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2015-2016

PRESIDENT’S REPORT


Dear friends,

2015-16 BOARD OF TRUSTEES CHAIR Jonathan T. Swiatkowski, CPA VICE-CHAIR Siobhan C. Smith MEMBERS Sharon Prise Azurin, Esq. G. Richard Braen, M.D. Sister JoAnne Courneen, RSM Sister Mary Jeanne Thomas Danahy, RSM ’67 Bassam M. Deeb, Ph.D., President Thomas J. Gamble, Ph.D. Brian A. Gould Michele A. Ladouceur ’01 Teresa Lawrence, Ph.D. Sister Diane C. Matje, RSM James Notaro, Ph.D. Sister Eileen O’Connor, RSM William A. Paladino Thomas J. Quatroche, Jr., Ph.D. Cynthia Rich Nancy J. Sheehan, Esq. ’84 Sister Sally Walz, RSM* Thomas H. Waring, Jr.

2015-16 ALUMNI BOARD OF DIRECTORS PRESIDENT Karen Chiantella, RN-BC, BSN ’96 John Anderson, MS, RN ’99 Dee Bellanti, RN, CLP ’13 Danielle Fox ’11 Monique Giambelluca Jarvis ’05

To say that the 2015-2016 academic year at Trocaire College was a year of transformation would be an understatement. The college saw exciting improvements in nearly every division, with a keen eye on our ever-present push to increase student success. This communication serves as our reinvigorated President’s report. After a several year hiatus, we are thrilled to present this and other new methods of continuous communication to you: our friends, partners, benefactors, alumni, and community leaders. In the pages that follow, we share updates on major institutional initiatives that took place during the ’15-’16 year, including a comprehensive brand refresh, the opening of a dedicated Barnes & Noble bookstore at our Choate location, and construction of the Statler Foundation Hospitality, Food, and Nutrition Service Learning Laboratory at our Transit Road facility. In Academic Affairs, professors began utilizing dynamic lecture capture software while simultaneously spearheading an inaugural teaching learning conference to serve the regional higher education community. All of that and we successfully ratified a new three-year collective bargaining agreement with the Trocaire Faculty Association. In Student Affairs, we explored and implemented innovative solutions to meet student needs with the addition of advanced online tutoring options. We also strengthened our Mercy heritage with the expansion of the Office of Mission, Ministry and Service. 2015-2016 brought with it a great deal of future planning as we continued to benchmark and propose new outcomes in our development function, while strengthening a successful signature event – Reflections – that netted more than $76,000 for student scholarships. A healthy financial footing has allowed for significant investment in people, infrastructure, technologies, student support and strategic initiatives, all of which are outlined herein. Just as this work was being completed, Trocaire began extensive planning efforts for an even stronger future. We launched the Trocaire in 2020 strategic planning process, the results of which will be shared in next year’s annual report. We also solicited a comprehensive branding study and competitor analysis, resulting in the approval and a roll-out of brand refresh reflected in this report. This work is but a sampling of the accomplishments of our faculty and staff last year in order to create a positive learning environment for Trocaire College students. We, as stewards of this mission, are collectively committed to the legacy of Trocaire as a private, Catholic, undergraduate institution in the Mercy tradition. Your interest and support of our efforts mean so much! In that vein, we also want to take this opportunity to publicly thank all of the individuals and organizations that contributed to that mission through personal investments. Each contribution helps Western New Yorkers pursue careers of achievement and lives of purpose through a Trocaire education. We could not do it without you! Thank you,

Ykeeta Henderson-Wilson, RN BSN ’08 Bonnie Kane-Lockwood ’75

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Bassam M. Deeb, Ph.D. President


The color red generally invokes excitement, youth, boldness, love, energy, strength, determination, action and passion. We chose a more subtle shade of red as compared to what was being used. Collectively this color choice symbolizes these words and meanings: grounded, realistic, strong willpower, success, self determination, passion, enthusiasm and courage. The typeface is subtly stylized, connecting the R to the E, to customize and represent our own unique take on a classic typeface.

Four “paths” = Trocaire’s Four Key Themes: Academics, Careers, Heritage and Community This shape and movement symbolizes the trail we are blazing into the future, pathways to career and personal success and fufillment, as well as innovation and excellence across the pathways of service. The paths also opens up to a world of new possibilities and the future. Thy represent degrees in growing fields. Trocaire students are VITAL to the future and progress of our region.

