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Issue 28

THE ART OF WORSHIP

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ROCKIN’ RECRUITMENT

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THE KEY TO A FUTURE


Issue 28

PRESIDENT & PUBLISHER Bob Kuhn ’72 SENIOR EDITORS   Wendy Delamont Lees, Jennifer Watton COPY EDITOR Amanda Lee Smith ART DIRECTOR Kazuko Kusumoto

LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT What a banner year it has been for Trinity Western’s athletics, especially our top-ranked Spartans. Our men’s and women’s teams have represented our university with such heart. In the course of doing so, they have displayed extraordinary athletic abilities, winning at the elite levels in Canada and demonstrating commitment to the ideal of being a Spartan. A Spartan is defined as a man or woman who is rigorously selfdisciplined, self-restrained, marked by brevity of speech, and courageous in the face of pain or adversity. I find that list of descriptors daunting, even discouraging, given so many limitations and demands. How would you measure up to this description? Hebrews 12 challenges me to consider again what it means to be a Spartan: Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Nelson Bergen

Shara Lee

J.R. Fehr ’09

Wendy Delamont Lees

Mark Janzen

Hannah Marazzi ’15

Angela Lee

Amanda Lee Smith

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS & ILLUSTRATORS

Rachel Barkman ’12

Wendy Delamont Lees

Mark Janzen

Vania Musa

Michelle Karst ’15

Scott Stewart ’92

ALUMNI OFFICE

Submit alumni news or updates to info@twualumni.org. TRINITY WESTERN ONLINE

twu.ca/magazine Send change of address and comments to magazine@twu.ca. GENERAL INQUIRIES & EVENTS

604.888.7511

twu.ca

PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS

888.go.to.twu

twu.ca/undergraduate

SPARTAN HOTLINE & SCORES

Like never before, Trinity Western University, its athletes, academics, students, and alumni face all types of scrutiny. Indeed, the “cloud of witnesses” includes many of you reading this magazine. And yet, those in our community—like the student whose global projects trip to Israel inspired him to help to bring a refugee family to Canada, or the marine biologist alumna who is researching pilot whales—demonstrate the heart of what it means to be a Spartan. All of us who want to see Trinity Western thrive are Spartans. To do so, we must put aside what hinders and entangles us as we persevere. God has blessed us with many who have stepped forward to be Spartans, committing to the many opportunities there are to run the race ahead. It is not just our talented and devoted athletes who proudly wear the twu Spartans label. Won’t you take up the challenge? Although we all play different roles, “We are all Spartans.” In His Service,

Bob Kuhn President, Trinity Western University

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604.513.2001

gospartans.ca

ALUMNI

800.463.5419

twualumni.org

DEVELOPMENT

604.513.2121 (3313)

twu.ca/giving

PARENTS

888.817.3759

twu.ca/parents

+ Trinity Western tells the story of twu and its mission through informative and credible reporting to unite twu alumni and friends in communication with the university and to celebrate the transformative influence of twu and its graduates around the world. Trinity Western is issued once a year. Printed in Canada Publications Mail Agreement No. 40010502 issn 1499-2868

Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to twu Marketing & Communications 7600 Glover Road Langley bc v2y 1y1


contents

Issue 28

FEATURES

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BY WENDY DELAMONT LEES

MercyMe’s Bart Millard brings skill and passion to twu’s new worship arts program

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BY AMANDA LEE SMITH

Student-run organization help gives a refugee family a home in Canada

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DEPARTMENTS

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CAMPUS CHRONICLE Ground-breaking marketing strategy helps twu

reach prospective students • twu and Sodexo shake up campus food service offerings • Student’s journey from China to Canada no coincidence • New campaign brings campus to students • Master’s student pursues love of learning • Online master’s degrees cater to adult learners • The llc turns 15 • First official twu space opens in Fort Langley

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FACU LT Y FOLIO Anabaptist-Mennonite Centre for Faith & Learning gets a new name • Math prof ’s research could predict how glaciers might alter under climate change • twu loses beloved rels prof

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PARTNERSHIPS Former aviation program plane takes flight • State-of-

ON THE COVER

the-art lab gives nursing students access to hands-on learning • New residence hall makes room for growing student body • Spartans Club program connects twu and Fort Langley

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ATHLETIC S Track and field athlete’s drive runs in his blood • Men’s volleyball team repeats as national champs • Spartans celebrate academic success with chocolate milk

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ALU MNI Photographers retreat zooms in on what matters most • Chemistry

"In Spirit and Truth"— We are united in seeking, in learning, and in worship. By Matt Le

ECO AU D IT

alum’s discovery garners widespread mention • Alumni-led initiative revives computing science program • twu’s maih helps alumna pave a new career

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T WU PEOPLE mvb alumnus returns to twu to head up Spartans Athletics

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BACK 40 The story behind twu�s first-ever dorms

The content of Trinity Western magazine is printed on FSC Mix Responsible paper. BY USING POST-CONSUMER RECYCLED PAPER INSTEAD OF VIRGIN FIBRES PAPER, TRINITY WESTERN MAGAZINE HAS SAVED: 65 trees | 59 waste containers | 20,991 kg of CO2. THIS IS THE EQUIVALENT OF: 675 days of water consumption or the emissions of 3 cars per year.

