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3.24.11

trojaneer Center Grove High School

byVincentWilliams NewsWriter

graphic by Lucas Matney

byLindseyWinneroski NewsWriter

With Spring Break just a day away, Center Grove students have joined the fitness craze in hopes to sculpt the perfect beach body. Beginning in January or February, the mad dash to rid oneself of the muffin top began. The only top which most spring breakers want to see is one of a bikini. Many students have been working out the last couple months with a baby-oil-slathered body soaking up the sun in mind. Swimsuits have made their way to the racks. Goggles and sunscreen have been replaced. Tanning salons have advertised on every street corner. Cars crowd gym parking lots. The hard work will soon pay off as suitcases are packed and flip-flops are uncovered from the depths of the closet. For some, workouts are part of a strict weekly routine. Senior Jordan Chambers is a regular at Mount Pleasant’s Community Life Center (CLC). “I work out six days a week, totaling about seven hours or more,” Chambers said. “I do mainly cardio, but I occasionally lift weights. I also tumble at Perfect 10.” Because Chambers goes to the gym so frequently, she tries to add diversity to her workouts. “I alternate between track, treadmill, and elliptical. I also have to listen to either rap or pop music when I run so I don’t get bored,” Chambers said. Chambers is planning on going on WesternCaribbean cruise this Spring Break. However, she intends on continuing her workouts even after break is over. “People should work out year round in order to stay healthy, not just for break,” Chambers said enthusiastically. “It’s a lifestyle.” Gyms, such as the CLC, offer a variety of classes to their members in order provide them with a

specialized workout. “I go to a lot of the classes at the CLC,” senior Maddy Cheek said. “I have taken yoga, core, and cardio classes.” Cheek is also part of Marty Mills’ weightlifting class here at the school. “Yeah, Marty Mills helps…a lot. I have a trip to Panama to prepare for,” Cheek said with a smile spreading across her face. “My workouts typically consist of massive amounts of heavy weightlifting,” senior Jon Clawson said. Eating right is just as important as exercise when it comes to getting in shape. “I do enjoy a light salad after a grueling workout,” Clawson said. The weeks leading up to Spring Break send many to the mirror, observing every curve of their bodies and analyzing the work still left to do. Health teacher Andrea Teevan warns students of the dangers involved in extreme dieting. Good intentions can quickly turn into unhealthy obsessions. “Students think that they can spot reduce. What many people don’t realize is that your body takes off weight overall, not just from your midsection,” Teevan said. “You can begin to tone the muscle underneath the fat in weeks leading up to break, but the fat won’t melt away.” Spring Break often marks a season of increased obsession with appearance crash dieting, and emergence of eating disorders. “You should only lose about a half a pound a week in order for the weight loss to be considered healthy. If you want to see results by Spring Break, you should set a New Years’ resolution to get fit,” Teevan said. “Short term

Vol. L, Issue 11

“Some kids at school just want to find some way to fit in, and they’ll do basically anything to get approval,” an anonymous student said. Made famous by the 70’s song “Smokin’ in the Boys’ Room”, the reality of kids performing illegal activities at school is not being overshadowed. Other CG students find the act disgusting. They do not like the experience of not being able to breath while peeing. “Its disgusting. Why would you do that?” junior Joe Wood said. In the Center Grove student planner under “standards of behavior,” number 25, the use of cigarettes or chewing tobacco on campus is not permitted. When administrators are dealing with a first time offender, they are given a two-day out-of-school detention along with the requirement of attending tobacco education classes in Franklin at Johnson Memorial Hospital. “They’ll bring in some doctors, cancer patients, and they’ll watch videos. They try to let the students hear it straight from the horse’s mouth when it comes to the issues of tobacco products,” Dean of Students Ruben De Luna said. Countless people have suffered due to the decisions they made while they were young. This class is intended to make all the students aware of what is to come in terms of general health. Even with all of that in place, everyone knows of or has seen people either smoking in the parking lot or has walked into a restroom full of cigarette smoke. “I was in the bathroom by the weight room once and I heard from one of the stalls like clicking from a lighter trying to be lit. I hurried up and left, but I went back in there about 30 minutes later and there was a pungent aroma of pot,” senior Aaron Manship said. Schools around the city have begun to implement rules to combat students smoking in the bathrooms. Many have a policy of locking bathrooms during class time and only opening them during passing periods. De Luna talked extensively about the main strategy the administrators use to catch kids at school: the addition of multiple cameras in the places where kids seem to hide out to smoke. Now, the students know about the cameras, so they will be taking a much bigger risk in trying to smoke during school. Administrators can catch almost anybody who tries to smoke in school because of the new cameras. “Just this past week we’ve caught two kids who were smoking in the elevator,” CGPD Police Chief Bill Spitler said. Spitler talked about how they will catch kids and adults all the time at school events because they will have plain-clothes people walking around looking for anyone who is breaking the tobacco policy. Nationwide, statistics report that 19.2% of high school seniors admit to smoking in the past month. 9% admit to using smokeless tobacco products. Although it is legal when you’re 18 years old, it is still illegal to use on school grounds. Scientists have done extensive research on the topic of youths smoking, and their results are earth shattering. Nicotine has a greater affect on a developing brain because the new neurological pathways created through development are being made addicted to the drug. The teenage generation will continue to be stereotyped and oppressed by the more experienced generations based on teens’ attitudes and actions.

dieting causes your body’s metabolism to shut down.” Although one may feel an increased sense of self-confidence by doing some pushups the week before vacation, drastic results are unrealistic. For those that start early, the sixty-two hours of crunches will be all worth it once your six-pack and your left bicep are tagged on Facebook for the Center Grove student body to see.

graphic by Lucas Matney


News

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the trojaneer

On the Ella’s bathroom Shoppe fills CG walls:

Frozen Yogurt:

Thursday, March 24, 2011

tummies

a canvas for and the crude artist byTylerSykes NewsWriter

Entering the bathrooms to take care of one’s necessities, it can clearly be noticed that graffiti seems to be becoming more and more of a problem. Slang and graphic drawings are plaguing bathroom walls with no or little opposition. It is a shame that such a wonderful school can be judged by explicit material written by an immature high school student. Bathroom graffiti has and will always be an issue in high schools around the nation. But over the years it appears to be growing into a rude, developing habit in Center Grove. “Bathroom graffiti is a disgrace. Not only is it disgusting but it makes our school look trashy when that is clearly not the case” senior Derek Hopper said. Hopper is one of the many students and staff members who are fed up with crude content in bathrooms. The men’s restroom in the hall of excellence, also known as the “Ritz”, seems to be a haven for graffiti and artistic misconduct. “Over the years, the amount of graffiti has fluctuated. By no means is it good now, and it seems to be excessive in [the Ritz]” art teacher Rick Jones said. As I’m sure you can all recall, last year there was a gun threat written on a bathroom wall in the science hallway that exploded into pandemonium. Whether the threat was ever serious or not, it was spurred from immature graffiti and caused a great amount of panic throughout the school. Obviously cameras cannot be installed in bathrooms to prevent graffiti, but if more preventative measures were taken and the graphic content was cleaned and removed quicker, the crisis could have been averted. “There’s no way to totally stop graffitiing, but I think teachers need to be more aware of kids roaming around the halls during class” Jones said. “The best solution would be to remove the graffiti from the walls as soon as possible to take the audience away,” Jones said. Many students find that writing crude material anywhere in the school is an overall disappointment. Moral of the story: we are all young adults and should be old and mature enough to not draw profanities on a bathroom wall, funny as they may be. They put a nasty scar on the appearance of our high school and are located in a room frequently visited by all staff, students, and visitors.

