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CATHEDRAL CONNECTIONS THE MAGAZINE OF TRINITY EPISCOPAL CATHEDRAL | OCTOBER/NOVEMBER 2016

One Year After the Flood: God’s Plans and Lessons Learned —pages 16-17

INSIDE: • A Season of Gratitude and Growth • Trinity Bazaar and Bazaar Bash • Blessing of the Animals • Local Art at the Trinity Bookstore


TRINITY CATHEDRAL’S CLERGY

In This Issue

The Very Reverend Timothy Jones Dean jones@trinitysc.org The Reverend Charles M. Davis, Jr. Canon Pastor/Canon to the Dean davis@trinitysc.org

The Reverend Ira Houck Canon Associate for Pastoral Care ihouck@trinitysc.org

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DISCERNING OUR SPIRITUAL GIFTS A Re-cap of Trinity’s Workshop

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WHAT DOES GOD SOUND LIKE? Choir Camp Stories by Jared Johnson

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The Reverend Patricia C. Malanuk Canon for Mission & Outreach pmalanuk@trinitysc.org

October/November 2016

UPCOMING EVENTS AND SERVICES Be Sure to Mark Your Calendar with These Upcoming Events!

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ONE YEAR LATER The Flood: God’s Provisions and Plans, and Lessons Learned

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A SEASON OF GRATITUDE AND GROWTH Trinity Cathedral Stewardship Campaign

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TRINITY BOOKSTORE Local Art on Display at the Bookstore

6 18 Trinity Episcopal Cathedral invites all to experience a joyful relationship with God, to share friendship with one another, and to make Jesus Christ known in the world. www.trinitysc.org 803.771.7300

Trinity’s Online History Project 4

Men of Trinity with Frank Martin

Volunteer Spotlight

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Blessing of the Animals

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Photo by Gerry Melendez.

FROM DEAN JONES:

Not Neglecting a Vision

We don’t always live on purpose. Sometimes we do things simply because they seem urgent. Not necessarily important, just urgent; the two aren’t always the same. That likely means, if you are like me, that you spend a fair amount of your day responding, but not necessarily taking initiative, not always making sure the most vital things are the priority things.

For others of us, our problem with not living on purpose may come from simply drifting along with the currents of habit. Sometimes we do things because we simply don’t take the time or have the courage to ask if we are doing what we are made to do, what God calls us to do. A church can become desensitized to its larger purpose. We can lose sight of the significance of what we do week in and week out. Worship, at the life-giving heart of things here, can become a mere custom. Or someone might serve on a committee, maybe too many committees, grudgingly, losing sight of what we are accomplishing for our fellow parishioners or for a needy world. Or we routinely put some modest amount into the offering plate, not asking what generosity God might be asking us to risk. We settle into what is comfortable, but not necessarily satisfying or significant. I’m interested in more than “church as usual.” We have good news that so transforms us and others that we are called to do no less than usher in God’s kingdom

work within these walls and in our wider community. But doing so asks of us intentional conversations.

Many organizations and businesses and churches avoid “mission drift” by keeping front and center a vision statement. A simple phrase keeps in view the purposes for which we are made, the things to which we are called. It can lend to a group a more powerful sense of doing God’s work. It helps us not to just get caught up in what’s expected, or float along.

CATHEDRAL CONNECTIONS The Magazine of Trinity Cathedral Trinity Episcopal Cathedral Vision Statement: To be a vibrant place to experience God, be transformed, and make Christ known in the world.

Here’s Trinity’s Vision Statement: To be a vibrant place to experience God, be transformed, and make Christ known in the world. I have been talking about those phrases, what they already mean in our common life. We will talk together about how those words might guide us even more intentionally to what could be ahead. Such conversations help focus our efforts. They help us become clearer and more excited about what we do. We will better remember the why of what we do, so we serve with new urgency and greater expectancy. Spend some times reflecting on that vision, and what your part might be in helping those words become an even greater reality.

Addie Thompson, Editor Cover Design by: Susan Craig Cover Photo by: Addie Thompson


Trinity Cathedral Online History Project By Ward Briggs

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few years ago, Lauren Fitzhugh, then a substitute docent, was sitting on the south porch of the Cathedral, pondering the need for new docents. How could fresh docents possibly master the long and complicated history of the Cathedral, the beauties of its stained-glass windows, and the celebrities buried in the churchyard? For one thing there was no authoritative guide to these aspects of the church; most docents relied on an oral tradition. Lauren broached the matter to Howard Duvall, who thought that the answer lay in putting technology to use. He conceived of putting the essential history of Trinity online not only as an easy guide for docents but as a self-guiding tour for visitors with smart phones or iPads. Howard conceived the project as having three stages. The first, now complete, describes in detail each window in the Cathedral, giving date, manufacturer, symbolism, iconography, and biblical references for the nearly 60 windows in the Cathedral. Howard had the original photographs taken by Frank Kinard for the first study of the windows by Sara Hempley. These were transferred to digital form and now appear online at trinitysc.org/windows. A diagram of the Cathedral floor accompanies

the description of each window, easily guiding the user to its location. The second phase of the project involves the use of Google mapping, digitized historical documents, and archival photographs to show the development of the physical church from its charter in 1812 and the donation of land by Mrs. Caroline Neyle Smythe and Col. James Gregg, through the construction of the present church in 1846, through the restoration of the Cathedral in 2008-2010. This portion of the project is supported by a grant of $1500 from the Vernon Fund. The third phase of the project will be a guide to the churchyard. Jim Simms has devoted years to cataloging the graves, their occupants, and their inscriptions. Our interactive guide will follow the pattern of the windows portion: the tombs will be numbered and a photograph of the gravestone will be accompanied by biographical information on the person buried, along with a locating diagram. This guide will be an accessible resource not only for parishioners here in Columbia, but those who appreciate the beauty and history of the Cathedral around the world.


