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2005-2006 Catalog


Who do you want to be tomorrow?

Contents Academic Calendars President’s Greeting Mission Community Life Admission Registration Tuition & Fees Financial Aid Academic Information Programs of Study Course Descriptions Faculty Index

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For further information, contact Academic programs, academic advising, curriculum development ........................................................... Academic Dean, (425) 961-5535, dean@tlc.edu Admission of students, information for prospective students, campus visits .................................... Admission, (800) 843-5659, admission@tlc.edu Alumni activities ............................................................................ Alumni, (425) 961-5507, alumni@tlc.edu Campus safety ............................................................................. Security, (425) 961-5576, security@tlc.edu Community life, residence halls .............................................. Residence Life, (425) 961-5562, walker@tlc.edu Fees and payment plans ........................................................... Student Accounts, (425) 961-5505, business@tlc.edu Financial assistance, scholarships, grants, and loans .......................................................................... Financial Aid, (800) 843-5659, fin_aid@tlc.edu General information .................................................................... Receptionist, (425) 392-0400, info@tlc.edu General interests of Trinity, church relations, and community relations ...................... President, (425) 961-5501, president@tlc.edu Health services, health education .......................................... Health Services, (425) 961-5564, health@tlc.edu International student programs ............................................ Dean of Students, (425) 961-5563, hekkel@tlc.edu Intramurals, physical fitness opportunities ................................................................... Student Services, (425) 961-5561, weswig@tlc.edu Student services and activities ................................................ Dean of Students, (425) 961-5563, hekkel@tlc.edu Transcripts, schedules, and registration .............................. Registrar, (425) 961-5513, registrar@tlc.edu Work-study opportunities, student employment, job options .......................................................... Financial Aid, (800) 843-5659, fin_aid@tlc.edu Worship services and spiritual life at Trinity ................................................................... Worship Advisor, (425) 961-5539, gravrock@tlc.edu

This catalog is not a contract, but rather an informational guide for the convenience of students. While every effort is made to provide accurate and up-to-date information at the time of publication, the college reserves the right to change, without notice, statements in this catalog concerning policies, academic offerings and calendars, rules of conduct, and tuition and fees. Changes go into effect whenever the proper authorities so determine and apply not only to prospective students, but also to those who at that time are matriculated in the college. The college reserves the right to discontinue courses at any time. Students are expected to confer with their academic advisors for precise information concerning academic programs. Advising by anyone, whether authorized or otherwise, inconsistent with published statements is not binding. Final responsibility for meeting academic and graduation requirements rests with each individual student. Trinity Lutheran College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, or gender in its admission policies, educational, employment, or student financial aid programs. Veterans: Information contained in this publication is hereby certified as true and correct in content and policy as of the date of publication, in compliance with the Veterans Administration DVB Circular 20-76-84 and Public Law 94-502. Trinity Lutheran College is in compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. See Student Records Policy on page 38.


2005-2006 Academic Calendar Fall Quarter: Residence Halls Open, New Students ......................................................................... Sept 11 Residence Halls Open, Returning Students ............................................................. Sept 12 Advising & Orientation ...................................................................................................... Sept 12 – 13 Opening Convocation ....................................................................................................... Sept 14 Fall Quarter Classes Begin ................................................................................................ Sept 14 Drop/Add Period Ends2....................................................................................................... Sept 22 Mid-Quarter 3............................................................................................................................ Oct 19 Winter Quarter Registration ........................................................................................... Oct 31 – Nov 4 Rehearsal & Study Day 1....................................................................................................... Nov 11 Fall Quarter Ends .................................................................................................................. Nov 23 Thanksgiving Break 1............................................................................................................ Nov 24 – 25 Discovery Module Begins ................................................................................................. Nov 28 Advent Festival Concerts ................................................................................................. Dec 2 – 4 Discovery Module Ends ..................................................................................................... Dec 9 Christmas Break 1................................................................................................................... Dec 12 – Jan 2

Winter Quarter: Residence Halls Open ......................................................................................................... Jan 3 Winter Quarter Classes Begin ......................................................................................... Jan 4 Drop/Add Period Ends 2....................................................................................................... Jan 12 Martin Luther King Day 1..................................................................................................... Jan 16 Mid-Quarter 3 .................................................................................................................... Feb 8 Presidents Day 1 .................................................................................................................... Feb 20 Spring Quarter Registration ........................................................................................... Feb 21 – 24 Rehearsal & Study Day 1....................................................................................................... Mar 3 Winter Quarter Ends .......................................................................................................... Mar 17 1 Spring Break .................................................................................................................... Mar 20 – 24

Spring Quarter: Residence Halls Open ......................................................................................................... Mar 26 Spring Quarter Classes Begin ......................................................................................... Mar 27 Drop/Add Period Ends 2....................................................................................................... Apr 4 Awards Chapel ..................................................................................................................... Apr 21 Mid-Quarter 3 ..................................................................................................................... Apr 28 Honors Chapel ..................................................................................................................... May 19 Fall Quarter Registration .................................................................................................. May 22 – 26 Memorial Day 1 ..................................................................................................................... May 29 Spring Quarter Ends ........................................................................................................... June 2 Baccalaureate ..................................................................................................................... June 2 Commencement .................................................................................................................. June 3

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No classes Last day to add classes; last day to withdraw from classes with no record on transcript Final day for withdrawal from classes without academic penalty; final day to change classes taking for credit to audit


President’s Welcome Do you want to acquire the values, knowledge and skills that will enable you to make a real difference in the world? At Trinity we believe you do. And, a Trinity education will prepare you to do that, and more. Beginning with the study of Scripture, you will learn what it means to be a life-long follower of Jesus. You will acquire Christ-centered leadership skills that will prepare you to make a significant difference in the lives of individuals, families and organizations wherever you live. How does a Trinity education prepare you to make a real difference in the world? First, at Trinity, emphasis is placed on acquiring Christian values and faith. Second, at Trinity our academic process keeps you actively engaged as a learner in our distinctive academic majors. Third, Trinity’s faculty are more than academic advisors. They are unparalleled mentors, interested in the personal growth and success of each student. Finally, opportunities to acquire and use leadership skills abound. Whatever your vocational aspirations as a Christian, whether they are in church-related ministries, social services, education, or a business enterprise, a Trinity education will prepare you as a follower of Jesus to make a profound difference in the world. Education at Trinity is a spiritual thing, a life-transforming thing. I invite you to experience it.

John M. Stamm, Ph.D. President

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Mission

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Mission “Trinity Lutheran College, through biblically-centered education, develops Christian leaders with a global perspective whose lives and ministry serve Jesus Christ in church and society.”

Heritage

wider fellowship of God’s people. Trinity is not affiliated with any single Lutheran denomination. As an independent college of the Lutheran heritage, our commitment is to uphold that tradition while seeking close partnership in ministry with all Christian churches.

The Lutheran Bible Institution of Seattle (LBIS) was founded in 1944, with roots that lie in a wider movement, which began in the United States in the early 20th Century among some Lutheran denominations. We are historically linked as well to a variety of European and Protestant Bible teaching institutions which grew out of the church renewal movements on the European continent and in Great Britain during the preceding two centuries, movements which sought to offer systematic, in-depth study of Scripture to lay persons in the historic Reformation tradition. In a real sense, we are rooted in the 2,000-year long tradition of the church, which, over and again, sought to form the life of God’s people in the light of biblical scholarship and devotion.

Servanthood Servanthood is a way of life and education at Trinity Lutheran College. Its faculty, staff, and students offer their talents and resources to congregations and community service organizations, especially in the Pacific Northwest. The faculty and staff offer a variety of outreach forums. Students participate in the Service Learning Practicum program whereby thousands of hours of community service work are performed. The campus facilities are frequently used by guests at conferences and retreats. At this college, learning and serving go hand in hand in the task of preparing effective disciples for a life of Christ-centered service.

Commitments

Distinctiveness Trinity Lutheran College emphasizes two disciplines for all students: biblical studies and general studies. Biblical studies have always been at the heartbeat of our education. Our Lutheran heritage teaches us the centrality of God’s Word. Each student is required to take a significant amount of biblical studies courses. “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of Wisdom,” says the proverb. That “fear” or respect and appreciation is learned through study of the Word. If students are to be properly educated to be Christian leaders, they must have a sound knowledge of the Bible. General studies are also required to educate students about important disciplines of life. These courses satisfy accreditation requirements, but more than that, they serve the requirements of students who must interact meaningfully and knowledgeably with their world. By concentrating on biblical and general studies, Trinity Lutheran College provides a sound educational platform for life and service.

Faith Tradition The Lutheran expression of the Christian faith emphasizes God’s grace in the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The Word and the Sacraments are the means of grace by which God’s love reaches people today. The gift of faith through the means of grace makes people right with God and empowers them as inheritors of eternal life. Trinity Lutheran College accepts and acknowledges the Canonical Books of the Old and New Testaments as the revealed Word of God. The college acknowledges the three ecumenical creeds of the Trinitarian Christian tradition: The Apostles’ Creed, the Nicene Creed, and the Athanasian Creed. Church Trinity is a servant to the church. The college is committed to its Lutheran heritage and participates in God’s mission in close fellowship with congregations, diverse Lutheran denominations, and the

Character and Values

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In addition, this college also requires students to be exposed to multicultural issues by taking courses that relate to local and global evangelism and missions. This is a singular emphasis among Lutheran colleges. The Service Learning Practicum program is a distinctive program at the college. Other institutions of higher education have recently emphasized “service learning,” while this college has been performing such service for decades. Each quarter, full-time students participate in an on-campus or off-campus service ministry that is supervised by faculty and community professionals. Thousands of hours are donated each year to the surrounding community. This is Christian education at its most visible and tangible. Integrity As a Christian college, the highest ethical and moral standards are upheld in teaching, scholarship, service, and treatment of constituents, employees, students, and accrediting agencies. “Whatever you wish that persons would do to you, do so to them.” (Matt. 7:12; Luke 6:31)

Accreditation Trinity Lutheran College is accredited by the Commission on Colleges and Universities of the Northwest Association of Schools and of Colleges and Universities, one of six regional associations in the United States that accredits schools and colleges. NASCU is recognized by the United States Secretary of Education. This means that Trinity credits are transferable on the same basis as other private and public colleges and universities throughout the United States and are regarded as meeting the standards expected of post-secondary education.

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Academic Partnerships Affiliated Learning Partners Trinity Lutheran College is a member of the Affiliated Learning Partners that exists as a consortium of higher education institutions including Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minnesota; Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, Berkeley, California; Concordia University, Portland, Oregon; and Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Washington. This consortium acts as the institutional arm of LENS (Lutheran Educational Network and Support), which provides enrichment, collegiate, and graduate Lutheran education in the Pacific Northwest. Pacific Association for Theological Studies Trinity is also a member of the Pacific Association for Theological Studies, which is a Seattle-based ministry that links “churches and academic institutions in creative partnerships focused on discerning local needs, creating relevant programs, developing appropriate resources, promoting theological formation, and providing a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional educational opportunities for the grassroots Christian community.” Lutheran Educational Conference of North America (LECNA) Trinity Lutheran College is a member of the Lutheran Educational Conference of North America (LECNA). LECNA, which was formed in 1910, is the oldest existing inter-Lutheran organization in the United States and Canada. Its purpose is to encourage, assist, and promote cooperation among Lutheran colleges and universities in the United States and Canada.


Community Life

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Community Life Campus Location and Facilities In January 1979, Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle moved from its home in North Seattle to the present facility, located 18 miles east of downtown Seattle near Issaquah, Washington. The present campus is set on the crown of a lushly forested ridge overlooking a large lake and just a half-hour drive from the Cascade Mountain ski resorts. Seattle, the “Emerald City,” boasts some of the tallest skyscrapers west of the Mississippi. This jewel of the Evergreen State is a cosmopolitan city of many facets. It is the crossroads of commerce with Asia and the gateway to Alaska. Second only to New York in live theater, it is rich in opportunities for cultural development and entertainment. Continually rated as one of America’s most livable cities, Seattle and its surrounding area were appraised by Rand McNally as America’s number one best vacation spot. Like any major community, however, it also needs ministry and is a venue in which classroom theories are worked out in real life. For those who prefer glistening icy pinnacles to glittering crystal towers, the mountains inspire spiritual retreats and winter fun. Rising well over two miles into the sky, the volcanoes of the Cascades point like marble cathedrals toward the heavens. Mt. St. Helens and her sleeping grandfather, Mt. Rainier, are two famous names among five equally majestic volcanic peaks. Fishing, skiing, snowshoeing, and hiking abound. In the winter, it is a wilderness of pristine Arctic splendor; and in the summer, the music of innumerable cascading streams, for which the mountains are named, flows over hillsides painted orange and red by the leaves of Indian paintbrush. It is at this crossroads of wilderness trails and urban boulevards that the Trinity campus lies. Ten interconnected buildings make up our campus facilities, which include spacious classrooms, a food service wing with three dining rooms, student lounges, large auditoriums with stages, conference rooms, a residence hall, a bookstore, and a library. At the center of the campus stands the magnificent chapel with 14 stained-glass windows created in Chartres, France, by the internationally recognized master of stained glass, Gabriel Loire. The triangular windows are 33 feet high and 14 feet wide at their base. The magnitude of the windows and the effect of sun shining through the multicolored glass create a feeling of tranquility mixed with awe. Part of the Trinity commitment to its students is a concern for their health. So, in addition to its other facilities, the campus has recreation areas that include a full-court gym; outdoor basketball, tennis, and sand volleyball courts; a soccer field; an indoor

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swimming pool; a fitness center; YMCA; and a large recreation room with ping-pong, pool, and foosball tables. To reach the campus, take Exit 17 from Interstate Highway 90 at Issaquah (18 miles east of Seattle). Proceed north on East Lake Sammamish Road for two miles and turn right onto SE 43rd Way. Proceed uphill for approximately one mile and turn left onto the campus.

Community Life Goals Each member of the community is expected to come ready to be educated, trained, equipped, and nurtured in the Word of God. Our goal is to assist students in integrating the biblical knowledge they gain in class into their personal lives and their ministry to the world. We believe the Bible establishes basic values and guidelines to help develop Christian character and establish a Christian lifestyle. We desire to demonstrate equally the forgiving grace of God and God’s standards of life for a Christian community.

Community Life Opportunities Associated Student Body Every student who is registered at Trinity is a member of the Associated Student Body (ASB). Members of the ASB elect student officers who represent student opinions in decision-making and action. The Student Council is made up of executive officers plus the chairpersons of each student Commission (Worship, Activities, Stewardship, Yearbook and Global Concerns), and intramural sports, on-campus, off-campus and international student representatives. The Commissions plan and facilitate various events such as worship, social events, recycling, and special emphasis weeks.


Worship Trinity is committed to the spiritual growth of each student. In order to facilitate spiritual growth, both individually and corporately, each member of the community is encouraged to worship regularly at chapel services Monday through Friday. Weekly times of Prayer and Praise are also scheduled. Each person is encouraged to worship regularly with and participate in a local congregation. One church meets on our campus each Sunday and is available for those who do not have transportation. Service Learning Practicum God calls every Christian to a lifestyle of service. Since its beginning, Trinity has affirmed that call by providing opportunities for students to discover their spiritual gifts and talents and to learn to use them for the sake of others. Because Jesus came to serve, not to be served, servanthood is taught and practiced as a way of life. Full-time students are required to participate in the Service Learning Practicum. Students volunteer two to four hours of public service each week in a variety of places, serving people who have a variety of needs. Sites of service include churches, the King County Detention Center, hospice homes, long-term care centers for elderly, tutor centers, urban mission agencies, youth centers, preschools, and more. Faculty members are involved as advisors and fellow servants. Intramural Sports Various intramural sports are offered at the indoor and outdoor facilities. Popular activities have included roller hockey, volleyball, basketball, flag football, and soccer. All activities in the intramural recreation program are initiated and organized by students under the supervision of the Student Services Assistant and Intramural Sports Representative.

Community Life Services Food Service Trinity operates its own food service. Twenty meals a week are available to each boarding student (three meals Monday through Saturday, two meals on Sunday). All residents of Cascade Hall must be boarding students; vegetarian entrees are provided. Commuters may purchase individual meals at a nominal fee. The cafeteria is closed during Thanksgiving, Christmas, Spring and Easter breaks, and the Spring Retreat. See the Student Handbook for details on schedules and further policies.

Health Services Trinity provides a Wellness Center with a parttime registered nurse who administers first aid, preventative treatment, medical advice and referrals to local physicians. Students are expected to supply medications they normally use (i.e., antacids, cold medicines, band-aids, antiseptics, etc.) Trinity requires international students and encourages domestic students to be enrolled in a medical insurance plan prior to arrival. Trinity does not provide student medical insurance. This is the responsibility of the student. For information on medical insurance plans, contact the Wellness Center. The center monitors immunization records, which must be submitted after a student is accepted. All immunizations must be up to date before registration, including a tuberculosis skin test within the last year, two measles vaccinations, one mumps and rubella vaccination (or documentation of immunity), and a tetanus-diphtheria booster within the last 10 years. The center provides educational programs regarding alcohol/drugs, AIDS, nutrition, CPR training, etc., and arranges for periodic donations to the local blood bank. Counseling Counseling services are available on campus through Presbyterian Counseling Services three days a week. There is a $10 fee per student visit.

Residence Life Residence Hall Living: Trinity provides private, furnished rooms for every full-time student. Living within the Trinity community in the residence halls is an integral part of the educational experience. Therefore, all single students under 21 years of age in their first year of college are required to live in the residence halls unless they live at home with a parent or guardian. The standard requirement for a student to qualify for residence housing is enrollment and attendance of no less than nine credit hours at Trinity. Men’s and Women’s Residence Hall: Men and women live on separate residence hall floors. Intervisitation hours are established by recommendation of the student body and approved by the Community Life Committee.

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Married Student Housing: A limited number of double occupancy rooms are available in the Pacific Wing (P-Wing) for married students on a priority basis. Because there are not adequate cooking facilities, all residents in the Pacific Wing are encouraged to participate in the board plan. Family Housing: A limited number of family apartments for full-time students with children are available on campus on a priority basis. There are adequate cooking facilities in each apartment, but participation in the board plan is also an option. Non-Traditional Student Housing: Students 25 years or older may request to live in the Pacific Wing and will be considered on a priority basis. Resident Director & Assistants: A Resident Director lives on campus, has responsibility for the security and well-being of the residents and is on call for emergencies. Student Resident Assistants are selected to serve as liaisons and facilitators within the residence units. Residence Hall Hours: For security purposes and because a rested body and mind are most conducive for learning, we expect students to comply with residence hall rules and regulations. Quiet hours are established out of respect and consideration for neighbors. Laundry Facilities: Each floor in the residence hall has a laundry room equipped with a cardoperated automatic washer and dryer, as well as an ironing board and iron. Mail Services: Mailboxes are provided in the Student Center for each student. Stamps and US mail services are available for purchase at the Reception Desk. Outgoing mail is delivered to the Issaquah post office each afternoon. The mailing address is: 4221 - 228th Ave. SE, Issaquah, WA 980299299. Field Quarter Housing: Students who will be gone from campus during the fall, winter, or spring Quarters for Field Experience may retain their rooms on a space-available basis. Housing During Breaks: Residence halls are open during Thanksgiving, but no meals are served. Limited housing is available during Christmas and Spring breaks for students who apply and pay the additional $12 per night cost for this option. There

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will be no food service during these breaks. The campus is also closed during the Spring Retreat. Summer Housing: Summer housing is available for those students employed by the college. For other returning students, housing is available for rent.

Commuter Students Trinity strives to be a community of learners who help each other grow through academic study and personal interaction. A significant number of our students live off campus, and it is important that these students be an integral part of the life of the community. Commuter students will benefit more from their education if they maintain a level of personal and spiritual interaction with the faculty and on-campus students, in addition to time spent in the classroom.

Security Although security coverage is provided, there is no foolproof way of preventing loss of property through theft or vandalism. Therefore it is imperative that all members of the Trinity community contribute by being alert to the safety and security of the campus, and promptly reporting any suspicious circumstances to the Security Staff or Residence Life Staff. Trinity is not responsible for personal property, including vehicles and bikes parked on campus. Items found on the campus will be kept in lost and found in the Housekeeping Office. Unclaimed items will be disposed of after 30 days.

Transportation On the residence hall opening day of each quarter, Trinity will provide transportation from the airport, train and bus depots for a $10 charge. At the close of each quarter, arrangements may also be made for transportation. Contact Student Services at 425-961-5563 one week in advance for travel arrangements. Metro bus service comes by the college in the morning and evening, with connections to Bellevue and Seattle.

Responsibilities and Policies Trinity believes the Bible gives guidance for Christian living. Therefore, we believe that as Christians we are called to live a distinctive life-style in this world, characterized by love and respect for others. Recognizing that the Scriptures do not provide specifics regarding all social practices, they do, nonetheless, advocate self-control in that which is harmful or offensive to others. Therefore, policies for


conduct that contribute to the goals of the college and encourage harmonious and effective community living have been adopted. These policies have been established by the Community Life Committee composed of representation from the faculty, staff and students and are outlined in detail in the Student Handbook. Some specific policies include: Firearms and Explosives: The possession of firearms, ammunition, fireworks, gun look-a-likes, or any other lethal or dangerous devices is prohibited on campus. Tobacco: The use of tobacco in any form is not allowed within any of the campus facilities. Alcohol and Drugs: The use of alcoholic beverages is prohibited on the Trinity campus. Washington State Law prohibits the use of alcohol by persons under 21 years of age, or making alcohol available to persons under 21 years of age. Students breaking the law or abusing the use of alcohol will be subject to disciplinary action. The use of unlawful and hallucinogenic drugs is not permitted on or off campus and will also be subject to disciplinary action. The Student Services staff provides educational programming on the issues. Dress Code: The primary guideline regarding dress is that our outward appearance reflects our inward commitment to Jesus Christ. Clean, neat clothes and shoes are expected in the classroom, dining hall, and public areas of the building. Vehicles and Parking: Students are permitted to keep vehicles (cars, motorcycles, bicycles) that are in operating condition on campus. Vehicles must be properly insured and licensed. Each vehicle must be registered at the Student Accounts Office. Trinity is not responsible for damage or theft of any vehicles. Sexual Misconduct/Harassment: Human sexuality is presented in the Bible as a good and gracious part of God’s creation. Members of our community have the right to work, study, and communicate with each other in an atmosphere free from unsolicited and unwelcome communication of a sexual nature. Trinity will take action to prevent and eliminate inappropriate behaviors of this nature. Individuals who engage in this behavior may be subject to disciplinary action, as well as criminal and/or civil prosecution. Students who believe they have been the subject of any sexual harassment or

who have concerns about the appropriateness of the behavior of a student or employee should report the alleged act immediately to a Resident Assistant, Director of Residence Life, Director of Health Services, Dean of Students, or Security personnel. Discipline: We seek to encourage students in their Christian growth and maturity, realizing a Christian is responsible to God, and to those given the responsibility of leadership under God, and to their community. It is the intention of Trinity to resolve violations of established policies in a way that will maintain respect for each person with a redemptive concern. We all share the responsibility for fulfilling and maintaining the community and lifestyle expectations. From a biblical perspective, all discipline is redemptive in nature, seeking to reconcile the individual to God and to his/her neighbor. To accomplish this, Trinity attempts to model the biblical ideal of redemptive discipline as outlined in Matthew 18:15-18. Students are encouraged to be accountable to and for each other. Should any dispute require further clarification and resolution, the Resident Assistant becomes involved, then the Resident Director. The next step involves the Dean of Students. In rare incidents the Judicial Board may intervene. Ultimately, the student has a right to appeal to the President of the college, whose decision is final. Student Life Covenant: Recognizing that the mission of Trinity is to develop Christian leaders with a global perspective whose lives and ministry serve Jesus Christ, the Dean of Students and the Academic Dean, on behalf of the college, covenant with each student before God to give guidance and support in learning and growing. Each student is invited to covenant with Trinity to let God’s Word minister to him/her through faithful attendance in classes and worship, caring for others by action and service, and taking responsibility for his/her conduct. The covenant agreement is included in the acceptance materials.

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Traditions and Special Events Opening Convocation: Opening Convocation is the celebrative worship service opening the academic year each fall. Students together with their families and friends are invited to participate in this special event. Discipleship Week: Discipleship Week is scheduled for one week every Fall Quarter. This is a time to focus on the call to Christian discipleship through special chapel speakers, worship services, and servant events. Mud Bowl: Mud bowl is a flag football game in Mid-October. Alumni, current students, faculty and staff divide into two teams: Washington vs. The World. The office of Alumni Relations sponsors a large tailgate party which includes members of the Board of Trustees. Advent Festival Concerts: Advent concerts, usually held the first weekend in December, are a highlight of the Advent and Christmas seasons. Additional choir concerts are held throughout the academic year. Friends and alumni also attend these inspiring concerts. Mission Emphasis Week: Mission Emphasis Week is the Winter Quarter special focus week. During this week the community is exposed to global needs and opportunities for service through guest speakers, seminars, and an opportunity fair, featuring summer, short-term, and long-term vocational mission opportunities. World Awareness Week: World Awareness Week is the Spring Quarter week set aside for special speakers to examine a facet of world affairs. A student-faculty committee selects the topics. Speakers are invited from around the United States and are often sponsored by the Staley Lecture Foundation. Awards Chapel: Awards Chapel is a special event on a Friday in April when students come forward to receive scholarship awards and financial grants for the following academic year.