wallets byAbbiStiffey

Frozen yogurt, the new ice cream it seems: just a scrumptious, but even healthier. Ella’s Frozen Yogurt shop just opened on Fairview and 135 quite recently. Many students here at CG have found a much needed “summer” jobs at Ella’s. “I am looking forward to getting to know my other fellow employees and the owners, Mrs. and Mr. Gray, a little bit better. I can already tell we are going to become a family,” Senior Lillian Hopson said. “I worked my first shift this past Wednesday night when we were closing,” Hopson said. “I heard about Ella’s from my dear friend, Lindsey Winneroski,” Senior Ethan Raker said. “I was looking forward to the people I would be working with and working the cash register. I wanted to help create a casual, family owned business environment,” Raker said. The application process for those who applied seemed to be quite a walk in the park. “It was very simple, we just submitted our applications and then sat with Mrs. Gray and her sister-in-law and talked. They asked some hypothetical scenario questions to get a feel for how we would act or respond to different situations in the workplace and asked all the typical interview questions,” Hopson said. “What I liked the most was that Mrs. Gray was striving to hire active young members of the community who are involved in things like choir, sports, the arts,” Hopson said. Ella’s is a family owned busi-

NewsWriter

ness. The Gray family had faith and the will to start their dream business. “The Gray’s are really nice people. They set their rules and expectations, but they are very flexible with working hours. They are the epitome of someone you would love to work for,” Raker said. Of those I Sean Brookes rings up a customer have talked to, Ella’s is the (right). The Grey family and CG ideal job to have, flexible employees Jimmy Dagget and and fun, with a warm envi- Emma Cross pose inside Ella’s Frozen Yogurt (middle). Senior Lindsey ronment. Winnerowski prepares yogurt for “I like the environment customers while on duty (left). at Ella’s. Being able to see Ella’s has become a local hangout people I know from school for Center Grove students, as well and show them my favorite as a source of employment. photos flavors, and then get to be by Julie Joson in the kitchen working with the yogurt and seeing all the aspects of the business is really fun. Mr. Clodfelter would be so proud of all my practical applications of our concepts in Econ to Ella’s as a business,” Hopson said. “They make it easy for us to work around our schedules, yet still get a good amount of hours in for working,” Raker said. Ella’s hopes to incorporate a positive working environment as well as promoting a healthier lifestyle for its worker and customers. After ordering your choice yogurt, the endless toppings are added next. There are over 40 different types of toppings, ranging from fruit, granola, candy pieces, and syrups. So go, visit friends and treat yourself to a delicious and healthy snack.

English teacher and publications adviser awarded Teacher of the Year

byAlliChamberlain

Each year Center Grove nominates teachers who exhibit excellence through teaching ability, resourcefulness to students and dedication in their career. This year the three teacher of the year nominees were Casey Tedrow, Jackie Fowler, and Russ Milligan. After voting for the final three, English teacher Casey Tedrow received the honor of high school teacher of the year. Photography teacher Jackie Fowler thought it was nice of her department to vote for her. “Even though I didn’t win the award, I think Mrs. Tedrow is very deserving of it, and she’s very involved in the school.” “She is a teacher who motivates students and helps them over come obstacles no matter what challenges they face,” English teacher and pro development co-chair Briana McDonough said. “Mrs. Tedrow is also a coach for the pro development committee, a sponsor for CGTV and yearbook, and a co-chair for the English department. Not only is she very hard worker, but she reaches out to the students,” McDonough said. Vice-principal Sandy Hillman believes Tedrow is a great leader of the English Department, and helps improve the school in literacy. “Mrs. Tedrow does professional work and she is well respected by all of the other teachers. She is dedicated, organized,

NewsWriter

Where in the world?

CG spring break destinations

very caring, and text-savvy,” Hillman said. Yearbook student Taylor Bibler has really looked up to Mrs. Tedrow. “She is my mentor, and I chose my future career because of her. Mrs. Tedrow is one of those teachers you can go to for anything. I may not have gotten through high school without her or yearbook. She cares about her students more than any other teacher I know. Watching her work with the students is inspiring.” Out of approximately 120 teachers, it’s a huge honor to achieve this award. But regardless of her honor, she prefers to focus on the students. Casey Tedrow is very flattered, but remains humble about the subject. “This is my 14th year here at Center Grove, and I admire so many students and love getting to know the students. I am also very proud of my students for awards they received themselves and for the students that continue to keep fighting and not give up,” Tedrow said. “Yearbook is something I’m very passionate about and it’s also a personal thing to me. Yearbook is a way to cover the school year in the form of a history book. It is important and is also a way to picture every person because every kid deserves to be included.”

Center Grove’s Business Professionals of America

would like to thank the following businesses for making their trip to Nationals a possibility:

Ray Skillman Performance Ford & Hyundai Ray Skillman Eastside Kohls


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Opinion

the trojaneer

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Labor Battles:

Democrats Flee while Protestors Fill State Capitols

byMattSaunders Opinion Writer

L

ast November, almost every election of state and congressional representatives was dominated by Republicans. The majority of Americans are tired of high-spending agendas and are worried about the growing mountain of debt our government continues to ignore. In some states, Republicanled legislatures have attempted to put their agendas to action, so one would think that we would have seen some passed bills and new policies by now. No, what happened instead was a mass exodus by Democrats from these states (including Indiana) and a wave of protests, sit-ins, and capitol building sleepovers.

Democratic representatives are currently crashing at a Comfort Suites in Urbana, Illinois until further notice, and thousands of angry protestors have clogged the streets outside the State House in downtown Indy.

so I will not pretend to be an expert. I am merely observing these events in the third person as an average citizen, but as a proud member of this democracy I have some criticisms of some of those involved.

It’s been almost a month since a Democrat has sat in the House of Representatives, so the Republicans have raised their daily fines from $250 to $350. It looks like everyone has made their point by now, so don’t be surprised if the Dems are back soon.

The first thing that concerned me was the teachers in Wisconsin who ditched school to march with their picket signs. Obviously I think the teachers have a valid point by standing up for themselves, but who they should really stand for is their students. Some teachers even brought some of their students with them to the protests who had no idea why.

So, what is my personal opinion on these events? Let me say first off that I am not an expert on the politics or economics surrounding these issues,

Another problem I have is the over-

exaggerated nature of some of the protests. Many people are saying that Mitch Daniels is trying to destroy education, or that Republicans hate public workers because they are lowering their wages. But when you look at the facts, the government has a massive debt and one way to deal with it is lowering the wages of state employees. Right now fixing the deficit needs to be a priority for governments in every state. If this problem is really going to be fixed, some sacrifices will have to be made. Sadly part of this burden will have to lie on public workers, but hopefully other methods will also be incorporated and we can all contribute in the effort to recover the economy.

The first protests took place in Wisconsin. Republican Governor Scott Walker was attempting to pass a bill that would take power away from unions and their workers, and decrease pay for state employees. Democratic representatives in Wisconsin then fled the State House to Illinois to prevent the bill from being passed. Not soon after, government workers from all over Wisconsin flocked to Madison to voice and demonstrate their opposition to the Governor’s agenda. Many of these protestors were public school teachers, and some school systems actually closed for many days because too many teachers were absent. The protests continued to grow each day but have since died down. But a similar movement was sparked here in Indiana. Governor Mitch Daniels has proposed many major policy changes to be enacted in the near future, such as merit-based pay for teachers and strengthening charter schools. But many Hoosiers were angered when he announced that Indiana would try to pass union-weakening legislation similar to Wisconsin’s. The result has been a march madness soap opera in Indianapolis.

Graphic by Lucas Matney

Trying in school... byCraigLotz

Co-Editor-in-Chief I spent the majority of my elementary years crying over ISTEP testing and Shirley method tests. As I progressed to middle school, I looked back and inwardly kicked myself for trying so hard. While I assumed that middle school years would ultimately “matter” to my future life, I was shocked at 8th grade graduation when I again encountered identical feelings. And now, merely seven school weeks from graduation I can officially say that I have slaved, sweated, and studied for twelve (thirteen if you count half-day kindergarten) years to learn knowledge that could very well have zero application to my future career. In essence, these twelve years did not matter. But what does “matter” actually mean.

trojaneer Contact Information Mailing Address: 2717 S. Morgantown Road, Greenwood, IN 46143 Phone: (317) 881-0581, Ext. 4175 E-mail: Staff members of the Trojaneer may be contacted by using their first name_last name and appending @ cgstudent.epals.com. For example Lucas Matney will recieve email at lucas_matney@cgstudent.epals.com. Responding to the Trojaneer [editor@trojaneer.com] Letters to the Editors will be accepted for the March 25 edition of the Trojaneer until March 18. Letters may be turned in to adviser Melissa Warner or Editors-in-Chief Craig Lotz and Ben Whitehead. All letters must be signed and include contact information for the writer. Anonymous letters will not be published. Letters may not contain personal attacks against individuals or any libelous material. The Trojaneer staff regards the right to edit letters for grammatical mistakes and length. Writers should strive to keep letters to less than 250 words.

