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TABLE

OF

CONTENTS

Trojan Editors-in-Chief Andrew Ford William Lay Kaitlyn Turney Mandy Yates Assistant/Production Editors Anna Claire Bradshaw Will Bumpas Kristen Kerr Katie Taylor

NEWS 3 DECA,

North Korea

5 Mr. Pattersons retirement,

Business Editor Hannah Chapman

Choir Tour

6 Top 10 10 FBC Mission

Business Staff Allyson Agee Amber Donaldson Elizabeth Finley Circulation Manager Jaylin Gardner

EDITORIALS

Circulation Staff Patrick Heckethorn Savannah Johnson

12 G20,

FCCLA

13 Nutrition

Design and Technology Editor David Grueser Electronic Columnist James Northcutt

FEATURES

Exchange Manager McCord Pagan

15 Fitness 16 Tre Mosely 17 Mascot 20 Senior sports scholarships 22 DHShistory, Carmike 25 TOMS,

Opinion Page Manager Matt Coker Photography Managers Alex Jacobi Madison Johnson Sports Manager Emma Caylor

Tornadoes

26 Nutrition 28 Finance

Staff Cartoonist Will Bumpas

SPORTS 30 Calapari,

Baseball 31 Soccer, World Cup

Letters to the editor can be on any topic of any length. They may be edited for length or libelous content. Letters to the editor are accepted in room 220.

ENTERTAINMENT 32 Haunting,

Ipod 33 U2 34 Kings, Hannah Montana 35 Tenth Avenue North

Check it out! Look at the back cover for a calendar of upcoming events!

Video Yearbook Editors James Guttery Erin Naifeh Video Yearbook Staff Anna Claire Bradshaw Emma Caylor Matt Coker Jeffrey Dycus Savannah Johnson Victoria Kirgis Andrew Legan McCord Pagan Ginny Roper Hunter Todd Advisors Suzanne Edwards Nancy Speck Trojan Torch Dyersburg High School 125 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 38024


NORTH KOREA breaks U.N. sanctions, launches rocket Photo courtesy of www.wikipedia.org Photo by Hannah Chapman

Advancing to Nationals: Becky Austin, Holly Owens, Kristen Kerr and James Northcutt smile with excitement after returning from DECA nationals in California.

O

ut of the more than 2000 students to compete at the 2009 DECA TN State competition, approximately 130 qualified to attend Nationals. Among this 130, four Dyersburg High School seniors-- Becky Austin, Kristen Kerr, James Northcutt, Holly Owens-- succeeded at the state competition and competed with 13,000 students from across the country at the national level in Anaheim, California. The third and final level of the DECA competition took place April 29 to May 2 in California. Becky Austin and Holly Owens competed in the Business Law and Ethics team event, and Kristen Kerr and James Northcutt competed in the Buying and Merchandising team event. Every team took at least one multiplechoice test and performed a role play in the first round. Austin and Owens advanced to the final round, where they then took another test and role play, making it in the top 20 of their division. “Thankfully, we were able to compete twice: once in preliminaries and once in finals,” Austin said. This is the first year of DECA for all of the students going to Nationals, and they have prepared for each competition: Regionals, State and Nationals. “I prepared a few weeks before each competition through online tests, vocabulary lists and case studies,” Owens said.

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“The Marketing I class has taught us most of what we needed to know for the competition throughout the year. Experiencing region and state competitions allowed us to understand what DECA competition is like,” Kerr said. Dyersburg High is also no stranger to Nationals. “We (Dyersburg) have usually made it to Nationals every year I have taught,” marketing teacher Judy Henry said. In 2005, Grace Andrews and Sally Heckethorn placed second at Nationals in the Internet Marketing team division. Not only did the team attend the DECA convention and competition, but they also went to Disneyland, Universal Studios, the beach and Los Angeles. “I loved experiencing California for the first time! The culture, food, sites and theme parks were exciting!” Kerr said. DECA has taught all the students beneficial skills. “DECA has increased my interview skills, which will help my life,” Austin said. “I have learned about marketing, and it has prepared me more for the business world, since I plan on majoring in international business in college,” Northcutt said. “I am very proud of these students for making it to Nationals. They are the best of the best from Tennessee,” Henry said.

hannah chapman

News

A

s media coverage has centered upon the faltering economy, foreign relations news has been out of the spotlight, until Kim Jong II recently sought to remind the world that North Korea still poses a threat to regional stability in Asia. On April 5, after much anticipation, the military of the Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea (North Korea), launched a Taepo-dong 2 missile which splashed into the Pacific Ocean. A report was released in March that warned that North Korea would launch a missile in early April, and it would have the capabilities of reaching U.S. soil. Days before the launch, North Korean officials claimed that the rocket would be launched, and it would send a Kwangmyongsong-2 satellite into space to expand North Korea’s space program. South Korea and the United States both released reports stating that no satellite was put into orbit by the rocket. The missile crossed over Japanese airspace, which prompted Japan to ask for and receive confirmation for an emergency meeting of the United Nations Security Council to discuss sanctions against North Korea. The Security Council discussed the launch and eventually condemned the rocket launch as a violation of previous sanctions against North Korea, which prevent North Korea from launching a missile. Japan’s Ambassador, Yukio Takasu, was very pleased with the Council’s reaction. “As the country most threatened by the recent launch, Japan is very pleased the Security Council has adopted unanimously a very strong presidential statement,” Takasu said. Barack Obama also used strong words in his rebuttal to the missile launch. "With this provocative act, North Korea has ignored its international obligations, rejected unequivocal calls for restraint, and further isolated itself from the community of nations," Obama said. On April 14, U.S. intelligence reported that North Korea told U.N. weapons inspectors to leave the country as soon as possible. Action indicates that North Korea is likely going to continue to be uncooperative in six party talks and will likely ignore any sanctions that the U.N. imposes.

matt coker Issue 6

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Res taurante Mexicano

-Allen Hester

1130 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 287-9488

Dr. Stanley P. Young, DDS  Flowering Dogwood Ln Dyersburg TN 

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JUSTOAK “Tomorrow’s Antiques Today” 212 Court St. Dyersburg, TN 285-9657

2710 Lake Rd. Dyersburg 286-6788

Save a Lot  Hwy  ByPass Dyersburg TN 

475 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 287-8292

1003 Reelfoot Ave. Union City, TN 885-7058

Roberts - Gibson Oil 115 Hwy. 51 By-Pass P.O. Box 681 Dyersburg, TN 285-4941


Photo courtesy of Cumberland Presbyterian

Cooper Patterson bids farewell

“A

gold watch is the most appropriate gift for retirement, as its recipients have given up so many of their golden hours in a lifetime of service,” Harry Mahtar said. If the saying is true, then Cooper Patterson deserves innumerable gold watches for his service to Dyersburg High School. This will be Mr. Patterson’s last year of teaching choir at DHS. He has been teaching for thirty-seven years, twenty-one of which have been spent at Dyersburg High School. Patterson has also taught band, general music and music theory. Over his years of service, Cooper Patterson has been fortunate enough to attend many competitions with choir. “I love choir trips, or just trips,” Patterson said. After over twenty years of dedicated service, Cooper Patterson will surely be missed. “I’m going to miss how he helps with the music and prepares us for the competitions,” sophomore Anna Vandiver said. “I’d like to thank him for all he’s done to prepare me for my future career in music and to overcome my fear of singing in front of people,” senior McKenzie Shankle said. “DHS will always be very dear to me, after all I spent the biggest part of my career in room 304,” Patterson said. Where one door shuts, another one opens. For Cooper Patterson this is just another door.

ginny roper

Photo courtesy of Dyersburg High School

Standing Proud: Choir Teacher Cooper Patterson looks on after a choir concert Trojan

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Cumberland Presbyteri an unites youth for choir tour

F

or nearly twenty years, the Cumberland Presbyterian Church has brought together youth from across Dyer County and united them all with a common purpose. Known as the choir tour, this group of teens travels across the Eastern U.S., singing and acting at different churches and schools. “We go to places like New York City, New Orleans, Oklahoma, Georgia, Texas, Florida, and Hilton Head,” sophomore Savannah Johnson said. This past spring break the choir tour traveled to Georgia and Hilton Head and performed for five different locations, like schools and churches. “The purpose of choir tour is to spread the word of God in a new age manner. It shows that no matter what age you are, you can make a difference in someone’s life,” sophomore Shelby Pleasant said. The group does not just go for pleasure and performance, but they are actively involved in service projects, such as helping build playgrounds for children who are ill. Giving of their spring break and of themselves is a great way they give their time. There are many people from Dyersburg and Dyer County, grades 7-12, who are involved. “It is not just for the youth of CPC,” Johnson said. “Anybody can come; it does not matter what denomination either,” senior Andrew Ford said. Many people are involved in making this tour possible. “Brad Sanko is our music minister and Matt Tyler is our youth minister. They

News

put the most into it by planning our trip and teaching us the music, but I believe that everyone puts something into it. Like the chaperones take up what Brad and Matt cannot do or forget,” Pleasant said. Although the choir tour has long hours and lots of hard work, many of the students have positive things to say about choir tour and highlight it as one of the best times of their lives. “There is really nothing to dislike about choir tour; I have gained new friends, strength in Christ and choir tour is like a great big, happy family,” freshman Kelly Burns said. “I love really changing someone’s life. You never know when you have saved someone,” Ford said. Students explain that they not only are moving in other people’s lives, but the things they experience definitely touch their own lives as well. “Everyone should go at least once. It is an amazing experience. Sharing God’s word and your faith cannot be more fun than choir tour. Also it is a rewarding feeling that you are a part of something much bigger than yourself. Traveling and seeing how other people worship is also very moving,” Johnson said. The Cumberland Presbyterian Church has created this project to help teens serve others. Participants do not necessarily have to be great singers or actors/actresses. The involvement helps unite young people with a common goal.

