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The Complete Organ Works of

Johann Sebastian Bach Trinity College Chapel October 2016 – June 2017

By kind permission of The Master and Fellows


Welcome from the Artistic Director Welcome to Bach at Trinity, a year-long celebration of the complete organ works of Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) and of the 40th anniversary of Trinity College’s chapel organ, completed in 1976 by the Swiss firm of Metzler Orgelbau. The organ is renowned not only throughout the United Kingdom but across the world, and is regarded by many as the best instrument in the United Kingdom for playing the organ music of Bach. The idea for this series first came when I noticed a message in the choir vestry addressed to the choir from Annette Marlow, wife of the late Dr Richard Marlow, Director of Music at Trinity from 1968 to 2006. Pinned beneath this note was a programme, styled with beautiful calligraphy, from the complete Bach series given by Dr Marlow in 1976-77 in order to inaugurate the organ. Bach at Trinity, then, is as much a celebration of the music of Bach and of this instrument as it is a celebration of the achievements of Richard Marlow and his vision in having this wonderful organ installed forty years ago this year. I am delighted that so many organists will be playing throughout the year, with current and former organ scholars from across the University of Cambridge, students from the Royal Academy of Music and some of the country’s finest professionals. I am also very much looking forward to the masterclass to be given by distinguished American organist, Ann Elise Smoot. I hope that you will be able to attend as many concerts in the series as possible. However, should you be unable to join us, we will also be webcasting every recital live online, and adding tracks to our online Bach Player, an ever-expanding resource of recordings from recitals and services. You can access the Bach Player at www.trinitycollegechoir.com/organ/webcasts/bach. I am hugely grateful to Paul Nicholson (Head of the Chapel and Music Office), Eleanor Lancelot (Music Administrator) and Susie Hill (Artistic Director of TCMS) for their invaluable help in the organization of this series.

Alexander Hamilton Artistic Director, Bach at Trinity


Joanna Harries

Celebrating the 40th anniversary of the completion of the Metzler organ


Excerpt from Organists’ Review (September 2016) A brief history of the organs of Trinity College The chapel of Trinity College was built by two queens: it was begun by Queen Mary, daughter of King Henry VIII, in 1554-1555 and completed by her halfsister, Queen Elizabeth I, in 1567. Trinity College was formed by the merging of two existing colleges, Michaelhouse and King’s Hall, and the first organ in the chapel was moved from King’s Hall in 1563. Thirty years later, Hugh Rose was employed to build a new organ to replace the transplanted organ from King’s Hall. John Yorke was then contracted to repair the “ould orgaine” and build a “new chaire orgaine” in 1610. Twenty-five years after this, the distinguished name of “Mr Dallam”, Robert Dallam, who probably built organs at York and Durham cathedrals, appears on the records. Robert was a son of Thomas Dallam, who had built the organ at King’s College thirty years previously in 1606. Robert Dallam was probably engaged in the maintenance and repair of the Trinity organ. With the dismantling and destroying of many organs (including the organ at Trinity) during the Commonwealth period, a significant number of English organ builders had either moved abroad to find work or sought alternative means of employment. It was just a few months after the Restoration in 1660 that a German organ builder by the name of Bernhardt Schmidt (circa 1630-1708) arrived in England. Schmidt anglicised his name, becoming Bernard Smith. ‘Father’ Smith, as he is often known, dominated the English organ-building scene for the majority of the latter half of the 17th century, being responsible for the instruments at the new St Paul’s Cathedral and Westminster Abbey. Smith moved in Royal musicmaking circles, befriending John Blow and Henry Purcell, and, in 1681 was appointed Organ Maker to the King. Another leading organ-building figure of the period was Renatus Harris (1652-1724). Smith and Harris’ rivalry was infamous, and their enmity was played out in a ‘Battle of the Organs’ at the Temple in 1684, whereby both builders were commissioned to build an organ for the two Societies of the Middle Temple and Inner Temple – Smith won the contest. Smith’s association with Trinity began in 1686, when he was contracted to build a new chaire organ. This instrument was, for some reason, not completed until 1694. He was then commissioned to build a second organ in 1706 (completed in 1708, the year he died), incorporating the pipework of the 1694 organ. The magnificent cases, which show the influence of Grinling Gibbons, date from this


time, and are some of the best examples of Smith’s work. Trinity’s Master at the time was Richard Bentley (1662-1742), who belonged to the same London club as Bernard Smith. It is possible that it was Bentley who gave Smith the endearing epithet ‘Father’. Bentley was responsible for numerous improvements around the college, in particular to the interior of the chapel. There was a tense dispute between Bentley and the Fellowship surrounding this, as one Fellow claimed that Bentley’s reason for beautifying the chapel was because he had already commissioned an expensive organ from Smith. The College’s income at the time was not great enough to finance this, so Bentley suggested that all Fellows contribute a substantial amount of their own money to the cause. This, as might have been predicted, was not well-received. The organ was maintained through the 18th century, with only minor alterations being executed. However, as is often the case, the organ was enlarged exponentially during the 19th and early 20th centuries. In 1836, John Gray extended the compass of the Great organ both downwards and upwards, converting the instrument from a G to a C organ, and a pedal board was also added. One of the most unusual features of the organ, installed under the auspices of Dr Walmisley, was the extension of the Great compass all the way down to 16’ C. This was removed in 1870 by the firm of Hill and Son, as pedal-playing technique had developed significantly, making the extended manual compass redundant. Hill and Son added a number of new ranks to the organ, notably the 32’ Open Wood, which, on account of the lack of space in the case itself, was laid on the floor of the Antechapel! Arthur Harrison reconstructed the organ entirely between 1911-1913, replacing the action with tubular-pneumatic systems and electro-pneumatic systems in the Swell and Solo divisions. It was a very large instrument indeed, with four manuals, seventy-four speaking stops and seventeen couplers. However, like the organ before it, the Harrison and Harrison organ became increasingly unreliable and difficult to maintain. The Director of Music, Dr Richard Marlow (1939-2013), approached the College Council about the commissioning of a new organ in 1972. At the time, other building works were taking place around the College, including the restoration of the famous Wren Library, removing Victorian accretions to expose the original Wren design. A similar approach was taken in relation to the new organ; it seemed appropriate that the new organ should be in sympathy with the interior of the chapel. The


decision to look for an organ building firm outside of England was not the first: the Danish firm, Frobenius, had recently built a new organ (1965) for The Queen’s College, Oxford, and the German firm of Von Beckerath had installed a new organ for Clare College, Cambridge, in 1971. There seems to be a pleasing symmetry in the continental influence seen in both the 18th century and in 1972 when the organ was commissioned. It really is a ‘multi-national’ organ, built by a Swiss firm, designed by a Dutch consultant (Bernhardt Edskes) and situated within a Cambridge college chapel. The starting point for the instrument was the original casework and seven remaining ranks by Smith. These are the Principal 8’ on the Rückpositiv, the Principal 16’ on the Pedal and the Principal 16’, Octave 8’ and 4’, Quinte 2 2⁄3’, and Superoctave 2’ on the Hauptwerk. These historic ranks combined with Metzler’s masterful craftsmanship result in an instrument of both brilliance and clarity but also warmth. The organ has been recorded many times, both in a solo and accompanimental role. It is a much more versatile instrument than some might give it credit for, being as at home with Bach as it is with Bingham. Alexander Hamilton, September 2016