The connection can also be interpreted to symbolize our strengthening students, careers and the community, as well as strengthening and serving the Mercy Mission and our four key themes. The font is Garamond. It is a classic and traditional font created by Claude Garamond (1480-1561). The Garamond typeface offers elegance and represents tradition and heritage that reflects the core of Trocaire College.

REBRANDING OUR INSTITUTION

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n August 2015, Trocaire College—in partnership with Cognitive Marketing of Rochester—launched a comprehensive Branding Study and Competitor Analysis to address persistent concerns about the college’s presence and visibility in Western New York. College leadership suspected that lack of a dynamic presence was a primary threat to long-term success in an increasingly competitive environment. The six-month study affirmed this concern and provided guidance and clarity on how to reposition the college in the years ahead.

Important discoveries: • Aided and unaided awareness were lowest amongst competitive set. • Stakeholders were confused about cost, value and some program offerings. • Trocaire was fairly invisible in the broader Buffalo market despite a massive alumni presence. • Alumni reported incredibly high satisfaction rates in the upper 90th percentile. • Word of mouth is a powerful tool we hadn’t utilized purposefully to advance our mission. • Internal allegiance was more departmentally-focused than brand-focused. • Voicing, imagery and messaging did not reflect the key themes revealed as our primary strengths.

Look for our four key themes on page 14.

A community conversation The Board of Trustees unanimously approved the business case for a brand refresh at its March 2016 meeting. The business case included the results of extensive analysis and subsequent recommendations based on quantitative testing. All of the recommendations were deeply rooted in conversations held with every key stakeholder group of the institution – students, alumni, faculty, staff, administrators, board members, deans, program directors, and even employers who hire our graduates. Recommendations also included the results of a programmatic competitor analysis, a regional panel survey, a full internal communications audit, and a Mosaic study to reveal target market profiles. A new toolkit A team of internal and external experts translated the results of the study into a set of comprehensive marketing tools including our Four Key Themes, Promise Statement, Positioning Statement, Tag Line, new color palette, and a refreshed logo. Looking forward With new tools in hand, the college would target the 20162017 academic year to reveal the new brand to the public, launch a new web site, finalize a more focused Integrated Marketing and Communications Plan with dynamic metrics, and begin the work of creating internal brand ambassador trainings and tools to equip stakeholders with the means necessary to “spread the word” about Trocaire College.

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WELCOMING BARNES & NOBLE

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n October 2015, due to the dramatic shift in student textbook purchasing behavior and the institution’s desire to meet its students’ needs, Trocaire College officially announced a partnership with Barnes & Noble, Inc., a Fortune 500 company and largest retail bookseller in the United States, to explore the future of its college bookstore. The partnership with Barnes & Noble came following a period in late August in which all employees and students were invited to participate in presentations and Q&A sessions from three potential partners in consideration of the future of the bookstore. Barnes & Noble was chosen for its ability to offer students multiple purchasing options and the greatest freedom of choice, while maintaining high quality. Over the course of the spring semester, renovations transformed the front entrance of the college—which formerly housed the information desk, switchboard operator, waiting area and President’s Office—into a brand-new bookstore. With Barnes & Noble at the helm, this freshly decorated,

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more spacious store offers Trocaire students and employees better prices, a wider variety of merchandise and a welcoming space the moment you walk to into the college. Trocaire held a grand opening of the new space on April 28, 2015 and the event was well attended by students, employees and administration, as well as several Sisters of Mercy and local elected officials.


TROCAIRE REACHES CONTRACT AGREEMENT WITH FACULTY ASSOCIATION

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ollowing nearly 17 months of intense negotiations, in July 2015 the Trocaire Faculty Association (TFA) ratified a new three-year collective bargaining agreement. The TFA represents more than 100 educators who instruct at Trocaire. The new agreement includes a 3% salary increase for each of the three years, as well as the removal of a cap on healthcare contributions. It is retroactive to August 2014, running through August 2017. “There was true compromise and collaboration by both sides to reach this agreement, as our faculty members

are an incredibly valued part of our organization,” Trocaire President Bassam Deeb said in a statement. “Our educators work hard to improve the quality of life of the students we serve. They are critical to helping our students achieve their dreams of building meaningful careers.” TFA President Jerry Clark agreed, adding that “the new agreement addressed concerns raised by both groups and allows the college to be competitive and meet the needs of our students.”