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jaylin gardner

5


10

Class of 2009’s

Photo by Erin Naifeh

T

he Commons of Dyersburg High School was adorned with decorations, recently as students and parents filled the room for the 25th annual Honors Banquet. Shortly after the honor roll and golden honor roll were announced, Principal Mickey Mahon took the stage and named the top ten seniors. These scholars are selected based upon their cumulative grade point averages during their high school careers.

10.

Number ten in the class of 2009 is Becky Austin, the daughter of Jeff and Carol Anne Austin. She plans to attend Lipscomb University and major in civil engineering.

9. 8. 6

Number nine is Andrew Lay, the son of Jeff and Leslie Lay. He plans to attend Duke University and major in biology with plans to attend medical school.

Number eight is Amber Donaldson, the daughter of Greg and Tammy Donaldson. Donaldson plans to attend the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and major in nutrition with a minor in psychology.

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Clocking in at number seven is Holly Owens, the daughter of Brenda Owens and the late Randy Owens. She plans to attend Union University and double major in vocal performance and cell and molecular biology.

7.

6.

Tied for fourth place are Marilauren Anderson and Andrew Ford. Anderson is the daughter of Maleia and Robert Lee and Mike and Reca Anderson. She plans to attend Union University and double major in biology and chemistry secondary education. Ford is the son of John and Debbie Ford. He plans to attend the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and major in business administration and minor in journalism.

4. 3. 2.

1.

Number six is Kristen Kerr, the daughter of Bruce and Laurie Kerr. She plans to attend the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and major in business or communications with a minor in Spanish.

Number three is James Northcutt, the son of William and Birgit Northcutt. He plans to attend the University of Memphis and major in international business.

With a grade point average of 99.517, the salutatorian is Adam Ford, the son of John and Debbie Ford. He plans to attend the University of Tennessee at Knoxville and major in music education.

And with a grade point average of 99.747, the class of 2009’s valedictorian is Hannah Chapman, the daughter of Willis and Melodee Chapman. She plans to attend Grove City College and major in international business management with a minor in mathematics. Both Chapman and Ford will speak at graduation on June 5th. The commencement ceremony will be held at the gym at 7:00 p.m. Baccalaureate services will be held at 7:00 p.m. June 3rd.

katie taylor Trojan

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Animal Care Hospital

Electrical Contractors 1106 East Court St. Dyersburg, TN www.amteck.com 286-2772

1991 St. John Ave. 285-6270 Dyersburg, TN Pierce White, DVM www.animalcarehospital.com

*Specializing in Insurance Claims* *Serving all of West Tennessee* 286-0524 Fax: 286-0565

1045 Vendall Rd. Dyersburg, TN

1801 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 286-5661 Fax: 286-4564

Belew & Ray Drugs “Home of Cheap Drugs”

285-4174 416 Court St. Dyersburg, TN Authorized National Distributor

1295 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN

770 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-8601

Ashley, Ashley and Arnold

Waltons Office Products

1906 St. John Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-4155

476 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-7491 Fax: 286-1534

470 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-5433

322 Church Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-5074


Get Involved! From Carla CHRISTIAN

1448 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-9640 www.daylightdonuts.com

Dyersburg Pediatric Dentistry

Dr. Chuck Hughes Dr. Jodi Braid 95 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN

288-2000

Passion. Drive. Skill. Commitment.

Radio Rd. P.O. Box 100 Dyersburg, TN 589-3670

400 Tickle St. Dyersburg, TN 285-2410

Dr. Scott J. Self, DDS

EAT MORE CANDY! 174 Community Park Rd. Dyersburg, TN 285-8890

Inland Dredging

Randall P. Prince, DDS, FAGD 427 Troy Ave. Dyersburg, TN 286-1583

2000 Hoff Rd. Dyersburg, TN

The same qualities it will take to succeed at DHS, you can find at...

Dr. Susan Cox Dr. Leslie Warren 286-1271 / 866-900-4KID www.teethrus.org

103 King Ave. Dyersburg, TN 287-8084

10% off any meal or dessert with this Expires: 6/30/09 coupon

770 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 286-2446

Cumberland Presbyterian Church 2280 Parr Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-5703

Early Service- 8:30 a.m. Sunday School- 9:30 a.m. Late Service- 10:40 a.m. The Journey- 6:00 p.m. www.cumberlandchurch.com


FBC Youth Group travels to Belize for mission trip M

ost teenagers like to spend their spring break sleeping in and just relaxing. The First Baptist Church youth group had other plans for their break. Members of the FBC youth group, along with youth minister Adam Lickey and several chaperones, embarked on an adventure of hard work and worship to the foreign country of Belize, which is in Latin America. The students who took part on this mission were all DHS students. Students included seniors Kristen Kerr, Becca Guthrie, Marci Coleman, Ashley Storey, Mollie Greenlee, Hamp Hickman and Wes Newbill; juniors Sara Frye, Sydnee Stafford, Sarah Norville and Carter Crews; sophomores Ashley Miles and Elizabeth Finley; freshmen Zac Bowers, Ryland Guthrie and Clark Harrington. Chaperones were Adam Lickey, Leslie Lickey, David Guthrie, Angela Harrington, Sarah Greenlee and Jan Storey. At 2:30 a.m. Friday, March 20th, the group of 18 students and five chaperones left for Memphis. After nine hours of traveling, the team arrived in Belize. “I expected it to be like some tropical country with all the forests and jungles, exotic animals and such. Instead it had a lot of poverty,” Coleman said. “I wanted to go and lead someone to Christ, and this trip seemed like a good opportunity to do that,” Miles said. “I thought the people were Brazilian or something,” Bowers said. “I expected it to be dirty and it was. I also thought they would speak a different language, but they all spoke English,” Stafford said. “I had visited Belize before and knew the country was very poor. However with what little they have, they live a life of contentment. They are also a very friendly group of people who have great knowledge of the United States,” Angela Harrington said. The team’s accomodations included a community bathroom and ice cold showers, comfy pool floats as beds on a church floor and no air conditioning.

“Nobody in our group complained. We got through the tough conditions and got to what was important, and we had an awesome trip,” Adam Lickey said. The group worked vigorously on projects in the poverty-stricken country. According to Angela Harrington, their ministries included entertaining and reading scripture with a local nursing home, working with children in an orphanage, painting the church and two houses, four days of vacation Bible school, and teaching Bible stories in two local schools. Along with working hard during the day, the youth found many ways to occupy their time through games and creating lots of memories. “We played Mafia almost every night. It got pretty intense,” Coleman said. “The funniest part for me was when Clark [Harrington] and Ryland [Guthrie] were taking their showers, and the water got turned off. With soap still on them, they had to rinse it all of off with water bottles,” Miles said. “On the last day, this little orphan boy I had gotten close to had started to call me Dad. He had never had a father and asked me when I was coming back. I could not bring myself to tell him I was never coming back,” Harrington said. “I thought the funniest thing that happened was when Carter [Crews] fell out of a chair when he was trying to eat a lime. He got the nickname ‘Lime Time’ from everyone,” Bowers said. The week ended with a visit to Caye Caulker, an island off the coast. While there for two days, the youth enjoyed snorkeling and exploring the island. “One of the most rewarding things for me was to see my youth give of themselves to do what God wanted them to do. They were selfless and even though the conditions were rough, they stayed focused on what was important, and God really moved,” Adam Lickey said.

Playing sweetly: Belizean school children gather together to take a photo.

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anna claire bradshaw

Photos by Sarah Norville

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Preaching to All: Pastor Mark speaks to eager VBS students.

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Hillcrest Baptist Youth “Teens Rockin’ in Christ”

Heckethorn Off-Road

Sunday services: 10:45 a.m. & 7:00 p.m. Wednesday service(youth): 6:30 p.m.

1400 Morgan Rd. Dyersburg, TN

285-6530

832 Main Ave. Dyersburg, TN

2030 Sylvan Rd. Dyersburg, TN 286-9202

825 Hillcrest Ave. Dyersburg, TN

285-1111 “Stay Smart” 822 Reelfoot Dr. Dyersburg, TN

286-1012 305 Court St. Dyersburg, TN 285-2346

Italian Restaurante

2000 Hoff Rd. Dyersburg, TN

2320 Amanda Ave. Dyersburg, TN

288-2000

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The Road to Success is Always Under Construction

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H and A Foodmart 1616 Hwy. 88 Halls, TN 38040 836-9507


Protesters attack G-20 Summit, ideas behind it

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ne might wonder what all of the commotion over the G-20 was about. Also, with so many important issues going on, why would people want to protest such a summit? To start off, the G-20 is short for Group of Twenty Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors and is comprised of finance ministers and central bank governors from the 19 largest national economies and the European Union (EU). These twenty national economies include Argentina, Canada, Indonesia, Italy, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, South Korea, Turkey, the United Kingdom and the United States. Also represented are the European Union and chairmen or presidents of global banks, such as the World Bank, IMF and the European Central Bank. These members make up twothirds of the global population, as well as over 80% of the global national product and world trade. The 2009 gathering of this council took place in London on April 2, 2009, and is called the London Summit, because of the broadened membership. Two major issues were discussed: First, a plan needs to be devised addressing how the various economies can work together to save the global economy, taking into account population growth and employment. Second, they addressed the reforming of the financial sector and international financial institutions like the International Monetary Fund or the World Bank. Protests took place around the day of the summit over issues like the economic policy of this organization, the banking system, the fight against terrorism and global warming. Primarily, though, the

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protesters were fighting against the extremity of capitalism that is so present in the major world economies today. There were only a few outbreaks of violence during these protests, but they mainly remained peaceful. During one of the protests, a newspaper vendor, Ian Tomlinson, was pushed by a police officer and hit in the head with a night stick, before he buckled and died from a heart attack. Also, almost 90 people were arrested in the protests. So what is the justification for the protests of tens of thousands? The people are afraid. They fear that the economic “solutions” will not help out the working class but instead just give all the money to the rich. Numerous groups attended the rallies, including the Stop the War Coalition and the Trades Union Congress. These groups want the rebuilding of our nations’ economies to be a democratic effort that is clear to the public rather than a capitalistic plan that only the government has control of and that will take years and years to take effect. Tony Benn, the president of the Stop the War Coalition, talked about the member nations of the United Nations. He said that the UN should have members elected to govern the world, according to population, instead of having five permanent members, with the biggest countries like China having as much of a vote as Luxembourg. His idea is that once our old system is updated, the world can work together in an improved way and recover from these hard times it is facing today.

james northcutt

Photo by Victoria Kirgis

Making a Difference: Officers Deanna Mallard, Chelsea Wilson and Melvin Shaw show students the right way to lead through their participation in FCCLA activities.