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Parent Weekend: Parent Weekend is held each Spring Quarter. Parents come to campus to spend time with their child, attend classes, tour the campus, visit with faculty and staff and much more. The weekend is wrapped around the annual theater arts event Playfest. Trinity Art Exhibition: During Spring Quarter, alumni, faculty, staff and current students submit personal art work to be displayed. Photography, sculpture, painting and various other mediums of visual art are presented. Playfest: An ever-changing theater event involving students and other members of the Trinity community, is held on campus each winter or spring quarter. Spring Retreat: The Spring Retreat is held every Spring Quarter. The entire Trinity community goes for a weekend to a local camp for a time of worship, relaxation, recreation and fellowship. Honors Convocation: Honors Convocation is a special chapel service in Spring Quarter when students are honored for their contribution to the Trinity community and for their academic achievements. Next year’s student leaders are presented at this time. Baccalaureate: Baccalaureate is a worship service held the evening before commencement as a closing worship of the academic year. Parents, friends, and the community are invited. Commencement: Commencement is a timehonored ceremony that recognizes and honors the completion of the graduates’ academic work and service.


Admission

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Admission Eligibility Applicants for admission to Trinity Lutheran College must have one of the following: • High school diploma • High school diploma equivalent (G.E.D.) Applicants are encouraged to have completed the following studies in high school: • Three years of English • Two years of science or mathematics • Two years of history • One year of a foreign language Trinity does not discriminate with regard to race, color, national origin, age, gender, or handicap.

Application/Matriculation Procedures To apply as a full-time student or part-time student working toward a degree or certificate, request an application packet from the Office of Admission, and follow these procedures: 1. Submit your completed Application and $30.00 Application Fee (made payable to Trinity Lutheran College) to: Office of Admission, Trinity Lutheran College, 4221 228th Ave SE, Issaquah, WA 98029-9299. The application fee will be waived if your application is received by January 1 for Fall quarter. An application form can be found on XX-XX of this catalog or you may apply online at www.tlc.edu. 2. Based on the information you provide in your completed application, we will request your high school academic records and send refer ence forms to the people you specify. As a courtesy to these people, you may wish to talk with your references and request permission to use their names. Transfer students must list all colleges previously attended and provide transcripts from those colleges. 3. We accept the ACT or SAT as a college entrance examination. Trinity code numbers for the tests are: SAT-4408, ACT-4453. Scores listed on an official high school transcript will be accepted. You do not need to submit scores if you are not required to submit a high school transcript. 4. An essay and/or campus interview is not required unless specifically requested. However, visits to the campus are strongly encouraged to provide you with valuable information with which to make your college decision.

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5. You may generally expect notification of your admission decision by mail within 10 days of the time we receive all the appropriate materials. The Admission Committee carefully considers the student’s academic performance, test scores, recommendations, as well as school, church, and community involvement. Application for Certificate of Professional Studies Students applying for the one-year postgraduate certificate (CPS) follow a two-part application process. 1. Complete the process listed above for entrance to the college. 2. Submit an additional application for the Academic Department in which you desire to study. Application Timeline High school students may begin early application after they have finished their junior year (see “Notice of Admission”). Students applying for Fall Quarter are encouraged to complete application by January 31. Application deadlines are as follows: Fall Quarter August 15 Winter Quarter December 1 Spring Quarter March 1 Application is possible after these dates with an additional $25 late fee. Non-Matriculated Part-time Students Part-time students who are not working toward a degree or certificate may simply register for courses by mail or in person. Call the Registrar to make an appointment to register and make payment, or request a part-time registration packet. When part-time students have completed six credits, they must either: 1. Declare a “non-degree” status with the Office of the Registrar if they are attending Trinity for personal enrichment and are not pursuing a certificate or degree, or 2. Matriculate by completing the application procedures listed above if they plan on working toward a degree or certificate. Re-Admission of Former Students Students who officially withdrew and are returning after an absence of less than two years may simply complete an “Application for Readmission.” They must also submit official transcripts from colleges attended during the absence from Trinity.


After an absence of two academic years or unofficial withdrawal, students must reapply, following the regular Application Procedures. A student who was dismissed for academic reasons must present sufficient college-level coursework from an accredited institution or other evidence that demonstrates ability to achieve the minimum 2.00 cumulative GPA required to remain in good academic standing. A student who was dismissed for any other reason must show evidence indicating that the circumstance that led to disqualification has been resolved in order to be eligible for re-admission. Re-admitted students must satisfy the requirements of the current catalog. See “Change in Catalogs” on page 38. International Student Admission Procedures Trinity welcomes students from other countries into our college programs and is authorized by federal law to enroll non-immigrants. To meet minimum requirements, an applicant must: Be 17 years of age Have graduated from high school (or equivalent) • Score 197 or higher on the computer-based TOEFL (525 paper-based). To submit an official TOEFL score, use institution code 4408. Registra tion materials for the examination are available from TOEFL Services:

• •

TOEFL Services P.O. Box 6151 Princeton, NJ 08541-6151 Phone: (609) 771-7500 FAX: (609) 771-7500 http://www.toefl.org Application Process for International Students To be considered for admission, international applicants must submit the following: 1. International Student Application for Admission 2. Reasons for applying: On separate paper, describe (in 200 words or less) your reasons for desiring to attend Trinity. Attach to the Application Form. 3. A $30.00 non-refundable application fee in US funds, payable to Trinity Lutheran College. 4. Official transcripts with certified English translations must be sent from high schools and all previously attended colleges. 5. Two recommendations from persons who are not related to you. The application packet contains the forms to be used. One reference must be from a pastor, the other from a teacher or advisor.

6. Official documentation of financial resources 7. Official TOEFL score, if English is not the native language. See above for specific program language requirements. 8. Upon acceptance for admission to the college, 40 percent payment of tuition for the first quarter is required. All application components must be written in, or translated into, English. Applications will not be processed without receipt of US $30 application fee.

Notice of Admission to Students Applicants will be notified of the Admission decision by mail. Early applicants for Fall Quarter of the next academic year will be notified after October Accepted students are required to submit the following to the Office of Admission: 1. An advance payment of $200 to indicate intent to enroll. Payment is encouraged to be made prior to May 1, the National Date of Declaration, for all students admitted to Trinity for Fall Quarter. For students admitted after April 15, payment is due within two weeks from the date of acceptance to Trinity. The recommended dates for advance payment for the other quarters are: October 1 for Winter Quarter and January 1 for Spring Quarter. This amount will be credited to the student’s account for the first quarter of enrollment. It is non-refundable after the application deadlines listed previously. 2. A completed On-Campus Housing Application which is submitted with a $75 room damage and key deposit if the student plans to live on campus. A student cannot move into the residence hall until these are received. 3. A signed Student Life Covenant. This indicates that a student understands and has agreed to abide by the policies of Trinity. 4. A completed Medical History Form. 5. International students are required to have health insurance while they are students at Trinity. This can be accomplished through the international student health insurance policy that is enclosed in the Acceptance Packet for international students or by securing international health insurance in their home country that meets or exceeds the coverage of the suggested policy. Deferred Admission Accepted applicants may request to defer admission to a later quarter. Application files are valid for two years following original acceptance. After two years, the student must reapply.

17


Registration

18


Registration Orientation All full-time students (both incoming and returning) are required to attend Orientation at the beginning of Fall Quarter. Part-time students are also encouraged to attend these days of Orientation. This period includes program orientation, registration, writing skills assessment, and an opportunity to become acquainted. Students who are entering Trinity during the Winter or Spring quarters attend orientation at the beginning of the quarter in which they enter. Full-time students who request late arrival for the quarter are advised that written approval from the Academic Dean and Dean of Students is required. In addition, the student accepts all responsibility for making up missed work and for any academic penalties associated with late arrival.

Registration Registration is complete when the proper forms have been filed with the Registrar and financial arrangements have been made. Because circumstances may alter Trinity’s ability to provide certain educational experiences, Trinity reserves the right to discontinue any course or program without prior notice. As a general rule, an enrollment of seven students is required to offer an elective course.

Late Fees Full-time continuing students registering after the day(s) specified for registration for each quarter are subject to a late registration fee of $100.

Changes in Registration Students may make changes in their registration during a specified Drop-Add Period at the beginning of each quarter or Discovery Module. After the official Drop-Add Period, courses may not be added. Students may change sections of a course by arrangement with the instructor and notification to the Registrar. Students dropping courses by midterm will receive grades of “D/P” (dropped-passing) or “D/F” (dropped-failing). After midterm, the grade for a dropped course will be “F.” Students are cautioned not to drop below 12 credits, the number required for maintaining financial aid.

Withdrawal from College Any student who wishes to leave Trinity in good standing before completing a program of studies must complete a withdrawal form and return it to the Registrar’s Office. Students who withdraw during the Drop-Add Period will have no record of the quarter on their transcripts. Students who withdraw after the DropAdd Period will show grades of “W” (withdrawn) for the quarter’s courses. It is important to formally withdraw from the college. When students do not formally withdraw, the grade of “F” is assigned for each course for which they are registered.

Definition of Student Status Matriculated: Students who have completed the admission process and have been accepted by Trinity. (All full-time students must matriculate.) Non-Matriculated: Students who have not completed the admission process. Full-Time (Degree): Matriculated students registered at Trinity for 12 or more quarter credits who have declared a degree program. Full-Time (Non-Degree): Matriculated students registered for twelve or more quarter credits that are not in a degree or certificate program. Nondegree students have no required courses, but must meet prerequisites. Note: Students must be full-time and be in a degree or certificate program to be eligible for federal financial aid. Students may take courses concurrently at Trinity and at another accredited institution, e.g., 10 credits at Trinity, 5.0 credits elsewhere. As long as the total number of credits is 9 or more, and the student is working toward a Trinity degree or certificate, he/she may live in the residence halls. Part-Time: Students registered for 11.5 credits or less, either degree or non-degree. May be matriculated or non-matriculated. Good Standing: Students currently meeting financial, academic standards, student life, and library obligations. Credit: Coursework is graded; transcript record; all coursework mandatory.

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Audit: No grades; transcript record; coursework optional, but 90% attendance mandatory. If attendance requirement is not met, a grade of UA (Unsatisfactory Audit) may, at the discretion of the instructor, be placed on student’s transcript. Audit hours may not be counted as part of the 12 credits needed for qualification as a full-time student. Academic Probation: The status of students whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00. See page 36. Disciplinary Probation: The status of students for whom a contract of disciplinary action has been written. See the Student Handbook for the policy.

Student Class Standing Freshman

0-44.5 earned credits; includes Trinity and transfer work accepted.

Sophomore

45.0-89.5 earned credits; includes Trinity and transfer work accepted.

Junior

90.0-134.5 earned credits; includes Trinity and transfer work accepted.

Senior

Minimum135 earned credits; includes Trinity and transfer work accepted.

Note: Senior status does not necessarily ensure graduation with that class.

Program Declaration 1.

2.

At or prior to registration, all matriculated students must file a Program Declaration Form with the Registrar stating the program they wish to pursue (either Degree or Non-degree.) If Degree, then either Associate of Biblical Studies (ABS); Bachelor of Arts (BA); or Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) (post-bachelor). All BA students must select a major. After making this selection, the student shall: a. Immediately notify the Registrar b. Apply for acceptance into the major program through the Department Head during Fall Quarter of the sophomore year.

CPS candidates declare their program choice as a part of the admission process and prior to the beginning of classes. Their one-year program is formulated with their Academic Advisor, and filed with the Registrar. Students may elect to change majors at any time, but are cautioned to evaluate any additional courses or added time required.

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Transfer of Credits Trinity may accept up to 90 quarter credits (combined total) toward a BA degree and 45 quarter credits toward an ABS degree from a community college, junior college, or non-accredited institution. Service Learning Practicum and English Composition II may not be met by transfer. To convert semester to quarter credits: semester credits x 1.5 = quarter credits. Credits may be accepted from the sources outlined below. Accredited Institutions Credits from accredited institutions may be accepted for transfer to: 1) meet the general studies requirements for a BA, or 2) substitute for Trinity courses. A grade of “C-” or better is necessary for required courses, except for English Composition I, which requires a minimum grade of “C.” A grade of “D” may be accepted toward elective credit only if the cumulative GPA is 2.0 or better. Upper division credits (300-400 level) are accepted only from regionally accredited institutions. Non-accredited Institutions Trinity reserves the right not to accept credits from non-accredited institutions. Any credits accepted will be considered tentative until the student’s scholarship is validated by one quarter of full-time study at Trinity with a cumulative grade point average of 2.0 or better. The conditions for accredited institutions apply. Transfer of further credits from a non-accredited institution is not allowed after establishment of a Trinity record. Distance Learning (Online), Extension and/or Correspondence A maximum of 15 quarter credits (combined total) from distance learning (online), extension and/ or correspondence courses may transfer. Advanced Placement Credit Policy Students who have participated in College Board Advanced Placement Program® may be eligible for the awarding of Trinity credits. Students who wish to have their scores considered should request that the College Board send them directly to Trinity. Scores of three (3) or above may result in credit. The Registrar and Academic Dean, in consultation with the appropriate academic department, will determine which scores result in credit.


Students who have earned the International Baccalaureate Diploma may be awarded credit for Higher Level passes with scores of five (5) or higher. The Registrar and office of the Academic Dean, in consultation with the appropriate academic department, will determine the awarding of credit. CLEP Credits may be granted on the basis of performance in the College Level Examination Program (CLEP) in accordance with the American Council on Education (ACE) recommendations. A maximum of 15 quarter credits will be accepted toward General studies requirements. College Credit Recommendations Students presenting proof of having taken courses listed in the College Credit Recommendations listing, published by the Board of Regents of the University of the State of New York, may be granted credits in accordance with the recommendations, toward general studies requirements. A maximum of 15 quarter credits may be allowed. Prior Learning See page 38.

Official transcripts are $5 each. Rush service is available for additional $1 per address (if mailed to more than one address). Rush requests are processed upon receipt of request but not available during quarter openings and final grade postings. Unofficial transcripts are $3 each. Fax service is available (for unofficial transcripts only) at (first page/subsequent pages) local call - $1/$0.50, long distance call - $2/$1, and international call - $4/$2. (Make checks payable to Trinity Lutheran College; credit cards accepted. Please do not send cash in the mail.) Every effort is made to process transcript requests within five (5) working days. The official transcript, which is dated, stamped with the Registrar’s signature and with the college seal, is acceptable evidence of the student’s academic achievements and good standing with Trinity. Academic records are subject to the provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (see page 38 for the Student Records Policy). Send or fax transcript requests to: Office of the Registrar Trinity Lutheran College 4221 – 228th Ave. SE Issaquah, WA 98029

Transcript of Academic Record Transcript requests must be made in writing, bearing the student’s signature, to the Registrar’s Office, and will be honored when the student’s financial accounts are in good standing. Transcript Request Form can be downloaded from www.tlc.edu. If a form cannot be obtained, letter with the following information will be acceptable: full name (name while at Trinity, if different), current address and phone number, social security number, birth date, last quarter at Trinity, and name and address where transcript should be sent.

Fax: 425-392-0404 For more information, contact the Registrar at 425-961-5513 or send e-mail to registrar@tlc.edu.

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Tuition & Fees

22


Tuition & Fees 2005-2006 Academic Year Full-Time: 12 credit hours or more per quarter

Fall Qtr. & DM Winter Qtr. (13 weeks) (10 weeks)

Spring Qtr. (10 weeks)

ANNUAL TOTALS

Tuition Room & Board ASB/Activity Fee* Technology Fee***

$4,600 2,370 90 150

$3,525 1,765 55 0

$3,525 1,765 55 0

$11,650 5,900 200 150

TOTAL (On Campus) TOTAL (Off Campus)

$7210 $4840

$5345 $3,580

$5345 $3,580

$17,900 $12,000

($255 per credit hour will be charged for all credits over 17.0 per quarter)

Additional Fees

Part-time Students

The charges listed above do not include lab fees, personal expenses, textbooks, or the following miscellaneous fees:

Per credit hour Per audit hour Tuition $310.00 $220.00 ASB/Activity Fee* 7.00 6.00

Choir Fee (per quarter) $ 15.00 Application Fee 30.00 Late Application Fee 25.00 Late Registration Fee** 100.00 Graduation Fee 85.00 International Student Fee (per quarter) 100.00 Music Lessons (per course) 250.00

Note: The Board of Directors and Administration of Trinity Lutheran College reserve the right to change the tuition and fees at any time.

Any off-campus course activities fee will be arranged by the professor with the Business Office. * The ASB/Activity Fee is collected on behalf of the Associated Student Body. It helps to pay expenses for social events planned by the committee and the costs of the student Yearbook. ** Late Registration Fee: New and part-time students are charged if a student registers after the fifth day of the quarter. Continuing students are charged if a full-time continuing student registers after the scheduled quarterly registration period.

*** The Technology Fee is not a user fee. Rather, it is a fee to help build the technological infrastructure of the college, which aids and supports all students. This fee is non-refundable. All full time students will be assessed the yearly $150 fee in the quarter in which they begin at Trinity Lutheran College. Part-time students taking 6 credits or more will be charged $150 in the quarter in which they begin. Students taking 4-5 credits will be charged $50 per quarter. If the student takes 6 or more credits the following quarter, he/she will be charged $100 for that quarter. The maximum charge each year will be $150. Students taking 3 credits or less per quarter will not be affected by this fee. Audit students will be charged in the same manner as students taking class for credit.

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Payment Options Normally, students are expected to pay their tuition, fees, and room and board in full for the entire quarter by September 1 for Fall Quarter and by the first day of classes for both Winter and Spring Quarters. If not paid by the fifth business day of the quarter, a late payment penalty equal to 5% of the payment due will be assessed. Two payment plans are also available: Academic Management Service Payment Plan (AMS) This plan allows the student to pay college fees in 9 convenient monthly payments commencing in July of each year. The cost of the plan is $60, which includes Life Benefit Coverage. AMS reserves the right to adjust this fee at any time. Trinity Payment Plan This plan allows the student to pay for each quarter in three payments as shown below. There is a fee of $50 for each quarter this plan is used.

On-Campus

Off-Campus

$ 2,630 1,905 1,905 $6,440

$ 1,680 1,255 1,255 $4,190

Fall 2005 September 1 October 1 November 1 Total

$1,940 1,455 1,455 $4,850

$1,265 950 950 $3,165

Spring 2006

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Unpaid Accounts Students with unpaid accounts from any previous quarter will not be permitted to register for a new quarter until all amounts due are paid in full. Unpaid accounts will be charged interest at 1% per month on the balance due until paid. Student transcripts will not be released until all accounts are paid.

Senior Citizen Audit Discount As a courtesy, senior citizens (65 years of age or older) may audit one course per quarter for $100 on a space-available basis. Travel courses are not included in this policy.

Withdrawals & Refunds Any student who is contemplating withdrawal from college for any reason should first consult the Academic Dean. Refunds due will be provided to students if they have met all financial obligations to the college and have completed the withdrawal actions as follows: (1) obtain the Withdrawal Form from the Registrar’s Office and get the requisite signatures; (2) return the form with the Trinity Student ID card to the Business Office. Failure to follow this procedure will result in grades of “F” for all courses and will prevent any refunds from being made. Tuition Refunds for tuition will be made in the following manner:

Winter 2006 December 1 January 1 February 1 Total

Late Payment Penalties for Payment Plan Payments are due on the first day of each month. If not paid by the 5th of each month, a late penalty equal to 5% of the payment will be assessed. If the balance plus penalty is not received by the 30th of the month, the student will be subject to dismissal.

March 1 April 1 May 1 Total

$1,940 1,455 1,455 $4,850

$1,265 950 950 $3,165

Total

$16,140

$10,520

Days of Classes and Percent Refund 1-2 3-5 6-10 11-20 21-25 100% 90% 60% 40% 20%

26-50 0%

Room and Board Charges for board will be refunded at the rate of 90% of the pro rata charge. Room charges are refunded at a pro rata basis if the room can be used without financial loss to the school. Admission Advance Deposit Fall quarter not refundable after August 15 Winter quarter not refundable after December 10 Spring quarter not refundable after March 1. All refunded deposits will be charged a $35.00 processing fee.


Financial Aid

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Financial Aid Because friends of Trinity give generously, the tuition for students is below the national average for private colleges. In addition to this basic assistance, several special sources of financial aid are available, including need-based grants, merit scholarships, loans, and employment. Recognizing that many students who desire to attend would be unable to meet all expenses of enrollment from personal or family resources, Trinity is glad to provide assistance to eligible students. The financing of a college education is a partnership between students, their families, and Trinity Lutheran College. Need-based student financial aid is available for filling the gap between students’ potential resources and their allowable educational expenses. Potential resources are parent contribution, summer and academic year employment, savings, and assets. The amount of contribution expected from the parents is related to the family financial strength, net income, number of dependents, assets and allowable expenses, and indebtedness. Merit-based aid for academic achievement, leadership, and talent is available in the form of renewable scholarships. The quantity and composition of federally funded awards is based on demonstrated financial need. In addition to the actual tuition, room and board charges, the government allows the following amounts to be included in figuring a student’s need: books, $750; personal, $1,968; and transportation from $600 to $1,400, depending on distance between the student’s home and the campus.

Trinity Merit-based Scholarships for First Year and Transfer Students Trinity Lutheran College offers merit-based scholarships for new students. As a candidate for admission, you will automatically be considered for these awards upon acceptance to the college. To find out which scholarships you may be eligible for, contact the Admission Office. Bishop’s Scholarship: 50% of tuition per year. Awarded to new students from participating ELCA synods. Recipients must live on campus. (Automatically renews annually for up to 3 years if you maintain a 3.3 GPA.) President’s Scholarship: $7,000 to $10,000 per year, awarded to first year students only. Recipients must live on campus. (Automatically renews annually for up to three years if you maintain a 3.5 GPA.)

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Dean’s Scholarship: $2,500 per year. Recipients must live on campus. (Automatically renews annually for up to three years if you maintain a 3.5 GPA.) Academic Excellence: $1,750 - $2,250 per year. (Automatically renews annually for up to three years if you maintain a 3.3 GPA.) Academic Honors: $1,225–$1,725 per year. (Automatically renews annually for up to three years if you maintain a 3.3 GPA.) Academic Merit: $750–$1,200 per year. (Automatically renews annually for up to three years if you maintain a 3.3 GPA.) Trinity Talent Scholarships: $250–$2,500 per year. Awarded to new students who have outstanding talent in any of the following areas: · Music (instrumental or vocal), drama, art (visual, photography, graphic design), public speaking, writing, poetry, or videography Available for renewal for up to three years based on participation using talent throughout the academic year. To be considered for a talent scholarship: 1. Present a live audition, or submit a video audition or written/printed materials (copies only) to the Admission Office. 2. Include a letter of recommendation pertinent to your ability and experience. 3. For a music scholarship, submit a completed music scholarship application. For all other scholarships, submit a resume detailing your experience. Leadership Scholarships: $250–$1,000. Nonrenewable scholarships awarded to new students who have excelled in positions of leadership in their church, other church-related ministries, school and community. To be considered for a leadership scholarship: Your completed application will be reviewed with regard to significant involvement in school, church, and community activities.


Trinity Academic Scholarships for Continuing Students In April the college awards scholarships for continuing students based on academic and other criteria. Application is made in the form of an essay submitted to the Financial Aid Office in March of each academic year.

4. 5. 6.

Honors Scholarships: Awarded for superior academic achievement. Students must hold a cumulative GPA of 3.9 or higher to be eligible for consideration.

7.

8. Academic Scholarships: Awarded for commendable academic achievement. Students must hold a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher to be eligible for consideration. President’s Leadership Scholarship: Awarded to an eligible student who is a senior, with 45 credits at Trinity Lutheran College and a cumulative GPA of 3.5 or higher, whose involvement in the college community has made a difference. General Achievement Scholarships: Awarded to students based upon academic achievement and significant community involvement.

Eligibility for Need-Based Aid Financial need is largely determined by the analysis of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid Form (FAFSA), which must be filled out by students requesting assistance. A statement of financial condition, called the Student Aid Report (SAR), is generated. The FAFSA analysis determines an expected contribution for college expenses from the students and their parents. (Under certain circumstances of student independence, parents are not expected to have the responsibility of assisting their offspring.) “Financial Need” is defined as the difference between total student expenses for an academic year and the expected student/parent contribution, and is a primary factor in determining eligibility for most available financial aid. Students must be matriculated and in a declared degree or certificate program to be eligible for federal aid. Application Procedures 1. Fill out a FAFSA form. These forms are available from high school counselors or college financial aid offices. The Trinity code is 013525. 2. After carefully and thoroughly completing the FAFSA, mail it to the Federal Student Aid Programs in the envelope provided, or submit it electronicallyat www.fafsa.ed.gov. 3. As a result of the information received from the

FAFSA, (a) the U.S. Department of Education will evaluate your eligibility for a Pell Grant, and (b) a Student Aid Report (SAR) will be formulated and sent to you. If federal school code is used, Trinity will receive your SAR electronically. Fill out the Trinity Application for Financial Aid and return it to our Financial Aid Office. Wait for the Trinity Financial Aid Office to make a need analysis and to notify you. If you are offered a Financial Aid Package, you must confirm your award by signing it and returning it within the requested time to Trinity. Aid, with the exception of Federal Work Study (FWS) is credited to the student’s account. Onethird of the amount is disbursed each quarter.