Joanna Harries


Praise for the Metzler The installation of the Metzler in 1976 was ridiculed by some as being not only completely impractical but also for being out of keeping with the assumed aesthetic of the ‘baroque organ’. But it – nearly alone in the UK – soon proved the point that an organ based on 17th century north European principles (and indeed ‘principals’), needed to be grounded in its supremely melodious foundation ranks, and not in the unsupported, squeaky upper work that was regularly shrieking out of so many neo-baroque instruments. The enduring quality of both its original and newly-made pipework has continued to surprise British organists; the stability, cohesion and individual qualities of all the components still remain a shining beacon in the UK. Although there are now a few British organs that rival it in some respects, for the performance of repertory at least up until the early 18th century, there is none that surpasses it. Professor John Butt (UK) The best instruments have a personality that informs the way we play. They can bring the performer closer to the music by allowing control of the wind supply and sound (both allow music to sing). The Metzler organ at Trinity is one of only a handful of instruments in the UK that provide both the performer and the listener with this experience, particularly in baroque repertory. As well as fulfilling its role within the liturgy, it is an incredibly valuable teaching resource and recital instrument. I wish all Bach project participants every success in what promises to be superb marriage of performers, music and organ. Henry Fairs (UK) Playing Bach on the Metzler is always an inspiring experience. It’s one of the few instruments in the UK able to offer some of the same subtlety and beauty of sound as the great historic instruments of mainland Europe, and it’s no surprise that it’s become one of the most sought-after recording venues for this repertoire. Every stop has true character and finesse of voicing: the playing action is superb. It is a great musical instrument, which challenges and refreshes those who perform on it. Dr Stephen Farr (UK)


I always play the beautiful Metzler at Trinity College filled with inspiration and emotion. Lionel Rogg (Switzerland) The organ of Trinity College, Cambridge, built by Metzler is one of the best instruments in the UK for performing Bach. The voicing was carried out by the Dutch organ builder Bernhardt Edskes, who managed to get the old prospect pipes of Father Bernard Smith back to their former splendour and “old sound”. The organ sounds magnificent in the beautiful acoustics of the chapel and has inspired many British and continental organists since 1976. Pieter van Dijk (The Netherlands) Recording Bach’s Great Eighteen Chorales on the Metzler organ of Trinity College Chapel was a deeply meaningful experience. When I was an organ student in England in the late 1990s, I relished every opportunity to hear and play great organs throughout the country; thus the recording sessions at Trinity felt like a moment of pilgrimage to a place of significance in my formation. I imagined Bach’s music would come alive in new and splendid ways on this organ situated within the College chapel’s magnificent acoustic. Indeed, it is rare to find a setting that combines noble character and color of pipe voicing with the acoustical resonance and clarity required for Bach’s rich polyphonic textures. The Father Smith ranks dating from Bach’s time, together with the outstanding craftsmanship of the Metzler firm under the guidance of Bernhardt Edskes, have resulted in an instrument of great artistic integrity and poetic beauty – an organ that transcends time to sound anew the transcendent music of Johann Sebastian Bach. Renée Anne Louprette (USA)


What makes the Metzler organ at Trinity such an outstandingly successful instrument? Perhaps that its overall concept seems to be based on the assumption that an impeccably voiced pipe organ, with a sensitive and durable key action, will be more than capable of doing justice to many musical styles and performing a variety of functions, regardless of the details of its stoplist. This marked the Trinity organ out from the mainstream of organ-building in Britain in the 1970s, with its uneasy mix of deference to the Anglican choral tradition and aspirations toward a vaguely-perceived ‘authenticity’ in solo repertoire. But the Metzler also established in the UK an aesthetic distinct from the continental mainstream, through its use of historic Father Smith pipework as the basis for the principal choruses’ scaling and voicing; this produced far more mellifluous ‘foundations’ than can be heard in most instruments of the time (the majority of which are to be found in Oxford and Cambridge chapels, if they have survived). The warm, singing quality of the principals and flutes explains the Metzler’s most surprising characteristic – its success in the accompaniment of choral singing, as demonstrated by generations of Trinity organ scholars. Robert Quinney (UK) Looking back, it seems incredible that I didn’t get an opportunity to play the splendid Metzler organ of Trinity College until 2006, a full 30 years after its inauguration. It was in that year that I was invited to perform all Bach’s Eighteen Chorales during a course run by the Royal College of Organists – an unforgettable experience. The organ, with its transparent choruses, beautiful flutes and characterful reeds (a perfect Posaune for Bach!) complemented this sublime music perfectly, and I immediately made arrangements to make a recording on it the following year. The warm but clear acoustics of the spacious chapel enhance the beauty of the organ sound, and I can think of nowhere better for a series of Bach’s complete organ works. Both performers and listeners are in for a treat! Margaret Phillips (UK)


The Specification

HAUPTWERK, C-f’’’ 1• Principal 2• Octave 3 Hohlflöte 4• Octave 5 Spitzflöte 6• Quinte 7• Superoctave 8 Sesquialter 9 Cornett 10 Mixtur 11 12

Trompete Vox Humana

SCHWELLWERK 23 Viola 24 Suavial 25 Rohrflöte 26 Principal 27 Gedacktflöte 28 Nasard 29 Doublette 30 Terz 31 Mixtur 32 Fagott 33 Trompete Tremulant

16 8 8 4 4 2 2⁄3 2 III IV IVV 8 8

8 8 8 4 4 2 2⁄3 2 1 3⁄5 IV 16 8

RÜCKPOSITIV 13• Principal 14 Gedackt 15 Octave 16 Rohrflöte 17 Octave 18 Gemshorn 19 Larigot 20 Sesquialter 21 Scharf 22 Dulcian

8 8 4 4 2 2 1 1⁄3 II III 8

Tremulant

PEDAL 34• Principal 35 Subbass 36 Octavbass 37 Bourdon 38 Octave 39 Mixtur 40 Posaune 41 Trompete 42 Trompete RP-HW, SW-HW, SW-PD, HW-PD, RP-PD

• Father Smith ranks (1694 and 1708)

16 16 8 8 4 V 16 8 4


Joanna Harries


Robert Quinney (New College, Oxford) Saturday 8 October 2016, 19:30 Prelude and Fugue in E minor (‘Wedge’) BWV 548 Sei gegrüsset, Jesu gütig BWV 768 Trio Sonata No 5 in C major BWV 529 (i. Allegro, ii. Largo, iii. Allegro) Toccata and Fugue in F BWV 540

Robert Quinney is Organist of New College, Oxford. In addition to the daily direction of New College’s world-famous choir, his work comprises teaching, lecturing, and examining, as a Tutorial Fellow of the college and an Associate Professor at the University Faculty of Music. He has conducted New College Choir in concert at home and abroad. Under his direction the choir continues to make recordings for its own label, Novum; the first, a disc of Symphony Anthems by John Blow, was an Editor’s Choice in Gramophone magazine. He maintains a parallel career as a solo organist, and is a prolific recording artist: his discs of organ music by J S Bach, Elgar, Dupré, Wagner and Brahms (and several CDs with Westminster Abbey Choir and The Sixteen) have been widely acclaimed. Of the second volume in his Bach series, Gramophone wrote: ‘the most distinctive feature is the way Quinney’s authoritative distillation of the music never results in dry, academic essays – while, also, never playing to the gallery with maverick rhetorical effects… Quinney’s Bach gets to the heart of the music with refreshing clarity and a communication born of genuine understanding’. A fourth volume was recorded in September 2016, and will be released shortly on the Coro label. Robert Quinney read Music at King’s College, Cambridge, where he was Organ Scholar. After four years as Assistant Master of Music at Westminster Cathedral, he became Sub-Organist of Westminster Abbey in 2004. While at the Abbey he performed on concert tours to the United States, Australia and Russia, and at several televised services, including the Marriage of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge in April 2011. In April 2013 he moved to Peterborough Cathedral, where he was Director of Music for sixteen months. Between 2009 and 2014 he was Director of Oundle for Organists, whose residential courses continue to attract young organists from all over the world.