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amily, Career, and Community Leaders of America or FCCLA is an active organization at Dyersburg High school.

“The main goal of FCCLA is to promote personal growth and leadership development through family and consumer sciences education,” FCCLA instructor Sandra Lanier said. “It helps to provide opportunities for personal development and preparation for adult life.” Other important purposes of FCCLA involve promoting understanding between youth and adults and preparing young adults to deal with the struggles of today’s society. “Being in FCCLA has taught me the ultimate roles of becoming the ultimate leader. It is the ultimate leadership experience,” FCCLA president Melvin Shaw said. Leadership and taking action in one’s community are encouraged through this consumer sciences program. Focusing on family roles is also a major attribute of this program. “FCCLA has really taught me a lot about how to care and play a major part in my family,” senior Deanna Mallard said. Just recently FCCLA took part in their annual Star events where members of different chapters compete in multiple events that help them with being more prepared for everyday life. Some of these events include job interviews, interior design, and focus on children. Dyersburg High School’s chapter received the Power of One award and a few members went on to the national competition. “It’s a really fun experience and I totally recommend people to join.” senior Chelsea Wilson said. Students can join FCCLA by enrolling in a FACS (Family and Consumer Sciences) class at the beginning of the year.

victoria kirgis

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Americans lose sight of importance of health O

ver time, the health practices of our nation have strayed further and further from nutrition and more towards convenience. This is not surprising considering our hurried lifestyles, misleading advertisements and the advent of processed food. However convenient our habits may be, it is time for a change. We must take responsibility for our actions, and our nation must make a healthier lifestyle more attainable. According to Youfa Wang, M.D., Ph.D., if we continue on this path, more than 86% of adults could be overweight or obese by 2030. How can this be; how can we as Americans have let ourselves stray away so far from what is beneficial? We are known as the doers who are hardworking and take life into our own hands. This being said, why would we neglect something as important as our health? We have lost the pride we took in producing wholesome food, cooking and sharing family meals that brought our friends and family together as well as taking care of ourselves with the food we eat. Americans need to get back to their roots, learning for themselves where their food comes from and what their bodies need. For too long, we have let the advertising world dictate what we put into our systems. Following miracle diets, eating foods packaged so appealingly that we believe they could never be harmful Making decisions: Americans today are unaware of and letting the amount of time food takes to cook in the mi- the dangers of obesity in modern society. crowave decide our dinner have obviously proven unsuccessful. Problems such as obesity, diabetes, heart disease and cancer have all been attributed to the food we eat. Many popular foods contain ingredients like Red Color #2 and aspartame, which is found in many diet beverages like Diet Coke, and in high doses can cause headaches, death of brain cells and possible long-term effects such as brain tumors and lymphoma. Considering this, our maladies should not come as a surprise. Overall, the solution is simple. Food consumed should be as close as it came from the earth. Advertisement claims should not be accepted without seeing if they hold true, and people should take time to maintain their bodies. Our bodies are our most important tool because they affect every aspect of our lives, and we do not get another one.

amber donaldson

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Merry Castle

2496 Lake Rd. & inside Walmart Dyersburg, TN

216 Market St. Dyersburg, TN 286-1162

Met Life 314 Church Ave.

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285-3204

Life Choices 286-HOPE(4673) www.hope-at-lifechoices.com

had sex? have questions? pregnant? Pregnancy testing and ultrasounds All services are confidential at no cost

“Proud supporter of the Trojans and the Trojan Torch”

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You are not alone. We are here for you.

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Dyersburg, TN

Offices in Jackson, Martin, Milan, Dyersburg, Henderson, Brownsville, and Bolivar Please call 1-800-548-5303 for an appointment

2100 Pioneer Rd. Dyersburg, TN 285-1154

Ashley, Ashley and Arnold General Appliance and Furniture Company Open from 8 to 5:30 Monday through Saturday 213 Court St. Dyersburg, TN

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322 Church Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-5074


Feel great, look even better

Spring into fitness by summer

S

ummer is right around the corner. Are you ready? It is never too late to start treating your body right. Fitness and healthy eating habits will have you looking and feeling your best. These exercises can get you on the right path to a healthier lifestyle.

Guys:

Ladies: ut ure o -- Fig sube t a y rt R rate b rt H ea heart 0. Your ta Targe m u 2 m i 2 n x e a m m fro etwe your r ag e fall b g you e should n i h ea r t t c t ra r max r t r at u a o e y h g et nt of perce 6 0 - 8 0 t e. ra

Lean Legs: Single Leg Squats Stand on a bench or flat surface that is about the level of your knees. Holding your arms in front of you, flex your right ankle so your toes are higher than your heel. Keeping your torso fairly upright, bend your left knee and slowly lower your body until your right heel is an inch from touching the floor. Hold this position for one second, then push yourself up. Repeat this ten times; then, switch legs.

Amazing Arms: Bicep Curl/Shoulder Press

Terrific Thighs: Hip-Lift Progression

Grab a pair of weights (size of weights varies with individual strength) or stand on an exercise band and hold it with your palms facing up with feet hip-width apart, abs tight. Keeping elbows tight, pull the weights or band toward your shoulders and turn the palms to face out; continue pushing the weight or band above your head in a constant motion. Then reverse the motion by bringing the weight down to your shoulders with the palms out, then to the starting position. Do 12 to 15 repetitions. As you gain strength, add more weight.

Crazy Core: The Plank Get into pushup position on the floor, bend your elbows at a 90 degree angle and have your elbows shoulder width apart. Rest your weight on your forearms and keep your body in a straight line from head to toe. Hold this position for two minutes (beginners may want to start with bent knees on the floor and work their way up). Once you have mastered the plank, try to challenge yourself by raising one leg without rotating your body, switching legs every two minutes.

Body Mass Indicator-- Measure how healthy your body weight is with this simple formula: (weight in pounds)/ (height in inches). A healthy BMI falls between 18 and 25.

Toned Tush: Pretzel Lift On the floor, lie on your left side, knees bent 90 degrees and left leg in front of you. Put weight on your left forearm, elbow directly under shoulder, and place right hand on hip. Next, place a weighted ball behind your right knee and raise leg to hip height, foot flexed and slightly higher than your knee. Be sure to keep your shoulders and hips square as you lift your right leg a few inches. Lower your leg to hip height and repeat. Switch sides to complete set. Do 12 to 15 reps.

Get pumped up for your next workout with this playlist:

This is an effective way to relieve tension in your lower back (you may want to use a yoga mat) and work your glutes simultaneously. Do it: Lie on your back with your arms by your sides and your knees bent, feet on the floor. Lift your hips toward the ceiling. Hold this position for one second and then lower your hips back down. Repeat the lifts for one minute, tightening your muscles at the top of the range of motion. Be careful not to overarch your spine. For more of a challenge, extend one leg at the top of the lift and hold the lifted position for about five seconds. Bring your foot back to the floor before lowering your hips. Repeat this exercise for 30 seconds; switch sides. Awesome Abs: Crunch Variations Lie flat on your back on the floor or, for increased comfort, on a mat. Place a lightweight ball or, if you are at home, a roll of paper towels between your shins. Extend your arms straight over your shoulders. Pull your shoulders off the ground and lift your legs while keeping your legs straight. Point your toes and try to crunch until you touch the ball between your shins. Do three sets of

1. “Return of the Tres” --Delinquent Habits 2. “Sandstorm” --Darude 3. “Love, Save the Empty” --Erin Mccarley 4. “Gamma Ray” --Beck 5. “Sing the Changes” --The Fireman 6. “Viva la Vida” --Coldplay 7. “Joy Ride” --The Killers 8. “New York, New York” --Ryan Adams 9. “Until the World” --The Afters

12 reps.