Is it worth it?

Yes it’s true. I probably will not need to know a transform boundary from a convergent boundary, or even a motif from a synecdoche. I don’t see any future purpose in knowing the six elements of art, and I can guarantee with the utmost confidence that I will not need to know how to find the anti-derivative of a natural logarithm. While these facts and other countless tidbits will no doubt maintain a healthy amount of dust in the shelves of my brain, the work ethics and habits acquired when learning them will be used for my entire life. In any job in every sector of society, employees will face challenges that require hard work, persistence, and creative thinking. No one will graduate from college with every ounce of in-

formation needed for their career. They’ll have to analyze problems, evaluate solutions, and execute plans of attack. I hate those calculus problems I spend forty minutes trying to figure out, but I know the effort put forth will be ingrained into my character for when I tackle conflicts in my later years. The cycle will continue. You can always complain that you don’t need knowledge or a certain skill. In high school, in college, at your job, you will always have opportunities to write something off as useless, and slack. But there will be a day when you need to dig deep and find the gumption to stick it out and deal with it. Practice now, be ready for later. It almost sounds too middle-aged but I’m fairly confident it’s solid advice.

Purpose The Trojaneer is a student-run publication distributed to faculty and staff at Center Grove High School with a press run of 2,400 copies. The Trojaneer strives to provide the Center Grove community with timely, factual, entertaining, and relevant information in an unbiased fashion, The paper serves as a public forum. Opinions expressed in the newspaper are not necesarily those of Center Grove High School nor the Center Grove Community School Corporation’s faculty, staff or administration.

Editors in Chief: Craig Lotz Ben Whitehead Managing Editor Lindsey Winneroski

Credentials The Trojaneer is a member of the Indiana High School Press Association and the National Scholastic Press Association. Advertising Businesses may advertise in the Trojaneer if their advertisements adhere to the newspaper’s guidelines. All ads must be tastefully designed, while containing no libelous material. Advertisements of alcohol and tobacco is strictly prohibited. A full copy of the newspaper’s advertising policy is available upon request in Room 175 at Center Grove High School.

Page Editors:

Ben Bacon Lucas Matney Becky Miller

Photo Editor Business Mgr Website Mgr

Hannah Furrow Shawna Miller Julie Joson

Photographers: Rileigh Cox Hannah Duke Staff Writers:

Mackenzie Dean Elaina Mellot Chris Collins Keaton Wright Matt Saunders Alec Dietz Vincent Williams Allison Chamberlain Luke Calvert Mackenzie Thompson Savannah Lorentzen

Trish Barton Mariah Hester

Jessica Edelman Zach Whitehead Jessica Gottlieb Tyler Sykes Hannah Morgan Ronni Meier Alex Jabre Nick Marley Delaney Burnett Abbi Stiffey Scott Sutton Kristen Southern


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Features

the trojaneer Thursday, March 24, 2011

Students go green with vegan lifestyle

byHannahMorgan Features Writer

A pig’s intelligence is said to be greater than that of a 3 year-old child. In fact, pigs are ranked fourth in overall intelligence of animals. Dogs and cats certainly don’t surpass that rank. In other words, your meat is smarter than your pet…and your toddler. It’s no secret that there are numerous health benefits to a plant-based diet low in fat, as well as environmental benefits. Heck, eating lower on the food chain can even help produce more food to distribute to the hungry. One of the One of the Heinz sisters’ biggest sacrifices is honey, one of their favorite condiments. most obvious reasons for a Hannah Duke vegetarian diet or a vegan lifestyle is to prevent animal So if she doesn’t eat meat or dairy or any animal products. This includes dairy, cruelty. anything with milk, butter or honey in eggs and depending on the individual: “I am an animal rights activist, and honey. it, what does she eat at school? Even the want to eat a diet with the least amount “We don’t, and that’s one of the hardmeat-free salads available in the deli line of animal products,” senior Marissa est things,” Heinz said. “Everything has have cheese in them! Heinz said. honey.” “She never really eats at school,” senior Heinz, along with her sister Katie, is Vegans who oppose animal cruelty often Hillary Degenhardt said. “She eats when vegan. Her parents are vegetarians. she gets home.” avoid any use of animal products. “She is the head honcho vegan,” senior Heinz usually waits until she gets home “We try to avoid leather, wool and Lillian Hopson said. fur, although we do slip up sometimes,” to eat, where her family has a wide array Several meat-eaters do not know the Heinz said. “Instead, we usually buy cotof vegan-friendly food. difference between vegetarians and “They get really creative at home,” seton or synthetic fibers.” vegans. Vegetarians do not eat flesh nior Katie Brown said. “Their meals are Marissa has been vegan for the past animal products (meat). Sometimes this always really elaborate.” two years, and vegetarian for the past includes fish; it varies from vegetarian to The Heinz family buys soy products five. vegetarian. Vegans do not eat

photo by

and other alternatives to meat and dairy. “I like Boca and Morning Star the best, and soy beef tips are my favorite,” Heinz said. Boca and Morning Star are two different brands of faux meat. Her favorite desert is to-fu ice cream. Brown often teases the Heinz twins, but it doesn’t bother them. The goodhearted twins take jokes lightly. “Katie brings vegan food to class sometimes and I always say it looks gross,” Brown said. “But I’ve tried some and it’s actually really good.” Much of the food that the girls eat isn’t too different from what any other person

would eat. “She’s brought walnuts before and I know she likes carrots,” Brown said about Marissa’s sister. Meat is not necessary, but protein is, so it’s important for vegetarians to eat other protein sources such as nuts, seeds and beans. For strict vegetarians or those following a vegan diet, broccoli is a great source of calcium along with other vegetables, fruits, grains and beans. “It’s not as hard as you might think; just take it one day at a time,” said Heinz. “Soon, it will become a lifestyle.”

Junior Hannah Theilmeyer scores big on the SAT

byElainaMellott Features Writer

On January 22nd, Center Grove junior Hannah Theilmeyer took the SAT at Southport High School. After making a deal with her parents three years prior to this test, she was hoping for the best- a perfect score. “In 8th grade, I made a bet with my parents that if I got a perfect score on the math and reading part of the SAT, they would buy me a car,” Theilmeyer said. And with hopes for a new car, she did just that, scoring a 2380. “The writing part, according to my mom, doesn’t matter very much to colleges, so she didn’t think I needed a perfect score on it,” Theilmeyer said, “I got a perfect score on the multiple choice

and missed twenty on the essay.” This was Theilmeyer’s first time taking the SAT, and a score that she was not expecting. “I was hoping to get somewhere in the 2000s. I expected I’d get something in the low 2000s, and I was really hoping to eventually get a 2300,” Theilmeyer said. “I was really surprised [after seeing my score],” Theilmeyer said. “I thought I did pretty well, but not as good as I did!” Though

Theilmeyer’s first sitting with the test was a success, it is very rare to be finished with the SAT on your first try, as many students take it multiple times to get the score they are hoping for. This feat for Theilmeyer was not easy, as the average from Center Grove students taking the exam were 544 in math, 522 in verbal, and 497 in the writing during 2010. Hannah Theilmeyer, between taking online study courses and answering practice questions from SAT books, felt like she did not have to study too hard but her scheduling courses may have given her an additional advantage. According to Center Grove High School counselor Jill Arbuckle, her taking Advanced Placement classes gave her another level of competitive edge. “Typically students taking A.P. tend to have higher scores,” Arbuckle said. “They usually go hand-in-hand because the students taking the A.P. classes have

initiative and motivation to engage in learning. They use more critical thinking.” The school’s guidance director, Pam Price, also tends to see these trends. “A.P. classes seem to be a general trend, along with the duel credit courses at IU, ACP classes, seem to help in this,” Price said. However, Theilmeyer is not only involved in just academics. In fact, she is an active member in the school, from performances in CG Singers to guitar club. She also will be participating in the school musical, The Sound of Music as a part of the nun choir. Though Theilmeyer has yet to pick a school, she is already thinking ahead to her future. She hopes to study anesthesiology. “I don’t want to say that I absolutely love one school, but as of right now, my favorite is Washington University in St. Louis,” Theilmeyer said.