Discerning our Spiritual Gifts By Louise Taylor

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hat is meant by the term “spiritual gifts?” Who has them and how do we know if we possess them? How do we use them for the benefit of our church family?

encouragement, leadership, hospitality, mercy, and giving, as well as other qualities. For the purposes of this workshop, the Trinity group worked with a list of 20 possible spiritual gifts.

These and many other questions were addressed by a group of Trinity parishioners at a Spiritual Gifts Workshop at the home of Beebe James on August 12-13. Participating in this event facilitated by Beebe were Carol Britton, Carol DuBose, Anna Griswold, Melissa Hickman, Sally Lewis, Kay Roman, Betsy Wolff, and Louise Taylor. During two days of intense focus, the group learned that most of what is known in the Bible about spiritual gifts is identified by St. Paul in Romans 12, Ephesians 4, and I Corinthians 12.

During the course of the workshop, the group performed activities that helped identify each participant’s most dominant gifts. Also emphasized were thoughts of contemporary writers including Elizabeth O’Connor, who stated in her book, Eighth Day of Creation, “A primary purpose of the Church is to help us discover our gifts….” That goal was actually met during the weekend as workshop participants discerned their gifts that had already been claimed, as well as their potential gifts.

Spiritual gifts are those given to each one of us by God in order to do the work of his kingdom in our world. According to St. Paul, spiritual gifts can include prophesy, serving others, teaching,

Through the use of a 60-question self-assessment inventory, the group identified a spiritual gift cluster of their five most dominant spiritual gifts and were given examples of how each gift could be utilized in the church. The group

was very interested to learn that Lloyd Edwards, a former priest at Trinity Cathedral, had expressed in his book, Discerning Your Spiritual Gifts, that “Everyone is gifted. There are enough gifts in our parish that we can do whatever we need to do on behalf of the kingdom of God.” Many other fascinating activities took place during the weekend, including the administration of the Keirsey Temperament Sorter Assessment, a device similar to the Myers-Briggs Personality Inventory. Based on their answers, participants received a personality typing which allowed them to relate their spiritual gifts to their own unique personality characteristics. At the conclusion of the weekend, using the words of theologian Frederick Buechner in his book, Wishful Thinking, Beebe reminded us that in using our spiritual gifts, “The place God calls you is the place where your deep gladness and the world’s great hunger meet.” 5


By Jessica Shand & Katie Rankin

The Trinity Bazaar is just a few weeks away! On Saturday, October 15 from 10 am - 2 pm, Trinity will open its doors and its hearts to the Midlands community for shopping, fellowship, and fun — all for a wonderful cause. The Bazaar Bash kicks off the festivities on Friday, October 14, from 6 - 9 pm. Plan to enjoy the crisp October air in the Keenan Courtyard with delicious food from the New York Butcher Shoppe and music from some of Trinity’s finest. Preview items to be sold on Saturday, and bid on exclusive silent auction items that can only be won at the Bash. There is no charge to attend, but donations are graciously accepted. Parishioners have been hard at work for months baking, pickling, knitting, and smocking, ensuring that when the doors open on October 15, the Midlands will see the many talents and

gifts of the congregation ultimately being used to serve those in need. Thanks to the generosity of the Trinity family, donations have poured in steadily with fine (and well-loved!) furniture, books, art, clothing, lamps, jewelry, china, and much, much more. The entire Cathedral will be alive as handmade gifts and rare finds at unusually low prices are offered to shoppers. Sidewalk Shoppes will line the grounds with one-of-a-kind jewelry, paintings, crafts and other unique wares. The Children’s Carnival will be held in the Cathedral Courtyard with pony rides, face painting, and snow cones that will delight children of all ages. Listen to live music from some of our very own church musicians while enjoying a delicious BBQ lunch, homemade sandwiches, and desserts.

What does the Trinity Bazaar mean to

Perhaps most anticipate fellowship that is enjoye volunteer of the Bazaar. bonds are made, traditio and memories are made If you haven’t already, pl part of this special day a in the making.

The results of the hard w the Bazaar volunteers wi non-profit agencies: God Illness Recovery Center ( Children’s Shelter and Se the Midlands.

For more information ple Rankin, katiewrankin@g Shand, jessicatshand@gm questions or to voluntee

you?

"The camaraderie enjoyed with all of fellow volunteers and knowing that all proceeds will go to special charitie

"I love Bazaar day, and all that leads up to it! To me, the Bazaar means watching our church community come tog what the body of Christ can do in service to others. The fellowship on that day is incredible!" —Michelle Thomas

"The truly amazing thing about the Bazaar is not just the enrichment it brings to the community on the day of t fellowship and joy that it brings to all of us in the months and weeks leading up to the big day. From frozen ca brainstorming meetings, I have gotten the immense pleasure of meeting and learning from some truly amazi working toward a worthy c

"To me the Bazaar means fellowship and friendship. It's our church community coming together to improve the liv fortunate in our city." —Joie Ray

"The Bazaar is such an amazing opportunity for fellowship between Trinity members and the community. Betw smiling volunteers, fun music, children's activities, and great shopping, it's a win-win for all. I especially love it both small businesses and the wonde


ed is the opportunity for ed by each and every Friendships are formed, ons are passed down, e that will last a lifetime. lease consider being a and a tradition 68 years

work and dedication of ill benefit the following d’s Storehouse, Mental (MIRCI), Palmetto Place exual Trauma Services of

ease contact Katie gmail.com or Jessica mail.com with any er.

es!" —Ruth Tibshrany

gether to celebrate

the event, but also the asserole workshops to ing women—all while cause!" —Kate Crater

ves of those less

ween the yummy food, ts focus on supporting erful grant recipients!" —Sarah Gawler

“MISS MARTHA’S” CHOW-CHOW

This is the recipe used by Howard and Allianne Duvall to make Artichoke Chow Chow for the Bazaar. A similar recipe by Mrs. Edward Royall can be found in the 1950 edition of Charleston Receipts. Howard’s mother, Martha McInnes Duvall learned it from her mother Martha McClellan McInnes. The recipe has been handed down from the McInnes family and modified through the years.