Nick Rutter


Glen Dempsey (St John’s College, Cambridge) Saturday 15 October 2016, 12:30 Prelude and Fugue in A minor BWV 559 Trio Sonata No 1 in E flat BWV 525 (i. Allegro moderato, ii. Adagio, iii. Allegro) Fugue in C minor (on a theme by Legrenzi) BWV 574 Erbarm’ dich mein, o Herre Gott BWV 721 Wir glauben all’ an einen Gott BWV 765 Wir glauben all’ an einen Gott BWV 740 Trio in C minor BWV 585 Prelude and Fugue in C BWV 531

Glen Dempsey was born in Bury St Edmunds. His formative musical education came as a chorister in the Choir of St Mary’s Church, Bury St Edmunds, and later in the choirs of St Edmundsbury Cathedral. Lessons with Michael Nicholas led to his being awarded a scholarship to study organ, piano and voice at the Purcell School of Music. During this time he performed in many of the UK’s great concert halls as organist, pianist and conductor, including débuts at the Royal Festival Hall and Wigmore Hall. Glen was an Organ Scholar at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, where he continued to study the organ with the American virtuoso Ann Elise Smoot. In September 2014 Glen arrived at the Nicolaasbasiliek te Amsterdam as AssistentOrganist. Under the mentorship of Michael Hedley, he accompanied the majority of the choral services in the Basilica. He also took a share of the choir-training of the various choirs and ensembles. Alongside this, he undertook advanced organ studies with the late Dutch pedagogue Jacques van Oortmerssen. Glen is currently Herbert Howells Organ Scholar at St John’s College, Cambridge, where, in addition to reading for a degree in Music, he accompanies the award-winning choir. We are very grateful to Glen for playing two of the recitals in this series.


Jack Spencer (Queens’ College, Cambridge) Saturday 22 October 2016, 12:00 Prelude and Fugue in F minor BWV 534 Jesus Christus, unser Heiland BWV 626 Christ is erstanden BWV 627 Erstanden ist der heil’ge Christ BWV 628 Prelude and Fugue in F BWV 556 Machs mit mir, Gott, nach deiner Güt BWV 957 Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ BWV 1100 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan BWV 1116 Aria in F (after Couperin) BWV 587 Prelude and Fugue in A minor BWV 551 Herr Gott, dich loben wir BWV 725 Herzlich tut mich verlangen BWV 727 Fugue in G (‘Gigue’) BWV 577

A native of Yorkshire, Jack Spencer is the Junior Organ Scholar of Queens’ College, where he reads Natural Sciences. Jack started his musical education as organ scholar at Leeds Minster and spent his gap year as organ scholar at Rochester Cathedral. He currently studies with Stephen Farr. An active recitalist, venues in the last year have included the cathedrals of Liverpool, Ripon, Rochester, Bradford, and Southwark. Jack is an advocate of lesser-known works from the organ repertoire, and performed Whitlock’s rarely heard Sonata in C minor twice last year. In 2013, he took his ATCL diploma in organ performance in which he received a distinction. During 2016 he is playing a major work of Max Reger each term to celebrate the centenary of his death. Jack has also participated in masterclasses with Dame Gillian Weir, Stephen Cleobury and Robert Quinney, among others. During vacations he can often be heard playing the organ for visiting choirs at cathedrals around the country, and during September was Acting Cathedral Organist at Bradford Cathedral.


Mark Williams (Magdalen College, Oxford) Saturday 29 October 2016, 12:00 Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C BWV 564 Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier BWV 730 Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier BWV 731 Herr Jesu, Christ, dich zu uns wend’ BWV 655 Fantasia super Komm, Heiliger Geist BWV 651 Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten BWV 642 Alle Menschen müssen sterben BWV 643 Ach wie nichtig, ach wie flüchtig BWV 644 Prelude and Fugue in A minor BWV 543

In January 2017, Mark Williams took up the post of Informator Choristarum, Organist and Tutorial Fellow at Magdalen College, Oxford. He held the Organ Scholarship and an academic organ scholarship at Trinity College, Cambridge, and was for six years Assistant Organist of St Paul’s Cathedral and Director of Music at St Paul’s Cathedral School. Between 2009 and 2016, Mark was Director of Music, College Lecturer and Fellow at Jesus College, Cambridge. He has appeared as organist, harpsichordist and conductor internationally and on disc with many of the UK’s leading ensembles, including the London Philharmonic Orchestra, Britten Sinfonia, The Sixteen and the Gabrieli Consort and Players. He has given solo recitals and led masterclasses in choral training, singing and organ performance in the UK, the USA, Asia and Africa. He appears on over 30 discs and a number of soundtracks. With the Choir of Jesus College, he has toured the world, specialising in projects in India and Sri Lanka. A Fellow of the Royal College of Organists, he is a Freeman of the City of London, and a trustee of the Oundle Music Trust, the Harlton Organ Trust, Cambridge Early Music, Songbound and the Muze Music Trust in Zambia. He is the Principal Guest Conductor of the City of London Choir and Honorary President of the Chamber Choir of Erne Integrated College in Enniskillen.


Simon Bland (St John’s School, Leatherhead) Saturday 5 November 2016, 12:00 Prelude and Fugue in C minor BWV 549 Wo soll ich fliehen hin BWV 694 Fugue in G BWV 581 Wir Christenleut BWV 710 Wir Christenleut BWV 1090 Komm, Heiliger Geist, Herre Gott BWV 652 Nun danket alle Gott BWV 657 Vor deinen Thron tret’ ich BWV 668 Prelude and Fugue in B flat BWV 560 Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut BWV 1114 O Herre Gott, dein göttlichs Wort BWV 1110 Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir BWV 1099 Toccata and Fugue in D minor BWV 565

Simon Bland is the Organist and Assistant Director of Music at St John’s School, Leatherhead. His musical training began at Oundle School ahead of a year’s organ scholarship at Hereford Cathedral. He was for three years an Organ Scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge, under the direction of Stephen Layton. The choir undertook several high-profile tours and recordings during his time at Trinity, including the 2012 Gramophone award-winning disc of the music of Herbert Howells. He continues his organ studies with Colin Walsh. He is in demand as a recitalist and accompanist across the country, and has worked with such groups as The King’s Consort under the direction of Robert King. He acts as repetiteur for a number of choral societies in the Surrey area and beyond, and is regularly engaged with choral music in London, working principally with the professional choir at St Pancras Old Church.