Theilmeyer was rewarded for her incredible achievement with a new car. photo by Hannah Duke

Basketball manager keeps team’s spirits up

byMackenzieDean Features Writer

“The best part about being the manager for the basketball team is that I have gotten to encourage and inspire the team whenever the team is right or wrong,” junior Seth Irskens said. Hours of practice and months of dedication helped this year’s basketball team reach new records and to be anticipated as one of the best varsity basketball teams to come through Center Grove. Tremendous effort was exerted by all the players and coaches to achieve success. Quality basketball and smart coaching was praised all over the community; however, the outstanding management of this team should not go unseen. “The team loves me, so that’s part of the reason why I have stuck with being manager,” Irskens said. To the team, Seth means more than someone who just simply helped around with tasks around the gym or in the locker room. “Whenever you see Seth he is always smiling whether it’s in the hallway or anywhere else and, I think that is how Seth really contributes to the team,”

senior Johnny Marlin said. Irskens not only adds fun to the team, he also goes above and beyond on all of the tasks he covers for all three of the basket ball teams. “I fill all the water tanks and bottles for all three teams, work the scoreboard, do whatever coach tells me and film the games,” said Irskens. Irskens takes pride in his filming. He has exceptional talent in filming and creating semiphotography films. Irskens even uses his team managing opportunity to help prepare for a possible potential profession. “Filming helps me prepare for my future career of director and a voice actor hopefully at Disney Pixar,” Irskens said. Any teammate or anybody who has seen an interpretation by Seth Irskens could see this career to be fitting for Seth. “Seth does the best Pokemon interpretation I have ever seen,” Marlin said. He even often does interpretations for the team which provides them entertainment. “At anytime I will do voice interpretations, dance or sing for the players,” Irskens said. Whether if it’s a time of laughter or more of a serious moment during the

season, Irskens was there beside the team to experience it all. He went to all the games this season and saw the ups and downs the team went through. The season has closed for the Trojans. Just like the fans, players and Coaches, Seth looked upon this season as one of the best. “I always miss basketball season and I will especially miss the seniors this year because I really got to know them and they got to know me,” Irskens said. The three years Irskens has spent around the helping the team has really been an enjoyable experience for him and others around him. Seth looks forward to receiving a varsity letter this and hops to be honored with the Senior Management Award in the future. However, the greatest honor he can receive is the positive impact he has made for his team. “Seth is funny and would never mean to hurt anyone. If he does, he always makes sure to apologize. He always cares about everyone and that is the best part about him,” Marlin said.

Irkens is well known for his positive attitude and ever-present smile. photo by Julie Joson


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the trojaneer

Entertainment

The Joisy Effect

Thursday, March 24, 2011

by AlecDietz

EntertianmentWriter

“I like it because it’s funny.” “I like it because all the people are dumb.” “I watch it because it’s extremely entertaining.” “I don’t know why.” These are the most common responses I received from Center Grove High School students when I asked them why they like MTV’s infamous Jersey Shore, a show that is not only MTV’s most popular program of all time but also a cultural phenomenon. The premise of the show is simple, eight people of Italian American roots who refer to themselves as Guido’s and Guidettes move in to one house and party on the Jersey Shore. It’s filled with drama, sex, alcohol, fighting, yelling, plenty of steroids, and our generation has bitten hook, line and sinker. You can look at Jersey Shore in multiple ways but you have to admit it’s extremely entertaining. Many people can’t seem to understand why Jersey Shore is so successful. Why would large masses of people (mostly teenagers to young adults) want to watch a group of people get black-out drunk, go clubbing, fist pump, lift weights, fight with each other, do laundry, get tan, and hookup with numerous strangers? That’s like asking why is the sky blue, or why does Wiz get so zoned all the time? Sex, drama, and substance abuse sells, it’s as simple as that. MTV knows what audiences want to see and they have combined it all into one show called Jersey Shore, which has grossed hundreds of millions of dollars over the course of three seasons. Pure genius. Jersey shore is more than a successful television show raking in an average of 8 million viewers every new episode. It has fueled a cultural movement as well. Jersey Shore owes much of it’s success and acclaim to the fact that they exploit the subculture

that refer to themselves as Guidos and Guidettes, a group that until know was hardly known. Since Jersey Shore, the Guido has redefined what it means to be a bro in American pop-culture, and now anyone (not just an American with Italian roots) can become one. This spring break please notice the effect that Jersey Shore has had upon American pop-culture, especially on the teenagers who drove down to Panama with their parents from every type of suburb. They’ll be wearing wifebeaters, Oakley shades, gelled hair, Ed Hardy, Affliction, and will be looking out for grenades. “Come on let’s pretend we’re on Jersey Shore.” Jersey Shore hasn’t won the hearts of everyone though. Numerous parents, right-wing Christian groups, and even teenagers have come to complain about Jersey Shore. “Jersey shore is a mockery to our age group. I hope people from other countries don’t think that Americans over 21 are orange, vertically challenged people who party all night long…” junior Leah Porter said. But I have come to understand that Jersey Shore does not mock Americans, only Italian Americans. We have found a new stereotype in television to cash in on other than the dumb middleaged husband (Raymond, Doug, Homer, Peter, all Tyler Perry) known as the Guido. “I believe that people realize how stupid Jersey Shore is, but none of us want to stop watching it,” junior Jake Hudson said. The Jersey Shore effect is real and hilarious. From this glimpse of reality on the shore we have learned nothing, yet we have gained another group of people stereotype and poke fun at. All in all I don’t think anybody takes Jersey Shore too seriously simply because you can’t. As a result the shows influence on culture is purely comedic and therefore harmless.

