life co-chair, team development chair and the publicity chair. Before the event even begins, a Survivor Reception is held. A survivor is anyone who has had cancer and overcome it. “My favorite part of Relay for Life is the Survivor Reception because survivors get to share their personal stories,” math teacher and survivor Anne Houston said. The event opens as cancer survivors make their first lap around the track. Festivities follow for much of the night, and the last por-

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tion of the evening is a luminary service in which many honor and remember those who have been affected by cancer. Along the track, Relay for Life teams set up booths with food and activities. “Groups of people who want to support Relay’s purpose can form teams and work throughout the year on many different fundraisers. Then they come together the night of Relay for Life to celebrate their efforts and reach out to the community,” cancer survivor Cindy Taylor said. This year there are 30 total teams participating in the event. Examples of some teams include First State Bank, Dyersburg Regional Medical Center, Walmart and the Dyersburg City School system. “In the past, we have had Denim for Dollars, Celebrity service night at Lupo’s and a dessert bar in the cafeteria for staff as fundraisers for the Dyersburg City Schools

Photo by Nick Fowler Photo Contributed by State Gazette

Lighting the Way: A volunteer lights the luminary in honor of those who have died or survived cancer.

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team,” said Dyersburg High School Relay coordinator Amy Morgan. Relay teams are an important part of the event’s fundraising. In fact, last year, $114,618.57 was raised through the work of Relay teams. A unique feature of Relay for Life is the luminaries set out along the track. Each luminary – a white bag with a lit candle inside – is purchased in honor or memory of those affected by cancer. These special memorabilia are not only handled by the actual Relay coordinators; volunteer citizens assist with the project. “The luminary member on the board collects the bags and organizes them. Then, the Key Club, Rotary Club and the Civitan Club place the luminaries along the track,” Madden said. Even though much hard work goes into the event, those efforts do not go unnoticed. “I enjoy walking around looking at the luminaries and hanging out with friends,” senior Carter Crews said. “I also pray for those who have cancer and have died from it.” “What is most impressive to me is the luminaries set up around the track in honor or memory of those affected by cancer,” English teacher Cathy Pence said. Luminaries are further used to spell out the word HOPE in large letters as a concrete reminder of Relay’s purpose. In addition to the lights around Dyersburg State’s campus, music and entertainment will be provided. Ellen Carrington (Miss Tennessee 2008), DHS and DCHS cheerleaders and basketball teams, musicians and comedians are all scheduled to perform. “The choir also sings the national anthem,” senior Kaitlyn Davidson said. “I like seeing all the people smiling and having fun,” sophomore Tyeesha Hill said. But amidst all the festivities and social splendor, we cannot forget the main purpose for which many gather at Relay for Life. “I enjoy seeing the county come together and really work as one for the cure for cancer,” Madden said.

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Earth Day: 40 years and counting Nic Berry Reporter he first Earth Day was celebrated on April 22, 1970. This year marks the 40th anniversary of communities working together to better the environment. Today, Earth Day has become one of the largest secular holidays in the world. U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson created Earth Day to teach the nation about protecting and preserving our environment. In the first year over 20 million people participated. Since then, the numbers have been growing exponentially. Earth Day is now celebrated in 175 countries and by more than a billion people each year. Denis Hayes was the organizer of the first nationwide Earth Day in 1970. He and his team organized thousands of rallies at colleges and universities from coast to coast. Soon people began to realize

that they shared a common interest, and if they worked together, they could do something about it. Students here at Dyersburg High School have also realized that with numbers, they can make a difference. A new club called Global Youth has been created with the goal of having a positive impact on our community. Along with helping the earth, this group is doing things from benefit concerts to raise money for charities to creating TOMS shoes day to raise awareness of all of the needs in the world. “We all shared the same interest and wanted to make a difference in our community, so we decided to work together to accomplish these goals,” junior Sara Hester said. The Earth is in as much danger now as it was when Earth Day first began, with the climate change being the biggest challenge. With participation on Earth Day increasing every year, these challenges that our world faces will soon be a thing of the past.

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Tiger Woods makes comeback at 2010 Masters Sam Shankle Reporter he return of Tiger Woods was perhaps the most anticipated comeback since the return of Michael Jordan. Tiger, a man made for the spotlight, made his return at the 2010 Masters, the biggest tournament in professional golf. His fourteen major championships are the second most of anyone, and his ten-time PGA Tour Player of the year awards are only a few of Tiger's achievements. He was married in 2004 to former swimsuit model Elin Woods. He has two children, Sam and Charlie, and has recorded 71 PGA victories. Until Thanksgiving 2009, life was perfect, as far as we knew. Tiger was once perceived as untouchable, but his struggles began after his second-place finish at the 2009 Tour Championship. Tiger led the tournament going into the last day. He went on to lose his first of his fourteen major championships while having the lead or share of the lead on the last day. This defeat set the stage for Tiger to fall. Tiger's mysterious car crash on November 27 soon followed. The details of the crash are still unrevealed. Because of his infidelity, on December 11, Tiger revealed that he would be taking a break from the game to rebuild his marriage and family. The fall of Tiger has been filled with dropped sponsorships and accusations of drug abuse and domestic violence. Tiger's mistake is per-

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haps the most speculated about in sports history. "Tiger's personal life has not been over-speculated. He was as focused as ever, yet I believed Ernie Els was going pull out the win at the Masters," golf coach Jeff Chandler said. Through all the drama, one thing was for certain at this year’s Masters: the winner was still determined as the one who played and scored the best. Tiger inevitably had a lot on his mind, yet he had as good a chance as any to pull out his fifth Masters victory. Tiger’s focus was evidently present with his fourth place finish. "Perhaps the best way to silence critics would have been with a win at the biggest tournament in golf," junior Chris Berardi said. The critics may not be silenced, but it is certain that Tiger has not lost his dominance. Tiger finished fourth in this year’s Masters but appeared to be struggling all weekend. He set a record for having the most eagles in any Masters and had the lowest total on par 5’s in Masters history. Any other standards would have rated this as a solid performance. By Tiger’s standards, he played pitifully. Tiger seemed to be having trouble with his driver, putter and practice sessions. His performance surprised most, although some expected him to succeed. “I’m not happy; I only enter tournaments expecting to win,” Woods said after his final round.