FSC FPO

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From sea to sea to sea: TWU has hit the road with Christian artists to reach pot

ROCKIN’ RECRUITMENT How MercyMe and Rend Collective concerts are helping TWU reach prospective students BY ANGELA LEE

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hat do a private Christian university and an extreme energy drink have in common? When it comes to ground-breaking marketing strategies, more than you’d think. Even before world events shone an appealing light on Canada for many university-bound students, headlines reported that 88 per cent of faith-based colleges in the u.s., and 35 per cent of colleges in general, had missed their enrolment targets for 2016. By contrast, at twu, new student inquiries rose 37 per cent for the same period. The increase in enrolment (and resulting bed shortage) has even led the university to construct its first residence hall in over 20 years (see story p. 26), and there are plans to build more. Although this trend may have many drivers, including the

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appeal of the Canadian dollar, twu’s fresh approach to marketing can take a big dose of credit for enabling the school to seize the opportunities God has brought its way. Doing what practically no other university in North America is doing, twu is successfully partnering with powerhouse Christian artists like MercyMe, Chris Tomlin, Lecrae, Rend Collective, Phil Wickham, Lauren Daigle, and Hillsong United, among others—to speak directly to its core demographic. OUTSIDE IN(NOVATION )

“No one ever suggests that higher education marketing leads the way in innovation,” jokes Scott Fehrenbacher, twu’s Senior Vice President, External Relations, and the driving force behind twu’s new live events marketing strategy. So Fehrenbacher looked outside the field for inspiration—and found Red Bull. Back when it debuted, the energy drink didn’t have the dollars to go head-to-head with Coca-Cola for prime real estate on grocery-store shelves. By sponsoring extreme sports events like Formula 1 racing and downhill mountain biking,


ILLUSTRATION BY DEANNA RULE

t ential students from across the US and Canada.

the drink maker found it could gain direct access to an audience already primed for its message. And there was a side benefit: the thrill associated with extreme sports became synonymous with the beverage itself. Likewise, by sponsoring the concert tours of artists whose values and outlook align with its own, twu reached over 460,000 potential students and their families in the past year with the opportunity to start an adventure of a lifetime. “We get in front of thousands of people that we don’t have to pay to bring together,” explains Fehrenbacher, a Gospel Music Association board member. “And we just tag along with our message.” MINISTRY HAPPENS

Backstage at an Outcry concert in Raleigh, nc, twu’s live events marketing specialist, Graeme Fowler (’16), goes over what he’s about to say to the crowd of nearly 8,000. Adrenaline makes him pace the floor. Fowler knows—he’s seen it happen tour after tour—that his words or the twu video he’ll be showing will impact a number of lives that night.

“Every single night, there’s an opportunity for ministry,” says Fowler, who travels on tour with the bands. When he’s not presenting on stage, he’s listening to the dreams and aspirations of the students who visit his booth. Some have opened up about their anxiety over making the biggest decision of their lives. “We have a chance to empower them or pray with them for discernment, clarity, and peace in their decision,” he says. The results have been powerful. Fowler recalls one particular student who said she’d been praying over her decision for months. At the concert, she connected with what she saw and heard about Trinity Western. “She told me she’d declined two offers from other colleges that day,” Fowler says. “But with twu, she finally felt peace about where to attend.” “There are things that money can’t buy,” says Fehrenbacher. “The more we can show people what the opportunity is, the more our brand is built. It serves our alumni, serves our parents, and serves our mission.”