First Step:

4 qt. Jerusalem artichoke – cut in chunks 2 qt. Onions – diced or sliced (about 4 big onions) 1 qt. Bell pepper – red or green (about 4 large peppers, I use 2 red and 2 green for color) 1 medium cabbage – grated – not too fine You may also add some cauliflower, celery, and/or green tomatoes. Mother also added a small jar of pimentos (drained) if she thought it needed the red color. Add 1 cup of plain salt, cover the prepared vegetables with 1 gallon of water and let stand for 1 hour.

Second Step:

Make a sauce of: 1 ½ qt. white vinegar (6 cups) 4 cups of sugar - Let the above begin to heat on medium. - Mix 1-cup flour with enough water to make a soft paste. (Add a little flour and a little water and stir this until you have added the 1-cup of flour. Then dip a little of the heated vinegar and sugar mixture and further dilute the flour paste. Use a whisk to stir this mixture). - Slowly add this mixture to the vinegar and sugar, stirring frequently. When the mixture begins to thicken, turn the heat to low and add: 6 tablespoons prepared mustard 2 tablespoons turmeric Stir until all lumps are removed.

Third Step:

Bring vegetables to a boil on medium heat. While this mixture is heating up to a boil, frequently lift the mixture from the bottom with a spoon or paddle so the bottom does not scorch. Take the mixture to the sink and pour off the water. It is better to have one person tilt the mixture and one person to hold the mixture back so the water drains and the mixture stays in the cooking kettle. We pour into a large colander to catch any of the mixture that spills out. -Add to drained mixture: ½ cup brown sugar, 1 tablespoon celery seed, 1 tablespoon mustard seed - Add the sauce from Step 2 to the drained mixture, return to the stove. - Bring the mixture to a slow boil and let boil for 10 minutes. Stir carefully, lifting from the bottom. Do not make a “mush”! Be careful, this mixture scorches so easily. After the 10 minutes at a slow boil, remove the mixture to a work area. Using a large cup or pitcher, scoop up the mixture and put in the jars using a jar funnel. When done, pack in jars and seal with hot new lids and rings. Makes approximately 15 pints. Expanded version of the recipe available upon request.


What Does God Sound Like?

By Jared Johnson

On the first night of Choir Camp, the boy and girl choristers gathered together after dinner for an opening rehearsal. In the peaceful surroundings of the Kanuga evening, we talked about our goals for the coming year at Trinity. I gave the children a blank piece of paper and asked them to write their answers to a series of questions. One of the questions was, “What does God sound like?” Although several volunteered to read their answers, most wrote quietly and privately, and their papers were anonymous. Here are some of the things they wrote: • •

• • • •

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He sounds like many voices, different languages, accents, all in harmony God sounds like joy, peace, love and happiness for the people around us not depending on who we are or how we look Everything, nothing, silence, breath of one, all people are one, every single individual, every voice, every sound, no sounds at all Silence, a steady heartbeat, a baby laughing Favorite hymns and voices, any sound that expresses love The voice in head saying “do the right thing” Nothing of this world. It would split the ear and pierce the heart with

• •

• •

overwhelming and overpowering dedication to himself and only his holiness, yet he lovingly chooses to whisper his support and care for every single lamb of his hand. Whatever you think he sounds like. He sounds like everything, even the ugliest, most horrific things because he created them and they are beautiful in his sight I don’t think God sounds like anything we know of. I think he would have a different way of communicating with us. Christmas carols and hymns that we sing Love and kindness


Whole Hearted Worship By The Rev’d Canon Ira Houck

“And these words which I command you this day shall be upon your heart.” Deuteronomy 6:6 Good stewardship is wholehearted worship of God. Moses in the great “Shema” of Judaism declared, “The Lord is our God, the Lord is one” (Deuteronomy 6: 4). The Bible teaches us that God is one Almighty God; and the only proper response in knowing God is to worship. It teaches us that the people of God shall worship God: “You shall love the Lord your God with all your might” (verse 6:5). Jesus bound himself to the worship of the Father with his followers. In the Book of Hebrews we read, “…offer to God an acceptable worship with reverence and awe….” True worship is wholehearted worship, not a casual act. We call worship a delight that satisfies the deepest of human needs.

Moses saw two factors which dilute, if not eradicate, whole hearted worship. The first factor is laxity due to prosperity (verses 1015). When there is an abundance, or when suffering is minimal, we tend to forget about God. Let’s be alert to the temptation of forgetting God when we have everything we need. Moses saw a second factor which held the potential to weaken wholehearted worship. That factor is adversity (verses 16-29). In adversity the faithful are tempted to give up believing in God’s grace and good purpose. Jesus teaches us to be attentive and alert to the temptation of doubting God’s constant love and good purpose when faced with tragedy, troubles, hardship and misfortune.

THINK: Am I someone who worships God wholeheartedly? When I forget God in times of plenty, may I know that God never forgets me. Does my worship extend to my stewardship of all that God provides? PRAY: O Lord God, Creator of all things, Giver of all things, Redeemer of all things; I give you wholehearted worship; You are an awesome God. Help me to conform to your will that I may offer acceptable worship with a generous spirit and seal this prayer upon my heart. Amen. READ: Deuteronomy 6:1-29 What do the verses say about whole hearted worship of God?

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VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT “Margaret Manning is a phenomenal teen!” exclaims Trinity Newcomer Coordinator Allison Cox, going on to explain that Margaret’s volunteer activities started young when she agreed as a 6th grader to help with the basket booth for the bazaar.

Margaret Manning Article by Beebe James

Now a senior at AC Flora High School, she has continued her involvement at Trinity in the youth program but has taken it to another level as a leader. Austin Lewis, Trinity Youth Intern, tells us that Margaret finds her faith fed most through mentoring younger youth. She is an advisor for the 7th graders in the Sunday youth group where she participates in games alongside them and leads them in devotions. She has been a leader every summer for the Episcopal Outreach Camp (EOC), leading a group of middle school girls as they provide community service to many local Columbia organizations such as Camp Burnt Gin, Homeworks, Harvest Hope, Keep Midlands Beautiful and St. Lawrence Place and she has been on many of the mission trips offered through our Youth Program. In 2015 she went with a group of juniors and seniors to Costa Rica on the youth mission trip.