Red State by AlexJabre

EntertainmentWriter Kevin Smith would probably tell you that he’s not a real filmmaker, although that sentiment would be entirely wrong. The New Jersey native – who burst onto the cinematic scene with his 1994 indie sensation “Clerks” – made a stop to Clowes Memorial Hall on March 11th on a domestic tour to promote his latest opus; a horror film titled “Red State.” I’ve been a long-time admirer of Smith’s work, which has spoken for a generation of lethargic-yet-articulate loafers since the mid-90’s. Like true auteur, he’s not afraid to shock or surprise his audience, perhaps none more so than with “Red State.” His directorial voice is at times shockingly subversive but always very funny; one of his trademarks involves one of his characters providing an extended monologue on love, sex, philosophy, and even a little “Star Wars” usually in one long take. He even created his own movie universe – the “View Askewniverse” – that ingeniously weaves together recurring characters into the plot of many of his films. He started this trend with his hilarious debut “Clerks,” which portrays a day in the life of two obnoxiously funny counter jockeys named Dante (Brian O’Halloran) and Randal (Jeff Anderson) who struggle to make it through one long day without things going spectacularly wrong. Other highlights in this universe include the startlingly honest romantic comedy “Chasing Amy,” the brilliant and controversial religious satire “Dogma,” and “Clerks II,” the very funny sequel to the original that’s filled with lots of heart and beautifully brings the “Askewniverse” full circle. With “Red State,” his 10th film as a director, Smith has pulled off an astonishing achievement; shot in 25 days and made for a mere $4 Million, it is a masterful exercise in the horror genre and is quite possibly the best thing he’s ever done. Without giving too much away, I’ll say this: the movie begins with three teenage boys foolishly looking for a libidinous tryst, but instead end up taken hostage by a group of sadistic religious fundamentalists, led by the Fred Phelps-esque Pastor Abin Cooper (Michael Parks, in an unshakably creepy performance). When a group of ATF agents, led by the affable Special Agent Keenan (John Goodman) decide to take down the murderous group once and for all, a bloody battle begins between the forces of law and of seemingly God himself. Even a non-horror fan like me can’t deny that it’s films like “Red State,” “Black Swan,” and “Let Me In” that show what horror movies can and should be – brutal, uncompromising pieces of art that aren’t afraid to challenge and provoke its audience while still serving up genuine scares. It’s the shortest of Smith’s films, clocking in at less than 90 minutes, but it’s exactly as long as it needs to be and is edited at a perfectly tight and compact pace. Smith has reached his towering peak as a director here and his screenplay makes every ghastly surprise effective when it doesn’t pause for brief moments of dark humor. (So dark, in fact, that the real-life Phelps family actually walked out of the Kansas City screening 15 minutes into it). The performances from the cast are excellent and surprisingly evocative, much like the camera work from cinematographer Dave Klein, who makes the horrifying, nightmarish atmosphere all the more frightening. “Red State” is a disturbing experience, but it is absolutely worth checking out when it’s released on October 19th (the 17th anniversary of “Clerks”) and is hands down the best film of 2011 thus far. A Q&A session (which Smith has become quite famous for) followed after the film and it was a great pleasure to hear Smith talk about the movie and spew off on another one of his wildly entertaining anecdotes. What surprised me most was how genuinely friendly and down-to-earth he came off as, always very polite (though foul-mouthed) and never refused a hug or the pressing need for a fan photo. He discussed his daring plan to release the movie by himself with the tour’s profits to support its theatrical release, serving as a fist shaking screw-you to mainstream movie studios. Another thing he talked about was his retirement as a director next year after the release of his final hockey-themed film “Hit Somebody” to focus on his incredibly popular podcast network among other projects. While it is heartbreaking to see such an indie icon hang up the gloves so early, he’s certainly left behind a legacy that will continue to inspire (and make laugh) his strong cult following of fans like me. Smith remains to be one of the defining voices in American cinema, independent or not, and even his less-than-engaging films like “Cop Out” or “Jersey Girl” will make you not help but admire his fearlessness for challenging to re-invent himself and never playing it safe. When discussing his radical release plan for “Red State” at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, he claimed that, “Indie film isn’t dead. It just grew up.” And in many ways, so has Smith himself. Funny how one of the most quotable lines in “Clerks” is when Dante helplessly cries out, “I’m not even supposed to be here today!” When in reality, Smith couldn’t have come any sooner.

by ChrisCollins

EntertainmentWriter High school crushes, MIT diplomas and parties spawning less than moral behavior make for a pretty good Labor Day right? You might be thinking that nobody could possibly have this much fun. This actually takes place in the new retro comedy Take Me Home Tonight, starring Topher Grace, Teresa Palmer, Anna Faris, and Dan Fogler. Take Me Home Tonight is set in 1988. It is about 22-year-old Matt Franklin and his best friend Barry Nathan and their wild night bouncing around between several crazy Labor Day parties. Topher Grace is a good fit for the part of Matt Franklin, as Matt is a fairly quiet and self-conscious character, similar to Grace’s role of Eric Foreman in That ‘70s Show. Because Dan Fogler is used to stage acting, he was perfectly fit for the wildly varying part of Barry Nathan. Barry’s attitude and persona change throughout the movie to his various drug use and alcohol consumption, and Fogler played the part to the extreme. Matt graduated from MIT but now works at the Suncoast Video store in his local mall due to his loss of interest in [the career field of his major]. Working at a video store seems to be quite a let down for an MIT grad, something Matt’s father often brings up, but Matt can not decide what he wants to do with his life. While working, Matt runs into his old high school crush and decides to go to a big Labor Day party as a chance to talk to her. He goes with his sister (whose boyfriend is the party host) and his best friend Barry. Earlier that day, Barry was fired from the car dealership he had worked for since high school. As a way to get back at the dealership and impress Matt’s crush, the duo steal the most expensive car on the lot on their way to the killer party. It only gets crazier from there, as they find cocaine in the glove box, and the depressed Barry decides to indulge in it for the first time. The whole night gets crazier and wilder as they hit several parties, and Matt impresses the girl. “The fact that they just found cocaine and the one guy just decided to use it was crazy,” says Nate Olson. “I can’t believe he would try that when he’d never done it before.” The portrayal of cocaine use was a problem for the studios. It was part of the reason the movie was delayed in its release. The film was completed in 2007, but it was shelved until recently. There was concern that the movie was advocating cocaine use, but the consequences of Barry’s indulgence clearly shows denouncement for the drug. The use of cocaine was popular in the 1980s though, so it was considered essential to the plotline. “It surprised me that they just randomly found cocaine and the dude just used it, but then he stopped using it at the end, so I guess it wasn’t that bad,” says John Beauchamp. Take Me Home Tonight was completed by Universal Studios in 2007, and was bought by Rogue, a Relativity Media subsidiary, for $10 million. The film had been titled both “Young Americans” and “Kids in America” during production. Those were both popular songs in the 1980s, by David Bowie and Kim Wilde, respectively. The final title Take Me Home Tonight was taken from the popular 1986 hit by Eddie Money. The song was used in the theatrical trailer for the movie. Take Me Home Tonight premiered in the United States on March 4, 2011. Viewers generally liked the movie, commending the cast and character portrayal. It is rated R for language, sexual content and drug use. “I would definitely recommend this movie,” says Olson. “It was funny and something new. It’s pretty original and it’s funny.”


5

the trojaneer

Entertainment

The Joisy Effect

Thursday, March 24, 2011

by AlecDietz

EntertianmentWriter

“I like it because it’s funny.” “I like it because all the people are dumb.” “I watch it because it’s extremely entertaining.” “I don’t know why.” These are the most common responses I received from Center Grove High School students when I asked them why they like MTV’s infamous Jersey Shore, a show that is not only MTV’s most popular program of all time but also a cultural phenomenon. The premise of the show is simple, eight people of Italian American roots who refer to themselves as Guido’s and Guidettes move in to one house and party on the Jersey Shore. It’s filled with drama, sex, alcohol, fighting, yelling, plenty of steroids, and our generation has bitten hook, line and sinker. You can look at Jersey Shore in multiple ways but you have to admit it’s extremely entertaining. Many people can’t seem to understand why Jersey Shore is so successful. Why would large masses of people (mostly teenagers to young adults) want to watch a group of people get black-out drunk, go clubbing, fist pump, lift weights, fight with each other, do laundry, get tan, and hookup with numerous strangers? That’s like asking why is the sky blue, or why does Wiz get so zoned all the time? Sex, drama, and substance abuse sells, it’s as simple as that. MTV knows what audiences want to see and they have combined it all into one show called Jersey Shore, which has grossed hundreds of millions of dollars over the course of three seasons. Pure genius. Jersey shore is more than a successful television show raking in an average of 8 million viewers every new episode. It has fueled a cultural movement as well. Jersey Shore owes much of it’s success and acclaim to the fact that they exploit the subculture

that refer to themselves as Guidos and Guidettes, a group that until know was hardly known. Since Jersey Shore, the Guido has redefined what it means to be a bro in American pop-culture, and now anyone (not just an American with Italian roots) can become one. This spring break please notice the effect that Jersey Shore has had upon American pop-culture, especially on the teenagers who drove down to Panama with their parents from every type of suburb. They’ll be wearing wifebeaters, Oakley shades, gelled hair, Ed Hardy, Affliction, and will be looking out for grenades. “Come on let’s pretend we’re on Jersey Shore.” Jersey Shore hasn’t won the hearts of everyone though. Numerous parents, right-wing Christian groups, and even teenagers have come to complain about Jersey Shore. “Jersey shore is a mockery to our age group. I hope people from other countries don’t think that Americans over 21 are orange, vertically challenged people who party all night long…” junior Leah Porter said. But I have come to understand that Jersey Shore does not mock Americans, only Italian Americans. We have found a new stereotype in television to cash in on other than the dumb middleaged husband (Raymond, Doug, Homer, Peter, all Tyler Perry) known as the Guido. “I believe that people realize how stupid Jersey Shore is, but none of us want to stop watching it,” junior Jake Hudson said. The Jersey Shore effect is real and hilarious. From this glimpse of reality on the shore we have learned nothing, yet we have gained another group of people stereotype and poke fun at. All in all I don’t think anybody takes Jersey Shore too seriously simply because you can’t. As a result the shows influence on culture is purely comedic and therefore harmless.