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Some school spending not academically beneficial Ginny Roper Opinion Editor chartered bus for the football team: $1000 a day. New gym floor: approximately $15,000. What is wrong with this picture? Large sums of money have been spent that are not beneficial to the education process here at Dyersburg High School. Why? Dyersburg High School is recognized as a National School of Excellence. If we are so excellent, why do we come up short when it comes to materials needed to further the education process? There are not enough textbooks in chemistry, A.P. Government, A.P. U.S. History, world studies and geometry, and some students suffer because those classes are the most challenging ones. There are also some classrooms having to use out-

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dated overheads to give notes, making a student’s learning experience less than optimal. Lack of proper funds keeps students from going on field trips to broaden their knowledge. Spending over $15,000 on a resurfaced gym floor and a charter bus for the football team to go to a playoff game is nice and entertains a lot of people; but should the money not be spent more wisely on updated computers and projectors that will enhance the education process here? And how about providing each student with a textbook that can leave the classroom? Instead of comparing ourselves with surrounding schools, we should be the school everyone else looks to. Just be an excellent school. The school should use funds to eliminate academic needs and deficiencies before indulging in other perks and joy rides.

Photo by Ginny Roper

Piling Up: With money so scarce, should schools reallocate available funds more towards academics?

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Photo by Jaylin Gardner

Breaking the Bank: Student Kristin Jamison pays regular adult admission price to enter a recent softball game.

High-priced sporting events break students slim budgets Logan Collier Reporter nlike most high schools and colleges across the nation, Dyersburg High School students are required to pay the same cost for admission to sporting events as the general public. Dyersburg’s sporting events have a five dollar entrance fee. It does not seem like much, but considering that there are 5 football, 13 basketball, 11 baseball, 6 men’s soccer and 10 softball home games, the total is $225 just on sporting events! Teams at Dyersburg High School are restricted by superintendent Lloyd Ramer on how many fundraisers they may do per year. The limit is set so that the general public is not constantly pressured to buy from students. This means that teams must make as much money as possible during the season at home games. Unfortunately for students, most of that money comes from admission. However, many athletes would rather have a smaller budget and more fans in the stands.

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“To me, the more fans at a game makes it more exciting. As an athlete, I enjoy performing in front of my peers. I think that is the case with every athlete. Players will step their game up in every sport if they know their friends and classmates are in the stands. So students should have a discount when they attend sporting events,” senior Collin White said. What should be done? This year the school has offered a spring sports pass. This pass costs $25 and will admit a person to all regular season home baseball, softball, men’s soccer, tennis and track events. This helps students who attend sporting events regularly, but does not save the occasional spectator any money. A solution that would benefit both the regular and occasional fan would be offering a student discount at the gate. If a student presents his or her ID, he or she would be entitled to two to three dollars off the regular admission price. This would not only help the students out financially but allow them to attend more games.

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To be exempt or not to be:

That is the question!

Staff Editorial n one way or another, everyone in this school has been affected by the school exam policy. People have been through the process either by being exempted from an exam or by not meeting the criteria for being exempted. Is the exemption process fair to all students, though? In the school handbook, the whole policy is laid down, but for whatever reason, no one has really studied this policy, and students have just listened about the policy from others. The policy states that if a student has perfect attendance in a class and has a passing grade, the exam is automatically exempted. This policy also states that a student with no more than two absences and at least a 90 average will also be exempt. There are no exemptions, however, for a test that is part of the state administered battery of tests, such as the ACT in classes like ACT prep, and classes taken through another school, such as college courses. What is good about this policy is that it is a means to reward those students who have good attendance and a good average. It also helps to lower the stress level of students because they do not have numerous tests all in the same week. Part of the uncertainity of the policy is what will be accepted as a waived absence and what will not be accepted. Only school-related or school-mandated absences will be waived in the total of absences a student can have. School-mandated absences are ISS, suspen-

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What? You’re sick? Too bad it still counts against you.

sions and Learning Center assignments. It is unfair that students could spend a whole trimester either in ISS or suspended because of unruly conduct and still be counted as present in the class and therefore exempt an exam. A solution to this rule is simply to count these people as officially absent from class or have a set number of times, such as two or three, that one can be sent to ISS before those days will be counted against him or her.

Students should be allowed ‘grace days’ to go visit a college choice. Another issue in the exemption policy is that students are not alloted days to visit colleges. High schools claim that they try their best to get every student who passes through their halls prepared for college or a higher level of education. But given the way the policy is set up, any day a student has to miss to tour a college is counted against the student. In fact, colleges typically only offer guided tours during the day Monday through Friday. And yes, this schedule could work for local colleges, but it does not work for colleges that are far away. Students should be allowed “grace days” to visit a college choice. A solution to the thought of “Oh, the kids will take advantage of this and just skip

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school” is to limit the number of college days each student receives and to have the student have the absence pre-approved and have him get a letter signed by an official of the school saying he was indeed at the school touring and not skipping. Another improvement to this policy would be the number of days a student can miss before having to take the exam. If a student has missed more than three days but has a high enough average, why should that student be made to take an exam that will just bring down her grade? If a student has an average of 95 or better, it is proof that the student knows the material. In life things come up, and it is not the student’s choice whether he or she can come back to school or stay at home. In some medical cases, the doctor will tell a patient to stay at home so that illness does not spread throughout the school system. Yet, the student is not sick enough to be hospitalized. Even so, the days missed count against the student because she is not hospitalized. If a student brings a doctor’s note, that student’s missed days should not be counted because her excuse is legitimate. We should have a policy that treats each student fairly and consistently and will give rewards where students have earned them. If a student misbehaves or has an unexcused absence, then he should not be rewarded with a waiver for the day he missed; but if a student has a real excuse for missing, such as having a doctor’s note or visiting a college, then those days should be exempted.