Cardio-- Mix your workout up by alternating exercises with activities such as running, jumping rope or swimming! Your muscles can get used to routine workouts, so increase your strength and durability by changing up your workout.

kristen kerr Trojan

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r o f r o o d s n e p o y l e s o M e Tr

g n i d a e l r e e h c e l a m

Q: What inspired you to try out for cheerleading? A: “Because of my tumble and stunting abilities, my friends at school and my coach at Rainbow Gymnastics encouraged me to give it a shot and possibly get scholarships for college.” Q: How did you feel when you made it? A: “I was very excited, but in all honesty it hasn’t really become real to me yet. So I’m both anxious and excited at the same time.” Q: What are some goals you hope to achieve in the next year? A: “I hope to get stronger physically and get better at tumbling. Mostly, I want to improve my stunting skills.” Q: Why do you enjoy cheerleading? A: “Well, this is my first year cheering, so I hope to enjoy it.” Q: What part can a male play in cheerleading and how will this make the team better? A: “Males can play a lot of parts on a cheer squad. They can make them louder with their deep voices, they can help with tumbling and, most importantly, stunting.” Q: What do you look forward to most about being a part of the team? A: “Just adding to the school spirit.” Q: What was your dominant emotion when trying out for the team? A: “Very, very nervous. I think everybody was, but I was really nervous because it was my first time.” Q: Do you plan to pursue this sport in the future? A: “Yes, I do. I plan on using cheerleading to get a scholarship for college, and then doing competitive cheer in college.” Q: What would you like people to know about the sport of cheerleading for males? A: “First and foremost, I would like to open the door for more male cheerleaders at DHS. There is this belief by some people that a guy has to be ‘a certain way’ to be a male cheerleader. I want people to know that is not the case. Cheerleading is a sport just like football, soccer and track. It requires a great deal of physical strength, endurance and skills. It is a sport where guys are greatly needed.” Q: Would you like to add anything else? Photos by Alex Jacobi A: “I’m really glad to be a part of the DHS cheer squad. I’m very thankful to my family for being very supportive. I’m also grateful to all my friends and DHS faculty for their Stick It: Tre Mosely assists a team member encouraging words and support. I look forward to a great year!”

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in completing a stunt.

alex jacobi Issue 6

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Taking on the crowd: Bradshaw fills in big shoes as mascot

Photos by Emma Caylor Q: How long have we had a mascot? A: “We have had a mascot for the past six years.” Q: What made you want to become the mascot? A: “I knew our last mascot, Taurean Thompson, would be graduating, so I figured, what the heck? That would be so fun! I want to be a character at Disney World some day, so I figured I might as well start practicing now.”

Suiting Up: Bradshaw prepares herself to fill the shoes of the Mighty Trojan.

Q: What are the best things about being the mascot? A: “Getting into the games free, making people laugh, and getting people into the game.” Q: What’s the worst part about being the mascot? A: “It gets really hot during football season, and the Trojan head really smells.” Q: How has being the mascot changed you? A: “I have learned that it is okay to show your crazy side and have fun. I also have more respect for the mascots that do a bunch of crazy stunts.” Q: What was your best mascot memory? A: “When I chased (galloped) after the Choctaw Princess at the Dyer County game.” Q: What is the biggest obstacle you face? A: “At football games, it is hard to get the crowd pumped up.” Q: What do you do to fix it? A: “I usually stand up on Coach Doug’s gator and tell everyone to cheer.” Q: How do you manage the stink in the Trojan head? A: “ I try to Febreze it after every game and let it sit over the weekend.” Q: Do you plan to return next year? A: “Yes! I love this job!”

EMMA CAYLOR Trojan

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Working the Crowd: Pumping up the crowd is a major task for the Mighty Trojan mascot.

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Joe F. Wood, LUTCF Financial Representative

General Appliance and Furniture Company Open from 8 to 5:30 Monday through Saturday 213 Court St. Dyersburg, TN

285-5201

William M.Boehmler

Tom Manning, O.D. Doctor of Optometry

Senior Vice President Financial Consultant

Justin Shroeder, O.D. Doctor of Optometry

1950 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 287-9700 1-800-588-1740

doctormanning@msn.com

575 Mall Blvd. Dyersburg,TN

MEMBER NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, AND SIPC.

Suite L-2 285-3338

West Dyersburg Church of Christ “Where Families Matter” 820 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-0477

1502 Brayton Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-7267

401 Tickle St. Dyersburg, TN 285-5411 Fax: 285-8481

Steely Foot Clinic, P.L.L.C. Dr. Bill Steely

J.J.B. HILLIARD, W.L. LYONS, INC.

Super D

Dyersburg Family Eye Care

Sunday Bible Classes: 9:30 a.m. Morning Worship: 10:15 a.m. Evening Worship: 6:00 p.m. Wednesday Bible Classes: 6:30 p.m.

Tucker Street Church “TogetherServingChrist” 454 TuckerSt. Dyersburg, TN

286-0864

Ashley, Ashley and Arnold

Sunday School - 9:30 a.m. Worship - 10:30 a.m. Youth - 6:00 p.m.

Papa John’s

638 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 286-0800

First United Methodist Church 100 McGaughey St. Dyersburg, TN 285-6454

322 Church Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-5074

Dr. Phillip A. Cook, Minister


P.O. Box 30

Armorel, AR 72310 870-762-2100

of West Tennessee

Your kind of people. Your kind of bank.

Delivering truth to teens, empowering them to make right choices in life.

firstcitizens-bank.com

285-4410 800-321-3176

www.rightchoicestn.com 1-866-RIGHT04

Tempe’s Ladies’ Apparel Sizes 4-18 144 Court St. Dyersburg, TN 286-0355

10% off any meal or dessert with this Expires: 6/30/09 coupon

770 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 286-2446

Anderson Printing

285-4174 416 Court St. Dyersburg, TN

640 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-2679

Member

FDIC

Tucker Tire A Square Deal on a Round Tire 285-8520 P.O. Box 1149 Dyersburg, TN

The Road to Success is Always Under Construction

1311 Court St.

Dyersburg, TN

285-5185


Athletic Justin Whitfield

a Ry

Tallon Scott

ood W n

Jason Click

William Lay Arie Cork

Bobby Ellis

a Ev

o nJ

ne

s

Allyson Agee

Joey Wilder

R ya

m am G n

ons

Tracy Ratliff

Jessica Light

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re a e r e h W g? n i o g y e th

Ryan Wood-FREED HARDEMAN Arie Cork- LAMBUTH UNIVERSITY William Lay- RHODES COLLEGE Tallon Scott- UT MARTIN Allyson Agee- CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY Evan Jones- UNION UNIVERSITY Jason Click- UT MARTIN Tracy Ratliff- DSCC Joey Wilder- COLUMBIA STATE Bobby Ellis- UT MARTIN Jessica Light- FREED HARDEMAN Ryan Gammons- CUMBERLAND UNIVERSITY Justin Whitfiled- BETHEL COLLEGE

Favorite Athletic Memory:

Scholarships “Watching Ryan Wood fall running to first base.” -Joey Wilder “When I hit six homeruns my sophomore year.” -Tracy Ratliff “Coach Counce waving his towel over his head after beating Covington in the playoff game.” -Bobby Ellis “Playing all 18 holes in a thunderstorm at the state tournament.” -Allyson Agee “Finishing 4th in the state tournament my sophomore year.” -Evan Jones “Winning the game against Crockett County when I made a sack.” -Arie Cork

favorite Quote: “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.” -Phillippians 4:13 -Jessica Light “Life’s a garden, dig it!” -Ryan Gammons “If you can’t accept losing, you can’t win.” -Vince Lombardi -Justin Whitfiled

“ To give anything less than your best is to sacrifice the gift.” -Steve Prefontaine -Tallon Scott “It’s always a great day, today.” -Ryan Wood

“It’s not the size of the dog in the fight, but the size of the fight in the dog.” -Jason Click

“Stick together and be aggressive, and let that be the difference.” -Bob Bradley -William Lay

katie taylor Trojan

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DHS changes with time

D

yersburg High School has changed through the years, not only in the students who have come through it, but also through new additions and construction. Dyersburg High School was integrated in 1966; at that time DHS was located where the PDC and YMCA are currently operating. The current DHS building was built in 1971. Through the years, DHS has had many renovations such as our new offices and track. In 2005, a tornado hit the heart of Dyersburg, DHS, leaving behind wrecked baseball and softball fields, half of the sportsplex and excessive water damage. After this devastating event, the school had a complete makeover. The gym and sportsplex were redone; many classrooms were renovated because of excessive water damage. DHS has not only changed physically, but also in how it is run. In 2000, we switched to an enhanced calendar, the schedule we have now. Before we had the more traditional schedule that many nearby schools share. There was not a fall break and summer was longer. Next year our school will have a trimester system that will allow students to receive more credits in the same amount of time. The rules on dress code have changed, too. “I think we have always had a dress code. Common sense used to weigh in more, but I think we lost the common sense approach,” Penny Switzer, DHS English teacher for 18 years, said. In the 1990s, there was a policy stating that students would be sent out if they had blue or orange hair. Not only have the school building and curriculum changed, but also the students. Students come and go. Graduations take place every year, but senior class memories live forever. Students’ attitudes towards learning have changed along with the ways they dress and conduct themselves. “Students are more polarized. We have students who are as smart and dedicated as any before, but we also have the opposite with fewer and fewer in the middle,” Neel Durbin, DHS geography teacher for 27 years, said. Over the years, teachers have taught different subjects. For instance, Mr. Arrington used to teach yearbook, and Mrs. Switzer taught Latin I and II. Dyersburg High School has gone through many changes, but it is still students’ home away from home. Students probably spend more time at school than they do anywhere else. “I travel to many schools around the world and see many situations, and whenever I come home, I am glad to be a part of this school system,” Durbin said. “DHS will always be very dear to me. After all, I have spent the biggest part of my career in room 304,” Cooper Patterson, DHS teacher for 21 years, said.