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Each year, Margaret is one of the youth who volunteer for Vacation Bible School and; one of the VBS chairs says there is something very special about those young people who choose to spend time with the little children there. She attends worship regularly and serves as an acolyte, having been recently selected as a captain of one of the teams. Margaret is dependable and easily called on due to her willingness always to help. She is known as a great role model because she herself has succeeded through her high school years and displays that determination to succeed, inspiring younger people. In addition to all of her accomplishments, Margaret is just a nice person and a great big sister (now often filling in as driver for younger siblings), actively involved in her last year of high school and looking forward to her next stage of life. Margaret Manning is a great example of our Trinity youth and we are glad to claim her as our own.


CATHEDRAL HAPPENINGS: FALL 2016 Sunday, October 2 Blessing of the Animals at 6pm

OCTOBER

Monday, October 3 9am DHC Board Meeting 7:15pm Yoga Tuesday, October 4 10am Yoga 6pm Men of Trinity Drop In Wednesday, October 5 5:45pm Parish Suppers 6pm Trinity Film Group 6:30pm Stories in Stained Glass 6:30pm The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss Thursday, October 6 12pm Contemplative Prayer 6pm Yoga Friday, October 7 12pm Men of Trinity Meeting 6pm Kids Movie Night Sunday, October 9 Regular Schedule Monday, October 10 6pm Bishop Finlay 7:15pm Yoga Tuesday, October 11 10am Yoga Wednesday, October 12 8:30am Bishops’ Dialogue 5:45pm Parish Suppers 6pm Trinity Film Group 6:30pm Stories in Stained Glass 6:30pm The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss Thursday, October 13 12pm Contemplative Prayer 6pm Yoga 7:30pm St. Thomas Choir Concert Friday, October 14 6pm Bazaar Bash Saturday, October 15 10am Trinity Bazaar Sunday, October 16 Regular Schedule Monday, October 17 7:15pm Yoga Tuesday, October 18 10am Yoga 4:30pm TLC Board Meeting Wednesday, October 19 4pm Executive Committee 5:30pm Finance Committee 5:45pm Parish Suppers 6pm Trinity Film Group 6:30pm Stories in Stained Glass 6:30pm The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss

Thursday, October 20 12pm Contemplative Prayer 6pm Yoga

NOVEMBER

Friday, October 21 6pm Parents Night Out 7pm Pre-Marriage Workshop Saturday, October 22 8:45am Pre-Marriage Workshop 9am Acolyte Festival Sunday, October 23 Regular Worship Schedule Monday, October 24 7:15pm Yoga Tuesday, October 25 10am Yoga 4:30pm Trinity Foundation Meeting Wednesday, October 26 5:45pm Parish Suppers 6pm Trinity Film Group 6:30pm Stories in Stained Glass 6:30pm The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss Thursday, October 27 12pm Contemplative Prayer 6pm Yoga 6pm Vestry Friday, October 28 5pm TLC Family Fun Night Sunday, October 30 Regular Worship Schedule Monday, October 31 10am TLC Parade Wednesday, November 2

5:30pm All Souls Requiem 7pm Parish Shrimp Boil

Thursday, November 3 12pm Contemplative Prayer Friday, November 4 12pm Men of Trinity Meeting 6pm Kids Movie Night

6:30pm Stories in Stained Glass 6:30pm The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss

Thursday, November 10 12pm Contemplative Prayer Sunday, November 13 Regular Schedule Monday, November 14 6pm Bishop Finlay Tuesday, November 15 4:30pm TLC Board Meeting Wednesday, November 16 5:45pm Parish Suppers: Last One 6pm Trinity Film Group 6:30pm Stories in Stained Glass 6:30pm The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss Thursday, November 17 12pm Contemplative Prayer 6pm Yoga 6pm Vestry Friday, November 18 6pm Parents Night Out Sunday, November 20 Regular Schedule Wednesday, November 23 Offices close at 2pm Thursday, November 24 10am Thanksgiving Day Service Friday, November 25 Offices closed Sunday, November 27 Advent Festival & Lessons and Carols Tuesday, November 29 5:30pm Men of Trinity Advent Teaching

SUNDAY WORSHIP SCHEDULE CATHEDRAL SERVICES

Monday, November 7 9am DHC Board Meeting

7:45 am: Holy Eucharist, Rite I 9 am: Holy Eucharist, Rite II 11:15 am: Holy Eucharist, Rite I 4 pm: Choral Evensong

Tuesday, November 8 6pm Men of Trinity BBQ

KEENAN CHAPEL SERVICES

Sunday, November 6 Regular Schedule

Wednesday, November 9 5:45pm Parish Suppers 6pm Trinity Film Group

11:15 am: Holy Eucharist, Rite II 6 pm: Holy Eucharist, Rite II


2016-2017: ADULT FORMATION OPPORTUNITIES

SUNDAY MORNING Liberty and Law: A Study of the Book of Exodus in Satterlee Hall

WEEKDAY CLASSES MONDAYS

Facilitators: The Rev’d Ira Houck, Sally McKay, & Belton Zeigler “Footnotes” 6pm in the Library Facilitator: Ray Barrow

“All the Company of Heavens” Angels, Saints, and Other Glimpses of Heaven’s Wonders in the Keenan Chapel

TUESDAYS

Facilitator: Dean Tim Jones Men of Trinity Morning Bible Study 8:30am in the Stirling Room Facilitator: The Rev’d Charles Davis St. Francis, a Spiritual Guide st for the 21 Century in Room 114 Facilitators: The Rev’d Patsy Malanuk, Charles Education for Ministry (EfM) Dibble, Susie Dibble, Walter Edgar, Nela Edgar, 5:30pm in Room 114 Facilitator: Karen Pearson Betty Hudgens, & Anne Runge