Red State by AlexJabre

EntertainmentWriter Kevin Smith would probably tell you that he’s not a real filmmaker, although that sentiment would be entirely wrong. The New Jersey native – who burst onto the cinematic scene with his 1994 indie sensation “Clerks” – made a stop to Clowes Memorial Hall on March 11th on a domestic tour to promote his latest opus; a horror film titled “Red State.” I’ve been a long-time admirer of Smith’s work, which has spoken for a generation of lethargic-yet-articulate loafers since the mid-90’s. Like true auteur, he’s not afraid to shock or surprise his audience, perhaps none more so than with “Red State.” His directorial voice is at times shockingly subversive but always very funny; one of his trademarks involves one of his characters providing an extended monologue on love, sex, philosophy, and even a little “Star Wars” usually in one long take. He even created his own movie universe – the “View Askewniverse” – that ingeniously weaves together recurring characters into the plot of many of his films. He started this trend with his hilarious debut “Clerks,” which portrays a day in the life of two obnoxiously funny counter jockeys named Dante (Brian O’Halloran) and Randal (Jeff Anderson) who struggle to make it through one long day without things going spectacularly wrong. Other highlights in this universe include the startlingly honest romantic comedy “Chasing Amy,” the brilliant and controversial religious satire “Dogma,” and “Clerks II,” the very funny sequel to the original that’s filled with lots of heart and beautifully brings the “Askewniverse” full circle. With “Red State,” his 10th film as a director, Smith has pulled off an astonishing achievement; shot in 25 days and made for a mere $4 Million, it is a masterful exercise in the horror genre and is quite possibly the best thing he’s ever done. Without giving too much away, I’ll say this: the movie begins with three teenage boys foolishly looking for a libidinous tryst, but instead end up taken hostage by a group of sadistic religious fundamentalists, led by the Fred Phelps-esque Pastor Abin Cooper (Michael Parks, in an unshakably creepy performance). When a group of ATF agents, led by the affable Special Agent Keenan (John Goodman) decide to take down the murderous group once and for all, a bloody battle begins between the forces of law and of seemingly God himself. Even a non-horror fan like me can’t deny that it’s films like “Red State,” “Black Swan,” and “Let Me In” that show what horror movies can and should be – brutal, uncompromising pieces of art that aren’t afraid to challenge and provoke its audience while still serving up genuine scares. It’s the shortest of Smith’s films, clocking in at less than 90 minutes, but it’s exactly as long as it needs to be and is edited at a perfectly tight and compact pace. Smith has reached his towering peak as a director here and his screenplay makes every ghastly surprise effective when it doesn’t pause for brief moments of dark humor. (So dark, in fact, that the real-life Phelps family actually walked out of the Kansas City screening 15 minutes into it). The performances from the cast are excellent and surprisingly evocative, much like the camera work from cinematographer Dave Klein, who makes the horrifying, nightmarish atmosphere all the more frightening. “Red State” is a disturbing experience, but it is absolutely worth checking out when it’s released on October 19th (the 17th anniversary of “Clerks”) and is hands down the best film of 2011 thus far. A Q&A session (which Smith has become quite famous for) followed after the film and it was a great pleasure to hear Smith talk about the movie and spew off on another one of his wildly entertaining anecdotes. What surprised me most was how genuinely friendly and down-to-earth he came off as, always very polite (though foul-mouthed) and never refused a hug or the pressing need for a fan photo. He discussed his daring plan to release the movie by himself with the tour’s profits to support its theatrical release, serving as a fist shaking screw-you to mainstream movie studios. Another thing he talked about was his retirement as a director next year after the release of his final hockey-themed film “Hit Somebody” to focus on his incredibly popular podcast network among other projects. While it is heartbreaking to see such an indie icon hang up the gloves so early, he’s certainly left behind a legacy that will continue to inspire (and make laugh) his strong cult following of fans like me. Smith remains to be one of the defining voices in American cinema, independent or not, and even his less-than-engaging films like “Cop Out” or “Jersey Girl” will make you not help but admire his fearlessness for challenging to re-invent himself and never playing it safe. When discussing his radical release plan for “Red State” at this year’s Sundance Film Festival, he claimed that, “Indie film isn’t dead. It just grew up.” And in many ways, so has Smith himself. Funny how one of the most quotable lines in “Clerks” is when Dante helplessly cries out, “I’m not even supposed to be here today!” When in reality, Smith couldn’t have come any sooner.

by ChrisCollins

EntertainmentWriter High school crushes, MIT diplomas and parties spawning less than moral behavior make for a pretty good Labor Day right? You might be thinking that nobody could possibly have this much fun. This actually takes place in the new retro comedy Take Me Home Tonight, starring Topher Grace, Teresa Palmer, Anna Faris, and Dan Fogler. Take Me Home Tonight is set in 1988. It is about 22-year-old Matt Franklin and his best friend Barry Nathan and their wild night bouncing around between several crazy Labor Day parties. Topher Grace is a good fit for the part of Matt Franklin, as Matt is a fairly quiet and self-conscious character, similar to Grace’s role of Eric Foreman in That ‘70s Show. Because Dan Fogler is used to stage acting, he was perfectly fit for the wildly varying part of Barry Nathan. Barry’s attitude and persona change throughout the movie to his various drug use and alcohol consumption, and Fogler played the part to the extreme. Matt graduated from MIT but now works at the Suncoast Video store in his local mall due to his loss of interest in [the career field of his major]. Working at a video store seems to be quite a let down for an MIT grad, something Matt’s father often brings up, but Matt can not decide what he wants to do with his life. While working, Matt runs into his old high school crush and decides to go to a big Labor Day party as a chance to talk to her. He goes with his sister (whose boyfriend is the party host) and his best friend Barry. Earlier that day, Barry was fired from the car dealership he had worked for since high school. As a way to get back at the dealership and impress Matt’s crush, the duo steal the most expensive car on the lot on their way to the killer party. It only gets crazier from there, as they find cocaine in the glove box, and the depressed Barry decides to indulge in it for the first time. The whole night gets crazier and wilder as they hit several parties, and Matt impresses the girl. “The fact that they just found cocaine and the one guy just decided to use it was crazy,” says Nate Olson. “I can’t believe he would try that when he’d never done it before.” The portrayal of cocaine use was a problem for the studios. It was part of the reason the movie was delayed in its release. The film was completed in 2007, but it was shelved until recently. There was concern that the movie was advocating cocaine use, but the consequences of Barry’s indulgence clearly shows denouncement for the drug. The use of cocaine was popular in the 1980s though, so it was considered essential to the plotline. “It surprised me that they just randomly found cocaine and the dude just used it, but then he stopped using it at the end, so I guess it wasn’t that bad,” says John Beauchamp. Take Me Home Tonight was completed by Universal Studios in 2007, and was bought by Rogue, a Relativity Media subsidiary, for $10 million. The film had been titled both “Young Americans” and “Kids in America” during production. Those were both popular songs in the 1980s, by David Bowie and Kim Wilde, respectively. The final title Take Me Home Tonight was taken from the popular 1986 hit by Eddie Money. The song was used in the theatrical trailer for the movie. Take Me Home Tonight premiered in the United States on March 4, 2011. Viewers generally liked the movie, commending the cast and character portrayal. It is rated R for language, sexual content and drug use. “I would definitely recommend this movie,” says Olson. “It was funny and something new. It’s pretty original and it’s funny.”


