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SERVICE LEARNING PRACTICUM MANUAL Syllabus | Policies | Information Revised August 26, 2010


Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning Trinity Lutheran College 2802 Wetmore Ave. Everett, WA 98201 Office: 425.249.4770 Toll-free: 800.843.5659 Fax: 425.249.4801 www.ccesl@tlc.edu

Stacy D. Kitahata Director ccesl@tlc.edu 425.249.4770

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Table of Contents CCESL Contact Information ........................................................................................ 2 Course Overview, Objectives, and Requirements Overview of Service Learning Practicum ....................................................................... 4 Official Course Description ............................................................................................ 4 Course Objectives ........................................................................................................... 4 Course Format ................................................................................................................. 5 Required Materials ......................................................................................................... 5 Course Requirements ...................................................................................................... 5 Grading ........................................................................................................................... 6 Service Learning Requirements for All Students ........................................................... 6 Service Learning Requirements for Degree Programs ................................................... 6

What is Service Learning? What is Service Learning? .............................................................................................. 8 What Makes a Positive Service Learning Experience? .................................................. 8 Why Service Learning?................................................................................................... 9

Process and Policies for Site Matching Identifying an Appropriate Site .................................................................................... 10 Factors to Consider When Identifying a Site Match ..................................................... 10 Process for Changing Sites ........................................................................................... 10 Policies Regarding Community Partners and Site Mentors .......................................... 11 Termination of an Service Learning Placement............................................................ 11 Information for Community Partners ....................................................................... 12

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Course Overview, Objectives, and Requirements Overview of Service Learning Practicum Service Learning shapes college education for every student and faculty member at Trinity Lutheran College. Active engagement in ministry and non-profit organizations integrates classroom and course learning with real life application. Weekly reflection with peers and faculty incorporates biblical and systemic analysis. Students serve 3-5 hours per week in one aspect of a larger ministry/service program. Participating with experienced supervisors and colleagues, students discover the implications of classroom concepts and discover their gifts and capacities for compassion, organizing, critical thinking, conflict resolution, problem solving. Students work under supervision of a Site Mentor rather than in the lead role of an entire ministry/service program. Students complete four credits of SLP as part of the Trinity Core Curriculum. The program is administered by the Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning (CCESL). In September students explore site options and, in consultation with the CCESL staff, identify appropriate sites that match and challenge their interests and abilities. Students generally serve in the same organization for the entire academic year (September to mid-December and January/February to mid-May). Official Course Description – RELI 106/206 This course engages the greater Puget Sound community as a practical learning context that addresses issues and topics identified by community partners, providing an opportunity for faithful Christian witness in word and/or deed. Students serve 3 to 5 hours per week and spend additional time reflecting on the service experience with other students and a Faculty Mentor. Placement options include teaching in a preschool, tutoring inner-city youth, visiting nursing home residents, serving meals in an emergency shelter, leading youth Bible studies, and more.

Course Objectives The Service Learning Practicum program seeks to:  Provide opportunities to engage in faithful Christian witness in word and/or deed.  Integrate service experiences with biblical and theological themes introduced in the Trinity Core.  Provide a context through which students address expressed community issues and topics through acts of service that make a difference in the lives of others.  Recognize the greater Puget Sound community as a practical context in which members of the community serve as co-teachers and co-learners in the service learning process.  Promote servant leadership and the desire to live a servant lifestyle.  Provide opportunities for students to discern and explore possible vocations. -4-


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Teach students to reflect critically on the practical work they do in the field, drawing from the resources they have gained in classwork and research. Teach students to reflect critically on the texts and lectures they engage in their coursework, drawing from practical realities they experience in the field. Help students develop sophisticated understandings of the nature and role of community organizing and service. Course Format

Each week students serve with a community organization, meet in a group with a Faculty Mentor to reflect on their community involvement, train, plan and prepare for applying learning and insights, explore biblical application and pray for their classmates and site colleagues. Required Materials Robert C. Linthicum, Building a People of Power: Equipping Churches to Transform Their Communities (Authentic Media, 2006) Faculty Mentors may include other materials as they relate to the service learning experience. Course Requirements Requirement Participate in weekly SLP group and plenary sessions Complete a Weekly Log as evidence of your service learning experience