Anna Lapwood (Pembroke College, Cambridge) Saturday 12 November 2016, 20:00 Prelude and Fugue in G minor BWV 535 O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig BWV 1085 O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig BWV 1095 O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig BWV 656 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 711 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 715 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 716 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 717 Fugue in G minor (‘Little’) BWV 578 Christus, der ist mein Leben BWV 1112 Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ BWV 1102 Wenn dich Unglück tut greifen an BWV 1104 Toccata and Fugue in D minor (‘Dorian’) BWV 538

Anna Lapwood is the Director of Music at Pembroke College, Cambridge. Alongside her role at Pembroke, she continues to pursue postgraduate study, specialising in organ performance. For three years, Anna was Organ Scholar at Magdalen College, Oxford, from where she graduated with a First Class degree. She was the first female to have been awarded this prestigious organ scholarship in the College’s 560-year tradition. Recent recital venues include Magdalen, Merton and Keble Colleges, Oxford, Buxton Festival, Westminster Abbey, and the 2016 Three Choirs Festival. Anna is also regularly engaged to play the organ with London Contemporary Orchestra. Anna continues to be active as a harpist, both orchestrally and as a soloist. During her time as the principal harpist of the National Youth Orchestra she performed as part of the BBC Proms. Recent performances have included Fauré’s Requiem with Magdalen College Choir, Bernstein’s Chichester Psalms with the Westminster Williamson Voices, and a solo recital for the Magdalen College Benefactor’s Gaudy. www.annalapwood.co.uk


Glen Dempsey (St John’s College, Cambridge) Saturday 19 November 2016, 12:00 Praeludium in a BWV 569 Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele BWV 759 Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele BWV 654 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland BWV 599 Gott, durch deine Güte BWV 600 Herr Christ, der ein’ge Gottes Sohn BWV 601 Lob sei dem allmächtigen Gott BWV 602 Trio Sonata No 3 in D minor BWV 527 (i. Andante, ii. Adagio e dolce, iii. Vivace) Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten BWV 690 Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten BWV 691 Prelude and Fugue in D BWV 532

Glen Dempsey was born in Bury St Edmunds. His formative musical education came as a chorister in the Choir of St Mary’s Church, Bury St Edmunds, and later in the choirs of St Edmundsbury Cathedral. Lessons with Michael Nicholas led to his being awarded a scholarship to study organ, piano and voice at the Purcell School of Music. During this time he performed in many of the UK’s great concert halls as organist, pianist and conductor, including débuts at the Royal Festival Hall and Wigmore Hall. Glen was an Organ Scholar at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, where he continued to study the organ with the American virtuoso Ann Elise Smoot. In September 2014 Glen arrived at the Nicolaasbasiliek te Amsterdam as AssistentOrganist. Under the mentorship of Michael Hedley, he accompanied the majority of the choral services in the Basilica. He also took a share of the choir-training of the various choirs and ensembles. Alongside this, he undertook advanced organ studies with the late Dutch pedagogue Jacques van Oortmerssen. Glen is currently Herbert Howells Organ Scholar at St John’s College, Cambridge, where, in addition to reading for a degree in Music, he accompanies the award-winning choir.


Asher Oliver (Trinity College, Cambridge) Saturday 21 January 2017, 12:00 In dulci jubilo BWV 729 Puer natus in Bethlehem BWV 603 Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ BWV 604 Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ BWV 722 Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ BWV 723 Trio in G (after Telemann) BWV 586 Der Tag, der ist so freudenreich BWV 605 Der Tag, der ist so freudenreich BWV 719 Prelude and Fugue in G minor BWV 558 Vom Himmel hoch, da komm’ ich her BWV 606 Vom Himmel hoch, da komm’ ich her BWV 738 Gott, durch deine Güte BWV 724 Prelude and Fugue in C minor BWV 546

Asher Oliver is the Junior Organ Scholar of Trinity College, where he is in his first year studying Music. He is a former pupil of Chetham’s School of Music, where he studied the organ with Christopher Stokes. He was a chorister at Manchester Cathedral, and it was his experiences in the choir stalls there that encouraged him to pursue cathedral music-making and to take up the organ. He later rejoined the music department at Manchester as Junior Organ Scholar in his Sixth Form years. Asher spent a gap year as Organ Scholar at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, in which role he regularly accompanied and directed the Chapel Choir in their daily services, as well as assisting in training the choristers. During his time at Windsor, he gained his ARCO, and began to have organ lessons with Daniel Moult. Asher has taken part in masterclasses with esteemed organists such as Gordon Stewart, Margaret Phillips, Frédéric Blanc, David Hill, and the late Peter Williams. Recent recital venues include St Lawrence Jewry, King’s College, London, Exeter College, Oxford, and St Mary-le-Bow, Cheapside.


Richard Gowers (King’s College, Cambridge) Saturday 28 January 2017, 12:00 Prelude and Fugue in G BWV 550 Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern BWV 739 Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern BWV 763 Trio in G BWV 1027a Vom Himmel kam der Engel Schaar BWV 607 In dulci jubilo BWV 608 Lobt Gott, ihr Christen, allzugleich BWV 609 Jesus Christus, unser Heiland BWV 666 Jesus Christus, unser Heiland BWV 665 Nun freut euch, lieben Christen g’mein BWV 734 Passacaglia in C Minor BWV 582

Richard Gowers is Senior Organ Scholar at King’s College. From 2008 he was a music scholar at Eton College, where studied with David Goode. He became a prize-winning Fellow of the Royal College of Organists aged 17, and won the Northern Ireland International Organ Competition in 2013. Richard spent a year studying with Professor Stefan Engels at the Mendelssohn Conservatoire in Leipzig with generous sponsorship from the Nicholas Danby Trust. He is currently taught by Gordon Stewart and Frédéric Blanc. At King’s, Richard plays for the daily services in term time, as well as CD recordings and concerts. Recent concerts with the choir have included the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, Beijing’s National Center for the Performing Arts, the Fauré Requiem at the BBC Proms and tours to the USA, Germany, Sweden and Belgium. Richard is also very active independently as a concert organist, and made his third solo tour of the USA in September 2016. He has given recitals in the UK, abroad in Dresden Cathedral, the Nikolaikirche (Leipzig), the Hallgrímskirkja in Reykjavik (Iceland), Washington National Cathedral, Princeton University Chapel and Newark Basilica and the Cathedral of Our Lady and the Angels in Los Angeles. In 2015 he was a featured artist at the inaugural Brisbane Baroque Festival in Australia, performing a Bach series at Brisbane City Hall.