Here you go son. I’ll see you Monday. Don’t forget your work!

Cartoon by Walt Carter

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Andrew Legan Features Editor or the past three years, Patricia Gam has been a math teacher at DHS. She has impacted numerous students and continues to prepare pupils for the future. Most students are familiar with Gam, but there are also many interesting facts unknown to the student body. After graduating from Union County High School in Morganfield, Kentucky, Gam continued her education at Bethel College. She double majored in math and business administration with emphasis in accounting. Gam has enjoyed continuing her career at DHS. “I like the math department here; we seem to get along pretty well,” Gam said. During her years of teaching, Gam has taught general math, applied math, math for technology, pre-algebra, Algebra I, Algebra II, advanced trigonometry, pre-calculus, statistics, calculus and ACT-prep. “I really didn’t like math until I got to Algebra I, and I’ve loved it ever since,” Gam said. Although proficient in math, Gam also has other areas of interest. She was on the baseball, softball, basketball, girls’ football, tennis and track teams in high school and continued to play tennis in college. In her free time, Gam plays tennis, practices several musical instruments and cooks. “I play the flute, the bari sax, the trombone and the piccolo,” Gam said. “I like all music but country and heavy metal,” Gam said. “That heavy metal gives me a headache.” Gam has influenced many students throughout DHS. “Mrs. Gam teaches in a way that reaches out to all different learning styles, and she is willing to go out of her way to help her students before and after school,” junior Maggie Renshaw said. Her teaching has helped equip students with the math experience

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Photo by Andrew Legan

Preparing for Next Year: Patricia Gam collects and checks textbooks to give to upcoming students. they need for college. “If I have difficulty in math when I go off to college, I’m going to come back and ask Mrs. Gam!” junior Breonna Hill said. “I love when former students call me on the phone and tell me how wonderful their math class was today because they knew what was going on!” Gam said. “Mrs. Gam and I were first-year teachers together. She is a good friend and a great cook! She is also very patient with me when I walk into her room and diss math. She was Sarah Anne’s (daughter) favorite teacher, and our faculty is fortunate to have her!” AP English teacher Suzanne Edwards said. In her classes, Gam has one primary rule: “Don’t be a flake!”

Headed to Louisville:

DECA to compete at national competition

Jackson Lay Reporter his year Dyersburg’s DECA program, a group focused on marketing, will be competing at the national competition. “We’re really looking forward to it,” DECA teacher Judy Henry said. To win the chance to compete at the national level, students must first succeed at the regional and state level. The regional competition consists of a role play and a test, while the state competition includes an additional role play. Photo contributed by Rebecca Moore Dyersburg has had a DECA organization Celebrating their Successes: DECA students for the past 11 years and has competed at pose with teacher Judy Henry during state comthe national level for 10 out of 11 years. petition in Nashville, Tennessee. DHS will be represented this year by Becca

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Moore, Chelsea Metz, Cason Nobles, Anna Claire Bradshaw and Kayla Dubrule. Because the group received diamond level status, they were able to select CJ Nolan to attend the Senior Management Industry. The national competition is much more competitive and brings students from all 50 states. Several other nations, such as Guam and Canada, will also be participating, making this an international competition. Previous locations for the competition include Orlando, Florida, and Anaheim, California. This year nationals will be held in Louisville, Kentucky. “These underclassmen need to work hard because next year we’re headed back to Florida!” Henry said.

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Summit on the Summit raises awareness of clean water crisis

Wikipedia

“The rate of ascent (10,000 feet to 19,000 feet) tions, including winds, rain and snow--as well Lauren Brooks in a period of five days is pretty extreme,” as nausea, injuries and dizziness. But the force Reporter of cause kept them going. ver one billion people across the photographer Jimmy Chin said. “I don’t think any of us knew exactly what Climbers agreed that the mental state of globe do not have access to clean drinking water. This is the cause be- mind was as important as the physical state of we were getting ourselves into, from all the weather and other physical and mental ashind Summit on the Summit. Led by mind. Grammy-nominated Kenna, a group of “It was a combination of the mental and the pects. But we are climbing this mountain for climbers started the hike to reach the summit psychological aspects of the mountain and the a purpose, and we will get there,” SOTSK director Brooke Fedro said. of Mount Kilimanjaro. Finally, after six days of trials and triThe inspiration for Summit on the Sumumphs, the group successfully reached mit sparked when Kenna’s father told the summit. After a brief celebration, the him the impact of waterborne illnesses. group headed back down the mountain. Kenna decided to do something about it. Even though the climb is complete, “It wasn’t a big deal at first. It was just Kenna continues to stress the importance, me going on a climb and hopefully raissaying that the clean water crisis is not a ing money for the cause,” he said. distant, in-the-future issue. It is now. When asked why he chose to climb a Alexandra Costeau said that we are all mountain, Kenna said, “Water is the one connected on the issue because water is a major thing that we need to live,” he says, universal need that affects us daily. “If we “so that’s why I selected Kilimanjaro.” think about our connection that way, I beKenna, who had attempted to climb the lieve we will find a solution.” mountain several years prior, had a “I hope we can broaden public knowl“vendetta” against the mountain, which Calling for Support: Members of the Summit on only added to his drive to complete what the Summit team send their heartfelt message to edge. Water is a precious resource, and we’re misusing it flagrantly,” Kick he had started. the world while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro. Kennedy said. He had little trouble assembling a team, “I think the climb was a great way to direct and the final product was something to be slow-but-steady pace that you had to go up it, proud of: 300 people ranging from recording and that sometime made your brain just want attention to the issue. It made me want to to explode because you just wanted to get climb Mount Kilimanjaro,” sophomore Abbi artists, photographers, actors and activists. Tabor said. The climb began at approximately 11,000 there so badly,” actress Jessica Biel said. Summit on the Summit: Kilimanjaro, a 90“There’s an eighty percent chance you’re feet, and not long after the hike began, the climbers soon realized some of the many chal- going to be uncomfortable, so you have to minute documentary, aired Sunday, March 14 lenges that lay ahead; several climbers could rewire to make uncomfortable, comfortable,” on MTV. Viewers can watch the episode on mtv.com. already feel shortness of breath because of the entertainer Lupe Fiasco said. The climbers endured harsh weather condiextreme altitude.