EMPHASIZING ECHO360 AT TROCAIRE

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ver the past year, Trocaire College has adopted an innovative teaching tool called Echo360. Using Echo360, students can interact with the classroom material— including video lectures—from any device at any given time. Echo360 strives to help make students responsible learners and increase institutional student retention rates. It not only re-creates the classroom experience for students who would like to watch the lectures or study notes over and over again, but also helps professors track student engagement and interact with their students by offering immediate feedback in real-time dashboards. Instructors can also use this tool to experiment with “flipping” their classroom, a set-up in which students are expected to familiarize themselves with the lecture before class. This allows faculty to maximize in-class time with hands-on learning opportunities and student discussion and interaction, as well as reenergize classes with in-class polls, quizzes and other questions to assess and facilitate student understanding of the lecture material.

This year, nearly 30 full-time and part-time Trocaire instructors across disciplines embraced this new tool, thanks to the Faculty Excellence Grants offered by the Faculty Senate, which encouraged faculty to think creatively about new ways to engage students and measure results with the Echo360 platform. The faculty who chose to use Echo360 shared their triumphs and challenges with the rest of the Trocaire family by hosting presentations and discussions through the Mary Clare Development Center. Echo360 itself acknowledged Trocaire’s success with its program. It published a blog post about the college’s efforts in February 2016, and in May, faculty members Rachel Suto McCormick, Kjerstin Owens and Jennifer Blickwedehl and Education Technology/Instructional Design staff Alissa SteelePruitt and Derek Farkas hosted a webinar on using Echo360 that was attended by close to 100 educators streaming from all across the country.

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TROCAIRE HOLDS FIRST TEACHING AND LEARNING CONFERENCE

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rocaire College held its inaugural Teaching Innovations and Enhancing Learning (TIEL) Conference on April 9, 2016 at the Ramada Hotel and Conference Center in Getzville. The theme of the day was “Rebooting Critical Thinking.” Co-chairing the conference were Dr. Jennifer Blickwedehl, professor of biology at Trocaire and president of the Faculty Senate, and Sierra Adare-Tasiwoopa ápi, who was coordinator of Trocaire’s Mary Clare Development Center at the time. The conference drew more than 120 educators from Western and Central New York, Western Pennsylvania and Canada. There were 17 breakout sessions throughout the day, with presenters representing Trocaire, SUNY Alfred State, Bryant & Stratton, Hilbert College, Niagara Community College, Niagara University, Carlow University, Daemen College and SUNY University at Buffalo. In addition, there were 10 poster presentations and a dozen roundtable discussion opportunities. Dr. Richard Arum delivered the event’s keynote address: “Critical Thinking, College Experiences and Transitions to Adulthood: Lessons from ‘Aspiring Adults Adrift.’” The chair of New York University’s Department of Sociology with a joint appointment in its School of Education, Dr. Arum is also the director of the Education Research Program of the Social Science Research Council and has co-authored several books on critical thinking and college students.

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The conference’s theme underscored the importance of incorporating critical thinking skills and assessment into curriculum across the disciplines without overburdening

course content or the faculty. Breakout sessions and poster presentations offered a critical space to examine and share the latest research, theories and best practices in higher education. The roundtables and breakouts offered a valuable platform for faculty to network and share their teaching experiences.


UTILIZING TUTOR.COM

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to do is simply click on a link, which takes them to the Tutor. tarting in January 2016, Trocaire College partnered with Tutor.com to pilot a program to give online tutoring access com platform. In this arena, a qualified tutor will use a virtual to all students taking Anatomy and Physiology (A&P)—24 hours whiteboard, along with a text box to communicate with the student and go over specific areas of concern. a day, seven days a week. The two levels of A&P are considered “gateway courses” that almost all students in healthcare programs need to successfully complete. For many students, especially those without a strong science background, these classes can be problematic, and extra support is needed to help them succeed. The new pilot program involves no cost to the student, and there are no restrictions on how many times they can use the services over the course of the semester. All students need

The results of the spring pilot were encouraging, as 55 out of approximately 250 individual students over the course of the semester used the service at least once. Students used the services an average of 3 times each, and the average length of each session was 25 minutes. Students are also encouraged to fill out a brief survey after each session, and the tutors received a 4.17 out of 5 satisfaction rating. This project is being continued in the Fall 2016 semester in the hopes of collecting more outcomes data.