Reading and reading journal

Complete student selfevaluation at the end of the semester

Description Engage with peers and faculty mentor every week, applying course content to service and vocational discernment. Actively participate 3-5 hours per week (45-75 hours per semester) in service learning experience at approved community site. Students who do not complete the minimum number of hours required will not be considered for a passing grade. Record dates and times of service, comments about the service experience, prayer concerns, and points of learning (such as self awareness, ability to work with others, etc.). These must be signed by the Site Mentor and shared with the Faculty Mentor every week. Students must follow the reading schedule, come to class prepared for discussion of the book, and provide one weekly journal entry that provides one or more of the following: a) reflection on noteworthy and meaningful sections of the reading, with student response b) discussion of ways in which the reading sheds light on or provides a critique of the work experienced at the site, and c) discussion of ways in which the site experience challenges the ideas presented in the readings Submitted to and reviewed with the Faculty Mentor, this tool for selfreflection can assist growth in the learning process, encourage the development of a servant lifestyle, and provide feedback about the program.

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Grading Student grades for Service Learning Practicum are determined at the end of each semester and are assigned as Pass (P) or Fail (F). The P (Pass) grade is given when the student actively participates in weekly SLP class meetings, attends SLP Plenary Sessions, completes a Weekly Log as evidence of the service learning experience, shows evidence of reading the assigned text, completes a self-evaluation at the end of the semester, and the Site Mentor’s Student Evaluation is consistent with a passing grade. The F (Fail) grade is given when any of the course requirements are not met and if the Site Mentor’s Student Evaluation is not consistent with a passing grade (even if all course requirements are met). A student may also fail the course if he/she fails to actively engage with his/her SLP site by midterm. Special Accommodations Trinity Lutheran College is committed to providing reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities whenever possible. This syllabus will be available to students in alternate formats upon request. Students with disabilities who need accommodations in this course must contact a member of Student Services who, if appropriate, will craft Individual Education Plan for you to present to your professor at the beginning of the semester. Students are responsible for costs related to professional testing for learning disabilities. Academic Responsibility We will outline conduct, participation and criteria for academic accomplishment together. This means we will set high standards, hold one another accountable, critically challenge and encourage each other. Academic Honesty Academic honesty is expected of all students at all times at Trinity Lutheran College. Academic dishonesty constitutes a serious violation of scholarship standards that can result in substantial penalties, including denial of credit in a course, as well as dismissal from the college. Any act that involves misrepresentation regarding the student’s academic work or that abridges the rights of other students to fair academic competition is forbidden (e.g., revealing contents of exams or quizzes). Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on assignments or exams, plagiarizing (misrepresenting another’s work as one’s own original creation), submitting the same (or substantially the same) paper in more than one course without prior consent of all instructors concerned, and depriving others of necessary academic sources. Students charged with academic dishonesty have the right to appeal any disciplinary action to the Academic Committee.

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Service Learning Requirements for All Students      

Full-time B.A. and A.B.S. students: Four credits total, as required as part of the Trinity Core, taken as 1 credit for each of 4 semesters. (Transfer students – see below.) Part-time B.A. students: Four credits total, as required as part of the Trinity Core. Certificate of Professional Studies students: Two credits as required by certificate program requirements, taken as 1 credit for each of 2 semesters. First-year students register for RELI 106 Service Learning Practicum; sophomores register for RELI 206. Transfer students must take SLP as part of the Trinity Core until the four-credit requirement is met, unless the student is enrolled in a practicum or internship course as required as part of his/her major. Students who desire to participate in SLP beyond their program’s requirements may continue to enroll in RELI 206 Service Learning Practicum.