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Global Youth discovers new organization to aid:

www.invisiblechildren.com

Bringing Change: Co-founder Jason Russell is one of the three filmakers who created the group. Andrew Legan Features Editor n northern Uganda, the longest running war in Africa continues to rage. For twenty-three years, an unsettled conflict has existed between the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and the Government of Uganda. The LRA, led by Joseph Kony, is classified as a terrorist organization by the US Patriot Act of 2001. Ninety percent of the rebel militia’s troops were abducted as children. Because of Kony’s constant efforts to overthrow the government and instigate more violence, the conflict is sometimes referred to as Joseph Kony’s War. The non-profit organization, Invisible Children, aims to end the conflict in northern Uganda. The group was founded by Jason Russell, Laren Poole and Bobby Bailey. Using media and documentaries to display the agony of the lives of the devastated child soldiers and innocent villagers, the association has shed light on one of the greatest war atrocities of all time. “Basically, Kony has been terrorizing all of Uganda and East Africa. It’s more of a battle of his pride and ego,” Invisible Children representative Eugene Kim said. Through intense activism in the USA and other developed countries, Invisible Children calls out to politicians and individuals in places of power to support the cause and help end the conflict. They work to aid the people in northern Uganda by improving water sanitation, education, buildings,

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economy, technology and power in the region. The new DHS student organization, Global Youth, discovered Invisible Children and decided to take action in supplying aid. “We decided to sponsor a benefit concert to provide a donation to Invisible Children in hopes of helping the child soldiers in northern Uganda,” Global Youth founder Savannah Johnson said. The concert, to be held at First Christian Church, will be made up of a variety of bands and musicians from DHS. An assortment of musical genres will be displayed, and the diversity is sure to be entertaining. With a coffee bar provided by Java Café, an informal atmosphere will be created in which the audience can enjoy the show. All admission profits will benefit Invisible Children. “We chose Invisible Children because it affects kids our age, just on another continent,” Johnson said. “The Invisible Children campaign Schools for Schools allows schools in the US to raise money for schools in Uganda.” Uncertainty about the future remains constant in northern Uganda, where Kony has failed to sign the Final Peace Agreement for a fourth time. Where a child lives should not determine whether or not he or she lives past his or her fifteenth birthday. “Join our Schools for Schools program and get involved politically. We ask people to inform their congressmen,” Kim said. Aid is more urgent now than ever, and there is an opportunity for everyone to help by attending the Global Youth Benefit Concert on May 16 at 6:30 p.m.

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Tap Project: Buying clean water one child at a time

Aura Mae Northcutt Reporter he UNICEF Tap Project was started in 2007 in New York City and was based on one concept: Restaurants ask their patrons to donate one dollar or more for the tap water they usually got for free. The money that is gained through this project is used to bring clean and accessible water to millions of children around the world. Nearly 900 million people around the world lack access to clean drinking water, and almost half of those are children. Because of many water-related diseases, about 4,100 children die every day. By donating just one dollar, one can buy a child around the world forty days of clean water. Only ten dollars can buy a year’s supply of clean water. "Water is something that we as Americans often take for granted, but the reality is the lack of clean and accessible drinking water kills 4,100 children under the age of five every day. As a new father I have become

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highly attuned to the needs of children everywhere," 2010 UNICEF Tap Project National Spokesperson Pete Wentz said. “Unfortunately, it’s usually when emergencies like Haiti occur that the importance of clean water really becomes apparent to the rest of us.” Most of the water that is donated is sent to Togo, the Central African Republic, Vietnam, Guatemala and Haiti. Between 1990 and 2004, 1.2 billion people were able to get to accessible and clean drinking water and improved sanitation facilities. To help get all this water, UNICEF believes in rainwater harvesting and affordable family water filters. The week of March 21 through March 27 was dedicated to the World Water Week, encompassing March 22nd as the United Nations’ World Water Day. The point of this week is to get a little closer to their goal of getting people without clean and accessible water from fifty percent down to zero per-

cent. There are many restaurants in Tennessee involved in this project. Most of them are located in Chattanooga and Signal Mountain. These restaurants include Between the Bridges Cafe and Mojo Burrito. UNICEF provides access to safe water and sanitation facilities while also promoting safe hygiene practices in more than 100 countries. Thousands of students, volunteers, dining patrons and restaurants, as well as corporate, community, celebrity and government supporters have come together to join the project and have raised over $1.5 million to provide over a million children and young adults with clean and accessible drinking water. You can also get involved by becoming a UNICEF Tap Project volunteer, becoming a UNICEF Tap Project participating restaurant, donating money to the UNICEF Tap Project or even by telling your friends about the website and encouraging them to donate. Photo by Aura Mae Northcutt

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Kindle: revolutionizing reading across globe Shelby Pleasant Reporter he Kindle is Amazon’s new e-reader. This device can accomplish many tasks. Not only does it provide a portable connection to dozens of books that are owned and are also free, but also to thousands that one can buy. The Kindle is not restricted to books alone. Kindles can access books, magazines, blogs, newspapers, one’s own personal documents emailed to the Kindle, pictures and now music files for listening pleasure while one reads. Amazon’s prices for products range between free for the older classics or not very well-known books to $14.99 for the newer books. The makers of the Kindle and other E-books are hopeful that producing this technology will help cut down on tree consumption because all the books will be in one place and not on paper. “The Kindle will help save trees and decrease trash and waste from books being lost or thrown away,” junior Mary Baker said. According to Amazon.com, there are many attributes that make the Kindle revolutionary. Kindles have a wireless option where books can be delivered straight to the Kindle. Kindles do not use Wi-Fi, though; they use the same high-speed data network as advanced cell phones. This means that searching for that special spot for service is a thing of the past. With this technology (WhisperNet) one can browse books from California all the way to China. Another revolutionary feature of the Kindle is the way the picture is displayed. With the new Eink technology, ink particles disperse across the