“CONVERSATIONS” in the

Administrative Conference Room Facilitator: Ray Barrow

Growing in Christ in the Stirling

Room Facilitators: Sharon Roach, Rox Pollard, Tommy Price, Lee Ayers, Emery Clark & Cubby Culbertson (3rd Sundays) 12

Theology Through Film

WEDNESDAYS “A Women’s Heart” Bible Study

9:30 am in the Edward Room (every other week) Facilitator: Bibs Babson

The Ark Group

10am in the Stirling Room

Dave Ramsey’s Financial Peace University (FPU)

6:15pm in the Admin Conference Room Facilitators: Nan and Kent Krieg, Shannon and Brian Kvam

Trinity Film Group

6pm in the Edward Room 6pm in the Edward Room Facilitator: Peter Shand Facilitator: Peter Shand

Stories in Stained Glass

6:30pm in the Cathedral Facilitators: Clergy and Docents

For more information about these formation opportunities, visit trinitysc.org/formation.


UPCOMING FALL EVENTS & SERVICES • Sunday, October 2: Blessing of the Animals at 6 pm in Keenan

Chapel Courtyard. Bring your furry (or scaly) buddies. All animals welcome!

• Thursday, October 13: St. Thomas Choir of Men & Boys from St.

Thomas Choir School in New York City Concert at 7:30 pm in the Cathedral. $10 general admission tickets available at the door.

• Friday, October 14: Trinity Bazaar Bash from 6-9 pm in the Keenan

Chapel Courtyard - Sign-up online at trinitysc.org/bazaarbash. This is a free event but donations will be accepted online and at the door.

• Saturday, October 15: 68th Annual Trinity Bazaar from 10 am -2 pm • Sunday, October 23: Stewardship Celebration Sunday • Wednesday, November 2: All Souls Day Requiem at 5:30 pm followed by a Parish Shrimp Boil in the

Cathedral Courtyard at 7 pm—Purchase tickets online at trinitysc.org/shrimpboil or by calling 771.7300.

• Wednesday, November 16: Last Parish Supper of the Year • Thursday, November 24: Thanksgiving Day service at 10 am in the Cathedral • Thursday, November 24 & Friday, November 25: Cathedral offices closed for Thanksgiving

• Sunday, November 27: Advent Lessons and Carols at 4 pm in the Cathedral followed by a Parish-wide Advent Festival for all ages at 5 pm.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT SUPPERS Parish suppers are at 5:45 pm each Wednesday evening in Satterlee Hall. The supper menu each week and online registration can be found at trinitysc.org/supper. Cost is $7 for adults and $4 for children ages 12 and under. This Fall’s programming for adults is Stories in Stained Glass which is led by clergy and docents in the Cathedral at 6:30 pm. Children programming is “The Gospel According to Dr. Seuss.”

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CHILDREN MINISTRIES: UPCOMING EVENTS • Family Pumpkin Pickin’ and Carving: Sunday, October 9 - Come and pick a pumpkin from 4-6 pm at the State Farmer’s Market. Then join us for a special pumpkin carving story and supper at the Babson’s home. • Trinity Bazaar: Saturday, October 15 - Don’t miss the fun Children’s Carnival! • Fall Scavenger Hunt: Monday, October 17 at the Carolina Children’s Garden from 11 am - 1 pm. Bring a bag lunch and come explore all 12 gardens and see how many items you can find on the scavenger hunt...be on the lookout for Pooh and Peter the Rabbit! • Christmas Present Project: Sunday, November 13 from 4-6 pm at the Mad Platter - Bring the whole family and create a special ornament or keepsake for Christmas 2016. • Advent Lessons & Carols and Advent Festival for all ages: Sunday, November 27

YOUTH: WEEKLY OFFERINGS & UPCOMING EVENTS • Youth Fall Retreat to Awanita: October 7-9 • Home Works Blitz Day: Saturday, October 22 • Youth Masquerade Ball (Big Halloween Party): Sunday, October 30 • Fifth Sunday Homeless Breakfast: Sunday, October 30 • Happening #76 (10th-12th graders): November 18-20 • Advent Lessons & Carols and Advent Festival for all ages: Sunday, November 27

WEEKLY OFFERINGS Sundays: • • •

10:15 -11am: Christian Formation with Breakfast; 5-7 pm: Middle School Youth Group and Dinner; 6:30-8:30 pm: High School Youth Group with Dinner

• •

7 am: High School Breakfast Club at Dunkin Donuts 7 am: Middle School Girls Breakfast Club at Bruegger’s Bagels

• •

7 am: High School Girls Breakfast Bible Study at Bruegger’s Bagels 7 pm: High School Bible Study at Trinity in youth room

7 am: Middle School Breakfast Club at Bojangles on Ft. Jackson Blvd.

Tuesdays:

Youth Updates

Text trinity youth to 41411 and follow prompts to sign-up.

Wednesdays: Thursdays:

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For a full listing of youth events and to register for any of the events listed above, please visit trinitysc.org/youth For questions, contact Eleanor Smolen, Director of Youth Ministries, at esmolen@trinitysc.org or by cell phone at 912.332.2606.


By Pat Manley Pat Manley attended Trinity’s Writers Workshop in June of 2016. The Workshop trained and recruited lay people who have an interest in writing and editing for Trinity’s Cathedral Connections.

for her tireless work with the poor and infirm in third world India. But what makes a saint? There are millions of good people the world over who dedicate their lives to caring for those less fortunate; good God loving, church going, well respected souls who work beyond their personal tasks in life to help make life a little more comfortable for those who suffer. These are good souls, big hearted people, but are they saints? Of course, the criteria for traditional Sainthood are stringent ones, so there are relatively few “traditional” saints… Out of the blue, it occurred to me that being a saint is rare, living in a saintly way is pretty common.