Note: For the Fall Quarter, applications received by May 1 will be given preference. Applications received after that date will be considered on the basis of availability of remaining funds. It is necessary to make a new application for financial aid for each academic year.

Federally Sponsored Financial Aid The Pell Grant This program is designed to provide a foundation for a financial aid package for those individuals with a demonstrated financial need. It is compulsory that students of U.S. citizenship wanting financial aid of any type must first make an application for the Pell Grant and Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program. Guidelines are as follows: 1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Pell Grants are available to students who are attending an institution of higher education and who have yet to receive a bachelor’s degree. The duration of a student’s eligibility is the time required to complete the first undergraduate course of study being pursued by the student. Grants at Trinity will vary from $400 to $4050 for the academic year, dependent upon the award and circumstances of the student. A student must achieve satisfactory progress (a 2.0 GPA or better) to continue receiving a Pell Grant. Students who do not make satisfactory progress during a quarter, though given their Pell Grant award for that quarter, will not be given their award the next quarter until satisfactory progress is re-established. If satisfactory progress is not established before the end of the quarter, they will lose their award for that quarter. Application for the Pell Grant program is made by completing a FAFSA.

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Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant Program (SEOG) Guidelines 1, 2, 4, and 5 from the Pell Grant Program above apply to the SEOG program. The SEOG program differs from the PELL Grant program in the following ways: 1. Awards range between $200 and $4,000 per year and are awarded according to the demon strated need and availability of funds. 2. May 1 is the deadline for application for aid for the Fall Quarter. Applications received after that date will be considered on the basis of availabil ity of remaining funds.

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Unsubsidized loans (not need-based) are also available. PLUS Loan to Parents and Independent Undergraduates The government program of loans to parents for dependent undergraduate students began in 1981. Parents may borrow the cost of attendance minus other aid for any one student in any academic year. Repayment begins 60 days after disbursement. A first and second year independent undergraduate may borrow $4,000, and other independent undergraduates may borrow $5,000 in the unsubsidized Federal Stafford Loan Program.

Federal Work Study Program Guidelines 1, 2, 4, and 5 from the Pell Grant Program above apply to the FWS program. The FWS program differs from the Pell Grant program in the following ways: 1. Work studies are awarded according to the demonstrated need and availability of funds. 2. Earnings must be used for educationally related expenses. 3. For Fall Quarter enrollment, May 1 is the dead line. Applications received after this date will be considered on the basis of availability of remaining funds.

Veteran & Other Benefits Programs of study are approved by the Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board’s State Approving Agency (HECB/SAA) for enrollment of persons eligible to receive educational benefits under Title 38 and Title 10 USC. Upon admission to the college, a student may apply for benefits at the Regional Office of the Veteran’s Administration, Federal Building, 915 Second Ave., Seattle, WA 98174. Trinity is also approved for the benefits from Social Security, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Alaska.

Federal Family Education Loans Federal Stafford Student Loan Program The Stafford Student Loan Program provides financial assistance to students from loans made through banks, credit unions, savings and loan associations, and insurance companies. Applications for Federal Stafford Student Loans are available from Trinity and participating lending institutions. The guidelines are: 1. Students of U.S. citizenship or permanent residents attending at least half-time are eligible to receive these funds. 2. These funds must be used for educationally related expenses. 3. The federal government pays interest on subsidized loans during this period while the recipient is attending school. 4. Interest is variable for first-time borrowers with a 10-year maximum repayment period. A deferment for undergraduate loans may be obtained for graduate study. 5. The annual loan limits are $2,625 for both dependent and independent freshmen. Sophomores may borrow up to $3,500, and all others up to $5,500. $23,000 is the total amount that can be borrowed under this program.

Conditions of Awards and Assistance from Trinity 1. A student must be a citizen of the United States or on permanent visa to receive federal financial aid (Pell, SEOG, FWS, FFEL). Scholarships issued by Trinity Lutheran College, excluding federal assistance money, may be available to all students, foreign or citizen of the U.S. 2. The financial aid recipient is obligated to main tain reasonable academic progress at the college. At Trinity, satisfactory progress is a 2.0 GPA. Students who receive below a 2.0 GPA will be placed on academic probation. If the student is able to re-establish satisfactory progress before the end of the quarter or payment period, financial aid will be released to the student. 3. Before graduation or official withdrawal, stu dents are required to have an exit interview with the Financial Aid Office. 4. Students enrolled full-time must take 12 credit hours or more of instruction per quarter to qualify for a full Pell Grant. Three-quarter-time attendance (nine to eleven hours) will entitle students to three-quarters of the Pell. Half-time attendance (six to eight hours) will entitle students to half of the Pell.


5.

6.

7.

8.

Students must inform the Financial Aid Office of any changes in their financial circumstances that exceed $200. Students must also report receipt of other resources, such as scholarships, awards, and earnings from employment. Work-Study employment offers begin with the first quarter of enrollment. Continuance is subject to satisfactory job performance as determined by the employment supervisor. Aid may be awarded in the form of scholarships (based on merit), grants (based on need), loans, and/or employment. Most financial aid awards are a combination package of different forms of assistance: Pell Grants, Supplemental Educa tional Opportunity Grants (SEOG), Federal Family Education Loans, Federal Work Study, grants, and scholarships. In packaging a student award, the Financial Aid Office attempts to be sensitive to any unusual circumstances. At no time is the Financial Aid Office able to extend financial aid over and above the established need factor. This would be considered an “over award” and not allowed according to the Department of Education’s regulations. Trinity Scholarships will not be applied if a student withdraws during the first three weeks of the quarter. Students withdrawing after three weeks will receive a pro-rated scholarship and will have to pay any balance on their account. Outside scholarships (money from your church or other organizations) will not be refunded if necessary to cover the student’s balance on their statement.

Refunds & Repayment Policy Students who are receiving federal student aid (Title IV monies - Stafford Loans, SEOG, Pell Grants and PLUS) will receive refunds in accordance with federal regulations. Repayments of funds received from Title IV Financial Aid Programs may be necessary in instances where funds were received from an account after all charges were satisfied. Refunds and repayments to be returned to the Title IV program(s) are determined by the fraction set forth in section 668.22 of the Federal Register. Specific information regarding this policy is available from the Financial Aid Office and Student Accounts Office.

Equal Opportunity It is the policy of Trinity Lutheran College to provide equal opportunity for all qualified persons in full compliance with Washington State and federal laws. Trinity does not discriminate on the basis of physical handicap in the admission or recruitment of students. All student financial aid programs are free from discrimination as specified by federal law. The college does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, or gender in its educational, employment, and recruitment programs. The designated coordinator of services for handicapped persons is the Dean of Students. The Trinity physical plant is geared toward the physically handicapped with its wide elevators, automatic front doors, ramps, and several residence hall rooms that are able to accommodate a wheelchair.

Employment The Financial Aid Office can assist a student in finding a part-time job. Three options are available. If a student qualifies for financial aid, part of the aid package may come in the form of an on-campus “Work-Study” job. Non Work-Study jobs are also available on campus. The Financial Aid Office receives listings of job opportunities off campus as well. Check with the Financial Aid Office for all three options.

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Summary of Grant, Loan, and Employment Programs

Grants

Loans

Program

Eligibility

Pell Grant

• •

U.S. Citizen Undergraduate

Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant

• •

U.S. Citizen Undergraduate

Trinity Grants

• •

Full-time students Financial need demonstrated through need analysis

Thrivent

• •

International or U.S. citizenship Students insured by Thrivent

International Student Scholarships

International citizenship

Church Matching Grants

Full-time students

Youth Encounter Alumni Grant

Full-time students

World Mission Prayer League Awards

WMPL Candidates

Federal Stafford Loan

• •

U.S. Citizenship At least half-time

Federal Work Study

• • •

At least half-time U.S. Citizen Students with the greatest need and skills consistent with job requirements

Non-Work Study

Any enrolled student

*Consumer Information can be found in the Financial Aid Office

Employment

Other Options

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Trinity qualifies as a recipient for funds from the G.I. Bill, Veterans Administration, Social Security and Vocational Rehabilitation, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Alaska.


Amount Available

Repayment

Special Conditions

Up to $4,050 per year

None

Students apply by filling out the FAFSA

$200–4,000 per year

None

For students with a high documented need

Up to $2,000 per year

None

FAFSA and Trinity Financial Aid Application must be on file

$200–1,000 per year

None

Students must have a Trinity Financial Aid Application on file

Varies

None

International Student Committee makes award based on need

Up to $500

None

Trinity will match church grants dollar for dollar to $500/year

One time $500 grant

None

Alumni of Youth Encounter

Varies

None

Approval by WMPL

For dependent or independent undergraduates: $2,625 for 1st year $3,500 for 2nd year $5,500 for others Additional $4,000 available per year unsubsidized for independent students

Payments begin six months after leaving post secondary education

Student selects own lending agency (i.e., bank, credit union, or savings and loan).

Depends on “Need Factor” and funds available Depends on job (most students work 10–20 hours per week)

None

Job assignments available on campus only through the Financial Aid Office

As outlined in “Employment” on page 31

None

Job assignments available on and off campus through the Financial Aid Office

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Academic Information

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Academic Information Academic Calendar The academic calendar, following the quarter system, provides for three quarters (Fall, Winter and Spring) of ten weeks each. Fall Quarter is followed by an additional two-week Discovery Module. Each credit represents ten class sessions of fifty minutes. Assignments are designed to require approximately two hours of preparation for each hour in class.

Academic Standards Trinity Lutheran College exists to educate leaders for Christ-centered service. In order to achieve this goal, faculty have been selected based upon their academic and experiential excellence. The academic programs are designed to deliver a high quality education. Each course is taught on the level appropriate to the student level, and standards of student achievement are high. Students are therefore expected to study diligently and apply themselves to their coursework responsibly. The office of the Academic Dean is charged with the administration of the academic program and, in conjunction with the Academic Committee, has jurisdiction over all questions pertaining to the academic division of the college. The Academic Committee has immediate jurisdiction over all questions pertaining to scholarship and is responsible to the faculty for maintenance of the academic standards of the college.

All Trinity advisors act as mentors for students. The faculty/student ratio allows for specialized mentoring by faculty. Students may feel free to approach their professors on a variety of faith, life, and career issues.

Normal Academic Load Definition of Credit: One “quarter credit” signifies the value toward graduation of a course meeting one period of fifty minutes each week for a quarter of ten weeks, together with satisfactory completion of the assigned out-of-class work. Semester credits (15 weeks) convert to quarter credits by the formula: semester credits x 1.5 = quarter credits. Permissible Academic Load: The phrase “academic load” refers to the schedule of courses for which the student is registered. Sixteen credits per quarter, excluding audit hours and Discovery Module credits, are considered a normal academic load for Trinity students. Courses may be taken concurrently at another institution to fulfill requirements for a Trinity academic program. Students taking more than 17.0 credits per quarter, excluding Discovery Module, must pay additional fees. Reduction or Limitation of Load: A student’s academic load is subject to reduction or limitation by the Academic Dean, in consultation with the Academic Committee, for inadequate scholarship or excessive employment beyond class time.

Course numbers indicate the relative degree of difficulty of the coursework and the academic maturity expected of the student. 100 and 200 level courses are introductory and intermediate; i.e., college freshman and sophomore levels. 300 and 400 level courses are advanced; i.e., junior and senior levels.

Leadership Activities: To participate in leadership activities (e.g., student government, resident assistant, student ambassador) students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.50 during the quarter prior to the quarter in which they participate in such an activity. This minimum must be maintained throughout the period of leadership. Minimum cumulative GPAs for student body officers are spelled out in the ASB Constitution.

Academic Advising

Absence Due to Illness

All matriculated students are assigned to a faculty academic advisor ordinarily within their chosen major. While Trinity makes every effort to assist students by assigning academic advisors, the final responsibility for meeting academic and graduation requirements rests with each individual student. Advising by anyone, whether authorized or otherwise, inconsistent with published statements is not binding.

Extended absence from courses due to illness or accident should be discussed with each instructor involved. Students are responsible for contacting their instructors, either directly or through the assistance of the Dean of Students, as soon as an extended absence becomes apparent. Students should note that in some instances course requirements will be impossible to complete due to the extended absence.

Course Numbering

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Independent Study Eligibility 1.

2.

3. 4.

5. 6.

7.

A student wishing to undertake an Independent Study must have attained junior status (90 credits) and be in good academic standing, i.e., cumulative GPA is 2.50 or better. A student may not substitute an Independent Study for a course listed in the college catalog unless specific approval is given by the Aca demic Committee. The academic level of study must be 300 or 400 level. A student may earn no more than six credits of Independent Study in any given quarter and may count no more than fifteen credits of Independent Study credit as part of the number of credits required for the bachelor’s degree. A student must submit a Request for Indepen dent Study form to the Registrar. The Independent Study contract must be approved and signed by the Study Instructor, the head of the department in which the study is taken, and the Academic Dean. The contract is to be filed with the Registrar on or before the final date to add a course. The Study Instructor cannot be an Independent Instructor unless approval is given by the Academic Dean.

Grading System The quality of a student’s performance in a course is recognized by a letter grade that is counted in points: Grade Points Explanation A 4.0 Superior A3.7 B+ 3.3 B 3.0 Above average B2.7 C+ 2.3 C 2.0 Average C1.7 D+ 1.3 D 1.0 Below average F 0.0 Failed P * Passing U * Unsatisfactory AU * Satisfactory audit UA * Unsatisfactory audit (attendance requirement was not met) I * Incomplete IP * In progress

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R * NR *

D/P * D/F * WA * W

*

Repeated course Not reported (used for courses spanning more than one quarter, e.g., a research project) Drop/Pass (student dropped the course, passing) Drop/Fail (student dropped the course, failing) Administrative withdrawal (dismissal from course or college) Student withdrawal from college

*Not calculated into the GPA

Grade Point Average To compute your grade point average (GPA), multiply the number of credits for each course times the grade points for the assigned grade (see above). Divide the total grade points earned by the number of total credits. Courses that assign a grade without corresponding grade points (i.e., “P”) are not counted. Example: COURSE CREDIT

GRADE

GRADE

POINTS

3.0 3.0 2.0 1.0

B F A P

[3.0x3] [3.0x0] [2.0x4] [0.0- ]

9.0 0.0 8.0

8.0 (GPA credits) 17.0 GPA = 17.0 ÷ 8.0 = 2.13

Academic Grading Standard Trinity faculty use the following scale in assigning grades for coursework: Grading Scale A = A- = B+ = B = B- = C+ = C = C- = D+ = D = F = Pass =

100-93% 92-90% 89-87% 86-83% 82-80% 79-77% 76-73% 72-70% 69-67% 66-60% 59% or lower 100-70%


Pass/Fail Option

Grade Reports

Students with 90 credits or more and with a 2.00 GPA or better may take one “Pass/Fail” elective course per year. Such courses may not be used to fulfill core, general studies, or degree major requirements, whether taken at Trinity or transferred from another institution. Students must declare the “Pass/ Fail” option before midterm by completing the appropriate form in the Registrar’s Office.

Grades will be reported to students quarterly and grade reports may be picked up from the Registrar’s Office. Grade reports will be mailed to students only if the student has provided the Registrar with a self-addressed stamped envelope. Parents of students will be mailed grade reports only if the student has provided the Registrar with a signed release or if the parent has presented the Registrar with evidence of the student’s current dependent status as defined in section 152 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954. The requirement of a signed release from the student or proof of dependency status became mandatory with the passage of the federal law “Protection of the Rights and Privacy of Parents and Students” enacted August 21, 1975.

Incompletes An “Incomplete” (I) grade may be given only when the major portion of the course has been completed satisfactorily and some minor but essential requirement has not been completed for health or other reasons that the instructor considers academically justifiable. If an “Incomplete” is deemed appropriate by the instructor, the student must file an Incomplete Contract with the Registrar’s Office one week prior to the end of the quarter. The contract specifies the deadline by which the work will be completed, and what will happen to the grade in the event the deadline is not met. Independent Instructors may not grant students’ requests for the grade of “Incomplete.”

Dropping a Course Students dropping courses by mid-term will receive grades of “D/P” (dropped-passing) or “D/F” (dropped-failing). After mid-term, the grade for a dropped course will be “F.”

Repeating a Course Students who receive a grade of “C-“ or below in a course at Trinity are allowed to repeat that course. The grade earned when the course is repeated is the grade which will be placed in the permanent record and which will be used in computing the cumulative grade point average. The grade earned the first time will be changed to an “R/(original grade)” and taken out of the GPA calculation. Course credits will be counted only once toward a degree. The student must notify the Registrar of the repeat by filing a Notification of Repeated Course Form.

Academic Honesty Academic honesty is expected of all students at all times at Trinity Lutheran College. Academic dishonesty constitutes a serious violation of scholarship standards that can result in substantial penalties, including denial of credit in a course, as well as dismissal from the college. Any act that involves misrepresentation regarding the student’s academic work or that abridges the rights of other students to fair academic competition is forbidden (e.g., revealing contents of exams or quizzes). Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on assignments or exams, plagiarizing (misrepresenting another’s work, including software programs, as one’s own original creation), submitting the same (or substantially the same) paper in more than one course without prior consent of all instructors concerned, and depriving others of necessary academic sources. Students charged with academic dishonesty have the right to appeal any disciplinary action to the Academic Committee.

Academic Freedom Academic freedom and freedom of inquiry are rooted within our commitment to all truth as God’s truth. Therefore, we belong to a tradition that does not seek to suppress freedom of inquiry, but to pursue it as an essential component of our faith and our academic program. The college encourages students and faculty to examine data, to question assumptions, to be freely guided by evidence, and to be learners and scholars together in the pursuit of truth.

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Degree Progress A student’s progress toward a degree or professional certificate is monitored on a Degree Progress (Credit Tracking) Form, which is issued quarterly by the Registrar’s Office to the student and his/her advisor. Students are expected to have read the catalog for general college, specific major, and graduation requirements, and be knowledgeable of all requirements to be completed for their specific major program and for graduation.

Student Honors Dean’s List Dean’s List honors are awarded quarterly to students in good standing who have attained a 3.75 or higher GPA. Eligibility for honors: Students must be registered for a full academic load at Trinity (12 credits or more) and have attained a 3.75 or higher GPA and have no Incompletes for the quarter. Any student who achieves a quarter GPA of 4.0 is nominated to the National Dean’s List. Annual Honors • Promising Leader Award • Inspirational Student Award • Who’s Who Among Students in American Universities and Colleges • Excellence in Writing Award Graduate Honors • Associate of Biblical Studies: • With Honors (3.5-4.0 cumulative GPA) • Bachelor’s degree: • Summa cum Laude (3.9-4.0 cumulative GPA) • Magna cum Laude (3.7-3.89 cumulative GPA) • Cum Laude (3.5-3.69 cumulative GPA) • Certificate of Professional Studies: • With Distinction (3.75-4.0 cumulative GPA) Note that before any honors can be awarded to graduating students, all coursework must be completed. Once it is completed, awards may be posted on the transcript.

Academic Probation A student whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will automatically be placed on first-quarter Academic Probation. The student will be notified when grades are reported. To remain at Trinity the student must petition the Academic Committee by the first Academic Committee meeting of the following quarter. The student must also appear before the

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Academic Committee to defend his or her petition. Once on probation, a student who earns a quarter GPA of 2.5 or higher, yet fails to raise the cumulative GPA to 2.0 or above, will be placed on probation hold. Once placed on probation hold, the student retains the same probation status as held the previous quarter, but does not move toward dismissal. The second consecutive quarter the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 and the quarter GPA is below 2.5, the student will be placed on second-quarter academic probation. The student must appear before the Academic Committee, and sign a “second-quarter academic probation agreement.” After the third consecutive quarter the cumulative GPA remains below 2.0 and the quarter GPA is below 2.5, the student will ordinarily be dismissed from the college. The academic dismissal will be noted on the student’s academic record. Dismissal is for a period of three quarters, after which the student may request readmission. If the student does not file a petition to remain at Trinity, sign a “second-quarter academic probation agreement” and/or fails to appear before the Academic Committee, that student will be subject to immediate dismissal from the college. If there are mitigating circumstances for unsatisfactory progress that result in dismissal (e.g., illness, family crisis, etc.) a student may appeal in writing to the Administrative Cabinet through the Academic Dean for readmission. Students on Academic Probation are not allowed to take an Incomplete in any course. Federal financial aid is not available to a student on Academic Probation. Academic Probation expectations are as follows: 1. Attend all courses for which student is regis tered. 2. Turn in all assignments on time. 3. Initiate weekly meetings with Advisor to evalu ate progress and receive assistance in meeting responsibilities in the areas of academics and community life. 4. Not participate in any major extra-curricular activities (i.e., those that require an involvement of three hours or more per week, such as team sports, yearbook staff, etc.).

Academic Dismissal The college reserves the right to dismiss any student whose academic standing is significantly below academic expectations.


Academic Appeals It is assumed that most academic grievances will be resolved in conversation between the student and instructor, or within the department involved. However, in cases where resolution is not achieved, the student may register a written appeal with the Academic Dean for adjudication in the matter. A formal appeal of grades must begin within 15 days of distribution of the official statement of grades from the Registrar’s Office.

Requirements for Graduation General Policies 1. Fulfill the course and credit requirements for the desired degree or certificate. 2. The last nine credits to be applied to the degree must be earned from Trinity. They may be earned in the last quarter before graduation, or on a part-time basis over three consecutive quarters. 3. Complete at least 90 Trinity credits for a BA Degree and at least 45 Trinity credits for an ABS Degree. 4. For a BA Degree, complete a minimum of 180 credits of which at least 60 must be 300 or 400 level. a. A transfer student must earn a minimum of 30 of the 60 upper division major credits at Trinity. b. All courses required for the degree in which the student received grades of “NR” or “I” must be completed before graduation date. If not, graduation will be deferred until all requirements are completed. 5. The ABS Degree will not be awarded until all required course work is completed. 6. Students seeking a BA Degree must have completed a minimum of three Discovery Modules, and ABS candidates must have completed two Modules. Audit hours do not fulfill this requirement. 7. Complete the following Multicultural Studies requirements (from courses designated “MC”): BA - three courses; ABS - two courses. 8. Attend the annual commencement exercises. Permission to graduate in absentia must be requested by petition to the Academic Commit tee at least six weeks prior to commencement. Such permission is normally granted only when it would cause serious hardship for the student to attend. 9. Be approved by the Board of Directors regard ing academic achievement. 10. Achieve a cumulative GPA of 2.0 or better. 11. Have student account paid in full.

12. Graduation requirements must be completed within six years of initial enrollment. 13. Exceptions to any of the above must be petitioned to the Academic Committee. Specific Policies Governing the Completion of a Major 1. A major is required for completion of the Bachelor of Arts degree. a. For a description of the majors, see the following section entitled “Programs of Study.” b. A written application for a major is to be made to the Department Head by the student normally during Fall Quarter of his/ her sophomore year unless otherwise specified. 2. All required upper level courses in a degree program must be passed with a grade of “C” or better. 3. English Composition I and II must be passed with a grade of “C” or better. 4. The department in which students complete their major must certify to the Registrar that students have satisfactorily met the evaluative and proficiency standards for such a major as established by the Faculty Council and approved by the Academic Committee.

Discovery Module The Discovery Module is an additional two-week period following Fall Quarter. When registering for Fall Quarter, students choose up to three credits from a selection of on-campus or off-campus courses for the Discovery Module. Each degreeseeking student is required to attend Discovery Module, earning a minimum of two credits per module. Choir will count as partial fulfillment of this requirement. Students seeking an Associate of Biblical Studies Degree must complete a minimum of two Modules, and Bachelor of Arts candidates must complete three Modules. Discovery Module tuition (and room and board, if you are living on campus) is included in full-time students’ Fall Quarter costs; it is not refundable if you choose not to attend the Module. Some Discovery Module courses require additional fees and travel costs. Trinity board fees apply toward but do not cover the entire off-campus costs. Some typical offcampus opportunities have been:

• • • •

Asian Experience African Experience Language and Culture Acquisition in Mazatlan, Mexico Holy Land Studies Tour

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Service Learning Practicum All degree-seeking, full-time students are required to register for a minimum of three years of Service Learning Practicum (SLP). Part-time matriculated students are required to register for one quarter of Service Learning Practicum for every 15 accumulated credits.