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page and stay stationary to form words, pictures or blank space. This technology allows the image to “freeze” on the screen for reading. “I like the E-ink feature of the Kindle because battery life is not wasted trying to constantly keep an image displayed,” junior Madison Ricks said. The Kindle also offers an option to sample a book before buying. This sample contains the first chapter of a book. This way a person can see if she will like the book or writing style of the author before buying. The Kindle also sports a long-lasting battery life. If its wireless is left on all the time, the Kindle needs charging every other day. If wireless is turned off, it only needs to be charged roughly every two weeks. It also only takes two hours to recharge fully. Now there is an application on the iPod Touch and the iPhone where one’s Kindle information is easily accessible. A person can choose the option to send a purchase directly to the Kindle or to read it straight on his or her iPod or iPhone. The only downfall to this application is that one has to have a Kindle account and e-mail address to be able to use this application to its full potential. The downside to the Kindle, for some people, is that the Kindle is different from just reading a book. The makers of the Kindle were thoughtful about whether or not avid readers would enjoy the process of reading off the Kindle or would not miss having a book to hold. “The Kindle is great and all, but I would rather read with an actual book in my hands,” Baker said. “I miss the feel of the book in my hands and the sound of the pages turning,” Ricks said.

“The Kindle will help save trees and decrease trash and waste from books being lost or thrown away.” -Mary Baker

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Photos courtesy of Wikipedia

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Top five funniest YouTube videos

Zach Golson Reporter ouTube is one of the most popular video websites for any age, and there are millions of videos watched every day. YouTube is a website for comedic, music or any kind of video, and the videos are all watched by people around the world. However, there are some videos that are watched more than others. Here are some examples of some of the most watched comedic videos in the world. The Fred Series: This series is about a fiveyear-old boy who has a sixteen-year-old mother who is an alcoholic. Every time something major happens, he makes a video diary about it, which makes up the Fred series. His videos are a global sensation and make kids all over the world laugh. He has made almost a hundred videos. Some examples would be Fred Loses His Meds, Fred Goes to the Dentist and Fred Gets Babysat. Each one he makes gets millions of views. If he keeps this up, he will be more than an internet sensation. All you need to do to find this video is type in “Fred.” Bacon is Good for Me: Based on an episode of the TV show “Wife Swap,” this video uses an excerpt from it. A woman comes to a house

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that has a bunch of junk food, and a small child wants to keep it all. However, the woman gets rid of the bacon, which is the kid’s favorite snack. He gets so mad that he starts ranting, packs his bags and leaves the house. He tells the woman that she will never see his face again.

Muffins: This video is about an elderly woman who works for a company called Cunningham Muffins. She has a grandson named Johnny, and he is visiting for the weekend. As the video starts, it’s morning, and the elderly woman is making muffins for breakfast. Then, she begins showing all the flavors her muffin

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company has, and they seem to be very normal. The video then goes on with very different kinds of muffins: a bird muffin, bullfrog muffin and cartoon muffin. “I thought this video was very different, but it was hilarious,” freshman Melanie Ward said. Keywords to search for this video would be either “muffins,“ or the maker, “Liam Kyle Sullivan.” Harry Potter Puppet Pals: This clip is a parody of the Harry Potter series. It introduces every character of the entire Harry Potter cast. As the video goes on, it begins to form a plot, with Voldemort attacking Hogwarts castle. David after the Dentist: A little kid who is under the influence of nitrous oxide or laughing gas has just come back from the dentist. He asks his dad where he is and what is happening to him. Then, all of the sudden he gets out of his seat and screams at the top of his lungs, then falls back down and goes loopy again. This kid does not know why he is there or how many fingers he has. These are all videos that have captured the laughs of millions. YouTube continues to entertain viewers with comedic videos that come out daily. In the future, YouTube is predicted to be the most watched video site in history.

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Saving the earth from styrofoam Jackson Lay Reporter very year Americans throw away 25,000,000,000 styrofoam cups, enough to circle the earth 436 times. Everyone knows that styrofoam takes a long time to break down, but just how long does it really take? It depends on whom you listen to. Just a few minutes on the internet will find you answers ranging from 50 years, 500 years, 2,000 years, up to a million years or never. But what’s so bad about styrofoam? After all, it’s used in cups, plates and packaging. The truth is styrofoam is a common name for a compound known as polystyrene, or plastic number six. Studies have shown that styrofoam cups lose weight while they are in use. This means that you’re actually drinking part of the cup. One of the main chemicals found in styrofoam is called styrene, this is the part of the cup or plate that is lost while you’re using it. A 1986 study showed that styrene was present in 100% of the human fat tissue that was tested. Styrene can actually build up to levels that can cause fatigue, nervousness, difficulty sleeping, blood abnormalities, difficulty hearing, decreases in reaction time and memory loss, low platelet and hemoglobin counts and may even help cause cancer. So what can we do to limit or reuse styrofoam? Here are some ideas: Saving styrofoam and cutting it up to use as insulation for my house. While it’s true that styrofoam is a fantastic insulator, it is extremely flammable and gives off toxic fumes when burned. Using styrofoam for insulation is a really bad idea.