Masterclass with Ann Elise Smoot (Concert Organist) Saturday 28 January 2017, 14:00 Distinguished American organist, Ann Elise Smoot, will lead a masterclass for organ scholars on a selection of chorale preludes from ‘The Eighteen’, BWV 651-668. Ann Elise Smoot has performed throughout the United States, Great Britain and Europe, with a repertoire that ranges from the 14th century to the present day. Her recital career was launched by success in major competitions and she has received wide critical acclaim for her ability to move between musical eras, styles and genres with sympathy and flair. After completing two degrees at Yale, where she won several major prizes for scholarship and for organ playing, she travelled to England, where she studied organ and harpsichord at the Royal Academy of Music, and privately with Peter Hurford and Dame Gillian Weir. Education has also been a major focus of her career. Ann Elise was a Professor of Organ at Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance and for 15 years was director of the St Giles Junior Organ Conservatoire, a unique and highly successful programme for teenage organists, preparing them for university organ scholarships and places in major conservatoires. She was also the Education Editor of Organists’ Review magazine from 2011 to 2015. In 2014 she became the Director of Oundle for Organists (linked with the Oundle International Festival). Passionate about bringing organ music to a wider audience and injecting new ideas into the organ world at large, Ann Elise has been involved in founding several initiatives, including the co-founding of the London Organ Forum, an annual study day combining academic research and live performances, which aims to encourage organists to look at their repertoire in a wider musical context. www.aesmoot.com


Joseph Wicks (St John’s College, Cambridge) Saturday 4 February 2017, 12:00 Fantasia and Fugue in C minor BWV 537 Jesu, meine Freude BWV 610 Jesu, meine Freude BWV 1105 Christum wir sollen loben schon BWV 611 Fantasia super Jesu, meine Freude BWV 713 Wir Christenleut BWV 612 Canonic Variations on Vom Himmel hoch BWV 769a Helft mir Gottes Güte preisen BWV 613 Das alte Jahr vergangen ist BWV 614 An Wasserflüssen Babylon BWV 653 Meine Seele erhebt den Herren BWV 733

Joseph Wicks is Assistant Organist of St John’s College, Cambridge from which he graduated with a BA degree in Music in June 2016. Joseph began his musical education as a Chorister at Salisbury Cathedral. He moved to Lancing College as a Music Scholar, and later Organ Scholar. He spent a gap year as Organ Scholar of Hereford Cathedral before moving to St John’s in 2013. Joseph’s organ teachers have included Neil Cox, Stephen Farr and Daniel Cook, and he now studies with Gordon Stewart. Joseph is a prize-winning Fellow of the Royal College of Organists, winning the Limpus, Shinn and Durrant prize for the highest mark in the practical examination. Joseph’s recent recital venues include Westminster Abbey, King’s, Queens’ and St John’s Colleges, Cambridge, and Truro and Wells cathedrals. Joseph’s first two CD releases as accompanist to St John’s College Choir are a disc of Christmas carols (released October 2016) and a disc of 20th century masses including Kodály’s Missa Brevis. In addition, Joseph is active as a singer, and is taught by David Lowe. A graduate of Genesis Sixteen, he sings tenor in The Gesualdo Six and is Musical Director of the Gentlemen of St John’s. www.joseph-wicks.co.uk


Henry Brearley (St Catharine’s College) and Dewi Rees (Jesus College) Saturday 11 February 2017, 20:00 Henry Brearley

Dewi Rees

Concerto in A minor (after Vivaldi) BWV 593

Prelude and Fugue in E minor BWV 555

(i. Allegro, ii. Adagio, iii. Allegro)

Dies sind die heil’gen zehn Gebot’ BWV 635

Christum wir sollen loben schon BWV 696

Vater unser im Himmelreich BWV 636

Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ BWV 697

Concerto in C (after Vivaldi) BWV 594

Herr Christ, der ein’ge Gottes Sohn BWV 698

(i) Allegro, ii) Recitativo: adagio, iii. Allegro)

Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland BWV 699

Durch Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt BWV 637

Vom Himmel hoch, da komm’ ich her BWV 700

Es ist das Heil uns kommen her BWV 638

Vom Himmel hoch, da komm’ ich her BWV 701

Prelude and Fugue in E minor BWV 533

Das Jesulein soll doch mein Trost BWV 702 Gottes Sohn is kommen BWV 703 Lob sei dem allmächtigen Gott BWV 704 Durch Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt BWV 705 Prelude and Fugue in C BWV 553

Henry Brearley commenced his studies with Dr Gordon Stewart and James McVinnie before taking a gap year at the Royal Academy of Music. During his time in London, Henry studied with David Titterington whilst holding the Organ Scholarship to Her Majesty’s Chapel Royal, Hampton Court Palace. Henry is now Junior Organ Scholar at St Catharine’s College, Cambridge, where he reads Physical Natural Sciences. As a recitalist, Henry is much in demand having appeared at the Royal Festival Hall, as well as at many of the UK’s great churches and cathedrals. Dewi Rees is Junior Organ Scholar at Jesus College, Cambridge, where he is in his first year, reading Music. He was a chorister at Westminster Abbey, where he sang in daily services and special services for national occasions. In 2011 he was awarded a music scholarship to The King’s School, Canterbury, and started learning the organ with David Newsholme. He has given recitals at the Church of St Mary Magdalene, Newark, and St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle. Dewi is an Associate of the Royal College of Organists.


Richard Pinel (Jesus College, Cambridge) Saturday 18 Feburary 2017, 12:00 Toccata in E BWV 566 In dir ist Freude BWV 615 Mit Fried’ und Freud’ ich fahr’ dahin BWV 616 Herr Gott, nun schleuss den Himmel auf BWV 617 Concerto in D minor (after Vivaldi) BWV 596 (i. Allegro, ii. Largo e spiccato, iii. Allegro) Das alte Jahr vergangen ist BWV 1091 Wie nach einer Wasserquelle BWV 1119 Trio in D minor BWV 583 Von Gott will ich nicht lassen BWV 658 Prelude and Fugue in B minor BWV 544

Richard Pinel is the new Director of Music and Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge. Between 2009 and 2016 he served as Assistant Director of Music of St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, where he accompanied the famous choir. Prior to his appointment in Windsor, he held similar posts at Magdalen College, Oxford, and Perth Cathedral, Australia, and the organ scholarships of St Albans Cathedral and Magdalen College, Oxford. He began his musical life as a chorister at All Saints’ Church, Northampton, and was awarded the prestigious organ scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxford, in 2002, where he read Music. During this time, the Grammynominated choir undertook several recording projects on the Harmonia Mundi USA label, on which Richard’s playing was hailed as “a force of nature”. More recently, Richard has undertaken further study with Henry Fairs as a Junior Fellow at Birmingham Conservatoire. Since then he has enjoyed competition success on an international level, culminating in the First Prize, Ad Wammes Prize and Naji Hakim Prize at the Breda International Organ Competition in The Netherlands. As a teacher, Richard has led masterclasses for the RCO and tutored at Oundle for Organists. Richard’s first CD, L’Orgue Symphonique, has recently been released on Resonus Classics. Recital engagements have taken him across the UK, to Europe and the USA and he has broadcast on BBC Radio 3, BBC Radio 4, Classic FM and Radio France Culture. www.richardpinel.co.uk


Bertie Baigent (Royal Academy of Music) Saturday 25 February 2017, 12:00 Fantasia in G BWV 571 Vater unser im Himmelreich BWV 737 Jesus, meine Zuversicht BWV 728 Kleines harmonisches Labyrinth BWV 591 Pedal-Exercitium BWV 598 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland BWV 659 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland BWV 660 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland BWV 661 Ich hab’ mein’ Sach’ Gott heimgestellt BWV 1113 Christ, der du bist der helle Tag BWV 1120 Ehre sei dir, Christe, der du leidest Not BWV 1097 Prelude and Fugue in G BWV 541