L

ately, amongst the political drama going on in the news each day, we’ve been hearing a lot of news reports about the process of the canonization of Mother Teresa of Calcutta in the Roman Catholic Church. One can’t help but listen to a process that we in the modern world have rarely, if ever witnessed. It was also reported in the last couple of days that Pope Francis did ultimately canonize her to be called St. Teresa of Calcutta. All this got me to thinking. What makes a saint? It’s true that Mother Teresa was loved throughout the Christian world and beyond –

Anyone of us who cares for a neighbor in need; anyone who prays for the sick; who brings a meal to an elderly family member, who loves their neighbor, even if the neighbor is not the best kind of a neighbor is a sacred soul who lives a saintly life. There might not be special ceremony around a saintly way of living, nor news flashes but we all know what we have been taught through Matthew 25:40 [excerpt] “…Verily I say unto you, inasmuch as ye have done it to the least of my brothers, you have done it unto me.” A powerful way to become a saint is to care about everyone in the best of ways. Maybe that’s what makes an “everyday” saint. 15


One Year Later... By Dean Timothy Jones

On that Sunday early in October last year, I first realized that something dire was happening when I tried to get to church. Less than a mile from my house, a police officer standing outside his car barred me from heading down Garners Ferry Road. Just beyond him, I could see the gathering swirl of waters. Rosewood Boulevard, an alternate route, was also swamped and blocked. As that day and succeeding days unfolded, many of our families were hit hard. More than forty, as it turns out. More than twenty were displaced. But as I said the following Sunday morning as we gathered for worship, what happened around us, and the ways we were galvanized to compassionate action, became a defining moment. So many reached out and helped by offering homes, their time, financial gifts, and shoulders to cry on. And that’s to say nothing of so many heartfelt prayers. Defining moments indeed! I’m grateful. We came together as a church family in glorious ways. I’ve not seen anything quite like it. We provide, one year later, just a couple of glimpses in how God enabled us to move forward and reach out. Article by Allison Cox

A

mong the dozens of Trinity parishioners who awoke to a home filled with rising waters on October 3 last year were Keren and Bob Riegel. Keren and Bob live in the especially hard hit Lake Katherine area. Evacuated by boat from a second story window, the Riegels arrived on dry land to be met by parishioner Jamie Newman, who simply said, “Y’all are coming with me.” The Riegels stayed at the Newmans’ until being allowed to return two days later to assess the damage and begin clean up. “Trinity people were everywhere,” recalls Keren. “Familiar faces, as well as those who I did not know personally.” As the threat of a breach in the Forest Lake dam intensified, the National Guard called for a mandatory

evacuation of the area, putting many homeowners and workers in military vehicles and taking them to safe areas and make-shift shelters. The Riegels once again were forced to leave their property and were once again met by a parishioner, Lucy Barwick, who without hesitation took them to the warmth and safety of her own home. Keren says that it was at this moment that she realized that this event was more than a bad storm but was indeed a natural disaster with a longreaching aftermath. “I now know,” she reflects, “what St. Francis meant when he said, ‘Letting go is what gives you freedom.’ Looking out a window while at the Barwicks’, I was struck by the realization that I had Bob and our dog, Macy, with me and that was all that truly mattered. Two days later I felt a freedom and a sense of hope - it was the most incredible feeling of my life.” Keren continues through tears, “We were surrounded by angels when we returned home.” The cleaning, packing the belongings that remained intact, moving furniture, removing dry wall, etc. was done by these very human “angels.” Keren goes

on to say that, “Bob and I know God’s grace now - we have experienced it first-hand. We did not deserve any of this outpouring of love and help but we were given it freely. This is truly Jesus on earth. While some people may not understand it, this event has been the greatest gift for spiritual and personal growth of our lives.” The Riegels next lived with friends Bob and (Canon) Patsy Malanuk for three months before securing temporary housing, while their home was repaired. Again, members of the Trinity family provided just what was needed during this tumultuous time. Keren says,

“We are all one. The earth is part of us and we are all part of one another. This experience has taken my theology from my head and put it in my heart.”


The Flood: God’s Provisions and Plans, and Lessons Learned

I

By Bibs Babson

remember October 3 and 4 as if it were yesterday. That Saturday night I had prepared my lesson of Abram and Sarai. I was having trouble keeping all of their journey straight. Was Shechem before or after Bethel? It would be okay, the children would hear the message of God’s provisions in each place and how he kept them safe. As Sunday morning approached, I laid in bed counting the seconds between the on and off cycle of the three sump pumps under our house. Finally hearing gurgling coming from the toilet, I decided we might better check out what in the world was going on. As John opened the back door, all we could see was a wall of water headed toward us. He told me to go get towels, but before I even reached the linen closet I was ankle deep in muck.

We found ourselves in a hotel in Blythewood. This would turn into our Bethel. We were starving and the love and kindness showed to us by the hotel staff and a precious waitress at Lizard’s Thicket was nothing but divine intervention. We then found ourselves in a small duplex for the next seven months. An Egypt of sorts. We knew the Lord was going to be with us, but we were scared of what lay ahead.

John told me to grab clothes and the dog. I grabbed yoga pants and found Sammy (our dog) swimming in my closet. As we made our way up the stairs John found my Bible on the counter and tossed it up the stairs to me. We were now trapped in Brooks’ room; our Shechem. I wasn’t ready to leave our house; our Haran. There was a lot of praying going on and also some funny stories that helped us realize that God was with us and was going to keep us safe. As people came from near and far to help pack up our home, news came that another dam was in danger of breaking.

Two weeks following the flood, Dean Jones called me to ask if I would consider stepping into the role of Director of Children’s Ministries. Can you imagine my shock? Hammond had been my home for years and years and now was really the only “home” I had. I couldn’t walk away from what I considered my home; but the Lord kept calling and so did our Dean. Abram walked away from his home for God’s promise of even greater blessing, but I was comfortable and secure. However, after much prayer, discerning and listening, John and I realized the Lord was leading me to a place of greater service and usefulness for him. We obeyed and here we are at home, at last in our Hebron. The Lord’s provisions are simply too many to name through this journey and we are eternally grateful. Lessons learned: There is a huge difference between want and need. Listen! Don’t miss out on God’s plan for you. God’s will be done!