Prior Learning Portfolio Prior learning is non-traditional learning that is acquired from non-classroom sources, such as work and life experiences, mass media, and independent reading and study. The particular focus of Trinity and the type of professional preparation it offers, makes the provision for Prior Learning an appropriate option for qualified students. Junior or senior students may apply to the Academic Dean for Prior Learning credit after earning at least 45 academic credits at Trinity that give evidence of a satisfactory learning pattern. The student must have a cumulative grade point average from all Trinity work of 2.5 or higher and must have been admitted to an academic major program. Prior Learning credit may constitute up to 25% of the 180 credits needed for a bachelor’s degree. The process that Trinity uses to assess Prior Learning is development of a portfolio. By assembling the portfolio, the student is able to summarize and specify learning gained while being “out of school.” The Prior Learning portfolio can tangibly express the value of experientially derived learning. In some cases, the assessment may also include skill demonstration, oral examination, work samples, and assessment of credentials earned. All students who plan to petition for credit for their prior learning at Trinity will enroll in PL 200 Prior Learning Seminar. Its completion is a prerequisite to the award of credits for portfolio evaluation. The course is designed to help the student in developing skills and techniques used in the identification, organization, articulation, and corroboration of prior learning. A completed Prior Learning portfolio, once approved by the Academic Dean, is assessed for college credit equivalence by an assessment team.

Change in Catalogs This official college catalog represents an understanding between the student and the college, spelling out graduation requirements. In the event that the catalog changes before a student graduates, the student may elect to remain under the catalog requirements in place at the time of enroll-

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ment at Trinity, provided that the student has been in college continuously; or, graduate under the new catalog, but not a combination of both. If students have been away from Trinity for three quarters and are taking at least one course at another college that transfers to their Trinity requirements, they may be considered active students and continue under the catalog used during their previous attendance. Students not studying at any institution for a period of one year of three consecutive quarters (or two semesters) or more will be required to graduate under the catalog in place when they re-enroll. See also “Re-Admission of Former Students” on page 16.

Student Records Policy Student records at Trinity are subject to the Federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The student’s file is open to the student except for confidential recommendations placed there before January 1, 1975. Students’ requests to see this file will be granted as soon as possible, and in all cases within 45 days of the request. Students may also review their own academic records. Faculty and other college personnel may review a student’s file and academic record when legitimate academic interests dictate. Information may also be provided to scholarship or government agencies regarding financial aid eligibility. No other requests for information, other than “directory information,” will be honored unless authorized by the student in a signed release, which states to whom and for what purpose the information shall be supplied. Directory information includes the following items: student’s name, address, telephone, email address, date of birth, place of birth, major, participation in officially recognized activities, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, and most recent previous educational agency or institution. The college does not supply directory information indiscriminately to commercial concerns for such purposes as mailing lists. A student may direct the withholding of any or all of this information by supplying a written request to the Registrar. Should students, after viewing material in their file, think that information is incorrect, they may place a written refutation of the information in the file or they may proceed with the college’s judicial process to request that incorrect material be removed. The claim of incorrect material must, of course, be substantiated before any material will be removed.


Library The library of Trinity Lutheran College is dedicated to the highest professional standards in serving the academic needs of Trinity students. No student is anonymous in the Trinity library. Professional library help is readily available for any student facing difficulties with a perplexing research project or a challenging paper. The library also boasts a “Writers Corner” staffed by exceptional student tutors who are able to assist fellow students with their writing needs. Standardized descriptions of the various types of papers along with many grammar helps are also available in The Writer’s Corner. In effect, the Trinity library is a study support center that is dedicated to helping students be academic winners! The staff of the Trinity library is committed to providing students with first-rate current information resources. The library subscribes to only the best in peer-reviewed journal materials both in hard copy and full-text computer format. Currently, the library subscribes to approximately 200 of the finest academic journals in Bible; theology; multicultural studies; philosophy; ancient, medieval, and reformation history; missions; psychology; archaeology; Christian education; youth and family studies; and spiritual life. The library is especially proud of its fulltext PsycINFO subscription, a superb collection of upto-date, full-text psychology articles selected by the American Psychological Association. Because courses at Trinity depend on journal research, the library is intent on making its journal resources among the finest in the Northwest. In our reference and circulation collections, Trinity library has well-selected holdings in the subjects essential to Trinity degree majors such as theology, multicultural and biblical studies, philosophy, missions, church history, apologetics, education, comparative religions, and pastoral studies. The library anticipates increasing its holdings in reformation studies, biblical scholarship, the classical works of Greek and Roman antiquity, the great books of western civilization, and the newest and major works in education and psychology.

Information technology is readily available to students on a number of levels:

• • • • • • •

The library maintains electronic (as well as manual card) access to its holdings. Several online public access catalog stations (OPACS) are available on the main floor of the library. PsycINFO journal resources are also part of the electronic catalog and may be sought and accessed as one would a book. The library circulation system is automated. CD ROM-based research resources are on reserve and may be used on the library com puter stations. Docking stations, as well as a wireless printer, are available in the library for students owning laptop computers. Recently added are: (1) the ATLA Religion Database , the premier index to journal articles, book reviews, and collections of essays in all fields of religion; and (2) ATLAS (ATLA Serials), an online collection of major religion and theology journals selected by leading religion scholars and theologians.

Educational Technology Center & Videoconferencing In an effort to enhance the academic programs and offerings, the college has a center devoted to technology and distance learning. This center is equipped with the latest hardware and software for classroom, student laboratory, and general public use. Video monitors, microphones, computers, and more supply the campus with the ability to broadcast courses to other sites or to use the center as a learning laboratory.

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Programs of Study

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Programs of Study Trinity Lutheran College offers the following programs of study:

Bachelor of Arts A Bachelor of Arts (BA) is a four-year degree, comprised of the Trinity Core Curriculum (biblical studies, religious studies, and general studies), a major in a student’s field of interest, and electives. A total of 180 credits is required to earn a BA degree. Students choose one of six majors:

• • • • • •

Biblical Studies Christian Education Early Childhood Education Multicultural Studies Music & Worship Youth & Family Ministry

All students, upon completing the biblical studies courses required in the Trinity Core Curriculum, receive a Minor in Biblical Studies (except Biblical Studies majors). Specific requirements for each degree program are listed under the appropriate department in the pages that follow.

Associate of Biblical Studies An Associate of Biblical Studies (ABS) is a twoyear degree, comprised of courses in biblical studies, religious studies, and general studies. The ABS degree prepares students for transfer to a bachelor’s degree program either at Trinity or another institution. A total of 90 credits is required to earn an ABS degree. Detailed requirements for the ABS degree are listed under the Biblical Studies Department.

Trinity offers the following certificates:

• • • • • •

Biblical Studies Christian Education Early Childhood Education Multicultural Studies Music & Worship Youth & Family Ministry

Students design their course of study with a faculty advisor. Detailed requirements for a CPS are listed under the appropriate department.

Enrichment Studies Trinity Lutheran College believes in the value of lifelong learning and encourages individuals to pursue continued education for personal or professional development. Students who wish to take courses, but not receive a degree, are welcome to enroll in courses for personal enrichment. For more information, see page 62.

Associate in Ministry Educational Requirements Trinity Lutheran College, in partnership with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Division for Ministry, presents a curriculum that fulfills the theological education requirements for becoming an Associate in Ministry. Students can also complete specialized studies in their area of ministry interest and a supervised field experience. Interested persons must contact their synod’s candidacy committee before enrolling in this program. For more information, see page 60.

Certificate of Professional Studies A Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) is a post-baccalaureate concentration in biblical and professional studies and is restricted to students who have already earned a bachelor’s degree. The certificate is not a degree, but rather certifies that the student has completed academic study beyond a bachelor’s degree. (Credits are not graduate level.) A total of 46 credits is required to earn a CPS.

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Trinity Core Curriculum The Trinity Core Curriculum is the set of courses required of each student in biblical, religious, and general studies. It is intentionally designed to introduce students to disciplined and progressive study of the Bible and the Christian faith, encourage personal spiritual growth, and provide enrichment through a broad range of liberal arts studies. The Trinity Core Curriculum consists of three components: Biblical Studies Component A minimum of 33 credits in biblical studies is required. Students study a variety of biblical literature in both the Old and New Testaments, including: Pentateuch, Psalms, writings of the Prophets, the Gospels, and a sample of Paul’s and John’s letters. In addition to certain required courses, students have the opportunity to choose electives. Also required in this component is an introductory course in theology. Religious Studies Component Students are required to complete 12 credits in religious studies. These courses, generally taken during the first year, provide a foundation for understanding the church’s essential ministries: worship, teaching, evangelism, and global mission. Also included is a course in inductive Bible study methods. General Studies Component The General Studies Component involves a rich blend of courses in social and behavioral sciences, humanities, fine arts, mathematics, and natural sciences. Through these courses, students broaden their knowledge of God’s creation (astronomy, earth science, fine arts), the human body (psychology, human physiology), history (Western civilization), how we live in community and the world (sociology, service learning, multicultural studies), and sharpen skills for critical thinking and communication (English composition, philosophy, mathematics, public speaking). Specific requirements and course offerings are listed under the General Studies Department.

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General Studies Department The general studies coursework for a bachelor’s degree, as identified with the descriptions of each major, may be taken: (1) prior to a student’s admission to Trinity, or (2) concurrently with the freshman, sophomore, and junior years at Trinity. In any case, this work must be completed before starting the senior year. General studies rationale A foundational curriculum of general studies is required of all associate and bachelor degree candidates. Designed to fulfill the mission of Trinity and its educational objectives and to provide a common educational experience for its students, general studies courses introduce the students to major areas of knowledge including the humanities, fine arts, social and behavioral sciences, mathematics and natural science. The general studies courses have been specifically chosen to serve students and the unique needs of our mission and major program requirements. Individual departments may require additional courses. Through its general studies requirements, Trinity seeks to achieve the following objectives: 1.

2.

3.

4.

Students will develop skills in writing, reading, critical reasoning, mathematics, and oral communication to equip them for a life of learning and service. Students will gain insight about cultures, societies, and patterns of human behavior through the study of history, sociology, and psychology for effective leadership in the world as well as in the church. Students will explore the natural world in which they live and the major scientific methodologies generally employed for understanding this world. Students will develop aesthetic values through the study of music and other fine arts.

General studies courses are considered integral to each major. Courses have been carefully selected to give the student a broad-based background and exposure to the humanities, fine arts, the natural sciences, mathematics, and social and behavioral sciences. We expect students to take these courses in sequence so we can be confident that the skills and knowledge required for more advanced study are acquired. If students are to be effective witnesses and leaders in the church and our world, they will need to have basic relational skills and knowledge of the world in which they will serve.

Writing at Trinity This college is committed to equipping students with the ability to communicate effectively. The faculty considers academic writing skills to be of paramount importance and, therefore, foundational and integral to our entire academic curriculum. Every student who enters a degree program (Bachelor of Arts, Associate of Biblical Studies, or Certificate of Professional Studies) will take a standardized writing proficiency test during the Fall Quarter orientation or during the first week of the first quarter of enrollment at Trinity. Two courses, GS 121 English Composition I and GS 123 English Composition II, are required of all degree-seeking students. To waive GS 121, a student must have a transferable English composition course from another accredited college or have received a score of at least 3 on an appropriate high school advanced placement (AP) course, and achieve a minimum grade of C- on the Trinity writing proficiency test. An elective course, GS 370 Creative Writing Seminar, specifically targets the development of writing skills. Ten courses, which have been designated “Writing Intensive,” will also provide assessment of progress in developing writing skills. The Writing Intensive courses are identified in the Course Descriptions section of this catalog and are listed below:

• • • • • • • • • •

GS 121 English Composition I GS 123 English Composition II MC 263 World Religions BI 264 Corinthians & Romans GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization BI 363 Johannine Literature BT 462 Biblical Theology Seminar BT 464 Senior Special Topic MN 467 History & Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry MW 487 Worship & Evangelism Seminar

Resources are available to assist the student in the development of writing skills. The Writer’s Corner in the college library will contain descriptions and student samples of the different writing genres required at Trinity, as well as a selection of writing manuals and reference works. Tutoring services will be available through The Writer’s Corner at regularly scheduled hours to assist those students seeking help in improving their writing skills. At the end of each academic year, an Excellence in Writing award will be given to that student who best exemplifies the highest standards in breadth and quality of research, style, format, clarity, and originality in written communication.

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General studies courses The general studies components of the Trinity Core Curriculum, which “informs” every major program of study, can be viewed as six building blocks, comprising 66 credits: 1. Humanities (19 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] 2. Fine Arts (3 credits): GS 201 Christianity and the Arts [3 cr] GS 204 Drama Workshop [1 cr] GS 264 Visual Arts Seminar [1 cr] GS 370 Creative Writing Seminar [2 cr] MW 102/202/302/402 Choir [1 cr each] MW 160/360 Touring Ensemble [1 cr each] MW 340 World Music [1 cr] 3. Social and Behavioral Sciences (15 credits) a. Required courses (8 credits): GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] b. Choose 7 credits from the following: BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] ECE 211 Theory & Practice in Early Childhood Education [3 cr] ECE 310 Practicum in Early Childhood Education [4 cr] ECE 461 Child Growth and Development [3 cr] GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr each] MC 362 Variant Religious Movements [3 cr] MC 367 Language and Culture Acquisition [4 cr] MC 403 Cross-cultural Evangelism [2 cr] MC 463 Perspectives on Urban Mission [3 cr] MC 464 Urban Sociology for the Church [3 cr] MC 466 Cultural Anthropology and Communication [4 cr] MC 467 Mission to the City [3 cr] MN 315 Lifespan Development [3 cr] MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] MN 364 Specialized Counseling Issues [4 cr] MN 466 Abnormal Behavior [3 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] YF 461 Adolescent Development [3 cr] 4. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] 5. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr]

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6. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years] Within the General Studies Core is a list of 13 courses, with only the slightest variations among major programs of study, in which every student must enroll and successfully complete prior to graduation. This inner core of 50 “non-negotiable” credits guarantees that every Trinity graduate has been broadly educated in each of the following areas of the traditional liberal arts curriculum:

• • • • • • • • •

Mathematics Natural Sciences English Composition Philosophy Western Civilization Fine Arts Sociology Psychology Public Speaking


Biblical Studies Department The Biblical Studies Department offers the following areas of study: • Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies • Associate of Biblical Studies • Certificate of Professional Studies in Biblical Studies • Associate in Ministry theological education requirements (see page 60) • Enrichment studies (see page 62) In addition to providing foundational courses in Bible and theology for all Trinity programs, the Biblical Studies Department aims to equip and prepare students personally and professionally to lead lives of Christian witness and ministry in church and society. Our goals are that graduates be conversant with the Bible’s content and message and that they use the Scriptures devotionally, as well as theologically, in their daily lives. We expect them to articulate the Christian faith effectively. The department seeks to foster and assist students’ growth in faith and worship, in the use and understanding of Scripture, in Christian discipleship, and in a posture of listening, respect, and service toward others.

Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies Overview The Bachelor of Arts degree with a Biblical Studies major (BABS) is designed to be the most comprehensive program in Bible and theology that Trinity offers. This major is especially designed to provide appropriate preparation for those who plan to continue their education in a theological seminary, other church vocations, or other graduate programs in biblical or theological disciplines. Such students should be careful to check the undergraduate requirements of their intended graduate school, to choose those electives that will meet that school’s prerequisites. Students should also be aware that some graduate schools require taking the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) or another admissions exam. While the Biblical Studies major does provide a full preparation for seminary studies, the major is not in itself designed to lead directly to employment. In fact, the BABS is the only Trinity major which is not employment-oriented. This major continues in the heritage of the Lutheran Bible Institute mission, namely, to provide a solid biblical foundation for

laypeople in their fath, their life, and their service in the church and the world. At the same time, graduates with a BABS enter the workplace with a solid, well-rounded, biblicallly-grounded college education which is recognized and embraced in all sorts of nontechnical occupations. In this sense, Trinity’s Biblical Studies degree stands in the tradition of the classic liberal arts education.

Distinctives of Trinity’s Biblical Studies degree • Approach to Scripture. Trinity’s approach to the Scripture is both scholarly and believing. We seek to study the Bible with the best of available scholarly tools, in a manner which is open to questions and to critical analysis. At the same time, we believe that the Bible is God’s word, and seek to approach that word reverently and to acknowledge its claim on our lives. • Direct encounter with the biblical texts. While our courses make use of important current scholarship concerning the Bible, the biblical text itself serves as the main resource for engaging students with the message and meaning of Scripture. This hands-on approach to biblical materials will prepare the student for a lifetime of personal study and growth. • The scope of the biblical core. Trinity’s biblical core of courses grounds every student in six of the most crucial types of literature in the Bible: historical narrative (the Pentateuch), prophecy, psalms, synoptic gospels, the writings of John, and the letters of Paul. Electives and further courses in the major explore other types, such as apocalyptic and wisdom literature. • Capstone courses. Three capstone courses assist students in integrating the disciplines of biblical study and biblical theology into an approach to life that holds God’s word and God’s world together in creative tension and harmony. Application to the degree program Application to enter the Biblical Studies bachelor’s degree program is made through the department during the Fall Quarter of the sophomore year. Failure to complete the application by this deadline will delay registration in upper-level BI/BT courses. The student is responsible for any costs incurred in the application process.

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Requirements A total of 180 credits is required to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies. Five components make up the degree: 1. Biblical Studies Component (26 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] 2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits): CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr] 3. General Studies Component (67 credits) a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr] b. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years] c. Humanities and Fine Arts (22 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] Fine Arts [3 credits required] d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (15 credits): BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] [4 credits of GS102/202 Service Learning Practicum may be applied to this category.] e. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] f. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr]

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4. Biblical Studies Major (30-31 credits) a. Required courses (19 credits): BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] BT 462 Biblical Theology Seminar [3 cr] BT 463 Issues in Hermeneutics [3 cr] BT 464 Senior Special Topic [3 cr] GS 360 Reformation History [4 cr] b. Choices (11-12 credits): Students must choose three additional courses, one from each of the following three pairs: Option 1: Choose either of the following two courses: BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] Option 2: Choose either of the following two courses: BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] Option 3: Choose either of the following two courses: BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr] BI 464 Biblical Apocalyptic [3 cr] 5. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following:

• • • •

A total of 180 credits. A total of 60 upper-level credits (300 or 400 level). At least three Multicultural Studies courses (one course, MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions, is already required). Three Discovery Modules.


Associate of Biblical Studies

2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits):

Overview The Associate of Biblical Studies degree (ABS) is designed to inform personal faith, as well as increase ministry skills. The ABS is a two-year degree providing a distinctive biblical foundation for life, allowing a student to pursue areas of interest in biblical study through a combination of required and elective courses. Courses required for an ABS include Trinity Core Curriculum courses (biblical, religious, and general studies) and electives. If a student decides to switch from the two-year ABS degree to one of the four-year BA degrees, it is important to make that transition by the beginning of Winter Quarter the second year, as course requirements at that time become different for the fouryear programs. (BA programs begin to require other courses beginning the second year that are not required for an ABS.) Students are encouraged to check with their advisor as soon as they decide to change from the ABS to a BA degree program.

CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr, F]

Requirements A total of 90 credits is required to earn an Associate of Biblical Studies. Four components make up the degree:

3. General Studies Component (36 credits) a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr] b. Service Learning Practicum (6 credits): GS 102/202 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for both years] c. Humanities and Fine Arts (14 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] Fine Arts (3 credits required) d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (7 credits): BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] Choose either of the following two courses: GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr]

1. Biblical Studies Component (33 credits) a. Required courses (27 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 263 Gospel of John [2 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] b. Electives (6 credits): Choose either of the following two courses: BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] In addition, electives must include at least two credits in biblical studies (designated BI) or in biblical languages.

e. Mathematics or Natural Sciences (8 credits): Choose two of the following courses: GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr] 4. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following:

• • •

A total of 90 credits. At least two Multicultural Studies courses (one course, MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions, is already required). Two Discovery Modules.

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Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) in Biblical Studies Overview The Certificate of Professional Studies in Biblical Studies is designed primarily for pre-seminary students and requires a bachelor’s degree for entrance. This program is well suited for those who are preparing for ministry and desire to supplement their educational background. Students design their own program with the assistance of a faculty advisor. Most prerequisites are waived for students in this program, with the permission of the course instructor. Requirements A total of 46 credits is required to earn a Certificate of Professional Studies. Three components make up the certificate program:

c. Epistles: BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] d. Biblical Theology: BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 369 History of Christian Thought [3 cr] BT 462 Biblical Theology Seminar [3 cr] BT 463 Issues in Hermeneutics [3 cr]

1. Biblical Studies Component (30 credits)

2. Service Learning Practicum Component (3 credits) GS 302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter]

A minimum of 30 credits in biblical studies (BI), biblical theology (BT), or biblical languages, including at least one course in each of the following areas:

3. Electives Students take additional courses as electives to reach the minimum 46 credits required.

a. Old Testament: BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr]

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b. Gospel or Acts: BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr]


Christian Education Department The Christian Education Department offers the following areas of study: • Bachelor of Arts in Christian Education • Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education • Certificate of Professional Studies in Christian Education • Certificate of Professional Studies in Early Childhood Education • Specialized studies for Associate in Ministry candidates (see page 60) • Enrichment studies (see page 62)

Bachelor of Arts in Christian Education Overview A Bachelor of Arts in Christian Education prepares the student to serve in the areas of teaching and administration within a congregation or in the wider church. Strong in educational philosophy and faith development, methodology and practice, students are prepared to direct Christian education programs or to enter graduate work in the field of education. Students, in conversation with department faculty and an academic advisor, have the opportunity to specialize their degree program within the field of Christian education. Specialized interests include children’s ministry, early childhood education, youth and family ministry, music and the arts, theology, pre-counseling studies, and outdoor ministry. Distinctives of Trinity’s Christian Education degree • A caring and supportive faculty. Faculty work one-on-one with students to create an academic plan and provide mentoring to assist in discovering their call. All faculty have congregational ministry experience. • Field experience. Students are required to complete a 400-hour internship, putting studies into practice under the direction of an on-site supervisor and faculty mentor. Students also participate in Trinity’s Service Learning Practicum program for a minimum of three years, offering additional “hands on” experiences.

• Children, Youth & Family Center. Students have access to a resource center with a collection of books, resources, periodicals, and curricula in the areas of youth and family ministry and Christian education. • Noah’s Ark Christian Preschool and Sammamish Christian School. Students are able to volunteer or work at Noah’s Ark Christian Preschool and/or Sammamish Christian School (elementary level), located on Trinity’s campus, to provide experience in working with and teaching children. • Associate in Ministry. Members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America can complete theological education requirements for becoming an Associate in Ministry as part of the degree program. • Preparation for graduate studies. Graduates from the Christian Education degree program are well prepared for graduate-level studies, including education, counseling, social work, or pastoral ministry. Application to the degree program Students apply for admission into the Christian Education degree program during Fall Quarter of their sophomore year. Failure to complete the application by this deadline will delay registration in further courses in the department. Students must be accepted into the degree program to enroll in upper-level courses required in the major. The student is responsible for any costs incurred in the application process. Requirements A total of 180 credits is required to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Christian Education. Five components make up the degree: 1. Biblical Studies Component (33 credits) a. Required courses (26 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] b. Electives (minimum of 7 credits): BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr]

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BI 464 Biblical Apocalyptic [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 356, 364, 365 Greek I [4 cr each] GS 461, 462, 463 Greek II [3 cr each] GS 355, 362, 363 Hebrew Language Skills [3 cr each] 2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits): CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr] 3. General Studies Component (70 credits) a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr] b. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years] c. Humanities and Fine Arts (22 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] Fine Arts (3 credits required) d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (18 credits): ECE 211 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education [3 cr] GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] e. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] f. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr] 4. Christian Education Major (56 credits) Suggested sequence: CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education [3 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr]

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ECE 211 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education [3 cr] CE 220 Children’s Literature [3 cr] CE 212 Summer Programming for Children [2 cr] or CE 305 Confirmation [2 cr] CE 310 Adult Education: Life-long Learning [3 cr] MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] MW 263 Music & Worship for Children and Families [2 cr] YF 365 Designs for Family Ministry [3 cr] CE 362 Children’s Ministries [3 cr] MN 371 Dynamics of Administration [4 cr] MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry [4 cr] CE 481 Field Experience [15 cr] MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies [3 cr] CE 468 Contextual Christian Education [1 cr] 5. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following:

• • • •

A total of 180 credits. A total of 60 upper-level credits (300 or 400 level). At least three Multicultural Studies courses (one course, MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions, is already required). Three Discovery Modules.

Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education Overview Combining theory and research, an understanding of faith development, and extensive practical experience, students are prepared to teach or administer a public or church-based preschool or daycare center. In addition, students are prepared to lead congregationally-based children’s ministry programs. Coursework in the degree program provides a multi-disciplined education in biblical and religious studies, early childhood education, Christian education, social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities.