Bertie Baigent is a conductor, composer, and organist, currently studying for an MA in conducting at the Royal Academy of Music. In June 2016 he graduated from Jesus College, Cambridge, where he was Organ Scholar. He is a prize-winning Fellow of the Royal College of Organists. Bertie has studied conducting with Nicholas Cleobury and has taken part in masterclasses with Pierre-André Valade, Peter Stark, and Paul Brough. In 2014 he founded the Percival Ensemble, a group drawn from Cambridge’s finest musicians, dedicated to performing small-scale 19th and early 20th century orchestral music. Bertie has worked extensively with Cambridge University Opera Society and was also the conductor of Cambridge University Symphony Orchestra. Bertie’s compositions have been performed by artists including the Britten Sinfonia, Fretwork, the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House, the Aurora Orchestra, the Bath Philharmonia, and the Choir of Jesus College, Cambridge. His compositions have been awarded accolades by the BBC, Stainer & Bell, the University of Cambridge, the National Centre for Early Music, the Royal Opera House, and the Royal College of Organists; recent commissions have come from St Paul’s Cathedral and the Royal Philharmonic Society. www.bertiebaigent.com


Edward Reeve (Queens’ College, Cambridge) Saturday 4 March 2017, 12:00 Fantasia and Fugue in A minor BWV 561 Christ lag in Todesbanden BWV 625 Christ lag in Todesbanden BWV 718 Christ lag in Todesbanden BWV 695 In dich hab’ ich gehoffet, Herr BWV 640 In dich hab’ ich gehoffet, Herr BWV 712 Concerto in C (after Ernst) BWV 595 Ich ruf’ zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ BWV 639 Wenn wir in höchsten Nöten sein BWV 641 Alle Menschen müssen sterben BWV 1117 Gott ist mein Heil, mein Hilf und Trost BWV 1106 Herzlich lieb hab ich dich, o Herr BWV 1115 Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott BWV 720 Prelude and Fugue in D minor BWV 539

Edward Reeve completed his ABRSM piano Diploma when he was fourteen. He gained the Licentiate of the Royal Schools of Music at the end of 2011 with distinction, achieving the same qualification on the organ in July 2014. Edward is a past recipient of the Sheila Mossman Award and was twice successful in completing the Regional Auditions for BBC Young Musician of the Year. Edward has performed piano and organ concertos with a number of orchestras, and forthcoming performances include Brahms’ First Piano Concerto and Beethoven’s Fourth and Fifth Piano Concertos, and the complete Bach Partitas. Previously organist at St Andrew’s Church, Caversham Heights, and Organ Scholar at Reading Blue Coat School, Edward spent his gap year as Organ Scholar at Salisbury Cathedral. He is now in his third year reading Music at Queens’ College, as Senior Organ Scholar. Edward studies conducting with Peter Stark and Nicholas Cleobury.


Andrew Arthur (Trinity Hall, Cambridge) Saturday 11 March 2017, 12:00 Allabreve BWV 589 Ach Gott und Herr BWV 714 Ach Herr, mich armen Sünder BWV 742 Prelude and Fugue in A BWV 536 Canzona in D minor BWV 588 Jesu, meines Lebens Leben BWV 1107 Herzliebster Jesu, was hast du verbrochen BWV 1093 O Jesu, wie ist dein Gestalt BWV 1094 O Gott, du frommer Gott BWV 767

Andrew Arthur is Fellow, Director of Music and Director of Studies in Music at Trinity Hall, Cambridge. In addition to his College responsibilities, he is also an Affiliated Lecturer in the University’s Faculty of Music. An acknowledged specialist in the music of the baroque and classical periods, he has toured extensively across Europe and the USA as both keyboard player and conductor. His solo keyboard engagements encompass harpsichord, organ and fortepiano literature and, together with his regular work as a recitalist and concerto soloist, he is in great demand as a continuo player with several of London’s leading period-instrument ensembles. He is currently Associate Director of The Hanover Band and Musical Director of his own period-instrument ensemble and vocal consort, Orpheus Britannicus. Since 1999, he has held the position of Principal Organist & Harpsichordist at the Carmel Bach Festival in California, where he also sits on the Committee of Artistic Directors, and is currently involved in performing a complete cycle of J S Bach’s organ works and in directing a series of Bach’s complete cantatas for solo voice. Andrew was a cathedral chorister and then Organ Scholar and Acting Precentor at Gonville & Caius College. He has since served as Associate Director of Music at All Saints, Margaret Street and as Deputy Master of Music of the Chapels Royal, HM Tower of London. www.andrewarthur.com


Joseph Beech (St Paul’s Cathedral, London) Saturday 29 April 2017, 12:00 Prelude in G BWV 568 Vater unser im Himmelreich BWV 762 Lobt Gott, ihr Christen, allzugleich BWV 732 Fugue in G BWV 576 Erschienen ist der herrliche Tag BWV 629 Heut triumphieret Gottes Sohn BWV 630 Komm, Gott Schöpfer, heiliger Geist BWV 631 Fantasia in B minor BWV 563 Trio Sonata No 4 in E minor BWV 528 (i. Adagio, ii. Andante, iii. Un poco allegro) Herr Gott, nun schleuss den Himmel auf BWV 1092 Erhalt uns, Herr, bei deinem Wort BWV 1103 Prelude and Fugue in C BWV 547

Joseph Beech is Organ Scholar at St Paul’s Cathedral and a prizewinning fourth-year undergraduate student at the Royal Academy of Music, where he studies on a scholarship with David Titterington. Upon arrival at the Academy, Joseph was selected to perform in both of the two opening concerts of the Kuhn organ in the Duke’s Hall, and in 2015 performed Saint-Saens’ 3rd Symphony (the ‘Organ Symphony’) there under the baton of Yan Pascal Tortelier. A recipient of numerous scholarships and awards, Joseph was named winner of the Academy’s inaugural Dorothy Cooper organ competition (2016). Recent recital venues include the London Oratory, St Paul’s Cathedral, Truro Cathedral, Westminster Cathedral, Ripon Cathedral and St Albans Cathedral. He has performed in ensembles at the Royal Festival Hall, Royal Albert Hall and Cadogan Hall, and been broadcast on BBC Radio 3. Hailing from Grantham, Joseph successively held Organ Scholarships at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, and HM Chapel Royal at Hampton Court Palace. He then spent two years as Organ Scholar at the London Oratory which is home to the senior Roman Catholic professional music foundation in the country, before taking up his present position at St Paul’s Cathedral in September 2016.