EXPANDING THE OFFICE OF MISSION, MINISTRY AND SERVICE

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n 2015, Trocaire renewed its commitment to its Mercy heritage in several key ways. As a member of the Conference for Mercy Higher Education, the college prioritizes preserving and developing our core Catholic identity and the tenets of an education grounded in Mercy values. Firstly, the college established an Office of Mission, Ministry and Service upon the retirement of Sister Margaret Mary Gorman, who had served in a part-time capacity as director of mission and service learning. Instead of simply replacing the part-time position, Trocaire hired two full-time staff members. Robert Shearn joined Trocaire as its new director of Mission, Ministry, and Service in November. His responsibilities at Trocaire include acting as the college’s mission officer, overseeing the Office of Service Learning, and providing both

pastoral care and campus ministry programming to students. Pam Jablonicky was promoted from an administrative assistant role to coordinator of Service Learning, a position in which she handles outreach to community partners, coordinates student placements and works to more fully integrate service learning into every academic program Trocaire offers. Since the overhaul of this institutional area, Trocaire has seen a surge of Mercy mission-related programing, from observing the “Year of Mercy” as declared by Pope Francis, to celebrating weekly Masses during Lent, to holding talks and events concerning some of the Sisters of Mercy’s critical concerns such as care for the Earth and nonviolence. In addition, service learning is now included as a mandatory component for every student who attends Trocaire.

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TROCAIRE COLLEGE In 2015-2016, Trocaire invested deliberately and significantly in critically important areas of the college such as people, infrastructure, technology, scholarships, and strategic initiatives. 2015-16 BUDGET OVERVIEW $20,261,115

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Academic Programs & Workforce Development Student Academic/Support Services & Enrollment Management General & Administrative Infrastructure & Operations Auxiliary Services Student Financial Aid Institutional Advancement

INVESTMENT IN INFRASTRUCTURE

INVESTMENT IN STRATEGIC INITIATIVES $329,110

was allotted to initiatives designed to move the institution forward,

$2,244,762 was invested in facilities and capital expenditures. Special projects included a building utilization study to inform long-term capital needs and strategies and various renovation projects.

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better meet student needs, succeed in a fluctuating market, and respond and contribute to the broader Western New York community. The result of this work will primarily roll out next fiscal year. Projects included a branding study and competitor analysis, strategic planning, an academic program costing study, an assessment to identify areas of improvement in the nursing curriculum, board training, a 360degree review process for administrators, and focused efforts in government relations and grant management and acquisition.


THE BIG PICTURE INVESTMENT IN TECHNOLOGIES $1,032,575

was invested in technology systems, infrastructure, and capital needs, including a newly upgraded college web site, a customer relationship management tool for admissions and enrollment, and a deep-dive assessment of the technology function to achieve improved services for students and employees.

INVESTMENT IN PEOPLE $12,030,586 invested in 346 employees, including payment of salaries and wages, payroll taxes and benefits, and professional development opportunities. Two unique initiatives were launched: The LAMA creativity training for all employees to build our collective, long-term capacity for innovation and the inaugural conference on Teaching Innovations and Enhancing Learning (TIEL) for faculty to access the latest research and innovations, instructional tools, and best practices available in higher education. See story on page 6.

INVESTMENT IN SCHOLARSHIPS $2,016,613

was awarded to students in the form of scholarships, institutional grants, and financial aid.

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REFLECTIONS 2015

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rocaire celebrated its 24th annual Reflections Awards Dinner on Oct. 8, 2015. The event was enjoyed by 242 attendees, and it raised $76,340. Reflections, as always, recognized Western New Yorkers who reflect the values of the Sisters of Mercy and the mission of Trocaire and who have made significant contributions to the community. Proceeds help provide the scholarship support Trocaire students need to realize their goals, improve their circumstances and become caring service professionals in their chosen fields. The 2015 Reflections Awards winners were:

• Dr. Candace S. Johnson, president and CEO of Roswell Park Cancer Institute • Mary Beth Billittier and Louis John Billittier, owners of Chef’s Restaurant • Trocaire’s partners in the NYS Pathways in Technology Early College High School (P-TECH) collaborative: the Lackawanna City School District, Erie 1 BOCES and Catholic Health.

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In addition, the Most Reverend Richard J. Malone, leader of the Diocese of Buffalo since 2012, received the President’s Distinguished Service Award, presented to a person or group whose community participation exemplifies Trocaire College’s Mercy mission without regard for community profile. Finally, 2015 was the first year Trocaire recognized the recipient of the annual Distinguished Alumni Award at Reflections. The honor was presented to Massage Therapy alumna Natalie Barnhard ’04, founder of the Wheels With Wings Foundation, an organization developed to help and support individuals who have suffered spinal cord injuries and their families.