Service Learning Requirements for Specific Degree Programs Applied Communications Visit the department chair before choosing an SLP for the year. There may be recommendations directing you into a particular type of experience relating to this major. Biblical Studies A studentin Biblical Studies (B.A. or A.B.S. degrees) is free to choose any areas of service with the recommendation that a different placement each year provides a greater breadth of experience. Business, Leadership & Management Visit the department chair before choosing an SLP for the year. There may be recommendations directing you into a particular type of experience relating to this major. Children, Youth & Family Studies A student is encouraged to choose a placement that develops skills in leadership, teaching, planning, and administration in settings working with children or youth. Early Childhood Education For at least one year prior to their senior year, students enrolled in the Early Childhood Education program must choose an SLP site in which they work directly with young children in a congregational setting or early childhood center. Intercultural Studies Intercultural Studies students are free to choose any areas of service that provide intercultural capacity building with the recommendation that a different placement each year to provides a greater breadth of experience.

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Music & Worship Before confirming a placement, Music & Worship majors must consult with the department chair. One year of SLP should focus on development of leadership skills, such as teaching, planning, or administration. Psychology A student enrolled in Psychology is asked to visit with the department chair before choosing an SLP for the year. There may be some recommendation that would direct you into a particular type of experience relating to this major. Certificate of Professional Studies Students working toward a Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) will normally choose a service learning site related to their particular field of study. See your academic advisor or department chair for more details.

What is Service Learning? There are dozens of definitions for service learning. However, one helpful definition for consideration is: “… a form of experiential education in which students engage in activities that address human and community needs together with structured opportunities intentionally designed to promote student learning and development. Reflection and reciprocity are key concepts of service-learning.”1 Service learning is not to be confused with “volunteering” or “community service.” While service learning involves volunteer service, it also incorporates structured reflection to provide the possibility for students to learn or grow through the experience. What Makes a Positive Service Learning Experience? In 1989, the “Principles of Good Practices for Combining Service and Learning”2 were developed by service learning practitioners representing public schools, higher education, government agencies, and community organizations. These 10 best practices provide a helpful guide for creating meaningful service learning experiences.

1

Barbara Jacoby and Associates, Service-Learning in Higher Education: Concepts and Practices. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1996, p. 5. 2 E. P. Honnet & S. J. Poulsen, Principles of Good Practice for Combining Service and Learning: A Wingspread Special Report. Racine, WI: Johnson Foundation, 1989.

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Why Service Learning? Principles of Good Practices for Combining Service and Learning 1. An effective program: engages people in responsible and challenging actions for the common good. 2. provides structured opportunities for people to reflect critically on their service experience. 3. articulates clear service and learning goals for everyone involved. 4. allows for those with needs to define those needs. 5. clarifies the responsibilities of each person and organization involved. 6. matches service providers and service needs through a process that recognizes changing circumstances. 7. expects genuine, active, and sustained organizational commitment. 8. includes training, supervision, monitoring, support, recognition, and evaluation to meet service and learning goals. 9. insures that the time commitment for service and learning is flexible, appropriate, and in the best interests of all involved. 10. is committed to program participation by and with diverse populations. Because service learning involves “practice by doing� and provides an opportunity to immediately apply learning, it is an exceptional teaching tool for aiding students in retaining information, as opposed to traditional teaching methods. The Learning Pyramid3 describes various teaching methods and the percentage of information retained for each method:

Lectures (5%) Reading (10%) Audio-Visual (20%) Demonstration (30%) Discussion Group (50%) Practice by Doing (75%) Teach Others/Immediate Use (90%)

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Source: National Training Laboratories, Bethel, ME, as cited in Dawn Duncan and Joan Kopperud, ServiceLearning Companion. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2008, p. 12.

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Process and Policies for Site Matching Identifying an Appropriate Site 1. All students are required to attend an orientation to the Service Learning process. 2. Students attend the Service Learning Fair in September and visit all possible site displays to learn about service opportunities. (See “Factors to Consider When Identifying a Site Match” below for a list of considerations.) 3. Complete a Student Interest form and submit it to the CCESL. 4. The CCESL will post SLP site assignments.