Alexander Hamilton (Trinity College, Cambridge) Saturday 6 May 2017, 19:30 Clavierübung III Praeludium pro Organo Pleno BWV 552i Kyrie, Gott Vater in Ewigkeit BWV 669 Christe, alle Welt Trost BWV 670 Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist BWV 671 Kyrie, Gott Vater in Ewigkeit BWV 672 Christe, alle Welt Trost BWV 673 Kyrie, Gott heiliger Geist BWV 674 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 675 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 676 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 677 Dies sind die heil'gen zehn Gebot’ BWV 678 Dies sind die heil'gen zehn Gebot’ BWV 679 Wir glauben all’ an einen Gott BWV 680 Interval – 15 minutes Wir glauben all’ an einen Gott BWV 681 Vater unser im Himmelreich BWV 682 Vater unser im Himmelreich BWV 683 Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam BWV 684 Christ, unser Herr, zum Jordan kam BWV 685 Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir BWV 686 Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir BWV 687 Jesus Christus, unser Heiland BWV 688 Jesus Christus, unser Heiland BW 689 Duetto I BWV 802 Duetto II BWV 803 Duetto III BWV 804 Duetto IV BWV 805 Fuga à 5 pro Organo Pleno BWV 552ii


Alexander Hamilton is Senior Organ Scholar and a second-year undergraduate of Trinity College, Cambridge, reading Music. At Trinity he works with the worldfamous college choir directed by Stephen Layton in a busy schedule of services, concerts, tours and recordings. During July and August 2016, he accompanied the choir on their tour of Hong Kong and Australia, with some concerts being broadcast on ABC Classic FM. He was a music scholar at Merchant Taylors’ School and in the Sixth Form became an Associate of the Royal College of Organists. Prior to arriving at Trinity, Alexander was Organ Scholar of St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle. At Windsor, his role as organ scholar involved accompanying and directing the choir in the round of daily services, as well as at special services attended by Her Majesty The Queen and other members of the Royal Family. Alexander won the Northern Ireland International Organ Competition 2015, widely regarded as the go-to competition for young organists and has recorded a CD at St Patrick’s Cathedral, Armagh, with other previous winners of the competition. Recent recital venues have included cathedrals and churches across the UK, and an all-Bach recital at St Albans Cathedral as part of the St Albans International Organ Festival. Forthcoming engagements include recitals at Westminster Abbey, St Paul’s Cathedral, the Temple Church, St George’s Hanover Square, and a recital as part of the London Organ Day 2017 focused on the stylus fantasticus. Alexander has studied the organ with renowned concert organist Ann Elise Smoot and now studies with Colin Walsh, Stephen Farr, David Briggs, and also with Pieter van Dijk in Alkmaar, NL. He has participated in many masterclasses, with Dame Gillian Weir, Robert Quinney, Margaret Phillips and Henry Fairs as part of the Three Choirs’ Festival. Outside of the chapel at Trinity, he is a director of Trinity College’s choral society, the Trinity Singers and a conductor of Trinity College Chamber Orchestra, and in November 2016 directed Ensemble Pro Victoria in a concert of Bach cantatas as part of the Cambridge University Lunchtime Concert series at West Road Concert Hall.


Owain Park (Trinity College, Cambridge) Saturday 13 May 2017, 12:00 Fantasia in C minor BWV 562 O Lamm Gottes, unschuldig BWV 618 Christe, du Lamm Gottes BWV 619 Christus, der uns selig macht BWV 620 Christus, der uns selig macht BWV 747 Fugue in C minor BWV 575 Da Jesus an dem Kreuze stund BWV 621 O Mensch, bewein’ dein’ Sünde gross BWV 622 Wir danken dir, Herr Jesu Christ BWV 623 Hilf Gott, dass mir’s gelinge BWV 624 Pastorella BWV 590 Christe, der du bist Tag und Licht BWV 1096 Als Jesus Christus in der Nacht BWV 1108 Fantasia in G (Pièce d’Orgue) BWV 572

Owain Park developed his love for the organ first as a chorister at St Mary Redcliffe church in Bristol, and then as Organ Scholar at Holy Trinity, Westbury-onTrym. He holds the FRCO diploma having been Senior Organ Scholar at Wells Cathedral and Trinity College, Cambridge, and currently sings in Trinity College Choir as a postgraduate student studying for a Masters in composition. Owain is a prize-winning composer, published by Novello. His music has been performed by ensembles including the Tallis Scholars and the Aurora Orchestra. Recent works include Shakespeare Songs of Night-Time and Beati quorum via. The Wings of the Wind has been included by Trinity College Choir in their tour to Australia. His music has been broadcast on BBC Radios 3 and 4, and Classic FM. Owain is also a conductor and singer. He conducts The Gesualdo Six, a vocal ensemble specialising in early music. Recent projects include four series of Bach Cantatas, Purcell operas and Bach’s St John Passion. He is also the conductor of the Cambridge Chorale. www.owainpark.co.uk


Joanna Harries


Anne Page (Concert Organist) Saturday 13 May 2017, 19:30 Die Kunst der Fuge (The Art of Fugue) BWV 1080 Contrapunctus 1 Contrapunctus 2 Contrapunctus 3 Contrapunctus 4 Contrapunctus 5 Contrapunctus 6 Contrapunctus 7 Contrapunctus 8 Interval – 15 minutes Contrapunctus 9 Canon in Hypodiapason (Canon alla Ottava) Contrapunctus 10 Contrapunctus 11 Canon alla Decima Contrapunto alla Terza Contrapunctus 12 (rectus) Contrapunctus 12 (inversus) Canon alla Duodecima in Contrapunto alla Quinta Contrapunctus 13 (rectus) Contrapunctus 13 (inversus) Canon per Augmentationem in Contrario Motu Contrapunctus 14


Anne Page began studying the organ in order to play the music of Bach. Born in Perth, Australia, her teacher at the University of Western Australia was Annette Goerke who guided her in the study of Bach, Franck, Messiaen and other contemporary composers. Upon winning a scholarship to study in Europe Anne spent two years in the class of Marie-Claire Alain at the Conservatory of Rueil-Malmaison then studied with Peter Hurford in Cambridge. A further two year period with Jacques van Oortmerssen brought a deeper awareness of historically informed performance. Anne made her London dĂŠbut in the Royal Festival Hall playing works by Alain, Schmidt and Heiller. An international recital career followed with visits to the USA, many European countries and Australia. Since the 1980s she has been based in Cambridge where during 2011-12 she performed the complete organ works of Bach on fourteen instruments in eleven chapels and churches. Since being invited by Peter Hurford to co-teach his organ class at the Royal Academy of Music in the 1980s, Anne has had extensive experience of teaching advanced students, including generations of organ scholars at the University of Cambridge, and she is one of the founders of the Cambridge Academy of Organ Studies. Developed under the auspices of the British Institute of Organ Studies with Heritage Lottery funding, the Historic Organ Sound Archive is a major resource for the study of organs in Britain from the 1690s to the early 20th century. It provides online recordings of forty-five historic organs and developed a programme of community events. Several instruments of historic importance were restored as a result of inclusion in the project. Anne played a key role in its development and implementation, and recorded some ten hours of music for the archive. Anne has been at the forefront of the revival of interest in the harmonium, which has only recently begun once again to receive serious attention from musicologists, performers and composers. She was invited by the RAM to establish a course in harmonium and has given many recitals across the country and abroad. Swiss organist Lionel Rogg, whose Bach recordings first inspired her to take up the organ, has dedicated a suite of pieces for harmonium to her. www.anne-page.co.uk


Alexander Pott (Magdalen College, Oxford) Saturday 20 May 2017, 12:00 Komm, Gott Schöpfer, heiliger Geist BWV 667 Prelude and Fugue in D minor BWV 554 Herr Jesu, Christ, dich zu uns wend’ BWV 709 Herr Jesu, Christ, dich zu uns wend’ BWV 726 Herr Jesu, Christ, dich zu uns wend’ BWV 632 Fugue in D BWV 580 Trio Sonata No 6 in G major BWV 530 (i. Vivace, ii. Lento, iii. Allegro) Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier BWV 633 Liebster Jesu, wir sind hier BWV 634 Ach, was soll ich Sünder Machen BWV 770 Prelude and Fugue in C BWV 545