TRANSFORMATION AT TRANSIT

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hanks in part to funds generously provided by The Statler Foundation, Trocaire College was able to completely renovate several rooms at its Transit Road Extension Center this past year. The campus community, donors and other guests celebrated the new space with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on June 16, 2016. Statler Foundation Hospitality, Food, and Nutrition Service Learning Laboratory: This area will serve as a simulated coffee café/small restaurant environment in which students in the Hospitality Management and the Nutrition and Dietetics programs will be able to learn “front of the house” operations in a food and beverage retail environment. Outfitted with coffee makers, refrigerated storage areas, and plenty of cupboard and counter space, the laboratory also allows events to be easily catered within the new space.

Classroom/Event Space: The third portion of the project is an updated classroom, equipped with new audio/visual equipment and furniture. A key feature of the classroom is the retractable glass wall that divides it from the Penfold Learning Commons and Statler lab. The space can be closed off, allowing a class to go on undisturbed even as other students utilize the common area. However, when the wall retracts, the three areas combine into a single space that can accommodate 100 to 150 people for special events, workshops and conferences.

Penfold Learning Commons: Named in honor of Dick and Karen Penfold, longtime supporters of Trocaire and champions of its students, this space serves as both a studying and gathering place. With Trocaire’s library offerings shelved to one side and the Statler lab just steps away, students will be able to gather individually and in groups, to study and prepare for classes, relax with a quick snack and access the internet—all within the same comfortable space.

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THANK YOU TO ALL OF THE INDIVIDUALS AND ORGANIZATIONS

that supported Trocaire College between June 1, 2015 and May 31, 2016. PRESIDENT’S CIRCLE

($25,000.00 to $99,999.00 Annually)

Russell J. Salvatore Lh.D.

TRUSTEE’S CIRCLE

($5,000.00 to $24,999.00 Annually)

Catholic Health System Ellicott Development Company Mr. Anthony B. Habib Kaleida Health Ms. Ellen E. Koessler Mr. & Mrs. Jon Scott Sisters of Mercy

LEADERSHIP CIRCLE ($1,000.00 to $4,999.00 Annually)

Advance 2000 Inc. Apex Mr. & Mrs. Joseph F. Basil Dr. G. Richard Braen‡ Catapult Chef’s Restaurant Ms. Karen Joy Chiantella ’96 Drs. Bassam & Jodi Deeb Mr. & Mrs. David H. Desmon e3communications Mr. & Mrs. George J. Eberl Eberl Iron Works, Inc. ECMC Eduserve GlobalQuest Solutions, Inc. Mrs. Amy J. Habib Mrs. Theresa Horner ’81 Mr. Jack Hudack Independent Health Association Mr. & Mrs. Fred & Lisa Kirisits Kirisits & Associates CPAS, PLLC Dr. Teresa Lawrence‡ Richard T. Linn Ph.D. Manning & Napier Advisors, LLC Dr. James Notaro‡ OLV Homes of Charity

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Mr. William A. Paladino‡ Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Penfold Phillips Lytle, LLP Mrs. Cynthia Rich‡ Roman Catholic Diocese of Buffalo Roswell Park Cancer Institute Mrs. Siobhan Smith‡ Ms. Sharman Staschak Vincent & Harriet Palisano Foundation Mr. Thomas H. Waring Jr.‡ Mrs. Pamela Witter

FRIENDS OF TROCAIRE COLLEGE ($1.00 to $999.00 Annually)

19 Ideas Mrs. Denise Marie Abbott ’03 Amalfi, Inc. American Legion Post 721 Amherst Security Mrs. Margaret Andrzejewski ’73 Ms. Elizabeth R. Assaf Mrs. Nancy Augustyn ’75 Ms. Margaret Babcock Mrs. Joanne Baldini ’68 Mrs. Mollie Ballaro Donald Balthasar Ph.D. Ms. Barbara A. Bargmann Ms. Zenaida Barnum ’70 Barrantys Mr. Brad Baumgardner Mr. & Mrs. James Biddle, Jr. Jennifer Blickwedehl, Ph.D. Mrs. Rebecca T. Boyle Ms. Bette Brancato ’79 Ms. Paula Braun ’69, ’80 Mr. Thomas J. Bubar ’75 Ms. Barbara M. Buchheit ’82 Mr. John Burgess Mrs. Emily Burns Perryman Mrs. Deborah Cammarata