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6

the trojaneer

Thursday, March 24, 2011


7

Sports

the trojaneer

Thursday, March 24, 2010

Girls Tennis Works Hard but with Little Recongnition byJessicaGottlieb Sports Writer

While most Center Grove students are still asleep in the comforts of their homes, the Center Grove girls tennis team is already awake, dressed, and at the school to start conditioning practice. “We have 6 AM conditioning practices on Tuesdays and Thursdays. A normal conditioning practice includes stair laps, plus running and stamina and agility training,” Junior tennis player Rachel Smith said. While the girls tennis team is one of the most dedicated group of athletes at the school, their fan base is not. “Our friends and family, plus other people that play tennis come to watch us, but people who don’t really understand the sport wouldn’t normally come to a match,”Senior tennis player Ashley Bergquist said. Other sports that put in just as much work as the girls tennis team, notably

football and basketball, draw in hundreds of fans on an average game, while the girls tennis fans can barely fill the much smaller portion of bleachers at the courts. Though the crowd they draw in is much smaller than more popular sports, the girls put in as much effort as every other athlete at the school. “We put in the same amount of effort as other sports do,” Senior tennis player Ashley Berquist said. “ The girls tennis team puts in hours of hard work at practice. Outside of practice, most of the girls are still doing something to better their game, whether it is private lessons or a practice match with their friends. Even vacations cannot stop the work efforts of the team. “Even over spring break, a lot of the girls will bring their rackets on vacation with them and play at the resort they stay at. Those of us that don’t go anywhere over break normally get practice matches together,” Junior tennis player Emily

Bueno said. Talent and hard work deserves support and encouragement, no matter what it is for. “I feel like girls tennis, along with other less popular sports at Center Grove, don’t draw a lot of fans in. They put in a lot of work and don’t get as many fans to support them,” Bueno said. Many of the girls have learned to accept this fact and even appreciate it. “It’s not like I want a lot of recognition. I’m happy with our team. Not a lot of people come to the matches but I’m okay with it,” Smith said. While they have come to accept it, some of them still would not mind having the support of the student body behind them. “The games are totally free, which is better than a football game where you have to pay to get in. If students want to come, they can stay after school for even just a couple minutes to cheer us on… quietly of course,” Bueno said.

Field Events On The Rise

byKeatonWright Sports Writer

Track and Field season is starting up again and the most popular headlines are of course, Austin Mudd, defending 800 state champion, and Nick Stoner, 100m dash runner-up last year. What is more intriguing, to the hard working, bearded men of suburban Center Grove, is the field events. Blake “Bearded Wonder” Russell is the leading discus and shot put athlete at Center Grove. He finished 7th in the indoor MIC meet throwing for 45 feet in shot put. “Shot put is more strength and discus is more form,” Senior Blake Russell said. Russell is replacing Joel Hale who threw last year but now attends Ohio State University. The throwers put in a lot of hours of practice and in the weight room. “We do all the power lifts like cleans and squat. Our coach also films practices and we try to break the form down. More time in the ring will get you better,” Russell said. Russell believes you have to have the right mindset to become a good distance thrower. “It’s all about speed, power, and attitude. You have to have the right attitude,” Russell said.

The shot put weighs 12lbs and the discus weighs 1.6kilos. It’s not light weight they throw. “We practice after lifting. We usually do disc one day and shot the next,” Russell said. Junior Jacob Hage is also throwing this year for the Trojans. He doesn’t feel sour about the runner’s attention. “They deserve the accolades because of their past, present, and future accomplishments,” Jacob Hage said. Another event that takes place off the rubber is the pole vault. “Usually the sprinters get all the attention, but when you’re a pole vaulter, you’re kind of on your own team,” Sophomore Eddie Brickely said. Brickley is starting his first year as a pole vaulter. Brickely and Sophomore Kyle Buchanan recognize the inexperience abroad. “It is our first year as pole vaulters except Zach Goodman, but in the future, I think it will be us getting the respect,” Buchanan said. Buchanan and Brickley believe that their dedication and hard work now, will result in success in the future. “If you want to be a pole vaulter, you need strength and speed. Sixty percent speed, twenty percent technique, and the last twenty percent is strength and

power,” Brickley said. Buchanan believes there is a risk when working the poles. “You also need that ten percent of guts. It’s a daring sport. You could fall back and land on your head. There have been fatal accidents,” Buchanan said. Lastly, the athletic grasshopper of Center Grove, Jordan Elsey, participates in long jump and high jump. Elsey, a junior, leads the Trojans in both jumping categories. “I have a normal warm up. I do leg exercises, sprints, and then I’ll jump,” Elsey said. Elsey’s current personal record in high jump is six feet, which is only seven inches off the school record of six feet seven inches. Elsey also holds a personal record of twenty-one feet in long jump, which the school record is twenty-five feet. “To be a good jumper, you need to have very strong legs. You also need to use speed before the jump,” Elsey said. The unnoticed track stars of Center Grove are accomplishing feats, although they may not be as glamorous as Indiana Gatorade Runner of the Year, or state runner-up in the 100 meter dash, they deserve to be acknowledged by the student body.

S

cott’s port pot

byScottSutton Sports Columnist

Perspective on Lacrosse: Hoping to Yield Support As basketball comes to a close, I find myself struggling to find a compelling topic to share with you, my fine reader. Social protocol dictate I would write about the three major men sports: football, basketball and baseball but I refuse to write about baseball until they do something worth writing about. I’m sorry but winning sectionals in 2009 and 2005 as well as a sectional in 1996 is not good enough material, yet. The track team is certain to impress this year, but little has been completed thus far. All the girls spring sports are out for now, sorry ladies but the interest level is just not there to attract readers. Note: That previous statement was not meant to have an antifeminist connotation, simply commenting on the world I live in. If it changes I will adjust my writing. So I guess that leaves only a few options to choose from, and if you know me well enough you know the obvious choice, lacrosse. Now I know what some of you “haters” are going to say that lacrosse is inferior to your sport or lacrosse is not even considered a sport, blah, blah, blah. But let me attempt to persuade you to become a fan of lacrosse. One of the fastest growing sports in the United States, lacrosse graced Center Grove four years ago. Under the direction of Coach Dave Hays the Trojans were unable to amount to much, but as a first year program little was expected. With the second year came more talent and experience along with a new coach, Coach Alonzo “Zo” Miller. But even with promising leadership, the team could not produce much in terms of W’s. Finally Center Grove began to piece the puzzle together bringing in experienced coach Constantine Komarovsky as well as having a strong offensive presence in former senior Patrick Hersman and sophomore at the time Brock Warner. With hard work and dedication the Trojans found themselves hoisting a nice piece of hardware at the end of the season, the IHSLA Consolation Championship Trophy. To explain, the top twelve teams make it to the State Tournament where as teams ranked from thirteen to twenty participate in the Consolation Tournament. Although not many people brag about being thirteenth place, no third year program has accomplished the feat of winning the tournament in such short time. This past winter Center Grove showcased there talent in an indoor lacrosse league in Pike. Finishing 2nd overall in the tournament, they had only one loss at the hands of the hated Carmel Greyhounds. The lacrosse team opens there outdoor season April 8 at Center Grove versus Bloomington. I urge you to come out and support, I can guarantee you wont be disappointed in this experience.