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Getting a lot of it together and burning it to get rid of it. Once again, styrofoam is toxic when burned, so it’s a really bad idea to burn it, even though it reduces the size. Cutting up cups or saving the packaging peanuts to reuse later. This is probably one of the better ideas, allowing you to save money on other packaging and giving styrofoam another use. Use cups as pots for plants around the house. While these may be cheap, the styrene from the cup will leak into the potting soil the plant is in. While the plant will still grow, you’re polluting dirt, which really does not make recycling worth it. Decoration. You can paint styrofoam with non-oil based paints and place it anywhere around the house. You can use it as filling for a plastic potted plant, or hang styrofoam balls around the house. They also make excellent snowflakes. Tupperware to restaurants. Instead of using a styrofoam box to take home your leftovers, bring a Tupperware bowl. It keeps the restaurant from using so much styrofoam and prevents chemicals from leaking into your food. Draw on it! Take a pen or pencil and just go crazy. This keeps you from automatically throwing it away, and reduces the amount of paper you use. So the next time you reach for that cup of hot coffee or that to-go box at a restaurant, remember what that cup or box can do to you. Make the healthy choice and help save the earth.

Photos by Jackson Lay

Enjoying Lunch: Junior Tiffany Halliburton eats lunch using a styrofoam tray and a styrofoam cup.

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Preparing for Lunch: The cafeteria staff stacks trays to prepare for the upcoming lunch shift.

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NBA post-season to get underway Chris Wagner Reporter s the college basketball season comes to a close, the NBA post-season is just starting. Sixteen of the best teams in the NBA, eight teams from each of the league’s two conferences, will have the privilege of competing for the glorious championship ring that awaits the winner of the NBA playoffs. The teams will be seeded 1 to 8 in a tournament bracket with all the rounds in a best-of-seven format. As usual, the Los Angeles Lakers have a very strong team, with stars like Kobe Bryant and Ron Artest, but the Cleveland Cavaliers make it competitive with standouts Lebron James and Shaquille O’Neal. They have already clinched the top seed in the Eastern Conference by posting their second conPhoto Courtesy of Wikipedia secutive 60-win season; they also won the Central Celebrating Victory: Lakers star Division for the second year in a row. player Kobe Bryant holds up the troOther teams that have claimed a playoff spot inphy the team received for winning clude the Orlando Magic, Boston Celtics, Dallas

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the national championship.

Softball begins new season:

Rocky start turns into strong season as the team continues to develop Shelby Pleasant Reporter his year’s softball team is starting off at a slow pace with a record of 11-11, wins to losses, but are hopeful for a great season. “I think that we will get better as the season goes on,” junior Leia Barch said. Not everything has been working for the team. “We need to keep everyone healthy and focused,” assistant coach Sarah Morris said. “The weather has been a problem. We’re not able to be out on the field and get real game scenarios,” senior Shawnna Weed said. “Lack of confidence tends to hold people back during the games and practices,” Barch said. With the season just starting out, the team has high expectations for the upcoming season. “We have a lot of talent on the team

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Photo by Shelby Pleasant

Sliding Home: Sophomore Shelby Andrews scores in the second game of a double-header against the Martin Westview Chargers.

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Mavericks, Oklahoma City Thunder and the Denver Nuggets. However, despite having a decent regular season, teams like the Memphis Grizzlies and the Houston Rockets have been eliminated from playoff contention. “I wish the Grizzlies would’ve made the playoffs, but even if they did, I couldn’t see them going far,” sophomore Joseph Smith said. Last year, the L.A. Lakers won their 15th championship title, beating Dwight Howard and the Orlando Magic. “I’m really excited about the upcoming playoffs; there will be a lot of drama and action,” junior Terrence Murphy said. The playoffs unofficialy start the 15th of April, when the team rosters are announced. The games begin on the 18th with ABC, ESPN, TNT and NBA TV broadcasting the games in the United States.

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even though the majority are young. If we come together as one, we will be an outstanding team,” Weed said. “Although the season is starting out rough, I believe we could be the best by the end of the year if we truly give it our all,” sophomore Julia Martinez said. Everyone pretty much has the same goals for this season. The hopes of the season are to be able to make it to the district tournaments and maybe even farther. Also, players have individual goals as well. “Our goal for the season is to continually improve,” Morris said. “I want to better myself as a player and to come together with my team,” Martinez said. “My goal is to give it my all, keep my head up and be remembered,” Weed said. “As a team we hope to get better each game in preparation for the district tournament,” Morris said.

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Major League Baseball looks to have exciting 2010 season Jacob Stegeman Reporter he Major Leagues have always been dominated by the New York Yankees. They have what seems like a limitless supply of money to go out and buy a team of All Stars. Their rampant spending has paid off in the form of 27 world championships, and they have a great chance of winning a 28th this year. However, their deep pockets have made them a shining example of one of the problems with baseball. “Baseball needs a salary cap like the NFL and NBA. Small market teams do not have a legitimate shot at winning the World Series,” science teacher Jim MacArthur said. Closer to home, the St. Louis Cardinals and their archrivals, the Chicago Cubs, will battle for the National League Central Division title. This heated rivalry is one of the best in sports and has some of the most passionate fans. “I hope the Cubs can find the magic this year. Also, I hope the Cardinals lose every game,” social studies teacher Josh Dye said. The heated races for division penants are usually won by the teams with the best pitching. This year should be no different as the favorites to win their divisions all have an ace pitcher who is in contention for the Cy Young award. Chris Carpenter and Adam Wainwright of the St. Louis Cardinals

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and the Yankees’ C.C. Sebathia are the favorites for the coveted award for the best pitcher of the year. Along with great pitching, the top teams all have superstars that are in the running for MVP. In the American League, Joe Mauer of the Minnesota Twins, Mark Teixeira of the New York Yankees and Evan Longoria of the Tampa Bay Rays are the leading candidates for the prestigious award. Albert Pujols of the St. Louis Cardinals is considered the best player in the game right now and has a great chance of winning a third straight National League MVP award and his fourth of his career. “Albert Pujols is a beast!” senior Carter Crews said. Jason Heyward of the Atlanta Braves is favored by almost everyone who knows anything about baseball to win the Rookie of the Year award. Even people who do not know his name think he will win. “The stud from the Braves is going to win,” Spanish teacher Señor Roy said. The Madness of March has come to pass. Big hits and touchdowns no longer captivate viewers. All that is left is the crack of a bat hitting a cork ball and the cheers of thousands as that ball sails into oblivion. Baseball is finally back, but what will the return of America’s pastime hold for its fans?