Mr. Kenneth M. Carluccio Mr. & Mrs. J. Jerry Castiglia Mr. & Mrs. Gabriel Chouchani Ciccheti, Inc. Ms. Julie Cioccio Ms. Kathleen Cioccio Ms. Susan Clark ’88 Clauss & Company Insurance Cognitive Marketing Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo Dr. Joseph R. Connelly Ms. Debbie Corcoran ’85 Cosgrove Law Firm Mrs. Kathleen F. Cosgrove-Drury ’74 Country Florist Ms. Bridgette D. Crawford ’99 Mr. George Crossland Mrs. Marie Cullum ’85 Mrs. Claire I. Darstein Mr. Isadore Anthony DeMarco ’95 Ms. Kathleen Dennehy Mr. Damian Desbordes Mrs. Nancy Deubell ’77 Mrs. Monica Joy Diasio ’78 Mrs. Ethel DiPaolo Ms. Kathleen Dolan ’74 Ms. Lindsey E. Dotson Mr. & Mrs. Shaun J. Duffy Mrs. Joan Dunbar ’77 Eaton Office Supply Company, Inc. Mrs. Barbara Eggleston ’81 Mrs. Diane Eggleston Ms. Jennifer C. Ehlinger-Saj ElderWood Assisted Living at Heathwood Sr. Sharon Erickson RSM ’62 Erie One BOCES Mrs. Elaine Evanovich ’76 Mrs. Maureen Fecio ’68 Ferguson Electric Inc.


Mrs. Deborah Finamore ’73 First Niagara Bank Dr. Peter W. Forgach Mr. Scott W. Franklin ’97 Ms. Donna M. Fraser ’81 Ms. Carole Frost ’86 Mr. Anthony L. Funigiello Ms. Gertrude Galati ’95 Mrs. Philomena M. Gallagher Dr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Gamble‡ Ms. Kelly A Garasz ’09 Ms. Mary C. Genzel Ms. Angela E. Giancarlo Sr. Alice Gilabert OSF ’81 Ms. Aimee C. Gomlak Ms. Carolyn Gorczyca Sr. Peggy Gorman RSM ’64 Ms. Therese M. Gorman Mr. Robert Graeff ’96 Ellen E. Grant Ph.D. Mr. James Grasso Dr. Catherine Griswold Mrs. Virginia Guenther ’81 H. G. Miller Farm, Inc. Mr. Brad Hafner Mrs. Kathleen Hahn ’70 Mrs. Helene M. Hamilton ’70 Ms. Sharon L. Hanson Harvard Business School Club of Buffalo Ms. Elizabeth Hawkins ’73 Mr. Robert Heacock Ms. Jane Higgins ’69 Mrs. Kathleen Hoffstetter ’71 Mrs. Rosemary Hopkins ’76 Susan L. Horrocks Ph.D. Ms. Maureen Huber Ms. Maureen Hudack ’70 Mrs. Noreen Hughes ’75 Dr. & Mrs. Paul B. Hurley Jr. Ilio DiPaolo Scholarship Fund Printing & Mailing Serv. Mrs. Pam Jablonicky William I. James MD Mrs. Elizabeth Jaworski ’72

JMZ Architects & Planners PC Jobs Weekly Mr. Edward A. Johnson Ms. Reggie Joseph Ms. Joyce Kaiser Mr. J. Michael Kearns Ms. Kathleen G. Kearns Assemblyman Michael P. Kearns Mr. Leo Kelly, Jr. ’84 Linda J. Kerwin, Ed.D. ’07 Ms. Kristy Kibler Robert Kieffer Ph.D. Ms. Wendy L. Kinsey ’07 Ms. Kimberley Kirch ’88 Mrs. Sally A. Klaskala ’75 Ms. Nicole Klem Mr. Michael R. Kolb ’06 Mr. William Korthals Mrs. Nancy Jo Kotlarz ’83 Ms. Lisa Kraska Ms. Cheryl Krouse Lawley Insurance Mrs. Claudia Lesinski ’82 Mrs. Patricia Lesinski Ms. Robin Loomis Lumsden & McCormick, LLP Mr. Darrel Lynch ’81 Sr. Marie André Main RSM ’62 Mrs. Margaret Makowski-Greenky ’72 Mrs. Barbara A. Mangan ’68 Ms. Jill Mangione Mrs. Jacqueline S. Matheny Mrs. Patricia A. Matlock ’83 Mauro, Inc. Mrs. Rachel Suto-McCormick ’85 Mrs. Molly McGee Randisi ’72 Mrs. Louise D. McGrath McGuire Group Ms. Sharon McHenry ’69 Mrs. Evelyn T. McLean ’72 Mrs. Sharon A. McNamara ’77 Ms. Joyce Melton ’93 Mrs. Marguerite Messina Mrs. Cheryl A. Miller