Trojan’s reminisce over great season that ended with regional loss byRonniMeier Sports Writer

After many battles, triumphs, and defeats, the mighty Troy has fallen. In the regional game against Hamilton Southeastern, the Trojan boys met their match, bringing a sad end to an incredible season. “Hamilton Southeastern had a really talented team. They shot the ball well and they clogged the lane in defense. We had some unforced turnovers that hurt, and weren’t able to get the ball down to Joe as much as we liked,” Senior Jonny Marlin said. Marlin ended the game with eleven points. “The Regional loss hurt, but we got a lot accomplished and you have to be proud of that.” Senior Andy Smeathers said. The Trojans started out the game strong, with Smeathers winning the tip-off, and ending the first quarter with an 18-12 lead. But Hamilton Southeastern wasn’t going down with out a fight. Contrary to their 34% shooting average in the regular season, the Royals knocked down 9 of 13 three pointers, as well as 14 field goals, adding up to 55

of their 69 points. The Trojans lost the lead throughout the second and third quarter. While Andy Smeathers lead a valiant comeback in the fourth, bringing the game 53-55, it wasn’t enough and the game ended with a score of 69-64. “We just gave up a lot of second chance points. Hamilton Southeastern scored twenty of their points on second chance shots, while we only scored ten. When you lose by five, those chances really add up,” Hawkins said. “We played our hearts out and left it all on the court. Hamilton Southeastern was just a good team,” Senior John Degenhardt said. The Trojans had a remarkable season, winning the Hall of Fame, County tournament, and Sectionals- a triumph Center Grove has not seen in seventeen years. With seven remarkable seniors, this rare team has accomplished much. “To win the sectionals after so many years and to play in the ‘Mecca’ of bascketball, it was steps to the ultimate success. We have had some great records set by the players. We are disappointed but proud of our accomplishments,” Cliff

Hawkins said. This season, the team’s motto has been doing things better than they have been done before. With an impressive record and great fans, the players and coaches feel as if their motto has been accomplished. “I would just like to thank the band, the cheerleaders, the students, and all of the people working in the background that make Center Grove Basketball possible,” Hawkins said. In Mr. Hawkins’s 30th senior class, the Trojans were headed by seven incredible seniors: Jonny Marlin, Andy Smeathers, Ben Whitehead, Tyler Gliesman, John Degenhardt, Mark “The Shark” Kwiakoski, and Davis Wentland. For Smeathers and Marlin, next year holds Division 1 basketball. Marlin will be attending IPFW and Smeathers is off to Butler. For the rest of the team, this season brings the end to the many years of sweat and hard work. “As much as I am looking forward to playing in college, I would rather be playing for the Center Grove Trojans. I grew up with this guys, and some of them are my best friends.” Marlin said.

“Basketball has made me a better person, both on and off the court, and I have learned to be a better role model because of the kid camps. Basketball is always going to be a big part of my life. I can’t live without it,” Degenhardt said. “These guys represent so much. They have great school citizenship and are leaders on and off the court. The younger players watching them have been raised with the expectation of what it takes to be a Center Grove basketball player. There are going to be seven empty seats next season, and who fills those spots will be dependent on who decides to be the best they can be. This is a sport that has no entitlement and is based off of the individual work ethic. My goal is to teach that the best basketball player is the product of a good student and a good person,” Coach Hawkins said. This end has been bittersweet. Obviously, it would have been incredible to go to the Championships, but there is not discrediting the accomplishments the boys’ basketball team has made. The Trojans put up a very strong front and represented Center Grove High School honorably.


Sports

8

the trojaneer Thursday, March 24, 2011

the

future

isCGnow Junior commits to Division One program

photo by Hannah Duke

Three-sport athletes these days are unheard of, espe“The head coach, Reed Sunahara, really drew me to Cincinnati,” Kitchel cially in a school like Center Grove, where 2,300 students said. byZachWhitehead are vying for positions in every sport. For Mackenzie Sunahara is the winningest coach in Cincinnati volleyball history, with ten SportsWriter Kitchel though, that is great seasons as the top dog. The university has not the case. Kitchel three Conference USA championships, a BIG is a junior at Center Grove High School EAST regular season championship, and many who is very involved in athletics. She is a other impressive accomplishments. varsity volleyball player, varsity track high “Cincinnati was so different to the other schools jumper and a varsity cheerleader. that offered me because of Coach Sunahara, the While she excels at high-jumping and team as a whole, and the campus. The campus back flipping, volleyball is her best, and fais large but also close together, which is nice,” vorite, of the three sports. Kitchel said. She has been playing volleyball since the Committing to the University of Cincinnati as a seventh grade when she played on the midjunior is not going to hold back Mackenzie Kitchdle school team. Now, Kitchel, or “Kitch,” el from anything for her fourth and final season is playing varsity volleyball as a junior and at Center Grove High School. has been on the varsity team since her “My personal goals for my senior year now that freshman year. I have committed, are to get the same achieveThe experience, along with the height, ments as this past season’s and hopefully more,” natural talent, and dedication has yielded Kitchel said. a plethora of both individual and team This past season as a varsity player for the team, Kitchel (top right) recieves instructions from her club volleyball success. Now, as a junior, Kitchel is in the she dominated her opponents and the postseason prime seasons to be considering a future in the coach at a recent game at Perry Meridian High School. The awards, including South Player of the Year, Johnson club season runs from the beginning of January through June, sport. County Player of the Year, ICGSA South Junior All allowing college coaches to see recruits without regard to an With so many looks and offers from great schools inseason team schedule. Star, ICGSA First Team All State, and a most impressuch as St. Louis, Western Kentucky, Ohio, Indisive All American at nationals for club volleyball. ana, Michigan State, Ball State, Kentucky, and Kitchel is the most decorated girls volleyball in recent Center Grove history, Florida, the six foot phenom committed verbally a couple weeks ago to set and now, in just one year, the Trojan will transform herself into a Bearcat, one out for Cincinnati, Ohio. There, she will play for the University of Cincinnati that Center Grove hopes will continue to succeed. women’s volleyball team in the fall of 2012.

The battle for inclusion:

Center Grove club teams dream for IHSAA recognition Center Grove is known for a many things, namely academics and athletics. Center Grove has had solid programs for just about every sport for many years. Yet there is controversy among this: whether or not the sport you are playing at CG is considered as “club” or an actual school sport. If other schools have it and you have matches and play-offs and off-seasons, then it should all be called a sport and should be treated like a sport. I know for a fact that for lacrosse, a club sport, you still have to pay a lot of money for all the equipment. If it is considered a club sport the school could supply some of the equipment that the team uses. “Personally I do no think it matters what it is classified as. I think club sports are generally more casual but nonetheless a sport. I feel like if you are in a sport that is not considered a club there is a little more competitiveness in the matches than in club matches,” junior John Dunaway said. There is always an argument to whether a sport is considered a club or not. “I think it matters it de-legitimizes the sport in a way and makes people assume it is an intramural sport and not a real sport,” junior Joey Phillips said. People’s attitudes seem to differ when the sport they are playing is recognized as a sport or a club. When it comes to clubs people attitude is more relaxed, but not always. “Normally the people I have met in or from club sports have been “snobs” because they are in a club and I have been in a sports club before and it was not any fun,” sophomore Max Humbert said. byNickMarley SportsWriter

“I think it matters if kids are in clubs or just regular sports. Kids in regular groups are more respectful and do not believe they are better than other people. I also believe we still need clubs though, because they do provide good coaching and a chance to reach your full potential. So I guess I am split half and half,” Humbert said. Becoming a sport can be a long process. Here at Center Grove the coach of the club has to make a presentation. “The process for a sport to be officially sanctioned by the High School Athletic Department would include the following procedures: 1. The head coach must make an appeal to the entire CG coaching at one of the four annual staff meetings.  This would involve a presentation as to why that sport should be considered, how they would mesh with the other sports, a background on their schedules, etc.  A question and answer/discussion period would follow. 2. After the presentation, every CG coach would vote for or against the proposal.  A simple majority would decide the outcome. 3. If accepted, that sport would be expected to conform to all of the rules and regulations of the CGHS Athletic Department as well as the rules and policies of the Indiana High School Athletic Association,” Zwitt said. “There are twenty IHSAA sports.  Center Grove supports nineteen of them, since the sport of gymnastics was dropped beginning this year.  Cheerleading was added as an official sport prior to the West Gym being built.  Boys & Girls bowling and Boys Volleyball were added beginning in the 2003-04 school year,” Athletic Director Mr. Zwitt said.

The Forgotten The sports at CG that go unnoticed by the IHSAA:

1) Boys Volleyball

Despite being a state power, the boys who get up and put it down can’t gain IHSAA recognition.

2) Ultimate Frisbee

Winners of the indoor state championship, favorites for this year’s outdoor state championship, and competitors on the national level, yet they can’t even get gym time for practice.

3) Boys and Girls Lacrosse

Despite recent success, and state recognition by club organizations, the sport remains on the IHSAA’s blacklist.

Issue 11  

March 24, 2011

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