Factors to Consider When Identifying a Site Match A Service Learning match is made by mutual agreement between the student, Service Learning Faculty Mentor, CCESL staff, and the Community Partner. The most positive SLP experiences (1) engage a student’s interests and gifts with the situation of Community Partners and (2) provide a context in which service, learning, and relationships are strengthened and expanded for the mutual benefit of the student and the Community Partner. The following factors are to be considered when selecting an SLP site:  How does this site utilize my gifts and passions?  How does this site challenge me to new ways of thinking and acting?  In what ways will this experience expand vocation and career options?  How will this experience diversify my knowledge of, and experiences in, forms and styles of leadership, exploring ministry/service, working with diverse populations, understanding systems, developing administration skills, engaging in teaching, designing programs, etc.?

Process for Changing Sites Students generally begin service in the fall and continue through the end of the school year in May. When conditions cause a student to consider requesting a different Service Learning placement discuss the situation early with the Faculty Mentor, and then with the CCESL staff in order to initiate mediation. To change an Service Learning site, complete a Change Form from the CCESL and secure signatures from: (1) Your Faculty Mentor, (2) the Site Mentor at the site you are leaving, and (3) the CCESL staff. Submit the completed form to the CCESL. Please note that SLP arrangements can be terminated for a variety of reasons (see “Termination of the SLP”).

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Policies Regarding Community Partners and Site Mentors Organizations and Site Mentors under consideration must meet the following criteria to be confirmed as a site placement: Final decisions rest with the Director for Community Engagement.   

Perceive the student as a learner while in service with the organization. Provide a practicum experience that satisfies the requirements of 3-5 hours per week (4575 hours per semester), that are accomplished within (and not beyond) the duration of the current semester. Provide a Site Mentor who is willing to (1) invest time in regular consultation with the student for the purpose of providing supervision, coaching and mentoring, (2) complete necessary documents for evaluation of the student’s practicum work, and (3) attend a Community Partner Training at Trinity Lutheran College, led by CCESL staff. Provide for reimbursement of expenses directly related to the practicum experience, such as materials, supplies, costs to attend retreats or training events, automobile use, etc.

Termination of a Service Learning Placement Every effort should be made to resolve misunderstandings and address problems as soon as they arise. Termination is a last resort. The process of terminating an SLP may be initiated by the Community Partner, the student, the Faculty Mentor, or the Director for Community Engagement. The first step in the process is to notify the Director for Community Engagement, who will determine if a resolution can be reached or if the process of ending the service learning experience should be initiated. Following consultation, the service learning placement may be terminated if the Student:     

Engages in illegal, unethical or immoral behavior. Engages in sexual misconduct (including a sexual relationship with a minor, dependent adult, or any staff person of the organization). Compromises the safety of a program participant, client, or other constituent. Engages in behavior deemed unprofessional by the Community Partner or Trinity Lutheran College. Students are bound by the expectations and policies outlined in the Trinity College Student Handbook. Fails by midterm to meet the expectations of the Community Partner and/or Site Mentor.

the Community Partner:    

Fails by midterm to meet the expectations of the program. Fails or ceases to provide a Site Mentor that meets stated criteria. Compromises the safety of the student. Asks the student to engage in illegal, unethical or immoral behavior, or engage in sexual misconduct. - 11 -


Information for Community Partners

Question

What is Service Learning Practicum (SLP)? What is “service learning?”

Where to Find the Answer See page 4, “Overview of Service Learning Practicum” See page 8-9.

How does an organization qualify to be a Community Partner?

See page 11, “Policies Regarding Community Partners and Site Mentors”

What are the responsibilities of the Site Mentor?

See page 11, “Policies Regarding Community Partners and Site Mentors”

How are students matched with sites?

See page 10, “Identifying and Appropriate Site” and “Factors to Consider When Identifying a Site Match”

How does the Community Partners report student accountability? Who do I contact at the college for more information or questions?

All other questions

A Weekly Service Log and end-of-term Site Mentor Evaluation will be provided. See page 2 for staff contact information

See page 3 for the Table of Contents or contact the CCESL staff (see page 3).

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