Men of Trinity Kickoff

By Rusty Miller

F

rank Martin is a teacher, a mentor, a role model, a community leader, a husband, a father and a pretty darn good Basketball Coach. His success as a basketball coach is because he is all of those other things first.

says a lot about his focus and priorities: Pressure is having an Algebra class of 25 high school students (in inner-city Miami) with 18 desks and 12 textbooks; with each student expecting to be taught the same as each other.

Coach Frank Martin was the featured speaker at the Men of Trinity Fall Kickoff meeting on Tuesday, September 6. Almost 100 Men and their children enjoyed sharing a BBQ meal and an evening with Coach Martin. He shared his guiding life principles using examples he learned from growing up as the first American-born member of his family that immigrated from Cuba to Miami in the early 1960’s. Many of the life lessons he learned formed the foundation of his life. He shared his formula for reaching young people and developing a relationship: Honesty is the foundation for trust. Trust is necessary for loyalty and the foundation of these three attributes develops into love.

Whether you are a Gamecock basketball fan or not, everyone should be a fan of Frank Martin.

Another vignette he shared was the time a reporter asked him, after a team loss, if he felt job pressure. His response

Men of Trinity 2016 Calendar Join the Men of Trinity on the first Tuesday of each month for a social to fellowship with other Men at Trinity. Save the dates for 2016! • • • •

Tuesday, October 4: Men of Trinity Drop-In from 6-8pm at Mason Hardy's home Tuesday, November 15: Men of Trinity Annual BBQ at Belle Grove Plantation Tuesday, November 29: Men of Trinity Advent Lessons at Trinity Tuesday, December 6: Men of Trinity Advent Drop-In from 6-8pm at Rox Pollard's home

Weekly Men of Trinity Bible Studies • •

Tuesday Morning Men’s Bible Study Lead by The Rev’d Charles Davis Friday Morning Bible Study at Phil Johnston’s house

Outreach Opportunities • • • •

Community Worship Service every Sunday at 8 am. With Keepin It Real Ministries. St Lawrence Place Fall Festival—October 27 All Saints' Parish Shrimp Boil – November 1 Epiphany Oyster Roast – January 6, 2017

Monthly Planning Meetings

• 1st Friday each Month: In the Workshop at Trinity Center


A Trinity Story: The Cooperative Ministry by The Rev’d Canon Patsy Malanuk

T

he early 1980’s were a “Perfect Storm” for poor people. After an earlier faltering economy, grants to the states for Medicaid programs were drastically cut. Added to that, there was a very tight housing market accompanied by interest rates skyrocketing as high as 21%. Unemployment was in the double digits, a level not seen again until the Great Recession of 2008. Average wages and benefits dropped. Also during that time, the SC Department of Mental Health followed the national plan to deinstitutionalize the mentally ill. The population of state psychiatric facilities was significantly reduced by releasing people to the care of communities. All of these factors came together just as the social safety nets and services were being cut. It was during those years that The Rev. John E. Banks became the second Dean of Trinity Cathedral. With social services reduced, people in need were arriving in ever greater numbers at the doors of churches. Early on, in an organization called Community Care, downtown Columbia churches worked together to meet emergency needs. Jack Banks had a passion for helping people in need, and he and Beebe James, whom he had recently hired as Trinity’s Coordinator of Lay Ministries, determined to find a way to coordinate services for people in need through the churches. The fledgling effort to serve the needs of Columbia’s poor was initiated with one young man who sat on a stool at the Oliver Gospel Mission receiving clients and then trying to find resources who could assist them. Beebe James remembers sitting with that young man herself a number of days trying to analyze how the vision could work. In 1982, the collaboration of five downtown churches – Trinity Cathedral, First Presbyterian, Main St. Methodist, Washington St. Methodist, and First Baptist – plus St. Martin’s in the Fields became a new non-profit: The Cooperative Ministry. Jack Banks provided leadership in the organizational development and served as first Board President. Beebe James joined him on the Board,

and Trinity provided funding through a generous donation from Trinity member Ruth Horne. As Cooperative Ministry has grown and evolved over 34 years into an organization with over 50 faith-based partners, 120 partnering agencies, and countless civic organizations and individuals, Trinity Cathedral has remained committed financially, and through volunteer help and board membership. Over the years, the needs of people trying to lift themselves up from poverty have not disappeared. Trinity Outreach Committee member Nela Edgar is now serving on Cooperative Ministry’s revitalized Parish Advisory Committee. Recently, Nela reported that the well known Cooperative Ministry Car Program, now called Autos for Opportunities, is gearing up for a “drive.” The Ministry accepts donated cars, rehabs them as necessary and provides transportation to jobs for Cooperative Ministry clients. The late Mac James, beloved member of Trinity, was the first leader of the Car Program and he led it enthusiastically for many years. During the month of November, expect to hear more about Autos for Opportunities and to find out how to donate your old car to one of the 19 families on the waiting list for the program. The stories of the power of transportation in the lives of people trying to lift themselves up from poverty are found on the Cooperative Ministry website, www.coopmin.org.

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A Season of Gratitude and By Wade and Lannie Stinnette

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t is stewardship season at Trinity Cathedral. “A Season of Gratitude and Growth” was chosen as our theme because stewardship is about being grateful for all of God’s blessings, especially for his greatest gift to us, Jesus, his only son. It is also a time of spiritual growth as we reflect upon our relationship with God and where we are on our Christian journey. Our faith does not grow without serving God. Spiritual growth does not occur without giving our time, talents, and treasure. Generosity with our time and money is often the greatest barometer of our spiritual journey. In The General Thanksgiving in The Book of Common Prayer, we pledge to praise God not only with our lips but in our lives. At Trinity, we fulfill our pledge by: • • • • •

Worshiping God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit with our whole selves, Teaching the faith to our children and the coming generations, Serving God’s people in need, Sharing the Good News of Jesus Christ throughout the world, and Giving generously and joyfully as God in Christ Jesus has first given to each of us.