Distinctives of Trinity’s Early Childhood Education degree • A knowledgeable, supportive faculty. Faculty work one-on-one with students to create an academic plan that meets a student’s educational and career objectives. Early Childhood Education faculty have experience in teaching, curriculum development, and administration. • Practicum course. Students complete a practicum experience at Noah’s Ark Christian Preschool, a preschool located on Trinity’s campus. Students apply classroom learning to “hands on” teaching experience, under the direction of a faculty advisor. • Field experience. In addition to the Practicum course, students are required to complete a 400hour internship, putting studies into practice under the direction of an on-site supervisor and faculty mentor. Application to the degree program Students apply for admission into the Early Childhood Education degree program during Fall Quarter of their sophomore year. Failure to complete the application by this deadline will delay registration in further courses in the department. Students must be accepted into the degree program to enroll in upper-level courses required in the major. The student is responsible for any costs incurred in the application process. Requirements A total of 180 credits is required to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education. Five components make up the degree: 1. Biblical Studies Component (33 credits) a. Required courses (26 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] b. Electives (minimum of 7 credits): BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr] BI 464 Biblical Apocalyptic [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr]

BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 356, 364, 365 Greek I [4 cr each] GS 461, 462, 463 Greek II [3 cr each] GS 355, 362, 363 Hebrew Language Skills [3 cr each] 2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits): CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr] 3. General Studies Component (70 credits) a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr] b. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years] c. Humanities and Fine Arts (22 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] Fine Arts (3 credits required) d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (18 credits): ECE 461 Child Growth and Development [3 cr] GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] e. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] f. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr] 4. Early Childhood Education Major (56 credits) Suggested sequence: ECE 102 Methods of Teaching – ECE [1 cr] ECE 110 STARS [2 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] ECE 211 Theory & Practice in Early Childhood Education [3 cr] CE 220 Children’s Literature [3 cr]

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MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] ECE 300 Special Topic Seminar: ELEA Conference [1 cr] ECE 310 Practicum in Early Childhood Education [4 cr] YF 365 Designs for Family Ministry [3 cr] MN 371 Dynamics of Administration [4 cr] ECE 461 Child Growth and Development [3 cr] MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry [4 cr] ECE 481 Field Experience [15 cr] ECE 465 Diversity in Early Childhood Education [2 cr] MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies [3 cr] ECE 468 Contextual Early Childhood Education [1 cr] 5. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following:

• • • • • •

A total of 180 credits. A total of 60 upper-level credits (300 or 400 level). Three Multicultural Studies courses (one course, MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions, is already required). Three Discovery Modules.

Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) in Christian Education or Early Childhood Education Overview The Certificate in Professional Studies program is designed as a continuing education opportunity to develop new skills or update previous learning. To enter the program, students must hold a bachelor’s degree in any discipline. By combining biblical studies with courses in Christian early childhood education, students strengthen their personal faith and increase their skills for ministry in a specific area. As a full-time student, the certificate can be completed in three quarters (one year). Students design their own program with the assistance of a faculty advisor. Most prerequisites are waived for students in this program, with the permission of the course instructor.

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Requirements A total of 46 credits are required to earn a Certificate of Professional Studies. Four components make up the certificate program: 1. Biblical Studies and Theology Component At least 15 credits must be completed in biblical studies or biblical theology (courses designated as BI or BT) and including CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study. 2. Christian Education or Early Childhood Education Component At least 20 credits must be completed in Christian education, early childhood education, or other chosen professional area (courses designated as CE, ECE, MN, or YF), including CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church; MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies; and CE 468 Contextual Christian Education or ECE 468 Contextual Early Childhood Education. 3. Service Learning Practicum Component GS 302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter] 4. Electives Students take additional courses as electives to reach the minimum 46 credits required.


Multicultural Studies Department The Multicultural Studies Department offers the following areas of study:

• • • •

Bachelor of Arts in Multicultural Studies Certificate of Professional Studies in Multicultural Studies Specialized studies for Associate in Ministry candidates (see page 60) Enrichment studies (see page 62)

Bachelor of Arts in Multicultural Studies Overview A degree in Multicultural Studies develops crosscultural competencies, which enable the student to function effectively in the global outreach of the church. With a solid background in the biblical, historical, theological, sociological and anthropological foundations of global or urban mission, the student is ready to make application for service in a multicultural setting with a church body, para-church agency, or faith-based non-government organization (NGO). The student is prepared to take assignments in such fields as evangelism, discipleship, Bible teaching, and church planting. The degree also prepares students for graduatelevel studies in intercultural studies, missiology, world religions, community development, English as a Second Language (ESL), leadership development, linguistics, or pastoral ministry. Students, in conversation with an academic advisor, have the opportunity of choosing a focusing emphasis within the major, such as global missions, urban missions, biblical languages, theology, or Christian education. Distinctives of Trinity’s Multicultural Studies degree • Small class sizes. Multicultural Studies courses are generally small in size, which offers in-depth conversation between students and the instructors. • Cultural immersion experience. Students are required to take a course in Language and Culture Acquisition, which includes a focus on learning a language in an ethnic community and home stays with non-English speaking families. This course is usually held in Mexico during Discovery Module. • Field experience. Students are required to complete a 400-hour internship, putting studies into practice under the direction of an on-site supervisor and faculty mentor. The student can complete either a global or urban field experience. Students also participate in Trinity’s Service Learning Practicum

program for three years, offering additional “hands on” cross-cultural experiences. • Associate in Ministry. Members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America can complete theological education requirements for becoming an Associate in Ministry as part of the degree program. Application to the degree program Students apply for admission into the Multicultural Studies degree program during Fall Quarter of their sophomore year. Failure to complete the application by this deadline will delay registration in further courses in the department. The student is responsible for any costs incurred in the application process. Requirements A total of 180 credits is required to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Multicultural Studies. Five components make up the degree: 1. Biblical Studies Component (33 credits) a. Required courses (30 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] b. Electives (minimum of 3 credits): BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr] BI 464 Biblical Apocalyptic [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 356, 364, 365 Greek I [4 cr each] GS 461, 462, 463 Greek II [3 cr each] GS 355, 362, 363 Hebrew Language Skills [3 cr each] 2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits): CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr]

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3. General Studies Component (71 credits) a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr] b. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years] c. Humanities and Fine Arts (22 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] Fine Arts (3 credits required) d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (19 credits): GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] MC 367 Language and Culture Acquisition [4 cr] MC 463 Perspectives on Urban Mission [3 cr] MC 466 Cultural Anthropology and Communication [4 cr] e. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] f. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr] 4. Multicultural Studies Major (50-53 credits): Suggested sequence: MC 261 Missionary Enterprise [4 cr] MC 367 Language and Culture Acquisition [4 cr] MC 263 World Religions [3 cr] MC 401 Perspectives on Urban Mission [3 cr] MC 403 Cross-Cultural Evangelism [2 cr] MC 363 Historical Dynamics of the Christian Movement [3 cr] MC 300 Special Topic Seminar [3 cr] MN 371 Dynamics of Administration [4 cr] MC 466 Cultural Anthropology and Communication [4 cr] MC 480 Field Experience Prep [1 cr] MC 481 Field Experience [15 cr] or MC 485 Field Experience [12 cr] MC 402 Church Planting and Growth [4 cr] MC 465 Biblical Theology of Mission [3 cr]

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5. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following: • A total of 180 credits. • A total of 60 upper-level credits (300 or 400 level). • At least three Multicultural Studies courses (Multicultural Studies majors satisfy this requirement by completing coursework in the major). • Three Discovery Modules.

Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) in Multicultural Studies Overview The Certificate in Professional Studies program is designed as a continuing education opportunity to develop new skills or update previous learning. To enter the program, students must hold a bachelor’s degree in any discipline. By combining biblical studies with courses in multicultural studies or missions, students strengthen their personal faith and increase their skills for ministry in a specific area. As a full-time student, the certificate can be completed in three quarters (one year). Students design their own program with the assistance of a faculty advisor. Most prerequisites are waived for students in this program, with the permission of the course instructor. Requirements A total of 46 credits is required to earn a Certificate of Professional Studies. Four components make up the certificate program: 1. Biblical Studies and Theology Component At least 15 credits must be completed in biblical studies or biblical theology (courses designated as BI or BT), including CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study. 2. Multicultural Studies Component At least 20 credits must be completed in multicultural studies (courses designated as MC). 3. Service Learning Practicum Component GS 302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter] 4. Electives Students take additional courses as electives to reach the minimum 46 credits required.


Music & Worship Department The Music & Worship Department offers the following areas of study:

• • • •

Bachelor of Arts in Music & Worship Certificate of Professional Studies in Music & Worship Specialized studies for Associate in Ministry candidates (see page 60) Enrichment studies (see page 62)

Bachelor of Arts in Music & Worship Overview The Bachelor of Arts degree in Music & Worship is designed to equip students for work as music and worship leaders in congregations. The goal of this department is to develop leaders grounded in knowledge of the Bible; skilled in changing worship styles, music and technology; trained in program administration, and staff and congregation relations; appreciative of lasting traditions; and possessing vision for music ministry. Like all Trinity degree programs, the degree in Music & Worship features well-rounded study in a variety of disciplines, including biblical and religious studies, natural and social sciences, and the humanities. Theory meets practice, as Music & Worship students are challenged and prepared to lead the people of God in the song of the church for a new century. Distinctives of Trinity’s Music & Worship degree • A faculty of working professionals. Music and worship instructors work in the areas of their expertise, equipping the Trinity student with practical ideas for flourishing on the front lines of parish music and worship ministry. • Field experience. Students are required to complete a 400-hour internship, putting studies into practice under the direction of an on-site supervisor and faculty mentor. Students also participate in Trinity’s Service Learning Practicum program for a minimum of three years, offering additional “hands on” experiences. • Music Lab. Students have access to state-of-theart music notation and sequencing programs and equipment in Trinity’s Music Lab. Additional music and worship resources, including periodical publications, a choral library and practice studios, are also available.

Application to the degree program Students apply for admission into the Music & Worship degree program during Fall Quarter of their sophomore year. Failure to complete the application by this deadline will delay registration in further courses in the department. The student is responsible for any costs incurred in the application process. Requirements A total of 180 credits is required to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Music & Worship. Six components make up the degree: 1. Biblical Studies Component (33 credits) a. Required courses (26 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] b. Electives (minimum of 7 credits): BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr] BI 464 Biblical Apocalyptic [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 356, 364, 365 Greek I [4 cr each] GS 461, 462, 463 Greek II [3 cr each] GS 355, 362, 363 Hebrew Language Skills [3 cr each] 2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits): CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr] 3. General Studies Component (67 credits) a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr] b. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years]

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c. Humanities and Fine Arts (22 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] MW 102 Choir [1 cr each for three quarters] d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (15 credits): BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] [4 credits of GS102/202 Service Learning Practicum may be applied to this category.] e. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] f. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr] 4. Music & Worship Major (52-54 credits) Suggested sequence: MW 150 Music Theory I [1 cr] MW 151 Music Theory II [1 cr] MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry [3 cr] MW 262 Choral Conducting I [2 cr] MW 266 Musical Theatre [2 cr] MW 263 Music & Worship for Children and Families [2 cr] MW 330 Church Music History [3 cr] MW 362 Choral Conducting II [2 cr] MW 371 Church Music Repertoire/ Performance Practice [3 cr] MW 264 Composition/Arranging for the Church Musician [2 cr] MW 331 Hymnody and Song [3 cr] MW 475 Worship Planning and Music Leadership [2 cr] MN 371 Dynamics of Administration [4 cr] MW 481 Field Experience [15 cr] MW 300 Special Topic Seminar [1-3 cr] MW 487 Worship and Evangelism Seminar [2 cr] MW 488 Senior Recital [1 cr] MW 202 Choir [1 cr each for three quarters]

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5. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following: • A total of 180 credits. • A total of 60 upper-level credits (300 or 400 level). • Three Multicultural Studies courses (one course, MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions, is already required). • Three Discovery Modules. 6. Additional Degree Requirements In addition to the requirements listed above, students will need to complete the following: • A minimum of six quarters in the Trinity Choir. (Three credits of MW 102 count toward the Humanities and Fine Arts requirement; three credits of MW 202 count toward the major.) Membership in the choir is required for enroll ment in MW 262/362 Choral Conducting I & II, typically the second and third years of the program. • A minimum of one year in MW 160/360 Touring Ensemble. • Applied Arts requirements. The student must demonstrate proficiency in voice, piano, guitar and music theory (includes harmony and ear training). The student may test out of these areas at any time (testing guidelines are avail able from the department). The student may satisfy the proficiency requirement by success fully completing two quarters of Applied Arts instruction in that area of study. There are additional costs for taking Applied Arts lessons. • Senior Recital. The student must demonstrate performance proficiency in voice, piano, guitar and rudimentary music composition in a graded recital presented Spring Quarter of the student’s senior year. • Minimum of one year involvement on studentled Worship Commission.


Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) in Music & Worship Overview The Certificate in Professional Studies program is designed as a continuing education opportunity to develop new skills or update previous learning. To enter the program, students must hold a bachelor’s degree in any discipline. By combining biblical studies with courses in music and worship, students strengthen their personal faith and increase their skills for ministry in a parish setting. As a full-time student, the certificate can be completed in three quarters (one year). Students design their own program with the assistance of the head of the Music & Worship Department. Most prerequisites are waived for students in this program, with the permission of the course instructor. Requirements A total of 46 credits are required to earn a Certificate of Professional Studies. Four components make up the certificate program: 1. Biblical Studies and Theology Component At least 15 credits must be completed in biblical studies or biblical theology (courses designated as BI or BT). 2. Music & Worship Component At least 20 credits must be completed in music and worship (courses designated as MW), including MW 105 Worship and MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry. 3. Service Learning Practicum Component GS 302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter] 4. Electives Students take additional courses as electives to reach the minimum 46 credits required.

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Youth & Family Ministry Department The Youth & Family Ministry Department offers the following areas of study:

• • • •

Bachelor of Arts in Youth & Family Ministry Certificate of Professional Studies in Youth & Family Ministry Specialized studies for Associate in Ministry candidates (see page 60) Enrichment studies (see page 62)

Bachelor of Arts in Youth & Family Ministry Overview A Bachelor of Arts in Youth & Family Ministry offers excellent preparation for designing and administering an effective youth and family ministry in a congregation, para-church organization, agency, or other nonprofit organization that serves young people and families. Our graduates typically serve as youth and family ministers, Christian educators, camp directors, pastors, counselors, social workers and teachers. Coursework in the degree program provides a multi-disciplined education in biblical and religious studies, youth and family ministry, social and behavioral sciences, and the humanities. Courses in the major allow students to understand the biblical and theological foundations for youth and family ministry; design, administer, and evaluate effective ministry programs; and meet the social, psychological, and spiritual needs of young people and families. Students are also prepared for graduate-level studies in counseling, social work, education, or pastoral ministry. Students, in conversation with department faculty and an academic advisor, have the opportunity to specialize their degree program within the field of youth and family ministry. Specialized interests include pre-counseling studies, early childhood education, Christian education, and missions. Distinctives of Trinity’s Youth & Family Ministry degree • A caring faculty with a variety of perspectives. Faculty work one-on-one with students to create an academic plan and provide mentoring to assist them in discovering their call. There are currently five faculty members who teach courses in the major, offering a rich variety of perspectives in the classroom. Professors have youth ministry experience in congregations, agencies, and/or nonprofit organizations.

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• Field experience. Students are required to complete a 400-hour internship, putting studies into practice under the direction of an on-site supervisor and faculty mentor. Students also participate in Trinity’s Service Learning Practicum program for a minimum of three years, offering additional “hands on” experiences. • Children, Youth & Family Center. Students have access to a resource center with a collection of books, resources, periodicals, and curriculum samples in the areas of youth and family ministry and Christian education. • Associate in Ministry. Members of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America can complete theological education requirements for becoming an Associate in Ministry as part of the degree program. Application to the degree program Students apply for admission into the Youth & Family Ministry degree program during Fall Quarter of their sophomore year. Failure to complete the application by this deadline will delay registration in further courses in the department. Students must be accepted into the degree program to enroll in upper-level courses required in the major. The student is responsible for any costs incurred in the application process. Requirements A total of 180 credits is required to earn a Bachelor of Arts in Youth & Family Ministry. Five components make up the degree: 1. Biblical Studies Component (33 credits) a. Required courses (26 credits): BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 264 Corinthians & Romans [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] b. Electives (minimum of 7 credits): BI 102 History of Israel [4 cr] BI 201 Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr] BI 464 Biblical Apocalyptic [3 cr] BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] BT 263 Social Ethics [3 cr] GS 356, 364, 365 Greek I [4 cr each] GS 461, 462, 463 Greek II [3 cr each] GS 355, 362, 363 Hebrew Language Skills [3 cr each]


2. Religious Studies Component (12 credits): CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study [2 cr] CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church [4 cr] MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MW 105 Worship [3 cr]

5. Electives In addition to the required courses listed above, students will need to accumulate elective credits to complete the following:

• •

3. General Studies Component (70 credits)

• a. College Preparation (1 credit): GS 101 College 101 [1 cr, F]

• b. Service Learning Practicum (9 credits): GS 102/202/302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter, for a minimum of three years] c. Humanities and Fine Arts (22 credits): GS 121 English Composition I [5 cr] GS 123 English Composition II [3 cr] GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy [4 cr] GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 273 Public Speaking [4 cr] Fine Arts (3 credits required) d. Social and Behavioral Sciences (18 credits): GS 144 Introduction to Sociology [4 cr] GS 243 Introduction to Psychology [4 cr] MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] YF 461 Adolescent Development [3 cr] e. Mathematics (8 credits): GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences [4 cr] GS 245 Introduction to Statistics [4 cr] f. Natural Sciences (12 credits): GS 249 Astronomy [4 cr] GS 250 Human Physiology [4 cr] GS 251 Earth Science and the Ecosystem [4 cr] 4. Youth & Family Ministry Major (51 credits) Suggested sequence: YF 201 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry [3 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] YF 205 Programming for Youth Ministry [4 cr] MN 361 Introduction to Counseling [4 cr] MN 364 Specialized Counseling Issues [4 cr] YF 365 Designs for Family Ministry [3 cr] MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry [4 cr] YF 461 Adolescent Development [3 cr] MN 371 Dynamics of Administration [4 cr] YF 481 Field Experience [15 cr] MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies [3 cr] YF 468 Contextual Youth & Family Ministry [1 cr]

A total of 180 credits. A total of 60 upper-level credits (300 or 400 level). Three Multicultural Studies courses (one course, MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions, is already required). Three Discovery Modules.

Certificate of Professional Studies (CPS) in Youth & Family Ministry Overview The Certificate in Professional Studies program is designed as a continuing education opportunity to develop new skills or update previous learning. To enter the program, students must hold a bachelor’s degree in any discipline. By combining biblical studies with courses in youth and family ministry, students strengthen their personal faith and increase their skills for ministry in a specific area. As a full-time student, the certificate can be completed in three quarters (one year). Students design their own program with the assistance of a faculty advisor. Most prerequisites are waived for students in this program, with the permission of the course instructor. Requirements A total of 46 credits is required to earn a Certificate of Professional Studies. Four components make up the certificate program: 1. Biblical Studies and Theology Component At least 15 credits must be completed in biblical studies or biblical theology (courses designated as BI or BT). 2. Youth & Family Ministry Component At least 20 credits must be completed in youth and family ministries (courses designated as CE, MN, or YF), including CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church, MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies, and YF 468 Contextual Youth & Family Ministry. 3. Service Learning Practicum Component GS 302 Service Learning Practicum [1 cr per quarter] 4. Electives Students take additional courses as electives to reach the minimum 46 credits required.

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Associate in Ministry Education Requirements Overview Trinity Lutheran College, in partnership with the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA) Division for Ministry, presents a curriculum that fulfills the theological education requirements for becoming an Associate in Ministry. Students must contact their synod’s candidacy committee before enrolling in this program. An Associate in Ministry (AIM) is a person recognized, commissioned, and called by the ELCA as a lay minister in the area of social service, the arts, Christian education, youth ministry, administration, or other area of specialized ministry. To become commissioned as an AIM, students must complete a bachelor’s degree, basic theological education, 600 hours of approved supervised field experience, and be approved for call by the ELCA. Options for completing theological education The theological education guidelines require 20 semester hours or 30 quarters hours of instruction, with at least one course in each of the following: Old Testament, New Testament, Lutheran theology and confessional writings, systematic theology, and Lutheran church history (including North American context). Students can complete their theological education at Trinity in several ways: 1. 2. 3. 4.

In 20 weeks of study (Fall and Winter Quarters), In Fall Quarter the first year, followed by Winter Quarter the second year, As a part-time student, over an extended period of time, or As part of a bachelor’s degree program at Trinity.

Options for completing specialized studies In addition to necessary theological education, students may also complete specialized studies in Christian Education, Early Childhood Education, Youth & Family Ministry, Multicultural Studies, or Music & Worship at Trinity, as directed by the candidacy committee. Options for completing field experience AIM candidates must also complete 600 hours of approved supervised field experience. If approved by a synod candidacy committee, students may

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participate in Trinity’s Service Learning Practicum program during two quarters of study to fulfill 60 hours of supervised field experience. If students choose a quarter of internship during the Spring Quarter, they may complete 400 hours of supervised field experience and receive college credit. Students must gain approval from their synod candidacy committee before completing hours in this way. Suggested courses The following are suggested courses the college offers during Fall and Winter Quarters that meet AIM theological education requirements. Suggested courses in areas of specialized study are also listed. Students should consult the college catalog and contact their synod candidacy committee for information regarding other courses that may qualify. Biblical Studies - Old Testament BI 101 Pentateuch [4 cr] BI 262 Prophets I [4 cr] BI 302 Psalms [3 cr] BI 463 Prophets II [4 cr] Biblical Studies - New Testament BI 103 Synoptic Gospels [4 cr] BI 362 Hebrews and the General Epistles [4 cr] BI 363 Johannine Literature [4 cr] BI 364 Prison Epistles [4 cr] Introduction to Systematic Theology BT 103 Theology of the Triune God [3 cr] Lutheran Theology and Confessional Writings BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church [3 cr] Lutheran Church History GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization [3 cr] GS 266 American Lutheran Church History [offered occasionally] Specialized Studies in Christian Education CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education [3 cr] CE 362 Children’s Ministries [3 cr] Specialized Studies in Early Childhood Education ECE 211 Theory & Practice in Early Childhood Education [3 cr] ECE 461 Child Growth and Development [3 cr]


Specialized Studies in Multicultural Studies MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions [3 cr] MC 261 Missionary Enterprise [4 cr] MC 401 Perspectives on Urban Mission [3 cr] Specialized Studies in Music & Worship MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry [3 cr] MW 262/362 Choral Conducting [2 cr] MW 102 Choir [1 cr each] Specialized Studies in Youth & Family Ministry YF 201 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry [3 cr] YF 205 Programming for Youth Ministry [4 cr] YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems [3 cr] Courses mentioned above are suggested areas of study; other courses may be substituted. Before registering for courses, consult both your candidacy committee and the department head of your area of specialization.

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Master of Arts in Education Transfer Program with Pacific Lutheran University Overview Students at Trinity Lutheran College may apply to the Master of Arts in Education (with teacher certification) Program at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Wash. Coursework in this program emphasizes teaching at the middle school-aged level and allows students to obtain a bachelor’s degree from Trinity and a master’s degree from PLU in approximately 5.25 years. PLU allows Trinity students to participate in their December Decision admission process. The process involves a written application, due by November 15 of the year preceding admission, and an interview experience with PLU faculty. Distinctives of the Trinity/PLU transfer program • Tradition. Trinity and PLU are both Christian colleges of the Lutheran tradition, with a goal of preparing leaders to work in the church or society. Completing a bachelor’s degree at Trinity provides a solid foundation in biblical and religious studies. • Credit transfer. PLU will recognize Trinity credits, without requiring additional coursework to enter into the master’s degree program. • Student teaching. For student teaching purposes, Trinity students may be placed in districts farther north than PLU’s usual Tacoma-area sites, when the number of participants and an appropriate placement site can be negotiated. • Teacher certification. Upon earning a master’s degree from PLU, students can be certified by the State of Washington to teach grades K-8.

Enrichment Studies Overview Trinity Lutheran College believes in the value of lifelong learning and encourages individuals to pursue continued education for personal or professional development. Courses can be taken for college credit (graded) or for audit (non-graded). Call the Office of Admission for available courses and registration fees. Enrichment students will be assigned a faculty advisor who will work with the student in designing a program of study. Courses can be selected from across the curriculum without regard to sequencing. If prerequisites are not met, students can ask for an exception by filing a Waiver of Prerequisite form (available in the Registrar’s Office), which must be signed by the course instructor.

Enrolling in a degree program After taking courses for personal enrichment, students may wish to pursue an Associate of Biblical Studies (two-year) or Bachelor of Arts (four-year) degree at Trinity. Any student taking coursework out of sequence may have difficulty in scheduling courses should they decide to continue in a regular degree program. Additionally, courses taken for audit (non-graded) cannot later be converted to college credit (graded). Audited courses would need to be retaken in order for the credits to be applied to any Trinity degree. If there is a possibility that the student may later decide to seek a degree, the student is encouraged to take courses in the proper sequence and according to course prerequisites.