creates Stimulus Tuesday by offering low prices

I

t is Tuesday afternoon, you are done with your nonexistent homework, and you are bored out of your mind. After all, this is Dyersburg. The only regular entertainment here is the movie theater. And that is just too expensive, right? Wrong. As of March 10, Carmike Cinemas has started a new economic stimulus plan. Every Tuesday they are offering a drink and popcorn for a mere one dollar apiece! The 16ounce coke and 46-ounce popcorn are both satisfying and filling and are made even better by the spectacular low price. Carmike’s plan, which is offered in all of its 250 theaters, is its way to get America’s economy back on track. The movie chain, which is based in small towns with fewer than 100,000 people in 36 states, says it is hoping to make the movie-going experience more “affordable and enjoyable.” And with these prices, going to the movies has become both. “I will definitely consider going on a Tuesday for the lower prices,” junior Tre Mosley said. Another idea to make your movie experience even more “affordable” is by attending a matinee on Tuesday. The matinee tickets are $5.75 and can be purchased for movies until about six o’clock. The additional price cut makes it possible to go to a movie, get a drink and popcorn and spend less than eight dollars. In addition to the price cuts, Carmike has recently upgraded its digital and 3-D projections in order to further enhance movie enjoyment. “The response to the changes has been very good, and I feel like the changes will be permanent,” junior and Carmike employee Crystal Connel said. So the next Tuesday afternoon you have free, you may find it worthwhile to go and check out the more “affordable and enjoyable” Carmike Cinemas.

allyson agee

mandy yates

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Photo by Allyson Agee

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H and A Foodmart

Joe F. Wood, LUTCF Financial Representative

1616 Hwy. 88 Halls, TN 38040 836-9507

Lusk Chiropractic 1150 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 286-8166

101 Mill Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-7284

815 Reelfoot Dr. Dyersburg, TN 285-6951

William M.Boehmler

Hardage Group

Senior Vice President Financial Consultant

Executive Search

1950 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 287-9700 1-800-588-1740

www.hardagegroup.com P.O. Box 208 Dyersburg, TN 285-3120

P.O. Box 30

Armorel, AR 72310 870-762-2100

J.J.B. HILLIARD, W.L. LYONS, INC. MEMBER NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE, AND SIPC.

Come check out what is happening at

F BC Dyersburg Student Ministry! Join us Sunday mornings at 9:40 a.m. and Wednesday nights at 6:00 p.m.

Everyone is invited!

Igniting a passion for God and His Word

285-4174 416 Court St. Dyersburg, TN


R&S Carpets, LLC 630 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-8871

Specializing in manicures, pedicures HAIR SALON 119 Volunteer Blvd. and facials Dyersburg, TN

287-0066

Dianne Bizzle C.P.A. 623 Harrell Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-1554

412 Court St. Dyersburg 285-5767

120 North Mill Ave. Dyersburg, TN

Mill Ave. 285-0485

Parker Plaza 287-4920 Mall Blvd. 287-4917

Industrial Park 287-4939

205 Main St. 602 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 288-2800

high-performance elastomers and additives

350 Hwy. 51 By-Pass P.O. BOX 768 DYERSBURG, TN 287-4700

105 Connell Ave. Dyersburg, TN 285-4353

286-6156 Mimi Cherry Fax: 286-6797 Clinic Manager

Passion. Drive. Skill. Commitment. The same qualities it will take to succeed at DHS, you can find at...

400 Tickle St. Dyersburg, TN 285-2410


Toms: changing the world one pair of shoes at a time

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an simply buying a pair of shoes change someone’s life? Yes, because of an organization called Toms Shoes. Toms Shoes was started by Blake Mycoskie. In 2006, he traveled to Argentina. Mycoskie was very interested in the native culture and people. He noticed the kids did not have shoes protecting their feet. This bothered him. He felt like he needed to do something to help these children who had become his friends. Blake Mycoskie thought giving only a few shoeless kids in Argentina shoes does not solve the problem. He knew that a lot of children in other developing countries grow-up barefoot. Providing children with shoes protects them from cutting their feet in unsafe environments and getting diseases. There is a soil-transmitted parasite that penetrates the skin through open cuts and sores and is the leading cause of disease in developing countries. Shoes can prevent this and also prevent the risk of amputation. This knowledge inspired him to create Toms Shoes. Tom stands for “tomorrow.” The idea is simple: for every shoe that someone purchases, Toms gives a pair of shoes to a child in need. It is

an easy process, but it took awhile for this business to get on its feet. Pun intended. “I felt good about purchasing Toms because it was in a win-win situation. I got a new pair of shoes and so did someone else,” sophomore Maggie Renshaw said. How could this type of business work? It seems nearly impossible, but this foundation has strived to make it work. The shoes run roughly about forty to sixty dollars. Remember that a person is paying for two pairs of shoes. They are basic, comfortable shoes, but Toms is coming out with new styles and patterns all the time. For example, they recently introduced a wrap boot for women. They are about one hundred dollars. “I bought my first pair of Toms about two years ago. It was such a good feeling knowing that it impacted a child’s life, and I have been a committed customer ever since. Every pair I buy is better in quality than the last; it is great to see how far the company has come,” senior Amber Donaldson said. Blake Mycoskie saw a problem, made a plan, and is now working every day to solve it.

savannah johnson

Photo courtesy of tomsshoes.com

Making a Difference: Blake Mycoskie places shoes on childrens feet in Argentina. Toms Shoes hand-places every pair of shoes they give away. They give shoes away all over the world. Trojan

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What to do to survive a tornado

Y

ou are in your home on a stormy night and hear the tornado sirens

sound. What do you do? We all have routines during these moments. Some people go to a closet, bathroom or storm shelter, but what if you are in your car? There is glass all around you, and the only thing between you and the mass of swirling wind is a thin sheet of metal that can bend and twist. It is important to know what to do to be safe in these deadly storms. The State Gazette reported that Tennessee has the most potential for deadly damage because of tornadoes. This is because 45.8% of Tennessee’s tornadoes between 1950 and 2005 occurred at night. This is the highest percentage in our country. These tornadoes catch people off guard or asleep, and they are less likely to take cover. Out of all the tornado-related deaths that occurred between 1997 and 2006, western Tennessee, northeast Arkansas, the Missouri Bootheel and northern Mississippi had the highest number. Around 70 people lost their lives during that time. Because we have such a potential for deadly tornadoes, everyone should have a plan to stay safe. “During a tornado, I go to my neighbor’s storm shelter,” freshman Whitney Reynolds said. According to the NOAA (Na-

Issue 6

tional Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) there are certain guidelines everyone should follow. During a tornado, mobile homes should be abandoned since they offer little protection. If you are in a house or building, take refuge in a basement or interior room on the lowest floor. A bathroom or closet located under stairs would be ideal. Cover yourself with a mattress or blanket. Remember never to open your windows. “My family goes to the bathroom where there are no windows,” sophomore Kalli Parr said. If in a vehicle, one should decide if it is possible to outrun the tornado. If not, try to get into a building. Overpasses, though commonly thought to provide safety, can increase the danger. If all else fails, lie flat in a ditch. It is also important to prepare for a tornado. Having an emergency preparedness kit somewhere safe can be useful when help cannot arrive after a storm. “Once a month, we restock our supply of canned foods and batteries for flashlights,” junior Price Whitnel said. Tornadoes can be deadly storms that leave tremendous destruction in their paths. Knowing exactly what to do and taking the warnings seriously can be the difference between life and death.

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Nutrition guidelines you believe: are they true after all?

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ith the ever-changing research, fad diets, labels and additives, it is difficult to be sure if the decisions you make regarding food are really the best; with homework, practice, jobs and family outings, it is not easy to find time to keep up. As a result, many false impressions have emerged not only among teens but among every generation. However, by remembering a few rules of thumb and putting some key terms under your belt, you will be one step further to becoming an informed and nutritional consumer. Below are a few misconceptions that may come as a surprise for some individuals.

Photo by Amber Donaldson

I am eating a salad; so that is good, right? Not always. Salads are a great part of a healthy lifestyle when done right, but just because it is a salad does not make it a nutritional champion. Some salads, for example, contain as much fat and calories as a cheeseburger. Where do people go wrong? First, salad dressing is key. It should be naturally lower in both fat and calories and used sparingly. Just two tablespoons of regular Ranch, for instance, contain 148 calories and 15.6 grams of fat, about 24 percent of a person’s daily value of fat. Next, the toppings such as fried croutons and full fat cheese are less healthful decisions. Try baked croutons and a limited amount of reduced fat cheese instead. To make the salad even better, expand your horizons and pile your plate with veggies in various colors and different lettuce, the darker the better. Iceberg lettuce, while low in calories, has little

To lose weight, fat-free is always the best choice. Contrary to popular belief this simply is not true. Fat is not the sole culprit in weight gain. It is an essential part of every diet that allows your body to feel satisfied, maintain healthy hair and skin, have sources of stored energy and carry out proper cell function. A person does not gain weight by simply consuming fat. Some fats, mono-unsaturated fatty acids, have actually been linked to reducing fat around the middle. Fat is stored as the result of consuming excess calories. One pound of fat equals 3500 unused calories. Fat-free is often a poor choice because in many cases it contains added sugars, carbs or other chemical additives, which may result in the same number of calories. In most cases, choosing low or reduced fat will cut down on both calories and additives. However, the best solution is to consume foods naturally lower in fat with few added ingredients and to limit your fat intake to about 30 percent of your total calories.

Sugar-free is the way to go.

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Basically no. Often sugar-free means that the food has been sweetened with artificial, no-calorie sweeteners, which sounds good in theory, but the grass may not be greener on the other side. In 2000 the number of Americans consuming artificially sweetened drinks and food rose to 160 million in comparison with the 70 million in 1987. At the same time the obesity rates greatly increased. A recent study done by Purdue University showed that when rats were given the artificial sweetener saccharin, their core body temperature did not rise as much as it normally does at mealtime, meaning their metabolism was not functioning at its prime, causing them to overeat and not effectively burn off the food consumed, resulting in weight gain. This has been speculated to be the case in humans, as well.