Photos courtesy of Wikipedia

Sliding into First Base: Chicago outfielder Kosuke Fukudome sprints to first base after hitting a pop fly. Trojan

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Making the Pitch: Cubs pithcer Carlos Zambrano curves the ball like a snake across the field to home plate.

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Usher’s Raymond v. Raymond includes personal lyrics, new beats Emma Caylor Sports Editor t the age of 13, Usher Raymond IV kicked off his career with a first place win on Star Search. His career did not stop rolling, and he soon turned into a teen sensation and major icon. With two multiplatinum albums, My Way and 8701, and his 2004 album Confessions, selling over 10 million copies, Usher created a success story that proved his talent to people everywhere. His albums usually portray a personal tune, and Confessions relates to Usher’s personal life and past relationships. Usher’s new album is no different. Raymond V. Raymond hit the stores March 30th, and the songs relate to the hard divorce with his wife, Tameka Foster. Usher told People Magazine that his new album will be "racy, risky and edgy, and sometimes about personal experiences.” Also in an interview with GMA, Usher said his wife and he were ok with the divorce and are happy. They are going to try and provide the best life for their children.

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On the other hand, Usher’s new album has the love song theme he has always carried out but lost the R&B tune. Songs like “Monstar” and “Lil Freak” have transformed into what is a mix between hip-hop and rap. These songs contain more editing and digital additions and less of Usher’s voice than those of past albums. He has transformed from the

slow heart-aching romance songs to the upbeat dance music. Personally, I believe Usher has a great voice, and this album will indeed reach out to people because of the trend of music lately; however, I do not think it tops Usher’s previous album Confessions which featured his voice more than the digital talent of his producers. So old-time Usher fans, Raymond v. Raymond may not be what you are expecting, but it definitely still shows Usher’s music talent. I think the transformation of his lover boy image to the big pop star might be a good change in today’s music world. This album does have two slow songs: “Papers” which talks about his being ready to sign for his divorce and “Foolin’ Around” which is about how sorry a guy is for being bad to a girl. These songs bring back that 2004 Usher image, but besides that, it is all fast-paced and different from past albums. Even though his new album is less R&B, I still give it an A. Expect to see and hear these songs at the top of the charts, but be ready for the change.

Dive into Oceans with Disneynature’s new movie Savannah Johnson Entertainment Editor hat better way to celebrate Earth Day than learning about the waters that cover nearly 75 percent of our Earth? On April 22nd, the mysterious world that lies beneath the surface was brought to the big screen with Oceans. In 2009, Disneynature presented Earth, a gripping film focused on three animal families and their lives on our planet. This year the same studio has a different focus by presenting Oceans. The directors, Jacques Perrin and Jacques Cluzaud, bring

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the diverse life of the ocean to the big screen. By using the latest underwater technologies, the film features the oceans in a way that they have never been seen. The new technology allows the directors to capture how the ocean is seen through the eyes of the creatures that live there. Not only can you explore the oceans like never before, you can also benefit by saving a precious part of our ecological system. If you see Oceans this week, Disneynature will make a donation in your honor to save our coral reefs.

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Electronic rock band releases psychedelic second album William Bumpas Editor rippy rock duo MGMT, known for hits like “Kids” and the pulsing “Electric Feel,” released its second album on April 13. Congratulations is a follow-up to the band’s 2008 debut Oracular Spectacular. On their first album, Brooklyn duo Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden fused 90’s Britpop with electronic rock and a helping of 70’s psychedelia. The result was an odd but curiously irresistible sound that landed the band four top 10 singles in 2008. Rolling Stone named Oracular Spectacular the 18th best album of the decade, and the band has enjoyed international success as well. For most new musicians, the cliché “second album” is about the difficulty of the life of fame and the ensuing identity crises. While MGMT is no exception, the band took steps to avoid this theme in Congratulations. The resulting sound is more of a departure from their previous work than a continuation of it. The new album is more strange and experimental, more raw and a little more psychedelic. The 70’s-pop influence can be heard more strongly, sounding at its best almost like The Beatles. MGMT has stated that the album was deliberately intended to produce no singles, but rather to engage listeners as one complete work. Few of the songs are selfcontained or “catchy” enough for radio play, and many shift several times between different melodies—and even different genres—over the space of just a few minutes. Nevertheless, the album contains a few golden moments, such as the climax of “Flash Delirium” and the first part of “Siberian Breaks.” The title track “Congratulations” is more subdued than most of the album’s other songs, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Casual listeners beware: MGMT may simply be a little too weird. However, Congratulations can be quite rewarding to those willing to give the album a chance.

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www.whoismgmt.com

Experimental Rockers: Electro-pop icons Ben Goldwasser and Andrew VanWyngarden have become known for their uniquely far-out sound. Inset: The cover of MGMTs new album is in keeping with the bands psychedelic aura. Trojan

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Rapper assures fans they will thank him later for new album

Tyler Roberts Reporter n an era of music when most popular artists rarely stay in the spotlight more than a year, Aubrey Drake Graham, better known simply as Drake, is confident he will be the next musician to reign over the hiphop/rap industry. Drake’s debut, full-length studio album is scheduled to hit the shelves on May 25, 2010, and after several hit singles, he is striving to step into the spotlight with style. The halfAfrican American, half-Jewish Caucasian has titled his debut album, Thank Me Later, assuring himself and others that, although he has yet to blow up the spotlight, the world will soon realize what diehard Degrassi fans have known for years--Aubrey Drake Graham is an exceptionally talented artist, and he guarantees he is here to stay with his new album For those unaware, Drake is a Canadian actor and recording artist, who for nearly a decade has been well known internationally for his character in Degrassi: The Next Generation, a Canadian show about teenage youth. Drake plays Jimmy Brooks, a jock superstar who was shot and paralyzed by a classmate. After his character graduated from the show,