Senior citizens Requirements 1.

2.

3. 4.

Attendance at a gathering of interested Trinity students with a representative from the PLU faculty, during the junior or senior year. Students must complete any bachelor’s degree from Trinity before transferring to PLU. Trinity students must complete PLU’s application process on time. There is no guarantee of admittance into PLU’s master’s degree program.

For more information about the scope and requirements of this transfer program, contact the Christian Education Department Head.

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As a courtesy, senior citizens (65 years of age or older) may audit one course per quarter for $100 on a space-available basis. (Travel courses are not included.)


Course Descriptions

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Course Descriptions

BI 103 (4 credits)

Courses required for specific programs of study are noted at the end of each course description using the following abbreviations: ABS = Associate of Biblical Studies BABS = Bachelor of Arts in Biblical Studies CE = Bachelor of Arts in Christian Education CPS = Certificate of Professional Studies ECE = Bachelor of Arts in Early Childhood Education MCS = Bachelor of Arts in Multicultural Studies MW = Bachelor of Arts in Music & Worship YF = Bachelor of Arts in Youth & Family Ministry

Matthew, Mark, Luke

Courses that satisfy the Fine Arts requirement are noted as “(FA)” at the end of appropriate course descriptions. Courses that satisfy the Multicultural Studies requirement are noted as “(MC)” at the end of appropriate course descriptions. Writing intensive courses are designated after the course title.

Examines the person and mission of Jesus Christ, as presented in the three Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. The course focuses on one of the three Gospels, makes comparisons with the other two, and explores the nature and extent of the synoptic relationship. Issues such as historical context, canon history, and interpretational methodologies are introduced. (Required for all majors and ABS) BI 109 (2 credits)

BI 101 (4 credits)

Pentateuch Fall Quarter

Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy Explores the first five books of the Old Testament to impart a deeper appreciation of God’s great acts in creation and history. The course shows God’s intervention in the lives of his people as they respond to his faithfulness and love. It further sheds light on God’s revelation of himself as Yahweh, and examines God’s covenant relationship with Israel and the greater fulfillment of that covenant in Jesus. (Required for all majors and ABS) BI 102 (4 credits)

History of Israel Spring Quarter 2007

Joshua through Nehemiah Reveals God’s faithfulness in his love and care for his people as shown through the stages of history from Joshua to Nehemiah. The course follows the kingdom of Israel from its beginning to its fall, observing the suffering of its people under captivity and their renewed hope as they return to the land. This course provides a background for the study of the prophetic literature. (Option 1 for BABS and ABS)

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The Sermon on the Mount Offered occasionally

Offers an in-depth, detailed study of crucial sections of the Gospels. Course includes several perspectives, including Jewish, Lutheran, Reformed, and Peace Churches. BI 201 (4 credits)

Biblical Studies

Synoptic Gospels Winter Quarter

Acts, Galatians, and Apostolic Fathers Spring Quarter 2006

Examines the course the early Church took as it spread beyond the narrow confines of Palestine and Asia Minor to infiltrate the farthest reaches of the Roman Empire. Attention in the Book of Acts focuses on the turbulent growth of the primitive Jewish church and the phenomenal expansion of the Gentile church through the missionary labors of St. Paul. Galatians opens a window into one of the crucial controversies in the early Church, the question of whether Gentile converts needed to embrace the Old Testament law, and develops the doctrine of justification by faith and its application to life. The theology of the apostolic fathers in the first and second centuries is explored. (Option 1 for BABS and ABS) BI 262 (4 credits)

Prophets I Winter Quarter

Isaiah, Hosea, Amos, Micah Introduces the Old Testament prophet in terms of qualifications, function, and message; and explores the prophet’s relationship to Yahweh, God’s people, and the times. The course studies Isaiah, centering on his historical setting, focal teachings, rhetorical power, and the application of his message to the New Testament. This course also examines three other prophetic books that address the same time period. (Required for all majors and ABS) Prerequisite: BI 101 Pentateuch; CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study must be taken concurrently.


BI 263 (2 credits)

Gospel of John Winter Quarter

Provides the opportunity to study the person of Jesus Christ from a bifocal (divine-human) perspective as he is presented in the Fourth Gospel. It views Jesus’ claims and signs as witnesses that he is the Christ and that believing in his name brings life. (Required for ABS) Prerequisite: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study BI 264 (4 credits)

Corinthians & Romans (Writing Intensive) Spring Quarter

1 Corinthians, Romans

BI 311 (3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar Biblical Studies Offered occasionally

Holy Land Studies Tour Discovery Module; Offered occasionally

An on-site study of the land, cultures, and history of Israel. Pre-tour orientation prepares the student for field and classroom work through the Jerusalem Center for Biblical Studies. (MC) BI 331 (2 credits)

Presents St. Paul’s teaching of Christ and his cross. With an emphasis on 1 Corinthians, the course explores the Corinthian correspondence, which represents a theological dialogue between a pastor and his congregation. Paul’s letter to the church in Rome is also explored for its rich theological concepts such as Christology, sin, justification, sanctification, ethics, and judgment. (Required for all majors and ABS) Prerequisites: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study; GS 123 English Composition II BI 300

understanding and appreciation of the Bible’s message. Classroom presentations and personal research increase appreciation of the background picture into which the people and events of the Bible fit.

Gospel of Matthew Offered occasionally

Presents Jesus as the one who fulfills Old Testament prophecy and the King who is coming again. This course focuses special attention on the teachings of Jesus for the life of the Church. BI 333 (2 credits)

Pastoral Epistles Offered occasionally

1, 2 Timothy, Titus

Examines special topics in biblical studies to broaden curriculum and better understand specific subjects related to this area of study. May utilize a workshop or seminar as the format for the course.

This course examines the letters to Timothy and Titus that deal with the church and its ministry. These epistles deal with a variety of ministerial concerns such as church organization, duties of ministry, “sound doctrine,” and the issues related to the church in, but not of, the world. Prerequisites: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study; BI 264 Corinthians & Romans

BI 302 (3 credits)

BI 338 (2 credits)

(1-3 credits)

Psalms Fall Quarter 2005

Examines Hebrew poetry and hymnody as expressed in Israel’s and the Church’s prayer-book, the Psalms. The course explores this literature analytically and devotionally. (Required for all majors) BI 310 (2 credits)

Biblical Culture & Archaeology Offered occasionally

Instills a deeper understanding of the people and cultures of the biblical world. It examines the manners and customs of daily life in both the Old and New Testaments and investigates the archaeological discoveries pertaining to biblical lands, to enrich

Wisdom Literature Offered occasionally

Job, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and others This course examines the writings and theology of Hebrew Wisdom Literature, its relation to Near Eastern Wisdom traditions and the role of Wisdom in the teachings of Jesus and the New Testament. Along with a discussion of the historical and theological contexts of Wisdom Literature, this class explores the practical and ethical implications of Wisdom teaching for contemporary Christian living. Important themes addressed include the problem of suffering, principles of decision-making, speech ethics and character formation.

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BI 339 (2 credits)

The Five Scrolls Offered occasionally

Ruth, Esther, Song of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, Lamentations Studies five of the shorter Old Testament books, which have been gathered up by the Jewish community as “The Scrolls” and read regularly as the scripture texts for five Jewish festivals. This course examines the message of Ruth, Esther, Song of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, and Lamentations for the times in which they were written, for later Israel and the Church, and for the daily life of the believer today. BI 340 (2 credits)

Gospel of Mark Offered occasionally

Presents the Gospel’s powerful portrayal of Jesus’ life, death, and resurrection. Mark raises two potent questions: “Who is Jesus?” and “What does it mean to follow Jesus?” This course lets Mark challenge students with the claims and call of Christ. BI 362 (4 credits)

Hebrews and the General Epistles Fall Quarter 2005

Hebrews, James, 1-2 Peter, Jude Studies the message of several New Testament books, which appear to have been written to a wider or “general” audience. Hebrews encourages the believer to live with bold and confident trust in Jesus, who is presented as the fulfillment of the Old Testament. James addresses matters of faithful daily living in Christ and insists that “faith without deeds is dead.” 1 Peter is a summary of Christian proclamation and practice. 2 Peter addresses the doctrine of the second coming of Christ. Jude warns against the influence of those who falsify their faith by immoral conduct. (Option 2 for BABS) Prerequisite: BI 264 Corinthians & Romans BI 363 (4 credits)

Johannine Literature (Writing Intensive) Winter Quarter

John, 1-3 John Explores the Fourth Gospel, researching John’s handling of the divine and human person of Jesus Christ, his call to faith in Jesus’ name, his proclamation of eternal life as a future gift yet already “real-

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ized” in the life of the believer, and his vision of the fulfillment of all things in the person of Jesus. The student follows several distinctive Johannine motifs that are woven into the literary fabric of the Fourth Gospel. The three letters of John extend the main themes of the Gospel—especially eternal life, abiding in Christ, and love for one another—and apply them to specific controversies faced by Johannine congregations in Asia Minor. (Required for all majors except ABS) Prerequisites: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study; BI 103 Synoptic Gospels; GS 123 English Composition II BI 364 (4 credits)

Prison Epistles Fall Quarter 2006

Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, Philemon Studies four books commonly called the “Prison Epistles.” Ephesians teaches that the Church is the body of Christ and that the immeasurable grace of God enables that body to live out its life in this world. Philippians focuses on the self-emptying of Christ as a model for the Church’s communal life. Colossians confronts the heretical teachings of this world with the assurance that Christ is the world’s hope and guarantee of a full life with God. Philemon is a personal letter to a fellow-Christian about a runaway slave. (Option 2 for BABS) Prerequisite: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study BI 371 (2 credits)

Intertestamental Period Offered occasionally

Surveys the history and literature of Palestine during the last four centuries before Christ. Often called “the four hundred silent years,” this period was anything but quiet for the Jews: It was a period of tremendous upheaval, both politically and spiritually. A better understanding of this period sets the political and religious stage for the New Testament and provides a clearer picture of who Jesus is.

BI 463 (4 credits)

Prophets II Fall Quarter 2006

Jeremiah, Ezekiel, Habakkuk, and others Explores the prophetic books that address the years leading up to and immediately following the fall of Jerusalem. The course explores Jeremiah’s message during the final days of the kingdom of Judah. Ezekiel addresses the exiled community in Babylonia with words of judgment and promises of restoration


to the land. Some of the minor prophets, such as Habakkuk, also address this same time period and are examined in this course. (Option 3 for BABS) Prerequisites: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study; BI 262 Prophets I BI 464 (3 credits)

Biblical Apocalyptic Spring Quarter 2007

Daniel, Revelation, and others Examines a type of literature that calls Christians to patient endurance in difficult times and gives hope for the future. This literature is related to, yet different from, most prophetic writings. This course studies the two chief apocalyptic books of the Bible, Daniel and Revelation, in light of the various ways of interpreting them. The course looks briefly at other examples of apocalyptic literature. (Option 3 for BABS) Prerequisites: BI 262 Prophets I; junior status

Biblical Theology BT 103 (3 credits)

Theology of the Triune God Fall Quarter

BT 263 (3 credits)

Social Ethics Spring Quarter 2006

Grapples with such human concerns as ecology, population problems, drug addiction, government, church/state relations, racial relations, and human sexuality in an endeavor to secure guidance for individual choices. The course explores the decision making role of Christians both individually and in community, emphasizing the importance of Scripture in the process. (Required for BABS and MW majors, and ABS) Prerequisite: BT 103 Theology of the Triune God BT 300 (1-3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar Biblical Theology Offered occasionally

Examines special topics in biblical theology to broaden curriculum and better understand specific subjects related to this area of study. May utilize a workshop or seminar as the format for the course. BT 301 (2 credits)

Christian Hope, Angels, & Eschatology Offered occasionally

Explores the fundamental doctrines of Christian faith, organized in terms of the three articles of the classic Trinitarian creeds. It explores first-article biblical teachings: God, creation, providence, humanity, and sin; second-article teachings: Jesus Christ (human and divine), justification and salvation; and third-article teachings: the Holy Spirit, vocation and sanctification, the Church, resurrection, and eternal life. (Required for all majors and ABS)

Focuses on Scripture that considers the beginning and the growth of Christian hope, the reality and work of angels as God’s messengers, and the dangers of over-fascination with the presence of angels in our society today. The course also deals with issues relating to the finalities of life on earth, the second coming of Christ, and the final judgment.

BT 262

BT 354 (1.5 credits)

(3 credits)

Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church Winter Quarter

Examines the Christian Scriptures and the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Communion as the means of grace God has given to the Church to create and maintain faith. Topics of importance relating to the Word, such as revelation, inspiration, authority, and canon formation, are considered as well as the use of the Word in Christian worship and proclamation. Explores the biblical basis for the sacraments and considers how they can be meaningfully used in the life of the individual and the ministry of the local congregation. (Required for BABS and ABS) Prerequisite: BT 103 Theology of the Triune God

Prayer in the Bible

Aids spiritual growth by (1) laying a biblical and theological foundation for approaching spirituality, (2) investigating the major traditions of spirituality in the Christian church and some of the classics of devotion, and (3) enabling and guiding the construction of a personal Christian spirituality for today. The fall module lays the groundwork in Bible and theology, with special attention to prayer in the Bible. BT 355 (1.5 credits)

History of Christian Spirituality

Aids spiritual growth by (1) laying a biblical and theological foundation for approaching spirituality, (2) investigating the major traditions of spirituality in the Christian church and some of the classics of devotion, and (3) enabling and guiding the construc-

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tion of a personal Christian spirituality for today. The winter module explores major themes in the history of Christian spirituality. BT 356 (1.5 credits)

Constructing a Spirituality for Today

Aids spiritual growth by (1) laying a biblical and theological foundation for approaching spirituality, (2) investigating the major traditions of spirituality in the Christian church and some of the classics of devotion, and (3) enabling and guiding the construction of a personal Christian spirituality for today. The spring module brings the story of Christian spirituality into the twenty-first century, and guides the student in the construction of his or her own spirituality. BT 361 (3 credits)

Contemporary Theology Offered occasionally

Focuses on theologians and movements of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. This course is an introduction to the challenge of continually relating the Christian faith to a changing world. Prerequisites: BI 103 Synoptic Gospels; BT 103 Theology of the Triune God. BT 369 (3 credits)

History of Christian Thought Fall Quarter 2005

Presents the origin and development of Christian doctrines from a biblical-historical perspective. It covers the history of such doctrines as the nature of Christ, the Trinity, the Holy Spirit, original sin, and atonement from the time of the early church through modern times. Prerequisite: GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization BT 462 (3 credits)

Biblical Theology Seminar (Writing Intensive) Spring Quarter

BT 463 (3 credits)

Primarily intended for pre-seminary students but open to all, this course introduces current issues and tools of biblical interpretation. Examines both historical critical methodology and more recent approaches to interpretation. This course explores the assumptions behind modern methods and the possibilities and limits of their use. The working presumption of the course is that the Bible is a human word that can be studied with the aid of literary tools and is, at the same time, God’s word through and through, calling God’s people to reverent listening. (Required for BABS) Prerequisites: BT 103 Theology of the Triune God; BT 262 Theology of Word & Sacrament in the Church; CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study; BI 103 Synoptic Gospels; senior status BT 464

(3 credits)

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Senior Special Topic Biblical Studies (Writing Intensive) Winter Quarter

This course functions as a guided independent senior thesis in which the student pursues a special topic of his or her own interest. (Required for BABS) Prerequisite: senior status

Christian Education CE 101 (2 credits)

Keys to Inductive Bible Study Winter Quarter

Introduces inductive Bible study skills and provides practice in observing, interpreting, and applying the messages of Scripture. Involves a study of the Book of James. (Required for all majors and ABS) CE 102 (4 credits)

Uses research, presentations, and discussion to explore biblical theology. Examines the relationship of biblical theology to systematic theology. Approach may vary according to instructor. (Required for BABS) Prerequisite: senior status; BT 463 Issues in Hermeneutics strongly recommended

Issues in Hermeneutics Winter Quarter

Methods of Teaching in the Church Spring Quarter

Introduces the basic theories of the educational process, including learning characteristics and teaching methodologies. Develops practical skills for teaching in the church for children, youth and adult programs. Applying KEYS Bible study skills to a variety of teaching situations will be explored. (Required for all majors and ABS) Prerequisite: CE 101 Keys to Inductive Bible Study


CE 202 (3 credits)

Foundations for Christian Education Fall Quarter

Introduces the purposes, contexts and processes of an effective Christian education program within the congregational setting. Provides an overview of the field of Christian education and the role of the teacher. Considers various components within the vocation of Christian education. Additional fee. (Required for CE major) CE 212 (2 credits)

Summer Programming for Children Fall Quarter 2005

Explores facets of summer activities with children in the church with a focus on Vacation Bible School, day camping, and event planning. Course will include the planning and implementation of a campus event for elementary-age children. (Required for CE major) CE 220 (3 credits)

Children’s Literature Spring Quarter 2006

Explores historical and contemporary works in literature for children ages toddler through 12. Content includes the history of children's literature, child development and literature, the elements of literature, the variety of genres, and book awards. Course will include an exploration of multicultural issues and expressions of Christian faith found in children's literature. (Required for CE and ECE majors) Prerequisites: CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church; GS 123 English Composition II CE 300 (0.5-3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar – Christian Education Offered occasionally

Studies special topics in the field of Christian education to broaden the curriculum and increase skills in teaching within or managing a Christian education program. Format of the course may utilize a workshop or seminar format. CE 305 (2 credits)

Confirmation Fall Quarter 2006

Explores the theology and cultural history of confirmation instruction and develops skills for evaluation of current confirmation practices. (Recommended for CE major) Prerequisites: CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church

CE 310 (3 credits)

Adult Education: Lifelong Learning Winter Quarter

Explores the different learning styles of each stage of adult life while analyzing effective programming for the formal and informal educational needs of adults in a congregational setting. Learning in community as a spiritual journey is explored, including the dynamics of aging and spirituality, resulting in a model of life-long learning for adult Christian education. (Required for CE major) Prerequisite: CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church; CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education; or instructor permission CE 362 (3 credits)

Children’s Ministries Fall Quarter

Explores goals, programs and curricula that are effective in Christian education for children ages infant through 12. Exploration will include spirituality issues, programs for children with special needs, and the needs of children around the world. (Required for CE major) Prerequisite: CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education, YF 201 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry, or instructor permission CE 468 (1 credits)

Contextual Christian Education Spring Quarter

A seminar exploring contextual Christian education programming, life-long learning and faith nurture. (Required for CE major) Prerequisites: MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry; CE/ECE/YF 481 Field Experience; must be taken concurrently with MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies CE 481 (15 credits)

Field Experience Winter Quarter

Offers opportunity for full-time (400 hours) practical experience in a congregation, school, or agency, working with an experienced on-site supervisor. Onsite supervision, mid-term and final evaluations, and a portfolio of required work will be used to evaluate performance. Periodic seminars will be held on campus throughout the term. (Required for CE major) Prerequisites: MN 371 Dynamics of Administration; MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry

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Early Childhood Education

ECE 310 (4 credits)

ECE 102 (1 credits)

Methods of Teaching ECE Spring Quarter

Introduces the process of lesson and theme planning and implementation in the early childhood setting. Concentrates on developing skills in presentation methods in the subject areas of math, science, social studies, language arts, music, movement, art, drama, and spiritual nurture. (Required for ECE major) Must be taken concurrently with CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church ECE 110 (2 credits)

STARS Fall Quarter

Provides the necessary training to meet the Washington State Training and Registry System (STARS) requirements, a career development system required of those who work in licensed childcare and early childhood education. Topics of inquiry and discussion include: an introduction to ages and stages, learning through play, planning activities, communication, guidance techniques, health, nutrition, child safety, and professionalism. (Required for ECE major) ECE 211 (3 credits)

Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education Winter Quarter

Explores the history of early childhood care and education. Explores developmental and learning theories: psychodynamic, behaviorist, cognitive, sociocultural, multiple intelligences, maturation, humanistic, moral, and spiritual. Examines current issues and brain research. Introduces program delivery models: Montessori, Waldorf, Reggio, Emilio, Bos. Introduces observation and evaluation skills. (Required for CE and ECE majors) Prerequisite: CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education ECE 300 (0.5-3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar – Early Childhood Education Offered occasionally

Studies special topics in the field of ECE to broaden the curriculum and to increase understanding of ECE issues in the church or public setting. May include participation in the annual Evangelical Lutheran Education Association (ELEA) regional event.

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Practicum in Early Childhood Education Spring Quarter 2007

Provides supervised observation and teaching experience in a preschool setting. A weekly seminar will link the classroom experience to effective ECE methods and faith development. Topics observed, evaluated, discussed, and taught in this practicum include safety and health, learning environment, physical and cognitive growth, communication, social and creative development, families, program management, and professionalism. (Required for ECE major) Prerequisites: ECE 102 Methods of Teaching ECE; ECE 110 STARS; ECE 211 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education ECE 461 (3 credits)

Child Growth and Development Fall Quarter

Explores basic principles of child development, with special attention to the infant, preschool, and elementary school age child. Course content will include: sequential stages of human development, factors influencing growth and learning, various risk factors and disabling conditions and their impact on growth, cultural and gender diversity among infants and children and their implications for growth, the role of play in development, and the implications of spiritual nurture in the growth of the child. (Required for ECE major) Prerequisite: ECE 211 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education ECE 465 (2 credits)

Diversity in Early Childhood Education Independent Study

Provides independent study, observation, and experience in multicultural, urban, and special needs classrooms. Targeted issues include: implications of developmental delays and disabilities to the classroom, inclusive environments, evaluation of delivery models, self-esteem and respect for individual and group differences, resolving conflict. Community resources will be utilized for observation purposes in this course. Final project presentations will focus on the development of a barrier-free, inclusive, anti-bias classroom. (Required for ECE major) (MC) This course is individualized and can be taken at any time during the final year of study. Prerequisites: GS 144 Introduction to Sociology; ECE 211 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education


ECE 468 (1 credits)

Contextual Early Childhood Education Spring Quarter

Seminar course that explores issues in ECE programming and delivery. Projects include planning, publicizing, and implementing a parent education event and presenting a final, capstone research paper. (Required for ECE major) Prerequisites: MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry; CE/ECE/YF 481 Field Experience; must be taken concurrently with MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies ECE 481 (15 credits)

Field Experience Winter Quarter

Offers opportunity for full-time (400 hours) practical experience in a preschool, home daycare, or agency, working with an experienced on-site supervisor. Onsite supervision, mid-term and final evaluations, and a portfolio of required work will be used to evaluate performance. Periodic seminars will be held on campus throughout the term. (Required for ECE majors) Prerequisites: MN 371 Dynamics of Administration; MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry

General Studies GS 101 (1 credit)

College 101 Fall Quarter

As a study skills and personal development course, this course is an introduction to academic and community life and will expose students to the tools of library research, computer skills (including use of PowerPoint), study habits, and assumption of personal responsibility. Particular emphasis will be placed on accessing, evaluating, and incorporating electronic sources (especially on-line research journals) into research assignments, using proper MLA formatting techniques. Concurrently, the topic of academic plagiarism (both defining and avoiding) will be addressed in depth. (Required for all freshmen and transfer students with less than 45 transferable credits).