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To be healthy, chocolate should be banned completely.

Carbs make you fat. Carbs should never be cut out of any diet. They are our bodies’ preferred source of energy and are in many of the most nutritional foods, such as whole grains, fruits and vegetables. You just need to select the right kind. Simple carbs, like sodas, candy and other sugary foods, are quickly digested and can be used immediately for energy and stored if not used, but that will eventually result with any food. Choosing complex carbs, which are in whole grains and produce, provides you with nutrients and fiber, without a sugar crash and quickly stored fat because they take longer to digest. Diets high in fiber can actually help to ward off hunger, keeping you more satisfied longer.

To lose weight, I should skip meals and eating altogether. Absolutely not. It is our biological instinct to nourish ourselves with regular, healthy meals, and when we go without food for extended periods of time, our metabolism slows, and our body goes into starvation mode. As a result, when we resume eating the food is not burned efficiently and is stored for the next period of starvation. The best choice is to eat more frequent, balanced meals throughout the day, breakfast being the most important because it does just what it says: breaks a temporary fast our body has been in during sleep.

Au contraire. The Mayans and Aztecs considered cocoa the food of the gods, and it has been an important part of many cultures ever since, serving as anything from currency to medicine to tokens of affection, and it is not going to be on the forbidden list any time soon. After conducting a recent study, Italian scientists recently concluded that consuming limited portions of dark chocolate on a regular basis could actually reduce the heart disease risk by one-third in women and one-fourth in men. Dark chocolate can serve as an anti-depressant, lower blood pressure and cholesterol, and slow signs of aging. It also contains mono-unsaturated fats, which can help decrease belly fat. So, including controlled amounts of dark chocolate in your diet can be good after all.

Illustrations by Adam Ford

Common terms: what they really mean Whole grain: The words Whole Grain do not always qualify Antioxidants: a product as whole grain. Whole grains include amaranth, barley, buckwheat, corn, millet, oats, quinoa, rice, rye, sorghum, teff, triticale, wheat and wild rice. These words should be the main ingredients, and the grain should be in its natural form, not bleached or enriched, to be sure to gain all of the nutrients. The 100 percent whole grain seal also marks the food as whole grain.

Antioxidants help reduce and prevent the

effects of free radicals, preventing disease and aging. Antioxidants are most abundant in foods like fruits and vegetables, nuts, chocolate, green tea and whole grains.

Trans fats: Trans fats, or partially hydrogenated oils, are in-

ticides, synthetic fertilizers, sewage sludge, genetically modified organisms or ionizing radiation. Animals that produce organic meat, poultry, eggs and dairy products do not take antibiotics or growth hormones. The USDA Organic seal certifies that a product is organic.

dustrially created by adding hydrogen to liquid vegetable oils to make them more solid. They raise bad (LDL) cholesterol levels , lower your good (HDL) cholesterol levels, increase the risk of developing heart disease and stroke and are associated with a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Trans fats are most commonly found in some fast food, and junk food and should be avoided as much as possible.

All-natural:

High fructose corn syrup: HFCS is a highly engi-

Organic: Organic products are grown without the use of pes-

All-natural does not mean that a product has

been certified as being made with solely natural ingredients. It is not always regulated. So, the individual should check the label for genetically modified, unrecognizable ingredients.

Free radicals: Free radicals are highly unstable, reactive molecules. They are produced in large quantities when the body is exposed to harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun, X-rays, radioactive material and pollution. They are linked to aging, tissue damage and some diseases such as cancer. Trojan

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neered sweetener that came about in the 1970’s. Although some claim it is all-natural, it is completely manmade. Some link it to the increase in the obesity rate in the U.S., and there are studies that connect it to various health problems and weight gain. Although it does contain the same calories as sugar and honey, its long-term effects and effects on our metabolism are unknown. If you choose to take your chances, it should be consumed it in moderation just like other sweeteners.

Features

amber donaldson See related article on Page 13

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R

ecently I visited the University of Tennessee at Knoxville where the fraternity Delta Sigma Pi (co-ed professional business fraternity) hosted a speaker. Speakers for these types of events are normally successful businessmen or prominent members of the community. This lecture was a little different: Financial advisor guru Dave Ramsey was the speaker. For those of you not familiar with Ramsey, he is a nationally renowned economic advisor. He did not start out in finance though; he began in real estate. He amassed a portfolio of over four million dollars by the age of 26 and then was forced to file bankruptcy. Ramsey was then below the low and had no place to go. After that he slowly climbed out of debt and began to counsel close friends and couples at his church. Ramsey had found his niche. His advice business has grown over the years, and he is once again in the millionaire’s club. He is the founder of The Lampo Group, Inc. (a financial counseling firm), Financial Peace University (a Biblically based 13-week video training series teaching good financial habits) and “Share It!” (a non-profit organization that works with other nonprofit organizations to help people become more financially literate). Ramsey offers simple solutions on how to live a debt-free life. He claims that his business The Lampo Group is run completely debt-free. So, how does he do it? What are his safely guarded secrets? The secrets are not guarded at all, actually. There are five pillars that Ramsey uses to stay financially secure. These are to act your wage, save, make a written plan, pay with cash and give. Ramsey said to “live on less than you make,” meaning, do not buy things you cannot afford. That seems simple enough, yet we all overspend money on things that are not needed. We eat out too much, buy cars that cost more than we can afford and purchase designer-brand clothing. Second, save money. This one is a must, because who knows when that bad driver will back into you in the parking lot or a soft drink will spill on your brand new laptop. Being rich begins slowly,

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so do not give up. A written plan is also needed for good money management. Every dollar should have a name. This helps with overspending and helps develop self-discipline. If you know you only have $50 a week set aside for eating out, you will not go to Texas de Brazil on Monday if you expect to eat out again that week. Every month make a budget and follow it strictly. You will be surprised about how much less you spend. Ramsey brought a wonderful visual aid to the presentation: a thousand dollars in one hundred dollar bills. This was to illustrate his point of paying with cash. “Paying with cash is important bePhotos courtesy of daveramsey.com cause you don’t feel like you’re just handing over a piece of plastic to be swiped; you feel like you Man with a Plan: Dave Ramsey are putting your child, Mr. Benjamin, up for adop- teaches how to live a debt-free life. tion,” Ramsey said. He also went on to say that paying with cash on large items such as a big screen TV or stereo system can get you discounts, if you bargain with the salesperson. When in doubt flash a couple of hundred dollar bills and say, “You know what happened to Circuit City, right?” Last and possibly most importantly is to give. It makes you feel good inside to leave that Sonic waitress $20 for a large sweet tea. Everyone likes the feeling of making someone smile, so what better way than giving someone a 2000% tip? “We don’t need to stimulate stupidity,” said Ramsey when asked about the stimulus package proposed by the government. He said that if more people gave money, then we would not be in this slump we are in. Ramsey also gave small tips such as cash value life insurance is terrible, renting a house is not a bad thing and if you are thinking of opening a mutual fund, look for one that is pre-1979. Also, he said that if you do get in credit card debt, attack the smallest first and move your way up. This is so the small one will not keep compounding with interest. The last bit of advice Ramsey gave was, “Talk to old rich people; they know what they’re doing.” Total Money Makeover: In his

david grueser

Features

book, Ramsey talks about his simple money-saving solutions.

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R esta u ra n te Me xi ca n o

-Allen Hester

1130 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 287-9488

Dr. Stanley P. Young, DDS  Flowering Dogwood Ln Dyersburg TN 

Jane B. Bradshaw 642 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 285-4546

2 9 1 8 H w y. 5 1 B y - P a s s P. 0 . B o x 6 8 7 D ye r s b u r g, T N 285-3671

JUSTOAK “Tomorrow’s Antiques Today” 212 Court St. Dyersburg, TN 285-9657

2710 Lake Rd. Dyersburg 286-6788

Save a Lot  Hwy  ByPass Dyersburg TN 

475 Hwy. 51 By-Pass Dyersburg, TN 287-8292

1003 Reelfoot Ave. Union City, TN 885-7058

Roberts - Gibson Oil 115 Hwy. 51 By-Pass P.O. Box 681 Dyersburg, TN 285-4941


Trojan baseball team has good chance at districts

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ith a record of 138-1, the Dyersburg High School baseball team has had a decent season this year. The team is awaiting districts which begin April 30, in Milan. “Our district tournament has always been exciting. Our goal this year is to win the tourney and advance,” said Coach Tom Mathis. "If we play well as a team, districts could go really good," senior Ryan Wood said. Collierville and Dyer County have been big competition in the district for the team this year. However, the team's biggest competition has not been another team. "Our biggest competition this year has been ourselves. Not playing the way we all know we can has hurt us in a couple of games," senior JD Newsom said. The guys have really worked well together as a

team.

Photo courtesy of wikipedia.org

S After losing key senior starters f r o m last year, everyone has stepped up. "These young men have worked extremely hard to improve this year by working every day and improving every game," said Mathis.

elizabeth finley

Photos submitted by Jackie Wilder

Hit and Run: JD Newsome sprints to first after putting the ball into play during a competitive game.