Mr. & Mrs. Martin Miller Millington Lockwood Business Interiors Mrs. Patricia Miodonski ’84 Mr. Thomas Mitchell Sr. Mrs. Moira Moldenhauer ’74 Mollenberg Betz Mr. Michael Moravec Mount Mercy Academy Sr. Marian Mullen RSM ’67 Ms. Maureen Myers ’73 Dr. Nicholas Naples ’77 Solomon Nelson, Ph.D. Ms. Judith Nolan-Powell Mrs. Valerie Nugent Sr. Eileen O’Connor RSM‡ Mr. James L. O’Donnell Ms. Vincenetta O’Donnell Off Beat Productions Ms. Margaret V. Overdorf Ms. Marilyn R. Owczarczyk ’94 Kjerstin Owens Ph.D. Mrs. Antoinette Packard Mr. & Mrs. Carl Paladino Mr. Sean Paonessa Ms. Joan A. Pax ’86 Mr. David A. Peck ’80 Mrs. Paula Penepent ’78 Performance Management Partners Inc. Mrs. Mary K. Perschy Ms. Janet E. Peters Althea T. Porter Ph.D. Mrs. Maria Povlock Sr. Mary Ann Powell RSM ’64 Power Drives, Inc. Mrs. Patricia Preston ’73 Ms. Sharon Prise Azurin‡ Ms. Mary M. Przepasniak Thomas J. Quatroche, Jr. Ph.D.‡ Mrs. Mary Ellen Regan Ms. Barbara A. Riederer ’91 Mr. James Rivetti ’90 Ms. Renee Roman ’75 Mr. Donald Roof ’94

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Rosina Food Products RT Dee & Associates Ms. Karen Rudnicki ’91 Mrs. Susan Saltzman ’67 Mr. & Mrs. Paul F. Santandreu Mr. & Mrs. Salvatore J. Savarino Mr. Christopher Scanlon Ms. Christine Schafer ’86 Mrs. Lisa Schaffer Ms. Judith Schwartz Ms. Terese M. Scofidio Mrs. Colleen A. Scoville ’84 Mrs. Michelle Semski Ms. M. Patricia Shanks Mrs. Barbara Shaw Mr. Robert Shearn Ms. Nancy J. Sheehan, Esq. ’84‡ Ms. Deborah Shelvay

Ms. Colleen Smith ’75 Mrs. Susan Smith ’78 Ms. Anne G. Spadone Mr. Donald Spasiano Mrs. Debra Stacey ’96 Mr. William T. Stachowski Mrs. Eileen Stadelmaier ’77 Mrs. Sheila Stanchak ’83 Mrs. Lorie D. Steinwald ’97 Mrs. Debra Steriovski Ms. Susan Stocker ’78 Ms. Cheryl D. Swain Ms. Rae Ann Swan ’80 Taheri & Todoro, PC Mrs. Jane F. Tebo ’70 Thomas Ramming Consulting Inc. Ms. Keri Thomas-Whiteside Nicole Tomasello Ph.D.

Ms. Elise Torre Tracy’s Retreat Dr. Nicholas D. Trbovich Sr. Uniland Development Company Ms. Judith J. Valdez ’67 Mrs. Assunta Ventresca ’70 Mrs. JoAnne Marie Viapiano ’76 Mrs. Kathleen Von Vreckin ’78 Ms. Mary Alice Walz Mr. Thomas Warger Waring Financial Group, LLC Mrs. Carol A. Whitton ’71 Ms. Mary Louise Wiatrowski ’71 Mrs. Maureen Winnert Ms. Ann Wojciechowski Rev. Msgr. John W. Zeitler * Zenger Group ‡ Board Member * Deceased

TROCAIRE COLLEGE'S FOUR KEY THEMES

ACADEMICS

CAREERS

COMMUNITY

Trocaire’s academic programs are engaging and active. Grounded in practicality and flexibility, we emphasize experiential learning while providing a strong liberal arts foundation. Our programs are career-oriented and market-driven, constantly evolving to offer students the most cutting-edge information.

Trocaire’s graduates are well-prepared and skilled industry professionals who use their degrees to improve their circumstances and pursue career pathways that often exceed median household incomes in Buffalo. They become part of a successful alumni network that includes more than 10,000 Trocaire graduates.

Trocaire offers the kind of nurturing and encouraging community only a small, student-centered institution can, allowing us to educate students effectively and persistently. Our graduates live and work locally, benefiting from and contributing to strong, community-based partnerships for clinicals, internships and service opportunities.

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HERITAGE

In the tradition of the Sisters of Mercy, Trocaire seeks to “meet the unmet need” in our community. Students are often first in the family to pursue college. Many have families of their own. At Trocaire they find a community that nurtures their ambition and talent while preparing them for careers of service.