GS 102, 202, 302, 402 (1 credit per quarter)

Service Learning Practicum Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Gives practical ministry experience to accomplish the following objectives: (1) to provide opportunity to apply faith to human need; (2) to develop skills that equip the student for a specific ministry; (3) to provide opportunity for service to the church and the community; and (4) to provide a context in which to develop and share a personal witness to Christ in word and deed. Includes regular academic classroom training and on-site practical involvement in a ministry. Grading is P, U, or F. (Nine quarters required for full-time BA students; six quarters required for full-time ABS students. Part-time matriculated students have a required registration of one quarter for every 15 accumulated credits, up to the minimum of nine quarters. CPS students will register for GS 302.) GS 106 (1 credit per quarter)

Aerobic Fitness Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

This is a program of self-selected aerobic exercise, intended to maximize the stewardship of your body as a gift from God. Self-evaluation of general health and goal setting for improvement or maintenance help you select aerobic activities best suited for your body and life-styles. All students are encouraged to consider this practice a lifetime commitment. Some of the self-selected aerobic activities include: swimming, biking, jogging, aerobic walking, soccer, basketball, volleyball, badminton, floor hockey, and water aerobics. Grading is P, U, or F. GS 121 (5 credits)

English Composition I (Writing Intensive) Fall Quarter

Teaches students to write clear, concise, grammatically correct English prose, covering the rudiments of English composition. Reviews parts of speech, punctuation, spelling, and sentence and paragraph construction. Develops analytical reading skills and prepares students for college-level composition. A minimum grade of C is required to meet the General Studies requirement for composition. To waive GS 121, a student must have a transferable English composition course from another accredited college or have received a score of at least 3 on an appropriate high school AP course and achieve a minimum grade of C- on the Trinity writing proficiency test. (Required for all majors and ABS)

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GS 123 (3 credits)

English Composition II (Writing Intensive) Winter Quarter

Enables students to sharpen analytical reading skills and, through the medium of a research project, to continue to practice the critical thinking and writing skills developed in English Composition I. Acquaints students with research resources available at Trinity and covers the entire process of academic writing and research. A minimum grade of C is required to meet the General Studies requirement for composition. (Required for all majors and ABS) Prerequisite: GS 121 English Composition I or waiver GS 144 (4 credits)

Introduction to Sociology Spring Quarter

A comprehensive introduction to the field of sociology including analyses of the mutual interaction of society and the individual, major theoretical perspectives, methods for obtaining sociological knowledge, major problems, and issues which confront societies. Emphasizes general sociological principles as seen from a biblical perspective. (Required for all majors) GS 145 (4 credits)

Mathematics for the Social Sciences Winter Quarter

A study of mathematical applications to business, economics, social sciences, and personal finance. Topics include mathematics of finance, taxes, insurance, and investing. Emphasis is upon application of mathematics to everyday problems, developing reasoning ability, and using technology appropriately. (Required for all majors) GS 201 (3 credits)

Christianity and the Arts Offered occasionally

Explores the historical and biblical use of the arts, the unique characteristics of each art medium (visual, literature, drama, music, and dance), the concept of creativity, aesthetics and criteria, and the use of arts in contemporary culture. Suggests and questions definitions of “Christian� art and challenges students to apply their artistic talents to their ministry, worship, and daily life-styles. (FA) GS 204 (1 credit)

Drama Workshop Offered occasionally

Involves work in one area of the dramatic arts such as playwriting, acting, directing, or play production.

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Opportunities for production include planning, writing, casting, rehearsing, and performing the work, including related technical requirements (lighting, sets, costumes, etc.). Finally, it emphasizes making best use of abilities and resources available in preparing for a congregational setting. (FA) GS 206 (1-3 credits)

Visual Arts Workshop Offered occasionally

Explores various visual art forms, such as drawing and painting, in addition to using different styles and media. Opportunities to explore oil, acrylic or watercolor painting, banner construction, photography, or other liturgical art forms may be offered. (FA) GS 241 (4 credits)

Introduction to Philosophy Fall Quarter

Systematic examination of the major Western philosophies along with a comparison of their respective treatments of the major questions confronting any philosophical system: the existence of God, the problem of evil, the nature of moral value, the theory of knowledge, the nature of reality, and the ethical determination of how we ought to live. (Required for all majors) GS 243 (4 credits)

Introduction to Psychology Spring Quarter

An overview of contemporary psychology which introduces the student to the following areas: human development, sensation, perception, motivation, learning, emotion, psychological measurement, personality, biological basis of behavior, experimental psychology, intelligence, abnormal behavior, and clinical psychology. (Required for all majors) GS 245 (4 credits)

Introduction to Statistics Spring Quarter

Designed to teach the core statistical ideas and some tools to potential users of statistics. Generally, the student will determine when to use a statistical analysis, how to structure and complete a statistical analysis, and how to interpret the results. Topics covered will include the structure of data sets, histograms, means, standard deviations, mathematical structures, and correlation. (Required for all majors) Prerequisite: GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences


GS 249 (4 credits)

Astronomy Spring Quarter

GS 266 (3 credits)

A study of the moon, sky, celestial mechanics, solar system, and the sidereal universe. Also included are the formation and evolution of stars, space-time, black holes and galaxies. Labs include a study of the laws of physics related to the optics of telescopes, evenings in observation, and a weekend field trip. (Required for all majors) GS 250 (4 credits)

Human Physiology Winter Quarter

Studies the designs and functions of the human body. Begins with cell biology, tissue, and membrane functions, and continues with the skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. (Required for all majors) GS 251 (4 credits)

Earth Science and the Ecosystem Fall Quarter

Introduces the nature of science and the use of the scientific method to study earth, physical, and biological sciences. The course is designed to show the numerous and important ways in which air, land, and aquatic systems interrelate with humans. Emphases are on broad concepts and fundamental principles of scientific technological methods, the ecosystem equilibrium, the impacts of technology on the world, and stewardship of the environment. (Required for all majors) GS 264 (1 credit)

Visual Arts Seminar Discovery Module; offered occasionally

This course is designed to introduce and explore the visual arts and their connection to the Church, according to the discretion and interests of the instructor. The course may involve student projects, a field trip, class discussion, and/or individual instructor/student meetings. (FA) GS 265

(3 credits)

The Church & Western Civilization (Writing Intensive) Fall Quarter

Christianity believes in a God who is active in history with a redemptive purpose. This course surveys the people and events contributing to the development of Western civilization and the Church from the late second century to the present. (Required for all majors and ABS) Prerequisite: GS 123 English Composition II

American Lutheran Church History Offered occasionally

A study of American Lutheran Church history through readings, personal reflections, and communal conversation. Readings and written assignments prepare students for participation in threaded discussions conducted weekly via the Internet. Particular attention will be paid to the unique characteristics of Lutheran denominations and synods that continue to influence the Lutheran churches in America today. GS 273 (4 credits)

Public Speaking Spring Quarter

This course develops the principles and art of oral communication, emphasizing preparation, poise, and the execution of public speaking through both prepared and extemporaneous speeches. (Required for all majors) GS 305 (3 credits)

Literature of the Western World Winter Quarter

Explores the development of Western literature from Homer’s Odyssey (ca. 650 B.C.) through the present day. The student will be introduced to a broad sampling of the “Great Books” which highlight the literary legacy of our Western Civilization. Special attention will be given to epic poetry and the four pillars of this genre found in the masterpieces of Homer (Iliad and Odyssey), Vergil (Aeneid), Dante (Divine Comedy), and Milton (Paradise Lost). In addition, the course will highlight works in which the authors combined timeless spiritual insight with extraordinary literary gifts to produce classics of faith expression. GS 307 (2 credits)

Contemporary Jewish Life Discovery Module; offered occasionally

Surveys the important historical and cultural developments that have shaped and defined modern Jewish life, culture and religion. The course will examine issues such as past and present expressions of anti-Semitism, the Holocaust, basic Jewish teachings, Jewish-Christian relationships, Jews in North America, the Land of Israel, Zionism, Jewish celebrations and festivals, rites of passage, worship in the synagogue, Jewish literature, the Israeli/Arab conflict. (MC)

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GS 355, 362, 363 (3 credits per quarter)

Hebrew Language Skills Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

GS 370 (2 credits)

Introduces the fundamentals of the Hebrew language: grammar, word and sentence structure, verbal system, reading, and writing. It also introduces resources and aids for word study and translation. Skills acquired are valuable for use in other coursework and personal Bible study.

Provides an opportunity and learning experience for students interested in creative writing. Fictional and non-fictional prose, playwriting, and poetry are covered. Student is individually accountable to the instructor to produce original, artistic creations. It is a writing-intensive course. (FA) Prerequisite: writing skills assessment by instructor

GS 356, 364, 365 (4 credits per quarter)

GS 461, 462, 463 (3 credits per quarter)

Greek I Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Gives preparation for reading and translating New Testament Greek with sufficient skill to pursue independent study or continue into Second-Year Greek. First-Year Greek stresses vocabulary and grammar. As skill increases, simple New Testament passages will be read. Spring Quarter focuses on translating I John and reviews both the grammar and the vocabulary of the first two quarters. GS 357, 366, 367 (3 credits per quarter)

Latin I Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Introduces basic morphology and syntax of Classical Latin; the course will focus on (1) English vocabulary building through a knowledge of Latin roots, and (2) an understanding of basic Latin grammar. During the spring quarter, students will begin to translate selected Latin texts. Readings will be drawn from Jerome (Letters), Augustine (Confessiones), Prudentius (Poemata Arcana), Bede (Historia Ecclesiastica), and A. A. Milne (Winnie Ille Pu). GS 360 (4 credits)

Reformation History Spring Quarter

Greek II Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Builds reading, translation, and exegesis skills. New Testament readings include epistles and gospels. Exegetical studies are required in the second and third quarters. Prerequisites: GS 365 Greek I

Independent Study IS 301, 401 (1-3 credits)

Independent Study Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Offers opportunity to research, analyze, integrate, and present a subject of personal interest. Subjects are normally interdisciplinary, incorporating biblical and theological foundations. Requirement for sources, length, organization, application, and style are based on academic level. Course is arranged by contract according to guidelines provided by the Registrar. Advising is assigned by the Academic Dean.

Multicultural Studies MC 103

Studies the key events, personalities, and movements that marked the Protestant reformation. The spirit of reform simmered for some 200 years before breaking out with surprising intensity in the 16th century, giving birth to Protestantism and shattering the papal leadership of western Christendom. Three major traditions marked early Protestantism: Lutheran, Reformed, and Anglican. After a generation, the Church of Rome itself, led by the Jesuits, recovered its moral fervor. Bloody struggles between Catholics and Protestants followed and Europe was ravaged by war before it became obvious that western Christendom was permanently divided. (Required for BABS) Prerequisite: GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization

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Creative Writing Seminar Spring Quarter

(3 credits)

Evangelism & Global Missions Winter Quarter

Introduces a biblical basis for evangelism and mission. It is designed to enable you to know and share the Gospel of Jesus Christ clearly and effectively. Explores the dimensions of the unfinished task of world evangelization, the current challenges facing missions (including the challenges of contextualization of the Gospel), and the life-style commitments required to meet those challenges. This course emphasizes the challenge of the Gospel to all the continents on the globe. (Required for all majors and ABS) (MC)


MC 109 (2 credits)

City Encounter Discovery Module; offered occasionally

Explores the life and issues that affect the city and its people. Introduces biblical foundations for urban ministry and surveys historical and contemporary examples of how churches and non-profit organizations have addressed urban issues. A minimal fee will be charged to cover cost of off-campus field observations. (MC) MC 261 (4 credits)

Missionary Enterprise Fall Quarter

By means of extensive exposure to contemporary missiological literature, this course grapples with major issues in the missionary enterprise today— issues which relate to the missionary, such as the call, qualifications, training, and personal adjustment; and issues which relate to the enterprise such as the goal of world evangelization, the uniqueness of Christ, religious pluralism, poverty, injustice, and liberation theology. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisite: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions MC 262 (3 credits)

Variant Religious Movements Spring Quarter

Considers the nature of religion as a human experience, including the historic developments of cults and sects in North America. Examines the psychological and sociological factors that draw people to them, comparing Christianity to the sects, cults, and “New Age” expressions. Clarifies what is distinctive in Christian faith and practice. (MC) MC 263 (3 credits)

World Religions (Writing Intensive) Winter Quarter

Introduces the basic tenets of the world’s major religions with a view toward developing an appreciation for various religious heritages and cultivating an openness toward people. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisites: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions; GS 123 English Composition II MC 300 (1-3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar – Multicultural Studies Spring Quarter

Studies special topics in missiology to broaden curriculum and understand more specific subjects related to the field. It may utilize a workshop or seminar format. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisite: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions

MC 305 (2 credits)

Rural Encounter Discovery Module; offered occasionally

Explores current issues in rural ministry and the church's response to those issues. The rural scene will be examined through movies, documentaries, position statements, and with a field trip to central Washington to visit farms, churches, and agricultural production plants. Additional fee. (MC) MC 307 (3 credits)

African Experience Discovery Module; offered occasionally

Students will travel to the African continent to learn of its history, culture, and religion. The trip offers unique experiences of observation, interaction, and participation through local worship services, guided tours, outside reading, work projects, interviews, and discussions. Each participant will be encouraged to reflect upon and integrate into their lives their new understanding of the greater Church in its expressions and missions. (MC) Prerequisite: junior status MC 308 (3 credits)

Asian Experience Discovery Module; offered occasionally

Students will go to one of the Asian countries, such as India, China, Japan or Taiwan, to learn about the history, culture, and religions of that specific country. The trip will offer opportunities for observation, interaction, and participation through local worship services, guided tours, outside reading, work projects, interviews, and discussions. Each participant will be encouraged to reflect upon and integrate new understandings of the Church, its expressions, and its mission. (MC) Prerequisite: junior status MC 363 (3 credits)

Historical Dynamics of the Christian Movement Winter Quarter

Following the history of missions and great missionaries, this course explores the dynamics that have encouraged or inhibited the spread of Christianity, such as: political conquest, cultural adaptation, dissimilation, monastic and mission society movements, relationships between mission societies and churches, people movements, colonialism, strategies of formative missionaries, racism, nationalism, and ecumenism. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisites: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions

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MC 364 (2 credits)

Guided Reading Seminar in Missions Winter Quarter

MC 403

(2 credits) Independent reading following a guideline that may include missionary biographies, mission history, theology, and strategy, with opportunities to discuss the readings with other students. (MC) Prerequisite: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions MC 367 (4 credits)

Language and Culture Acquisition Discovery Module 2006

“Community-based learning” is the foundation of this course, which focuses on: (1) bonding with a national family during a home stay in a non-English speaking country, and (2) learning a language in a community rather than classroom experience. A ten-part video series by Dr. Thomas Brewster establishes the course philosophy and shows how language learning outside of the classroom is, in itself, meaningful ministry. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisite: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions

The Verne Lavik Lectureship in Cross-cultural Evangelism was established by the family of Verne Lavik in 1984 to provide for education and training in communicating the gospel across cultural barriers. The scholar/lecturer is announced each year. (Required for MCS major) (MC) MC 464 (3 credits)

(3 credits)

Perspectives on Urban Mission Fall Quarter

Introduces students to an understanding of the modern city and how the Church relates to urban centers. Explores various approaches for addressing urban issues and biblical principles by which the Church may effectively minister to city life. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisites: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions; junior status MC 402 (4 credits)

Church Planting & Growth Spring Quarter 2007

Uses current readings, interviews with church planters, and a hands-on field project to affirm the significance, to build personal self-confidence, to clarify objectives, and to help evaluate potential with regard to church planting. It also introduces the theory and practice of church growth as originally developed by Donald McGavran. Basic tools offered are helpful both domestically and cross-culturally for gathering, analyzing, and utilizing church growth data. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisites: BT 103 Theology of Triune God; MC 261 Missionary Enterprise

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Urban Sociology for the Church Winter Quarter

Explores social geography and the relation of people to their living space, specifically in an urban context (“urbanism”). The cultural mentality of urban life is examined and the major challenges to the way in which the Church addresses urban life. (MC) Prerequisite: MC 401 Perspectives on Urban Mission or instructor permission MC 465

MC 401

Cross-cultural Evangelism— Lavik Lecture Discovery Module

(3 credits)

Biblical Theology of Mission Spring Quarter

Surveys selected sections of Scripture for an overview of God’s mission to the world. Discusses creation, the Abrahamic covenant, the inward and outward mission of God’s people, Diaspora, Messiah, Pentecost, the Church and the Kingdom, and Christ’s return. God is seen as the originator of mission, Christ as the embodiment, the Church as the instrument—empowered by the Holy Spirit and reaching out to the whole world. Intersperses these topics with dialog on the viewpoints of some contemporary contributors and issues such as Christ and culture, and contextualization. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisites: BI 102 History of Israel; MC 261 Missionary Enterprise MC 466 (4 credits)

Cultural Anthropology and Communication Fall Quarter

Examines the difference in social structures, role assignments, and worldviews in different cultures. Focuses on inter-cultural communication differences in terms of verbal and nonverbal symbols. Using methods of cultural anthropology and communication theory, the course further assesses the implications of living in other cultures and understanding


people of other cultural backgrounds, applying insights to Christian missions and an incarnational style of ministry at home and abroad. (Required for MCS major) (MC) Prerequisite: MC 103 Evangelism & Global Missions MC 467 (3 credits)

Mission to the City Spring Quarter

Urban laboratory course addresses a number of Church agency approaches to urban mission. Students go off-campus and perform interviews, demographic research, and case studies in actual urban settings. (MC) Prerequisites: MC 401 Perspectives on Urban Mission; MC 464 Urban Sociology for the Church; or instructor permission MC 480 (2 credits)

Field Experience Preparation Fall Quarter

Supervised preparation in the logistical and academic tasks required of those who plan to enroll in MC 481, 482, or 485 Field Experience. Includes finding a suitable location in which to spend the Field Experience, securing a Field Supervisor, compiling a file of information on the country or urban center to be visited, surveying the literature related to the Field Research topic, and preparing a prospectus for the Field Research Paper. (Required for MCS major) Prerequisites: MCS major; senior status MC 481 (15 credits)

Global Field Experience Winter Quarter

Places the student, for a maximum of one quarter, in a cross-cultural situation, living in close contact with people whose primary language is other than English. Through listening, participation, and research opportunities, this course helps to evaluate potential for adjusting to long-term cross-cultural involvement. (MC 481, MC 482, or MC 485 is required for MCS major) Prerequisites: MC 480 Field Experience Preparation; MCS major; senior status MC 482 (15 credits)

Bible Translation Field Experience Winter Quarter

Provides an opportunity, in a non-English speaking situation, to witness and participate in the life and work of a Bible Translation agency. Enables selfassessment relative to the skills and qualities such a position requires. (MC 481, MC 482, or MC 485 is required for MCS major) Prerequisites: MC 480 Field Experience Preparation; MCS major; senior status

MC 485 (12 credits)

Urban Field Experience Winter Quarter

Develops a practical, hands-on understanding of the city through fieldwork. Aids personal development by providing a firsthand understanding of the nature of the city, insight into the problems unique to people of the city, and familiarity with the special resources available in the city. Supervised by an experienced and trained Field Supervisor. (MC 481, MC 482, or MC 485 is required for MCS major) Prerequisites: MC 480 Field Experience Preparation; MCS major; senior status

Ministry Studies MN 300 (0.5-3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar – Ministry Studies Offered occasionally

Studies a variety of topics within the field of congregational ministry to broaden the curriculum. Format of the course may utilize a workshop or seminar format. MN 315 (3 credits)

Lifespan Development Winter Quarter

Emphasizes the continuity of human development across the lifespan and in the aging process. Explores cognitive, physical, social, and intellectual development with an aim to recognize the nature and needs of individuals at all developmental levels. Prerequisite: GS 243 Introduction to Psychology MN 361 (4 credits)

Introduction to Counseling Winter Quarter

Presents the primary dynamics of the non-professional counseling relationship, introduces basic tools, and surveys current theories. Emphasizes counseling from a Christian perspective and gives opportunity to practice basic skills. (Required for CE, ECE, and YF majors) Prerequisite: GS 243 Introduction to Psychology; YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems; junior status MN 363 (3 credits)

Visitation and Pastoral Care Spring Quarter

Introduces the purpose, context, and process of pastoral care, including visitation to homes, hospitals, and institutions. Explores the relational dynamics existent in any visitation context, combining a biblical ministry perspective with communication skills to promote effective care giving.

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MN 364 (4 credits)

Specialized Counseling Issues Spring Quarter

Provides a contextual awareness in which students will use their counseling, cross-cultural counseling, and ministry skills. Explores the following issues: transition, depression, suicide, death/dying, substance abuse, child abuse, domestic abuse, sexual abuse, and post-traumatic stress disorder. Emphasis is also given to pastoral counseling with neurologically, orthopedically, and developmentally challenged persons. (Required for YF major) Prerequisite: MN 361 Introduction to Counseling MN 371 (4 credits)

Dynamics of Administration Fall Quarter

Studies principles of administration as they apply to ministry organizations, including leadership styles, working with staff and volunteer groups, conflict management, budgeting, and professional communication. Processes for strategic planning and evaluating of ministries are also discussed. (Required for CE, ECE, MCS, MW, and YF majors) Prerequisites: GS 145 Mathematics for the Social Sciences; junior status; MW majors must concurrently take MW 475 Worship Planning & Music Leadership MN 466 (3 credits)

Abnormal Behavior Spring Quarter

Provides critical analysis of the history, etiology, and symptomology of abnormal behavior with reference to modern methods of assessment and treatment. Emphasizes on interdisciplinary approach to understanding of maladaptive behavior. Prerequisite: MN 361 Introduction to Counseling; senior status MN 467

(4 credits)

History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry (Writing Intensive) Fall Quarter

Explores historical movements in Christian education and youth and family ministry. Also examines the interplay between history, theology, and educational contributions from various fields of the social sciences. Writing a personal philosophy of ministry is a major component of this course. This course includes the annual retreat for CE, ECE and YF majors. Additional fee. (Required for CE, ECE, and YF majors) Prerequisites: BT 103 Theology of the Triune God; GS 123 English Composition II; GS 241 Introduction to Philosophy; GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization

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MN 468 (3 credits)

Applied Ministry Studies Spring Quarter

A capstone course that explores facets of contextual ministry in a variety of settings: school, congregation or agency. Discusses personal philosophies appropriate to the individual student’s field experience, life in community, individual and corporate spirituality and continued faith development. (Required for CE, ECE, and YF majors) Prerequisites: CE 481, ECE 481, or YF 481 Field Experience; MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry; must be taken concurrently with CE 468 Contextual Christian Education, ECE 468 Contextual ECE, or YF 468 Contextual Youth & Family Ministry

Music & Worship MW 102/202/ 302/402 (1 credit per quarter)

Choir Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Offers exposure to interpretation, theory, conducting, and to various musical styles to enlarge experience and understanding of the music ministry of a choir. Develops vocal production and ensemble skills. Involves participation in campus chapel services, seasonal concerts, occasional special performances, and local congregational visits. Additional fee. (May be taken more than one quarter.) (Six quarters required for MW major) (FA) Prerequisite: audition or instructor permission MW 105 (3 credits)

Worship Fall Quarter

Enhances understanding of worship through discussion of the origin, historical development, and contemporary view of worship; the Lutheran forms of worship and their functions; the attitudes, actions, aids, and elements of worship, corporate worship and individual devotions; liturgical and non-liturgical expressions; and the church year and related symbols of faith. Considers current trends, biblical descriptions of worship, the worship space, and the content and order of a worship service. (Required for all majors and ABS)


MW 110–115, 310–315 (1 credit per quarter)

Applied Arts Instruction Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Offers opportunity for instruction in piano, voice, and guitar. Instruction in other instruments is offered occasionally by special arrangement. Encourages discovery of new abilities and development of previous skills. Additional fee. (May be taken more than one quarter.) (Required for MW major) (FA) MW 150 (1 credit)

Music Theory I Winter Quarter

Provides a basic foundation of music theory and aural skills. Use of the Music Lab is required for this course. (Required for MW major) MW 151 (1 credit)

Music Theory II Spring Quarter

Provides a basic foundation of music theory and aural skills. Use of the Music Lab is required for this course. (Required for MW major) Prerequisite: MW 150 Music Theory I

MW 262 (2 credits)

Provides instruction in basic choral conducting patterns, expressive gestures, preparation of a piece for rehearsal and performance, rehearsal planning, selection and ordering of choral music. Explores the ministry of volunteer musical ensembles in the local congregation. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry; concurrent enrollment in Trinity Choir or another approved choral group; approved music theory competency MW 263 (2 credits)

Touring Ensemble Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Offers training in small ensemble and presentation team singing. Performing a variety of styles, the Ensemble focuses on contemporary Christian and world music, and song leadership, in local and regional appearances and tours. Entrance to the course is by audition; concurrent membership in Trinity Choir preferred. Students have the option of taking Touring Ensemble for their Service Learning Practicum requirement. (One year in Touring Ensemble required for MW major; applies toward the three-credit General Studies requirement for fine arts if not taken as Service Learning Practicum) MW 261 (3 credits)

Introduction to Music Ministry Fall Quarter

MW 264

Composition/Arranging for the Church Musician Spring Quarter 2006

Offers instruction in basic music composition principles, including melody, harmony, score analysis, song and chorale form. Includes an introduction to computer music software, prescribed composition assignments, and a quarter project. Examines application of composing skills in a parish music setting. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: minimum music theory background; MW major, or department permission MW 266 (2 credits)

Musical Theatre Winter Quarter

Explores musical theatre for children and adults for us in church music ministries. Different types of children’s, youth, and adult musicals will be examined, along with planning and implementation of producing a musical. (Required for MW majors) MW 300

Establishes a biblical basis for music ministry. Surveys the Church’s use of music historically, contemporary music and its impact on congregational life, the administration of a congregational music program, and the integration of music into other fields of ministry. Explores music leadership skills. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: MW 105 Worship; one year of Choir encouraged

Music & Worship for Children and Families Spring Quarter 2007

Provides experience with programming methods and materials as they apply to music and worship for children and families for congregational or home use. (Required for CE, ECE, and MW majors) Prerequisite: CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church (or concurrently)

(2 credits) MW 160, 360 (1 credit per quarter)

Choral Conducting I Winter Quarter

(1-3 credits)

Special Topic Seminar – Music & Worship Offered occasionally

Studies special topics in the field of music and worship to broaden the curriculum or increase skills in a specific area. Course may utilize a workshop or seminar format.