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Calapari makes tough switch

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hortly before the 20082009 college basketball season ended, the Kentucky head-coaching position became vacant. The Kentucky coaching position has always been a highly coveted one as far as college basketball goes. Kentucky’s coaches have had a phenomenally high success rate, and the program has had only six coaches in the last seventynine years of the program. Recently, John Calipari became the seventh. On March 31, Calipari signed a written contract for $31.65 million over an eight-year period. This deal makes Calipari the highest-paid coach in the collegiate game. Along with this lucrative contract also came some perks. Calipari will receive a membership to the country club of his choice, two cars, 20 lowerlevel season tickets to Kentucky home games and eight tickets for each Kentucky home football game. Despite this massive contract and these nice perks, many Memphis fans were left wondering what made him leave the team he had so much success with over a nine-year period-the Memphis Tigers. In those nine years, Calipari won 253 games, the most in school history. In addition, he had nine consecutive twenty-win seasons. Coach Calipari has been named Naismith Coach of the Year twice. Many suspect Calipari left Memphis because his teams

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never got any respect. Kentucky is in the Southeastern Conference, typically a powerhouse basketball conference. This means Coach Cal will get plenty of respect coaching Kentucky, the most winning program in the history of college basketball. In addition, Calipari was making $1.8 million at Memphis as opposed to the almost $4 million a year he will be making at Kentucky. Before leaving Memphis, Calipari had an all-world recruiting class. DeMarcus Cousins, Xavier Henry and John Wall all were committed to Memphis before Calipari made the switch. All three are top five recruits for the class of 2009. By splitting ways with Memphis, Coach Cal had to know his recruits would probably consider other schools and not follow him to Kentucky. Xavier Henry has decided to go to Kansas and John Wall is still undecided, but DeMarcus Cousins has decided to follow Calipari to Kentucky. Not only did Kentucky get a new coach, Memphis did also. Josh Pastner, Calipari’s long time assistant coach, will succeed Calipari as the next Memphis head coach. Kentucky obviously thinks highly of Coach Cal’s skills to offer him so much money. In a few years, it certainly will be interesting to see if Kentucky got their money’s worth or a raw deal.

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Boys soccer team looks to finish successful season

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his year, only 22 men made the soccer team. But what makes this team so successful each year? “We have a lot of seniors and a lot of dedicated underclassmen,” senior defensive player Ben James said. “We have strong players who get along pretty well,” sophomore Austin Evans said. The team this year has many players with talent. Players like Will Fowlkes, William Lay, Andrew Ford, Nic Berry, and Kyle Youmans have helped the team become successful. This year, the team has a new coach, Greg Stapleton. Stapleton was the middle school soccer coach for seven years. Because he was the coach at the middle school, most of the players have been under him and know what to expect. The fact that many players have already had Stapleton is beneficial because it helps the team

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work together more easily. “Soccer is my hobby; it’s something I truly enjoy,” Stapleton said. This year looks promising. The team has a good record and a strong team. The team is undefeated in the district so far. Many are saying that the team may be able to get to state. “We are probably going to make it to sub-state and possibly state,” freshman Will Fowlkes said. Dyersburg is not the only team in the area with a good team this year. Other teams like Martin, USJ and Madison Academy are threatening to strip Dyersburg of their undefeated district title. “Martin and the teams in Jackson are our biggest rivals,” Coach Stapleton said. With so many good teams out there, Dyersburg soccer fans will have fun watching their team compete.

mccord pagan

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he FIFA World Cup is one of the most widely renowned soccer events in the world. With over twice as many television viewers as the Super Bowl, the World Cup is a highly aspired-to goal for many of the world’s countries. The 2010 World Cup will be held in South Africa. This means South Africa automatically qualifies. Other teams, however, are still battling for qualification. Spain is the highest ranked team this year. They are the 2008 UEFA European Champions and will be big competition for this year’s World Cup. Despite their outstanding players, Spain has never won a World Cup and did their best finishing fourth in 1950. Another dangerous team is Germany, ranked second. Germany has won the World Cup three times and aims to bring home a fourth. Germany suffered a bitter defeat to Spain in the 2008 UEFA European Championship. They are the only country to have won both the men’s and women’s World Cups. The Netherlands (Holland) is another team not to overlook. They were a dangerous threat in the 2008 UEFA European Championship and present themselves to be a strong challenge for the 2010 World Cup. Hol-

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wikipedia.org

land is ranked third in the world and is presently top in its qualification group for the World Cup. Brazil is ranked fourth. Brazil has a long history of being ranked first but in recent years has dropped on the world rankings. They are the most successful team in World Cup history and hold five championships. England, the inventors of soccer, have won the World Cup only once and desire to win again. England is ranked seventh in the world and is a country that has proved its skill in its famous club teams. USA, ranked fifteenth in the world, is a skillful team preparing to cause a world upset. The USA leads its qualifying group and has a fierce set of starters, including 19-year-old Jozy Altidore, our own region three product. Altidore scored three goals in USA’s international game against Trinidad and Tobago, making him the youngest American to score a hat-trick in an international game. Only seven teams have ever won the World Cup. These teams are Brazil, Italy, Germany, Argentina, Uruguay, France, and England. There are many others with large goals to claim the world title and be added to the list.

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Abreath of fresh air to the horror movie scene

The new iPod that talks O

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he iPod Shuffle is a compact music player made by Apple which has been overlooked throughout the years of iPod growth. All of the previous Shuffles have been the smallest and cheapest iPods made by Apple. This is still true with the latest edition, but improvements have been made. The new Shuffle comes in one memory size and only two colors, making it a simple buy. The Shuffle is priced at just below eighty dollars. With four gigabytes of memory, the Shuffle can hold up to one thousand songs. Its rechargeable lithium battery allows the user to listen to his favorite music for up to 10 continuous hours. This iPod is only the size of a flash drive, making it the smallest iPod yet. Apple was able to compact the size while still cramming more technology into its case. The new Shuffle is the first music player that talks. The player will tell what song is playing with the press of a button. The reason behind this technology is to let the user know what song is playing since the player does not have a screen. The major downside to the updated iPod Shuffle is its incompatibility with other brands of headphones. The supplied Apple headphones integrate a small control to change volume and songs on the Shuffle. Without these headphones the player is practically useless. Overall, the new Shuffle is a great music player for almost anybody. Joggers can clip it to their shirts and never know it is there, while students can deceive the sharpest teacher. While it is not a multimedia player, it is a compact entertainment system that is smaller than a house key.

james guttery

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believe his new home contains supernatural inhabitants. He meets a fellow cancer patient at the hospital by the name of Reverend Nicholas Popescu (Elias Koteas) who gives him a contact card if he ever needs to talk. When his doctor tells his parents that he is having no peculiar side effects from the treatments, Sarah begins to wonder. Peter comes home drunk one night and removes all of the light bulbs in the house. Later that night, all the electrical appliances turn on and off by themselves, and lights flicker where the light bulbs used to be. Sarah resorts to calling the Reverend for help. While Nicholas is searching the house for evil spirits, he finds ashes and part of a skull in the mortuary oven. Doors and windows begin to repeatedly open and slam shut but cease when the ashes are removed from the house. Matt awakens to symbols being carved into his body by some unknown force. He screams and awakens the others, who immediately take him to the hospital. Matt’s doctors inform his parents that the treatment has had no effect, and he may die at any time. However, when they request to see him, they find his bed to be vacant and the window of his room to be broken. Back at the house, Matt orders his cousins and brother to get out while he barricades himself inside. He proceeds to smash the interior walls of the house with an ax, revealing dozens of embalmed corpses. What will happen to this sick young man and his family as he faces the dark forces that want them gone? To reveal this would ruin the story. Photo courtesy of www.rottentomatoes.com The Haunting in Connecticut is a creepy, thrilling horror movie that is not too overdone with the typical Hollywood guts and gore. With ghost stories, less is more. It is nice for a few small details to be left for the imagination. I highly recommend this flick to anyone thirsting for a classic ghost story that is well worth the cost of the admission ticket.

ver the p a s t decade, popular culture has bombarded us with horror movies featuring death-seeking ventriloquist dummies, psychotic men who parade the streets in ominous masks and a series of unspeakable acts of torture. Whatever happened to a good old-fashioned ghost story? Peter Cornwell’s The Haunting in Connecticut gives its audience just that. The Haunting in Connecticut is based on a 1987 occurrence in the town of Southington, Connecticut. The movie’s protagonist is Matt Campbell (Kyle Gallner), a sixteen-year-old boy who is undergoing experimental treatments for cancer and is able to see objects of the supernatural world because of his frail position between life and death. Sarah Campbell (Virginia Madsen), Matt’s mother, rents a house in close vicinity to the hospital, which she finds out used to be a funeral home. They move in shortly after, along with her younger son and two nieces. Matt’s father, Peter Campbell (Martin Donovan), visits on the weekends while maintaining his job at the family’s previous locale. Matt begins to experience a series of strange visions and disturbing events that lead him to

madison johnson Exploring the Unknown: Martin Donovan (performing as Peter Campbell) stares grimly into the shadows of his house.