In many ways our faithfulness to this call is measured by

our willingness to give sacrificially and to fully engage in the ministry God has in store for us. During this stewardship season, you are being asked to prayerfully consider not only the call of God upon your life but the blessings of God in your life, and then to respond in a manner that reflects your trust in and gratitude to God. Begin by seeking God through prayer. Prayer is an integral part of stewardship. Ask God what his will is for you at this stage of life. What would he have you do? Then, list your blessings: God’s grace, your family and loved ones, your job, your income, your home, Trinity. Be delighted and surprised. Be grateful. Then make your pledge. The amount of your gift is a decision of the heart and should be made between you and God. In Deuteronomy, the Israelites were instructed to set aside a tenth of all their fields produced each year. The purpose was to provide for their priests and to take care of the poor, the widows, and the orphans. The Biblical practice of tithing, which means to give back a tenth of our earnings to God, remains the standard; however, it is a goal many of us have to work toward. In this regard, please consider taking the 1% Challenge. On the following chart (pictured on opposite page), find your annual income, then move across until you reach your

Consider Taking the 1% Challenge... Annual Income $20,000 $30,000 $40,000 $50,000 $60,000 $70,000 $80,000 $90,000 $100,000 $125,000 $150,000 20

1%

2%

3%

$200

$400

$600

$300

$600

$400

4%

5%

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$14,000

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$1,250

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$3,750

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$8,750

$10,000

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$21,000

$22,500


d Growth

current giving amount. This will determine your giving percentage. Move to the right to determine how much you are willing to grow in your annual pledge. For example, if in 2016 you gave 5%, consider giving 6% in 2017. Currently, our annual pledges cover only 85% of Trinity’s operating budget. Every gift and every increase in giving is needed and will make an impact on the ministries of the church. Finally, please return your pledge card on or before Stewardship Sunday on October 23. Last year, only 37.5% of our parish families made a pledge. While God doesn’t need a pledge card to know our hearts and generosity, going through the process does encourage us to think intentionally about our commitment to God’s work through the church. Also, the Vestry, who desire to be good stewards, find the pledges to be invaluable when

preparing the annual budget. Knowing what to expect in the year ahead helps them prepare a budget that uses all our gifts wisely. From the eighth and ninth chapters of 2 Corinthians, we find that giving should be done regularly, cheerfully, even in hardship and should represent a sacrifice by the giver. What does it mean to give sacrificially? The answer comes from John 3:16, “For God so loved the world, that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life.” There you have it, the model for sacrificial giving. For God so loves US that he gave his only Son so that WE might have eternal life. May our gifts, given sacrificially, be a natural and joyous response to all that God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, has done, is doing, and will do for us and for the world. Thanks be to God! 21


Blessing of our Animals By The Rev’d Canon Ira Houck

The Blessing of Animals is Biblical and it happens at the Cathedral on October 2 at 6 pm, in the area outside of Keenan Chapel. We will assemble all creatures big and small beginning at 5:45 pm in the courtyard. The blessing of pets and animals is celebrated in early October to coincide with educating, inspiring, and connecting our faith journey with the life of Jesus Christ as expressed through the life of St Francis of Assisi. As we hear it said, “Our vision is to be a vibrant place to experience God, be transformed, and make Christ known in the world,” so why not include our beloved pets in our experience of a loving Father of Creation? The Bible teaches us that the act of blessing means “To impart power or life.” The person performing the blessing is mediating that power from God or Christ to the person performing or the subject, and in this case a pet. To bless is more than a statement of benevolence and caring. To bless is to pronounce God's loving power upon a person or animal! The blessing of each animal, by name, means that the church declares God’s loving expression for health, healing and life upon the pets of which we are good stewards. This act of pronouncing a blessing is merely facilitated by the priest but the power of health, healing and life comes only from God for the benefit of the animal in its relationship with its human partners. The Blessing of God upon Creation in Genesis applies to all creatures great and small. We are cautious not to reinforce the separation of human creatures from other animals by this blessing. Instead, consider reinforcing our common association by blessing ALL creatures (in God’s Creation)—in the saintly example of Francis of Assisi (See also Matthew 28:16-20). And for those interested in the stanza of a worshipping hymn of praise by Carolyn Winfrey Gillette, an Episcopalian, it is available from www.letallcreationpraise.org/worship-services/blessing-ofthe-animals/o-god-your-creatures-fill-the-earth

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Local Art at the Trinity Bookstore Photo from Columbia Living Magazine

Trinity’s own Laura Spong is the inaugural artist on the Bookstore’s Art Wall. Laura is an inspiration to artists and art lovers everywhere. She is very well respected in the art world and especially here at Trinity. She has just completed her biggest exhibition celebrating six decades of painting.

Come See What’s New in the Bookstore... Books for EDUSC’s SHIFT We have copies of Shift: Three Big Moves for the 21st Century Church by midlands author, Mark E. Tidsworth. This book will be featured as the Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina next step in strategic visioning for congregational lay and ordained leadership.

Books for Blessing of the Animals Come celebrate the Blessing of the Animals at Trinity on October 2. We’ve got lots of children and adults books about animals. Information about the Blessing of the Animals service on opposite page.

Interested in Volunteering at the Bookstore? Come be a part of our happy volunteer family. Generally shifts are for two hours a week. Contact Elizabeth Wyman for information at 461.7313 or bookstore@ trinitysc.org. The Bookstore is open Monday - Friday from 11 am to 3 pm (with extended hours during formation activities on Wednesdays) and on Sunday mornings. facebook.com/trinitybkstore | bookstore@trinitysc.org | trinitysc.org/bookstore | 803.771. 461.7313 23


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