Alexander Pott’s musical training began when he became a chorister at Westminster Abbey, where he sang daily services and many special services, often in the presence of royalty, as well as learning the piano, violin and bassoon. On moving to Merchant Taylors’ School, Northwood, at the age of 13, he also took up the organ with Richard Hobson, and held organ scholarships at St Mary’s Church, Harrow-on-the-Hill, and later at St Mary’s Church, Primrose Hill. On leaving school, he was appointed Organ Scholar at Chelmsford Cathedral, where he studied with Margaret Phillips. He then moved to Oxford to study Music at the university, and to be Organ Scholar at Christ Church Cathedral, where he studied with Thomas Trotter. During his time at Christ Church he toured the USA, Canada and China with the choir, took part in many high-profile services including the Royal Maundy service in 2012, and broadcast evensong live on BBC Radio 3. In his second year he also gained a Fellowship of the Royal College of Organists. As a recitalist he has played at many cathedrals and festivals, most recently at the Lichfield festival and the Buxton festival. Until January 2017, Alexander was Organ Scholar of Westminster Cathedral and is now Assistant Organist at Magdalen College, Oxford.


Jeremy Cole (St Martin-in-the-Fields, London) Saturday 27 May 2017, 12:00 Valet will ich dir geben BWV 735 Valet will ich dir geben BWV 736 Fantasia in C BWV 570 Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme BWV 645 Wo soll ich fliehen hin BWV 646 Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten BWV 647 Meine Seele erhebt den Herren BWV 648 Ach bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ BWV 649 Kommst du nun, Jesu, von Himmel herunter BWV 650 Prelude and Fugue in G BWV 557 Nun lasst uns den Leib begraben BWV 1111 Ach Gott, tu dich erbarmen BWV 1109 Durch Adams Fall ist ganz verderbt BWV 1101 Ricercar a 6 from the Musical Offering (arr. Guillou) BWV 1079v

Jeremy Cole is Assistant Director of Music at St Martin-in-the-Fields, one of London’s busiest churches and concert venues. He is the founder and artistic director of Illuminare Choir, a professional chamber choir with a growing reputation. Jeremy pursues a busy freelance career as an organist, conductor and piano accompanist, working regularly with soloists, choirs and instrumentalists, and as a continuo player. He has an increasing profile as a recitalist, with recent engagements including London’s Temple Church, Westminster Abbey, and Gloucester and Southwark cathedrals. Jeremy was Organ Scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge, from 2010 to 2013. He appears on disc with Trinity College Choir on their Gramophone Award-winning disc of the music of Herbert Howells, and features as accompanist and organ soloist on their acclaimed recording of the music of Kenneth Leighton. Jeremy is a Fellow of the Royal College of Organists and has studied the organ with Colin Walsh, Stephen Farr and David Briggs. www.illuminarechoir.com/jeremy-cole


David Goode (Concert Organist and Eton College) Saturday 3 June 2017, 19:30 Fantasia in G minor BWV 542i Trio Sonata No 2 in C minor BWV 526 (i. Vivace, ii. Largo, iii. Allegro) Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 662 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 663 Allein Gott in der Höh’ sei Ehr’ BWV 664 Concerto in G (after Ernst) BWV 592 (i. Allegro, ii. Grave, iii. Presto) Fugue in B minor (on a theme by Corelli) BWV 579 Christ, der du bist der helle Tag BWV 766 Fugue in G minor BWV 542ii David Goode is Organist at Eton College. A music scholar at Eton, and then

Organ Scholar at King’s College, Cambridge, he studied with David Sanger and Jacques van Oortmerssen. From 1996 to 2001 he was Sub-Organist at Christ Church, Oxford; following prizes at the 1997 St Albans Competition, and the 1998 Calgary Competition, he concentrated on a freelance career between 2001 and 2003. In 2003 he moved to Los Angeles as Organist-in-Residence at First Congregational Church, home to the world’s largest church organ. In 1999 he made the first of numerous appearances at the Proms, and in 2002 he made his recital débuts at the RFH and at Symphony Hall, Birmingham, subsequently playing all over Europe, the US, Australia and the Far East. He played at the AGO National Convention in Houston in 2015, and returned to the US earlier this year. He has an established partnership with the trumpeter Alison Balsom: in March 2014 they played for the reopening concert of the RFH organ. Of his Bach CD for Signum in 2013 The Times said: “An exemplary introduction”. He has now recorded the complete works of Bach for Signum from Trinity, Cambridge. He has forged a strong relationship over the years on Radio 3 with the BBCNOW and the BBC Singers, and has played numerous contemporary works, including Francis Pott’s Christus (“a stupendous achievement” The Times), and Peter Maxwell Davies’ Solstice of Light. He has also recently developed a profile as a composer: Six Anthems has been published, together with recordings by the choir of King’s College, Cambridge; and his Blitz Requiem was performed in September 2013 by the Bach Choir at St Paul’s Cathedral, and broadcast on Classic FM. www.goodeorganist.org


Series at a glance Michaelmas 08/10/2016 15/10/2016 22/10/2016 29/10/2016 05/11/2016 12/11/2016 19/11/2016

19:30 12:30 12:00 12:00 12:00 20:00 12:00

Robert Quinney (New College, Oxford) Glen Dempsey (St John’s College, Cambridge) Jack Spencer (Queens’ College, Cambridge) Mark Williams (Magdalen College, Oxford) Simon Bland (St John’s School, Leatherhead) Anna Lapwood (Pembroke College, Cambridge) Glen Dempsey (St John’s College, Cambridge)

21/01/2017 28/01/2017 28/01/2017 04/02/2017 11/02/2017

12:00 12:00 14:00 12:00 20:00

18/02/2017 25/02/2017 04/03/2017 11/03/2017

12:00 12:00 12:00 12:00

Asher Oliver (Trinity College, Cambridge) Richard Gowers (King’s College, Cambridge) Masterclass with Ann Elise Smoot (Concert Organist) Joseph Wicks (St John’s College, Cambridge) Henry Brearley (St Catharine’s College, Cambridge) and Dewi Rees (Jesus College, Cambridge) Richard Pinel (Jesus College, Cambridge) Bertie Baigent (Royal Academy of Music) Edward Reeve (Queens’ College, Cambridge) Andrew Arthur (Trinity Hall, Cambridge)

12:00 19:30 12:00 19:30 12:00 12:00 19:30

Joseph Beech (St Paul’s Cathedral, London) Alexander Hamilton (Trinity College, Cambridge) Owain Park (Trinity College, Cambridge) Anne Page (Concert Organist) Alexander Pott (Magdalen College, Oxford) Jeremy Cole (St Martin-in-the-Fields, London) David Goode (Concert Organist and Eton College)

Lent

Easter 29/04/2017 06/05/2017 13/05/2017 13/05/2017 20/05/2017 27/05/2017 03/06/2017

www.trinitycollegechoir.com/organ/bach-at-trinity www.organrecitals.com

Profile for Trinity College Chapel and Music Office, Cambridge

Bach at Trinity programme  

Join us for Bach at Trinity, a year-long celebration of the complete organ works of J S Bach and of the 40th anniversary of Trinity College’...

Bach at Trinity programme  

Join us for Bach at Trinity, a year-long celebration of the complete organ works of J S Bach and of the 40th anniversary of Trinity College’...

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