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however, Drake developed a close affiliation with hip-hop mogul and American icon, Lil Wayne, and his recording label, Young Money Entertainment. He officially signed with Lil Wayne and the record label as a professional recording artist on June 29, 2009. He has since become the most popular member of Young Money, a group who recently released a collective album to great recognition, and worked with hip-hop’s most esteemed artists and producers, including Lil Wayne, Birdman, Eminem, Dr. Dre, Timbaland, Kanye West, and Jay-Z. His mixtape, So Far Gone, contained two towering hits, “Best I Ever Had,” and “Successful,” and was named by MTV as the “Hottest Mixtape of 2009.” Such critical acclaim earned Drake several nominations and awards, even the opportunity to perform with Lil Wayne at the 2010 Grammys. Most of America’s youth have already tuned in to the artist who offers a breath of fresh air to a music industry currently owned by only a handful of musicians, but for those who have yet to experience the musician that Drake is, his debut album possesses the potential to be the most popular album of 2010. Quite simply, Drake guarantees that if anyone does not know who he is yet, by the time his album drops this summer, he or she will. Flowing smooth, PG-13 rhymes into intricate ideas while steadily offering catchy hook-lines and choruses worthy of both radio and club play, Drake has been working underground for the last few years with the hip-hop industry’s most innovative producers. He has searched fervently for his signature style and formula for hit records before releasing his heavily anticipated full-length debut. Drake claims Thank Me Later was influenced by several artists across a span of the last two decades, including the poetic master, Nas, who was a musical powerhouse in the 90’s, as well as Outkast member, Andre 3000, who is well known for his catchy choruses and danceable rhythms. Compared to his mixtape, Drake claims Thank Me Later will be “bigger, happier, and more victorious, because that’s where I am in my life.” Drake may very well celebrate the victory he

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aspires for, as the likelihood of a gold--maybe even platinum--album is high, since his first single from the album, “Over,” was released in early March and peaked at #17 on Billboard’s Hot 100 chart and #14 on Billboard’s Top R&B/Hip-hop songs. Drake believes the reason for his universal popularity is his strenuous attempts to appeal both to teens and adults, as well as all ethnic races and listeners of the most popular genres. He says, “I have songs for women who want to feel special. I have songs for dudes, too--if you thought my mixtape was too soft, this is one you will enjoy.” To offer further appeal, Drake has collaborated with hip-hop’s most popular artists on several tracks for the new album. Confirmed tracks with other artists feature “Light Up” with Jay-Z, and “Afrika Boombatta” with Lil Wayne. He has even hinted at an interest in working with the currently most popular rock group, Kings of Leon. Whether or not Thank Me Later lives up to the expectations Drake and his fans have set for himself, he assures us all with his latest single that “it‘s far from over.” For fans of Lil Wayne, or hip-hop in general, be sure to look for Thank Me Later to hit music stores shelves on May 25, 2010. Do not be surprised if it becomes the most heavily played album of the summer, because Drake is the apprentice of hip-hop’s biggest prodigy since 2pac, and he assures fans he is an artist intent on being “successful.”

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The Back 9

Waltons Office Products

476 Hwy. 51 Byp. Dyersburg, TN 285-7491 Fax: 286-1534

(Indoor 9-Hole Miniature Golf Course)

Green Village Shopping Center 285-2855 P.O. Box 30 870-762-2100

Amorel, AR 72310

The Road to Success is Always Under Construction

1311 Court St.

Dyersburg, TN

285-5185


April and May Sunday 25

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 27 28 29 30 26 Soccer v. Milan (A) Softball v. Obion County (A) Baseball v. Milan (H)

02

03

Tennis v. Trenton (A) Soccer v. Dyer County (A) Progress Reports

04

05

Soccer Final Soccer v. Munford (H) Baseball v. Brighton (H) Alg. I Track A/AA End of Course Test Pentathalon (A) AP Government Exam

09

10

Soccer v. Fayette Academy (A)

Baseball 13AA District Tourney (A) AP English Lit. Test Biology End of Course Exam

Marching Band Camp May 3-7 from 3:30- 5:00

11

12

13

Track A/AA Regionals (H) Choir Concert

Soccer Region A/AA Tourney May 10-20 Youth Leadership Graduation

Soccer Semi-final Baseball v. Dyer County (H) Tennis District Tourney

07

06

AP Calculus Exam English II End of Course Test

Track A/AA Regionals (H)

Saturday 01

08

Track Relays (A) AP US History Exam Jr. Choral Festival Dual Bio. Exam

14

Student Sports Physicals

15

APHuman Geography Exam Dance Class Recital

Thespian Banquet

Music Band Camp May 10-13 from 6:30- 9:00

16

17

18

Band Banquet Baseball Regional Semi-Finals

23

24 Track State Pentathalon(A)

English 9 End of Course Test US History End of Course Test

25

19

20

Baseball Regional Finals

26

21 FFA Banquet

27

Senior Exams Soccer State A/AA Tourney 26, 27 and 29

Senior Exams State Track Meet (A)

22

Baseball State Sectionals Track A/AA Sectionals (A)

28

Soccer Sectionals

29

Graduation Practice

Honors Banquet treats students

O

n April 22nd, students were honored for accomplishing the grades to maintain a GPA of 3.6 or higher. The Honors Banquet is sponsored by the Academic Booster Club and relies on the time and donation of the parent boosters. Every Honors Banquet has a theme. This year’s theme was Night in the Spotlight. Students looked forward to the keynote speaker, the delicious food, awards and announcement of valedictorian and Trojan Scholars.

Photo by Julie Norville

Photo by Charlotte Gardner

Celebrating Achievement: (Left) The Trojan Scholars, who were chosen by their ACT scores and classroom grades, proudly pose for their picture. (Above) Smiling one last time, the seniors who achieved a composite score of 30 and above on the ACT are recognized Thursday evening.


Issue 6 09-10  

Issue 6 09-10

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