LIFETIME, PLANNED AND CONSECUTIVE GIVING FOUNDER’S CIRCLE (Lifetime Giving Total of $100,000.00 to $1,000,000.00)

Community Foundation for Greater Buffalo Ellen E. Koessler Ms. Elizabeth N. Kolber John R. Oishei Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Carl Paladino Vincent & Harriet Palisano Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Richard C. Penfold Russell J. Salvatore Lh.D. Sisters of Mercy The Margaret L. Wendt Foundation

SISTER BARBARA CIARICO LEGACY SOCIETY (Planned Giving)

Ms. Ellen Bowman Mr. Thomas J. Bubar ’75 Ms. Maureen English Dr. & Mrs. Paul B. Hurley, Jr. Ms. Kathleen G. Kearns Mr. & Mrs. Hal Kingsley Ms. Ellen E. Koessler Mr. William Marx Mr. Thomas Mitchell ’89 Mr. Gerald C. Saxe

GIFTS IN KIND Buffalo Bills, Inc. Mr. George Crossland Ms. Monique M. Giambelluca Jarvis ’05 Mrs. Veronica Kane-Lockwood ’75 Lamar Outdoor Advertising Mrs. Cheryl A. Miller Park Edge Sweet Shoppe Russell J. Salvatore, Lh.D.

LOYALTY CIRCLE

(5-year Consecutive Giving History)

Mrs. Margaret Andrzejewski ’73 Mrs. Nancy Augustyn ’75 Ms. Margaret Babcock Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Basil Catholic Health System Ciminelli Development Company, Inc. Ms. Susan Clark ’88 Dr. Joseph Connelly Mrs. Mary Ann Deb Mr. & Mrs. David H. Desmon Mr. & Mrs. George J. Eberl ECMC Ellicott Development Company Ms. Maureen English Mrs. Deborah Finamore ’73 Mr. Anthony Funigiello Mrs. Amy Habib Mrs. Kathleen Hahn ’70 Mrs. Kathleen Hoffstetter ’71 Mrs. Theresa Horner ’81 Dr. & Mrs. Paul B. Hurley, Jr. Innsbruck Printing & Mailing Serv. Ms. Joyce Kaiser Kaleida Health Mr. & Mrs. Fred & Lisa Kirisits

Ms. Ellen E. Koessler Mrs. Michele Ladouceur ’01‡ Lawley Insurance Richard T. Linn, Ph.D. Lumsden & McCormick, LLP Manning & Napier Advisors, LLC Ms. Janet McGrath Mrs. Louise McGrath Mrs. Cheryl Miller Mr. Michael Moravec Mr. Henry Mumme ’01 Mr. Norbert Myslinski Dr. James Notaro‡ Mr. & Mrs. Richard Penfold Ms. Mary Przepasniak Russell J. Salvatore, Lh.D. Mr. & Mrs. Salvatore Savarino Mrs. Lisa Schaffer Ms. Judith Schwartz Sisters of Mercy Mrs. Siobhan Smith‡ Ms. Sharman Staschak The Statler Foundation Dr. Nicholas D. Trbovich, Sr. Mrs. Assunta Ventresca ’70 Mrs. Joanne Marie Viapiano ’76 ‡ Board Member * Deceased

DECADES OF GIVING For almost 60 years, Trocaire College Alumni have supported the college and its mission with their generosity. The following chart represents alumni giving by class year grouped by decade.

▪▪ ▪

1960’s - 108 Donors 1970’s - 356 Donors 1980’s - 484 Donors

▪▪ ▪

1990’s - 324 Donors 2000’s - 45 Donors 2010’s - 13 Donors

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360 Choate Ave. | Buffalo, NY 14220

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BUFFALO, NY PERMIT #2435

LAYING THE FOUNDATION FOR TROCAIRE COLLEGE IN 2020

I

n January 2016, Trocaire College engaged the services of Stephanie Argentine to bring a major strategic planning effort to conclusion. Together with a workgroup including representation from each major division of the college and members of the Board of Trustees, Stephanie guided the creation of a concise document that offers clarity of vision, goals, and action plans. Embedded in the plan were clear and practical mechanisms to track progress on a regular basis.

Stephanie’s work included extensive meetings with board members, faculty, staff, students and the Sisters of Mercy. At the conclusion of the 2015-2016 academic year, the work team began putting the finishing touches on the plan, which would be presented the following year to the Board of Trustees for review, approval and implementation.

Trocaire president's report 15 16  
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