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U2 experiments with new sounds U

2's constantly-evolving musical style, along with the consistent passion and grandeur of its lyrics, have set it apart from the rest of the world's biggest bands. Both qualities come to the forefront in the Dublin rock band's new album, No Line on the Horizon. The band's first album in five years, No Line on the Horizon takes the anthemic but sometimes predictable style of 2004's How to Dismantle an Atomic Bomb and 2001's All that you Can't Leave Behind and brings it to a newer, more experimental level. No Line has fewer crowd-pleasers than the last two albums, but it has more originality and intricacy. It also displays U2's new range of influences, primarily North African and Moroccan music: the band recorded a large portion of the album in an openair courtyard in Morocco. Lyrically, U2 is still one of the most intense, "deep" bands around. The songs of No Line on the Horizon center upon the idea of surrender and "the journey away

from self-consciousness." For several songs, lead singer/songwriter Bono creates characters—including druggies, dying soldiers and war correspondents—and tells their stories from their points of view. But even these character songs contain the element of universality which has come to define U2. No Line on the Horizon also contains some of the band's most vivid spiritual imagery in recent memory. One highlight is "Moment of Surrender," a reverberating sevenminute epic that best defines what the album is about. Another is "White As Snow," the quietest song on the album but possibly the most meaningful and memorable. Despite some awkward moments, No Line on the Horizon is an intricate album both musically and lyrically. It contains some of the band's best—or at least, most original—work since the early 90's. Many-layered and highly symbolic, it may take several listens to appreciate; this is the kind of album that grows on the listener.

william bumpas Photos from u2.com

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A new Life is a climb: drama of Hannah Montana:

Biblical proportions The Movie

delivers positive message

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Photo courtesy of NBC.com

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t is always interesting to see a classic story given a new twist, especially when that tale comes from the Bible. NBC’s new drama Kings does just that with the tale of David and Saul. Taking place in the fictional modern day kingdom of Gilboa, Kings takes the story of the shepherd boy David who defeats the mighty Goliath and is chosen by God to replace Saul as the king of Israel, and updates it to replace David the shepherd with David Shepherd (Chris Egan) and replace King Saul with King Silas Benjamin (Ian McShane). The story starts with the dedication of Gilboa’s new capital, Shiloh, while the country is at war with neighboring country Gath. Skip forward one year to the battlefront where a group of Gilboan soldiers has been captured. Young David feels compelled to do something, so he decides to go against orders across the border to free his fellow soldiers, unaware that one of them is the king’s son, Jack (Sebastian Stan). In the process he takes out one of the enemies’ tanks, cleverly named Goliath. The show continues with David thrust into the spotlight for his heroics and even offered a spot in the court due to his popularity with the public because of his humble origins. Like the Bible

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story, King Silas falls from favor with God, and David starts to see signs pointing him to prominence, maybe even royalty. The show has already laid the foundation and started to expand on many juicy subplots and secrets of the characters. The king’s brother-in-law, and financial provider for the start-up of Gilboa, William Cross (Dylan Baker), tries to control the king by threatening to pull out his money and supposedly has a son who has been locked away for years (to be played by Macaulay Culkin). All the characters have their problems, and no one is who they seem. Even David is not perfect, as the public would believe. Kings is a well-done show with top-notch performances. McShane is spot on with his performance of an often amoral king who is having trouble doing what he and God know is right. Stan also plays perfectly the troubled playboy prince, akin to Prince Harry. The show does a great job of keeping me interested, leaving just enough hanging to get me back the next week. The plot does seem to drag at points, but that’s probably because I usually watch comedies.

patrick heckethorn

my gosh Mommy, it is Hannah Montana!!” can be heard all throughout Hannah Montana: The Movie as Hannah Montana encounters crazed fans; it is also heard in real life whenever she is mentioned around groups of kids. However, Hannah Montana: The Movie surprisingly brings a message of overcoming obstacles and being true to oneself, and it is more relatable to teens than her targeted young kid to pre-teen age group. While there are entertaining musical numbers such as the slightly cheesy “Hoedown Throwdown” and light humorous moments such as Miley falling off her horse while her dream “cowboy” is watching, the movie deals with the more vital matter of remembering where you come from and what is most important in life, which most kids cannot relate to. But in all seriousness, this would be an excellent movie for teens to see, especially if there are big changes such as college coming up in their lives. The main plot deals with Miley Stewart (Miley Cyrus), AKA Hannah Montana, taking a trip back to her roots to the middleof-nowhere town of Crowley Corners, Tennessee, after acting too much like a diva for her father Robby Ray (Billy Ray Cyrus) to handle. At first Miley acts stuck-up in Crowley Corners, but she quickly falls in love with the town and people, especially a certain attractive cowboy named Travis Brody

(Lucas Till). Her attachment leads her to throw a benefit concert to halt the building of a shopping mall, which forces her once again to lead her confusing double life. While trying to sort right from wrong, Miley begins to find out who she truly wants to be. While the movie has its high points, there are also annoying stereotypes and irrelevant details that make little sense.Throughout the movie celebrities are weaved into the plot, almost awkwardly at times. For example when Miley arrives in Tennessee, the band Rascal Flatts is randomly sitting in her grandmother’s living room playing a song. Also, Hannah Montana: The Movie at first displays Tennessee as this land of hicks and cowboys with a seemingly dumb population. But as the movie progresses, the stereotype begins to fade into the background, which was definitely welcome. In the words of Miley, “Life is a climb,” which many people have to figure out. The most refreshing part of this movie is that it was not simply a superficial “kiddy” movie, but rather has meaning that people from all walks of life could relate to. The music will not disappoint the typical Hannah fan, but Miley also brings some more grown-up songs such as “The Climb.” Hannah Montana: The Movie combines family fun with a lesson of always being true to oneself. I give this movie three and a half out of five stars.

kaitlyn turney

Photo courtesy of wikipedia.org

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Over and Underneath brings positive lyrics, upbeat tunes to music industry

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Photo courtesy of Amazon.com

efore 2002, Tenth Avenue North was merely a street name in West Palm Beach, Florida. That all changed when two college musicians got together and created a band, naming it after the street on which they lived. In the years following, two more members were added to the group, and they came to find themselves at the top of Christian music charts with the songs “Love Is Here” and “By Your Side.” Last year, contemporary Christian group Tenth Avenue North released their debut album Over and Underneath. The group consists of Mike Donehey on vocals and acoustic guitar, Jason Jamison on drums, Scott Sanders on bass guitar and Jeff Owen on electric guitar and vocals. The music is a blend of a light traditional guitar feel and a moderate pop beat with a steady guitar accompaniment. The songs range from a soft, mellow flow to light rock and include everything in between, so it appeals to listeners Trojan

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with varied musical interests. Though the actual music is impressive, the lyrics are by far the most touching ones I have ever heard and really make this album complete. The best part is that the songs address struggles that all Christians face; they bring to light the questions that stump even the greatest theologians, yet they also wrestle with more common issues, such as conformance to the standards of a corrupt world. In their song “Satisfy,” the lyrics read, “When the day is closing in/ Like the stars in the night I am falling/ Into the pull of the earth and its affection.” This song poses the idea of being satisfied with the bounty that God provides rather than being sucked into worldly temptations that are sinful. The track “Times” is composed as a soft prayer to God that begs for forgiveness from sins we feel like we can hide. This song serves as an excellent devotion that brings you back in touch with the God of mercy.

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One of the more upbeat songs on the album, “Let It Go” advocates letting go of the firm track along which we steer our lives and trusting God despite our fears of what will happen when we relinquish control. Lyrics like “You said if I lose my life it’s then I’ll find my soul/ You say let it go” remind Christians that it is only in giving our lives to Christ that we experience salvation and the promise of eternal life. By far their most popular song in 2009, “By Your Side” assures that God is with us through all the struggles we encounter. It poses interesting questions, such as “Why are you trying to earn grace?” and “Why are you looking for love?/ Why are you still searching as if I’m not enough?” that make one realize just how

Entertainment

selfish his or her ambition appears when it turns us from worshiping the God that created us. Newcomers Tenth Avenue North struck gold with the debut of their hit album Over and Underneath. Usually when I buy a CD, I find that there are several great songs, but the majority sound the same and only seem to take up memory on my iPod. However, as I scanned through the songs on Over and Underneath, I noticed that none of the songs are classified on my “skip” list. Every song is unique and expresses concepts different from those presented by other top artists. I give this album five out of five stars and would go out of my way to recommend it to everyone.

katie taylor

Photo courtesy of itickets.com

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May and June Sunday 10

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 13 14 15 11 12 Baseball Regional Semi-Finals Dyer County Leadership Graduation

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Choir Concert at 7:30 Soccer District May 12-15

Thespian Banquet

Band Marching Camp 3:30-5:00 May 11-15

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Track State May 18-22 DECA Cookout

Baseball Regional Finals

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Baseball State Championship

EOC Test for U.S. History

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Saturday 16

AP Human Geography Test Baseball Sectionals Track Sectionals at USJ

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Soccer Banquet DECA Luncheon

FFA Banquet

23 Awards Day

Softball & Baseball Banquets

EOC Test for English 9

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No Classes Memorial Day

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Patterson Farewell Party 2-4 in Commons

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Senior Picnic

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Start of June

08 Report Cards pick-up

03 Final Exam (3&6)

Final Exam (2&5)

Senior Exams (2&5)

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Final Exam (1&4) Dismiss at 11 Baccolaureate prac at 1 Baccolaureate at 7

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Senior Exams (3&6) Spring Sports Banquet

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Senior Exams (1&4)

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Graduation at 7 ProjectGraduation

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Summer School

Comm Spot Greg Beam is a Youth Director at the Union Mission of Dyersburg. He works with a lot of people in Dyersburg. Here is a quick Q and A to become familiar with this member of our community.

Q:How did you get where you are today? A:Gods grace, Gods provision and Gods protection. Q:What is something not very many people know about you? A:I like caffeine-free Mountain Dew almost as much as regular Mountain Dew. Q:What is your favorite day and why? A:Thursday evenings. Iactually get to spend time with my family. Q:What characteristics do you think make a person? A:Humility and willingness to serve. Q:Would you rather live in South Africa or England? A:Id rather live in South Africa because I picture England as a dreary, rainy, cloudy and fairly

cold place. Q:If you could change a thing about Dyersburg, what would it be? A:I would seriously get some mountains here. Q:What makes you happy? A:My family--annoying my family. Q:What is your favorite word? A:Krunk-- or is it crunk? Q:If you could have any super power, what would it be? A:I would want to be able to fly. Q:What would you tell someone who didnt feel good enough? A:God made us to fulfill a specific, important role. He made you different from everybody else for a reason.

Photo by Alex Jacobi


Issue 6 08-09