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MW 330 (3 credits)

Church Music History Fall Quarter 2005

MW 371 (3 credits)

Surveys church music history from Old Testament roots to the present. Identifies pivotal events in church history, and their impact on musical expression. Includes discussion of the major musical periods, related composers and their works. Explores implications of church music history on contemporary music and worship practices. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization; MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry

Covers a broad range of choral, ensemble, solo, and instrumental church music. Explores different types of musical styles (such as jazz, blues, classical, tradition, and contemporary) as they apply to church music. Examines choral and instrumental music in light of its practical uses in worship services. (Required for MW majors) Prerequisite: MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry MW 475

MW 331 (3 credits)

Hymnody and Song Fall Quarter 2006

(2 credits)

Worship Planning and Music Leadership Fall Quarter

Examines the history and development of the hymn and worship song, including biblical foundations for their inclusion in worship. Considers the contributions of individual composers and lyricists. Presents methodology for evaluating worship music. Explores traditional and contemporary performance practice, and song composition for corporate worship. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: GS 265 The Church & Western Civilization; MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry; MW 264 Composition/Arranging for the Church Musician; or instructor permission

Explores different types of worship services and planning and implementation of all aspects of the worship service. Develops leadership abilities concerning practical skills and knowledge needed for creative service planning, leading rehearsals, and long range planning. Includes participation in service planning and leadership, and discussion of choral, ensemble, and instrumental formation and management. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry; MW major; must be taken concurrently with MN 371 Dynamics of Administration

MW 340 (1 credit)

MW 481

World Music Discovery Module

(15 credits) Explores the music of multiple cultures from around the world. Includes introduction to international worship songs, movement, and percussion. Examines the inclusion of global music in traditional and contemporary worship. (MC) (FA) MW 362 (2 credits)

Choral Conducting II Winter Quarter

Builds on the foundation begun in Choral Conducting I. Reviews basic choral conducting patterns and expressive gestures. Provides instruction in complex and irregular choral conducting patterns, interpretation of common musical styles, advanced rehearsal strategies, and vocal techniques. May include work with the Trinity Choir at instructor’s discretion. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: MW 262 Choral Conducting I; concurrent enrollment in Trinity Choir or another approved choral group

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Church Music Repertoire/ Performance Practice Winter Quarter

Field Experience Music & Worship Winter Quarter

Offers opportunity for internship in a congregation working with an experienced on-site supervisor in the area of music and worship leadership. Involves a minimum of 400 hours. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: MN 371 Dynamics of Administration; MW 475 Worship Planning and Music Leadership; MW major MW 487

(2 credits)

Worship and Evangelism Seminar (Writing Intensive) Spring Quarter

Uses research, presentations, and discussion to compare established and leading edge thinking on worship as it relates to evangelism. Presented from historical context, it considers emerging and projected trends of corporate worship, and implications for current and future worship practices. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: MW 261 Introduction to Music Ministry; MW 330 Church Music History; MW 475 Worship Planning and Music Leadership; MW major


MW 488 (1 credit)

Senior Recital Spring Quarter

YF 205 (4 credits)

Students graduating from the Music and Worship program must demonstrate basic performance proficiency in voice, piano, guitar, and rudimentary music composition in a graded recital presented Spring Quarter of the student’s senior year. The student has the option of a public or private (grading panel only) recital. (Required for MW major) Prerequisites: completion of Applied Arts performance proficiency requirements in voice, guitar, piano, and music theory; MW 264 Composition/ Arranging for the Church Musician; MW major

PL 200 (1 credit)

Explores models and methods for intentionally creating balanced youth ministry programs. This is a practical course, providing experiential learning through the planning, implementation, and evaluation of a high school youth event. (Required for YF major) Prerequisites: CE 102 Methods of Teaching in the Church; CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education or YF 201 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry YF 206 (3 credits)

Prior Learning Prior Learning Seminar Fall, Winter, & Spring Quarters

Students who plan to petition for Trinity credit for prior learning must enroll in PL 200 for training in portfolio development. Its completioin is a prerequisite to the award of credits for prior learning. The course is designed to help the student in developing skills and techniques used for the identification, organization, articulation, and corroboration of prior learning. Prior Learning Fall, Winter & Spring Quarters

Prior Learning is non-traditional learning that is acquired from non-classroom sources, such as work or life experiences, mass media, or independent reading and study. The particular focus of Trinity, and the type of professional preparation it offers, makes the provision for Prior Learning an appropriate option for qualified students.

Youth & Family Ministry YF 201 (3 credits)

Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry Fall Quarter

Surveys youth ministry, examining the scope of mission with young people and their families. Includes examination of purpose, motive, philosophy, theology, and management. Evaluates tools of youth ministry through the eyes of both the professional and volunteer leader. This course is a prerequisite for all other YF courses. Additional fee. (Required for YF major)

Introduction to Family Systems Fall Quarter

Explores basic interactive dynamics among people in a family system including cultural and intergenerational roles, homeostatis, triangulation, differentiation and individuation. Dynamics, challenges and changes in a student’s family of origin will be addressed through construction of a transgenerational family genogram. (Required for CE, ECE, and YF majors) Prerequisite: GS 144 Introduction to Sociology YF 300 (0.5-3 credits)

PL 201 (1-45 credits)

Programming for Youth Ministry Winter Quarter

Special Topic Seminar – Youth & Family Ministry Offered occasionally

Studies special topics in the field of youth and family ministry to broaden the curriculum and increase skills in designing and administering a youth and family ministry program. YF 365 (3 credits)

Designs for Family Ministry Spring Quarter

Explores programming elements and resources for creating effective family and intergenerational ministries. Based on biblical principles, emphasis is placed on how the church can support faith development in the home. (Required for CE, ECE, and YF majors) Prerequisites: CE 202 Foundations for Christian Education, ECE 211 Theory and Practice in Early Childhood Education, or YF 201 Introduction to Youth & Family Ministry; YF 206 Introduction to Family Systems

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YF 461 (3 credits)

Adolescent Development Fall Quarter

Surveys developmental issues of adolescence and examines the world in which youth live. Prepares students for programming and counseling in a developmentally appropriate manner. (Required for YF major) Prerequisites: GS 144 Introduction to Sociology; GS 243 Introduction to Psychology; senior status YF 468 (1 credit)

Contextual Youth & Family Ministry Spring Quarter

Explores contextual youth and family ministry programming. Discusses personal, organizational, and management issues specific to the administration of the congregational youth and family ministry program. (Required for YF major) Prerequisites: CE/ ECE/YF 481 Field Experience; must be taken concurrently with MN 468 Applied Ministry Studies YF 481 (15 credits)

Field Experience Winter Quarter

Offers opportunity for full-time (400 hours) practical experience in a congregation or agency, working with an experienced on-site supervisor. On-site supervision and periodic observation by the Field Experience supervisor, mid-term and final evaluations, and a portfolio of required work will be used for evaluation purposes. Periodic seminars will be held throughout the term. (Required for YF major) Prerequisites: MN 371 Dynamics of Administration; MN 467 History and Philosophy of Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry

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Personnel

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Board of Directors

Administration

(2005-2006) As of March 2005. Dates indicate expiration of term. Asterisk (*) denotes Trinity/LBIS alumni.

Dr. John M. Stamm, President

Don Benson (2007), Sammamish, Wash. Retired CEO, Associated Grocers.

B.A., Concordia University (River Forest, Ill.); M.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison. Joined Trinity in 1999.

Rev. Corey Bjertness* (2006), New London, Minn. Pastor, Prince of Peace Lutheran Church. Rev. Wm. Chris Boerger (2005), Seattle, Wash. Bishop, ELCA Northwest Washington Synod. Rev. Ruben Duran* (2007), Chicago, Ill. Executive for New Congregational Development, ELCA Division for Outreach. Guy Ellison (2006), Issaquah, Wash. Partner, Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. Rev. John Foss* (2005), Laguna Woods, Calif. Pastor, Aliso Viejo Church of the Cross. Ernie Fosse* (2007), Arlington, Wash. Analyst, Microsoft Corporation. Ed Hawxhurst (2006), Kirkland, Wash. Retired Partner, Ernst & Young LLP. Pam Holsinger-Fuchs* (2005), Crookston, Minn. Director of Student Activities/Service Learning, University of Minnesota-Crookston. Everett Holum (2007), Tacoma, Wash. Attorney. Sandra Jerke (2005), Tacoma, Wash. Financial Consultant, Sandra Jerke & Associates.

Paul Hartman, Director of Development B.A., Pacific Lutheran University; M.A., San Diego State University. Joined Trinity in 2002.

Jerry E. Hekkel, Dean of Students B.S., Eastern Montana State; M.Ed., Oregon State University. Joined Trinity in 1996.

Sigrid Olsen, Director of Admission B.A., Pacific Lutheran University. Joined Trinity in 1994.

Stacy Kitahata (2008), Seattle, Wash. Coordinator for Evangelical Outreach, ELCA Region 1 Office. David Knode (2006), Bellevue, Wash. Financial Advisor/District Manager, Waddell & Reed.

Tom Ramsey, Chief Financial Officer

Norma Larson* (2007), Port Orchard, Wash. Businesswoman.

B.A., University of Puget Sound. Joined Trinity in 2002.

Rev. Sigurd Lefsrud* (2007), Bremerton, Wash. Pastor, Emmanuel Lutheran Church. Richard Lodmill (2006), Burien, Wash. Retired Vice President, Weyerhauser Corporation. Forest Paulson (2007), Marysville, Wash. President/ CEO of private lending bank. Rev. Mark Reitan (2007), Lynnwood, Wash. Pastor, Trinity Lutheran Church. Rolle Walker (2005), Sammamish, Wash. Director of Development, PCL Construction Services. Rev. Laura Ziehl (2007), Rohnert Park, Calif. Pastor, Cross & Crown Lutheran Church.

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Rev. Lowell Stime, Academic Dean Diploma, Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle (Trinity Lutheran College); B.A., St. Olaf College; M.Div., Luther Seminary. Joined Trinity in 1980.


Faculty Rev. Dr. David Ellingson Youth & Family Ministry David Ellingson joined the faculty at Trinity Lutheran College in July 2004. He teaches courses in youth and family ministry, Christian education, and pastoral care. He also oversees the college’s Children, Youth & Family Center, serving as director. Prior to Trinity, Dave served as Congregational Ministries Coordinator for Region 1 of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), providing resources to 600 congregations in the areas of youth and family ministry, worship, Christian education, and communication. In that role, he founded many programs for youth, including Evergreen Youth Television (video production), Holy Commotion (worship leadership), Rainbow of Gifts (multicultural youth leadership), and Chosen for the Journey (young adults). He has previously served as a campus pastor at Long Beach State University and Central Washington University, and from 1984 to 2004 was an adjunct faculty member at Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary, Berkeley, Calif. Dave is nationally recognized as a resource in youth and family ministry, frequently conducting workshops, speaking at youth events, and working collaboratively on youth ministry initiatives. Dave earned a B.A. in Classics and English from Luther College and an M.Div. from Yale Divinity School. He also completed a D.Min. at the Claremont School of Theology, with a thesis in health and wholeness. He has completed sabbatical studies in youth and spirituality, family systems, and holistic health. Dave and his wife, LaRae, have five children and live in Edmonds. He enjoys running, reading, and gardening. Rev. Dr. Paul Gossman Multicultural Studies (Department Head) Paul Gossman joined the teaching faculty in Multicultural Studies in April 2005 and is primarily responsible for teaching courses in missions and multicultural studies, as well as serving as department head. Paul has broad experience in parish work, having served as a pastor in two congregations

of the Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, most recently as senior pastor of St. Paul Lutheran Church in Melrose Park, Ill. He has also served on the international mission field in the Phillippines (1985-89) and in Peru (1994-2000). Paul completed a B.A. at Lenoir-Rhyne College, an M.Div. at Concordia Seminary, and a Ph.D. in Intercultural Studies at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Paul is married to Priscilla and has one daughter, Sarah. Rev. Dr. Mark Gravrock Biblical Studies Mark Gravrock joined the Trinity faculty in 1986 and teaches courses in Bible (primarily Old Testament) and Greek. Ordained to the ministry of the American Lutheran Church in 1977, he served as Pastor of Bethany Lutheran Church, Kelley, Iowa (1977-80), and as Associate Pastor of Prince of Peace Lutheran, SeaTac, Wash. (1980-86). He received his B.A. in Classical Languages from St. Olaf College, Northfield, Minn. (1973), an M.Div. from Luther Theological Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. (1977), and a Ph.D. from Luther Seminary (1998). Mark is a hiker, an amateur naturalist, a musician and songwriter, and a dabbler in dead languages. Dr. Bruce Grigsby General Studies (Department Head) Bruce Grigsby came to Trinity Lutheran College in 1992 and has served as head of the General Studies Department since 1994. He teaches courses in language (Greek and Latin), church history, literature, and biblical studies. After earning his Ph.D. in New Testament studies at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland, Bruce accepted a teaching post in the Religious Studies Department at Biola University in California. In 1987, he pursued his love of ancient languages and enrolled in the Classics program (Greek and Latin literature) at the University of California (Irvine), earning an M.A. in 1991. After an additional year of doctoral work and teaching duties, he accepted a call to teach at Trinity Lutheran College.

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Active in several local churches as an adult education specialist and occasional preacher, Bruce also directs the bi-annual study tour of Greece and Turkey, sponsored by the college. His research has appeared in numerous theological journals, including Biblica, Evangelical Quarterly, and Novum Testamentum. Susan Houglum Christian Education (Department Head) Susan Houglum joined the college as an adjunct faculty member in September 1996. She became a full-time professor in August 1997 and is currently Head of the Christian Education Department, directing the college’s degree programs in Christian Education and Early Childhood Education. Sue’s teaching and administrative experience is varied: directing Nome Day Care in Nome, Alaska; teaching preschool and kindergarten in the Eskimo village of Teller, Alaska; owning and operating Children’s Learning Center in Kodiak, Alaska; college teaching at Vanderbilt University and the Kodiak extension of the University of Alaska (Anchorage). Sue was also active in congregations, primarily in the area of children and music. Prior to coming to Trinity, Sue was the Director of Music at Oak Harbor Lutheran Church on Whidbey Island, Wash. Sue earned her B.A. in Religion and Sociology from Pacific Lutheran University, Tacoma, Wash., and her M.Ed. from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tenn., where her studies centered on elementary and preschool education. Sue lives in Bellevue with her husband, Mark. They have two grown children, Brook and Luke. Mark Jackson Youth & Family Ministry (Department Head) Mark Jackson joined the faculty at Trinity Lutheran College in September 2001. He teaches courses in youth and family ministry, Christian education, and church administration. Through the Children, Youth & Family Center, he also organizes conference events for youth and youth ministry professionals and actively serves as a resource to congregations and organizations.

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Mark’s experience includes working with youth, families, college students, and young adults, as well as Christian education, worship planning and administration. Prior to Trinity, he worked in two congregations in Spokane, Wash., most recently as Director of Congregational Ministries at Central Lutheran Church. He served as Board Advisor of the E. Washington-Idaho Synod Lutheran Youth Organization and has wide experience in youth leadership training and conference and retreat planning. Mark holds a B.A. in Business Management from Whitworth College and an M.A. in Pastoral Ministry from Gonzaga University. He returned to Whitworth to complete a Certificate in Leadership and Church Management, and has continued graduate studies in Nonprofit Management through Regis University. Mark enjoys the mountains, rain, and good coffee of Western Washington. Deuane Kuenzi Music & Worship Deuane Kuenzi joined Trinity Lutheran College in November 2004 as half-time faculty in the Music & Worship Department. He teaches courses in music ministry and directs the Touring Ensemble. Deuane has a long and broad background in music and conducting. He currently serves as music director and conductor of the choirs at Messiah Lutheran Church in Auburn, Wash. In addition to his church ministry, Deuane is well known for his community involvement in music festivals in North America, Europe and Australia, in organizing and conducting Cora Voce (formerly the Northwest Lutheran Choir) and in establishing and directing the professional choir Gloriana since 1982. He is often invited to be a guest conductor of various performances in the United States and abroad. Deuane earned a B.A. from Pacific Lutheran University and an M.A. from Lewis-Clark College. In 2003, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Musical Arts by New York University.


Elliott Ohannes Director of the Library

Rev. Lowell E. Stime Biblical Studies (Department Head); Academic Dean

Elliott Ohannes became the Director of the Library at Trinity Lutheran College in November 1998. From 1969 to 1981, he was as an ordained pastor in the United Presbyterian Church (USA), serving congregations in Arkansas and Washington. He holds a B.A. in History from the University of Illinois, an M.Div. from Princeton Theological Seminary, and a J.D. from the Seattle University School of Law. At the University of Washington, he has earned an M.A. in Middle Eastern Languages, an M.L.I.S. (Library Information Science), and is a Ph.D. candidate in Middle and Near Eastern Studies. Elliott and his wife, Nel, are the parents of two children, Alexander and John Samuel. Dr. Rachel Root Music & Worship (Department Head) Rachel Root joined the college faculty in September 2004 as the Music & Worship Department Head. She teaches courses in worship ministries, music theory, conducting, and directs the college choir. Rachel began her career as an elementary music teacher and church organist. Prior to joining the college, Rachel most recently served as Director of Music and Worship at Trinity Lutheran Church in Tacoma, where she supported an extensive drama and music ministry program. She has conducted for organizations such as the Seattle Girls’ Choir, Tahoma Girls’ Choir, the Sacred Music Chorale, and has accompanied the Tacoma City Ballet. Rachel completed a B.A. in Applied Organ at Michigan State University, an M.A. in Church Music at Northwestern University, and a D.M.A. in Choral Conducting at the University of Washington. Rachel and her husband Tim have four grown children and currently live in Steilacoom.

Lowell Stime became a member of the faculty in 1980. He is the Head of the Biblical Studies Department and serves as Academic Dean. He primarily teaches courses in the Old Testament, theology, and Hebrew. Lowell completed undergraduate study at St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minn. (1960-66) and the Lutheran Bible Institute of Seattle (Trinity Lutheran College) (1963-65). A two-year internship (1968-70) took him to Papua New Guinea where he worked with the Lutheran Mission in Port Moresby doing parish and youth work. After graduating with an M.Div. from Luther Theological Seminary in 1971, his first parish call was to Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Eugene, Ore. From 1975 to 1980, Lowell served as the missiondeveloper of a new ministry at North Pole, Alaska, which became Lord of Life Lutheran Church. During those years, he also served as Assistant Pastor at Fairbanks Lutheran Church, Fairbanks. Stime is an adjunct instructor with The Jerusalem Center for Biblical Studies, leading student groups to the Holy Land over the years. He is also a Walk Thru the Bible instructor, presenting Old and New Testament seminars in congregations as an extension of his classroom teaching. Lowell is at home in the Old Testament and finds great fulfillment in helping students get excited about seeing these texts as preparation for the fulfillment that comes with Christ.

Instructors Rev. Dr. Daniel R. Bloomquist, Multicultural Studies (Global Missions) and Biblical Studies (Biblical Theology). B.A., Augsburg College; B.D., Pacific Lutheran Theological Seminary; D.Miss., Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. Jennifer Bohner, Christian Education (Early Childhood Education). B.A., St. Michael’s College. Dr. Jan Fekkes, Biblical Studies (New Testament). B.A., Biola University; Ph.D., University of Manchester (England). Glen Gersmehl, MinistryStudies (Peace and Justice). B.A., Concordia University-River Forest; M.P.A. in Conflict and International Security, Harvard University; graduate studies at Cornell University, University of Minnesota, Union Theological Seminary, and Maryknoll University.

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Linda Gibbs, Christian Education (Early Childhood Education). B.A., Annhurst College; graduate studies in Reading Specialty, Loyola Marymount University. Dave Hillis, Multicultural Studies (Urban Missions). B.A., Western Washington University; M.Div., Fuller Seminary; doctoral studies in global and urban ministry, Asian Graduate School of Theology. Rev. Peter Yung-ming Lai, Multicultural Studies (Communication, World Religions). B.A., National Cheng-Chi University; M.Div., Luther Seminary; M.Th., Fuller Theological Seminary; D.Miss. candidate, Western Conservative Seminary. Josh Ottum, Music & Worship (Guitar). B.A. in Music and Psychology, Seattle Pacific University. Dr. Ron Ruthruff, Youth & Family Ministry (Adolescent Development). B.A. in Human Services, Western Washington University; M.S. in Ministry, Pepperdine University; D.Min. in Ministry in Complex Urban Settings, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary. Elaine Stamm, General Studies (Visual Arts). B.A., Concordia University-River Forest; M.S. in Curriculum and Instruction, University of Wisconsin-Madison; additional studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. James Wilkinson, General Studies (Science, Mathematics). B.A., M.A., M.S., Stephen F. Austin University; B.S.M.E., University of New Mexico; M.S.M.E., University of Washington. Cara Woods-Berggren, Christian Education and Youth & Family Ministry (Pre-counseling Studies, Field Experience). B.A., Lutheran Bible Institute (Trinity Lutheran College); M.S. in Community Counseling, Seattle Pacific University.

Emeriti Year indicates date emeritus status conferred Rev. Robert Rismiller (1983) Rev. Jacque Schweiss (1988) Dr. C. Jack Eichhorst (1990) Dr. Trygve R. Skarsten (1994) Dr. Robert Moylan (1995) Patricia Lelvis (1997) Dr. James A. Bergquist (1999) Rev. John Bergren (2003) Dr. Daniel Bloomquist (2003) Josee Jordan (2003) Irene Hausken (2003) Rev. Don Fladland (2003)

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Professor Professor President President Academic Dean Professor President Professor Professor Professor Librarian Professor


Index A Absence 33 Academic Advising 33 Academic Freedom 35 Academic Information 33–39 Academic Partnerships 8 Academic Probation 20 Accreditation 8 Accredited Institutions 20 Administration 84 Admission 16–17 Advanced Placement Credit Policy 20 Advent Festival Concerts 14 Affiliated Learning Partners 8 Alcohol and Drugs 13 Appeals 37 Application Procedures 16 Application Timeline 16 Application/Matriculation 16 Art Show. See Trinity Art Exhibition Associate in Ministry Education Requirements 60 Associate of Biblical Studies 41 Associated Student Body 10 Audit 20 Awards Chapel 14

B Baccalaureate 14 Biblical Studies Department 45 Board of Directors 84

C Calendar 33 Campus Location and Facilities 10 Certificate of Professional Studies 41 Character and Values 7 Christian Education Department 49 Church 7 CLEP 21 Commencement 14 Commitments 7 Community Life 10–14 Campus Location and Facilities 10 Community Life Services 11 Commuter Students 12 Core Curriculum 42 Counseling 11 Course Descriptions 64–81 Credit 19

D Deferred Admission 17 Discipleship Week 14 Disciplinary Probation 20 Discipline 13 Discovery Module 37 Dismissal 36 Distance Learning 20 Distinctiveness 7 Dress Code 13 Dropping a Course 35

E Eligibility 16 Eligibility for Need-Based Aid 27 Employment 29 Enrichment Studies 41, 62 Equal Opportunity 29

F Faculty 85–88 Faith Tradition 7 Federal Work Study Program 28 Federally Sponsored 27 Financial Aid 26–29 Firearms and Explosives 13 Food Service 11 Full-Time 19

G General Studies Department 43 Good Standing: 19 Grade Point Average 34 Grade Reports 35 Grading System 34

H Health Services 11 Heritage 7 Honesty 35 Honors 36 Honors Convocation 14

I Incompletes 35 Independent Study Eligibility 34 Integrity 8 International Student Admission Procedures 17 Intramural Sports 11

L Late Fees 19 Library 39 Lutheran Educational Conference of North America 8

89


M Master of Arts in Education 62 Matriculated 19 Mission Emphasis Week 14 Mud Bowl 14 Multicultural Studies Department 53 Music & Worship Department 55

U Unpaid Accounts 24

N

V

Non-accredited Institutions 20

Vehicles and Parking 13 Veteran & Other Benefits 28 Videoconferencing 39

O Opening Convocation 14 Orientation 19

P Pacific Association for Theological Studies 8 Parent Weekend 14 Parking 13 Part-Time 19 Pass/Fail Option 35 Payment Plan 24 Playfest 14 Prior Learning 21 Prior Learning Portfolio 38 Probation 36 Program Declaration 20 Programs of Study 41–42

R Refunds & Repayment Policy 29 Registration 19, 19–21 Repeating a Course 35 Requirements for Graduation 37 Residence Life 11, 11–12 Responsibilities and Policies 12

S Scholarships 26 Security 12 Senior Citizen Audit Discount 24 Servanthood 7 Service Learning Practicum 11, 38 Sexual Misconduct/Harassment 13 Special Events 14 Spring Retreat 14 Student Class Standing 20 Student Life Covenant 13

T Tobacco 13 TOEFL 17 Transcript of Academic Record 21

90

Transfer of Credits 20 Transportation 12 Trinity Art Exhibition 14 Tuition & Fees 23

W Withdrawal from College 19 Withdrawals & Refunds 24 World Awareness Week 14 Worship 11 Writing 43

Y Youth & Family Ministry Department 58


91


2005-2006 Course Catalog  

An informational guide for the convenience of students.

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