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Error of Omission In Issue 27 of Trinity Western Magazine, we published an article, “The Story Beneath the Cherry Blossoms,” marking the 25th anniversary of the tragic aviation accident that claimed the lives of one instructor and five students, including Terry Townsend (pictured left). As part of the article visuals, we included yearbook images for each person but could not find a yearbook image of Terry. We knew that omitting Terry’s photo wasn’t an option. So we sourced an image of him, along with a number of other aviation students, from one of his fellow classmates and noted his name in the photo caption. In our search, however, we inadvertently overlooked a very important resource: our own twu Archives. Our omission, though unintentional, caused confusion and hurt for the Townsend family and for that, we are deeply sorry. We are grateful for the grace extended to us by Terry’s wife, Shelley, and daughter, Erika Borthwick, in bringing this oversight to our attention. PHOTO COURTESY TWU ARCHIVES

ALL YOU CARE TO EAT TWU and Sodexo roll out new, flexible meal plans, food, and retail options this fall big cha nges ar e on the way for trinit y w ester n ’s l a ngley

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ILLUSTRATION BY VANIA MUSA

campus cafeteria. To meet the needs of its rapidly growing student body, the university is shaking up its food service offerings. With the new All You Care to Eat meal plans, instead of worrying about declining meal card balances, students need only concern themselves with which of the six new cafeteria stations they want to try first. Here’s how it works: just swipe your id card once at the beginning of your meal, load your plate, and you’re done. Or maybe you aren’t—that’s fine, you can go for seconds. Want to sit and enjoy a cup of coffee after your meal? You’re welcome to do that, too. It’s all you care to eat! In addition to new plans and food stations, TWU and Sodexo will offer more robust options for dietary restrictions, free guest passes for students to offer friends and family, and new retail options across campus in spaces like the Lower Caf and the Cog. These changes will start to take shape as the cafeteria undergoes significant renovation in summer 2017. “The students, staff, and faculty are why we’re here,” says Erin Maclean, Sodexo General Manager of Food, Conference, and Catering Services at TWU. “If we can serve a little bit more, a little bit better, and create a better atmosphere, that’s important.” –NB


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“TRINITY WESTERN IS A GREAT UNIVERSITY. IT’S NOT JUST ABOUT EDUCATION. IT’S ABOUT LIFE.” VERA XIONG

CROSSING OCEANS, CROSSING PATHS BA in Leadership student Ivy Chen’s life-changing journey from China to TWU Richmond can’t be a coincidence BY NELSON BERGEN

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unshine streams through the windows of TWU Richmond as the campus hums with activity. Ivy Chen sits comfortably at a booth in the main lounge. She’s talkative and smiley, occasionally pausing to greet passing friends. She seems at home. The story was very different two years ago, when Ivy was living in China where she had grown up, gone to high school, and completed a business degree. She hadn’t known much about Canada, nor had she ever really thought about coming here. The second-year Bachelor of Arts in Leadership student now realizes her experience has been nothing short of transformational. Looking back along the chain of events that led her to this place—a supportive mentor, a fateful phone call, an unexpected reunion—Ivy can’t help but feel that, even before she knew Him, God had a hand in it all. Ivy comes from a fairly humble background. Though never significantly in need, her family would not have been expected to send their child to study in North America. Her high school education was supported by a Canadian charity called Growing Seed Foundation (gsf), and it was one of the charity-workers—a mentor she now affectionately calls “auntie”—who originally suggested TWU. In a fateful phone call, Ivy was asked, “Do you want to study in Canada?” She boldly answered, “Yes.” Soon after, thanks to the continued support of gsf, Ivy moved to Richmond, bc, and enrolled at TWU. Her start at the university, however, was not as promising as she had hoped. She had trouble identifying with the other students, many of whom came from a completely different socio-economic background than her. “I felt totally different from them, they seemed to think differently,” she says. “I didn’t feel very close to them or the community.”

But that was before she was unexpectedly reunited with an old friend from China, Tiffany Choi, who is now a local alumna of Trinity Western. Not only did the two women meet again, they also shared a common connection with the university. The reignited friendship that followed was one of the keys to turning Ivy’s university experience around—that, and becoming a Christian. Growing up in a non-Christian family, Ivy never knew much about God. But as she reflected on her journey to TWU and all of the people and experiences along the way—she felt sure it couldn�t all be coincidence. It was her Introduction to Christianity class—specifically a film they watched about Christ’s death and resurrection—that finally led her to Jesus. After that, she approached Katherine Sayson, Director of Operations at TWU Richmond, and now a close friend, and the two prayed together. “We were all elated,” says Kim Chen (�94), Associate Director of Student & Community Life at TWU Richmond. “Not because that’s what we’re here to do—we’re just here to love on the students—but to see one make a decision like that through the school, we were blown away.” For the staff, to connect with a student like Ivy so early in the life of the campus (it only opened in fall 2015) was immensely encouraging and inspiring. “Getting to know her personally and hearing about the crazy God-arranged events in her life made us realize we’re just one part of what God is doing in her journey,” Kim says. Since then, Ivy has felt a dramatic change in her life—and in how she perceives her peers. “After I became a Christian, I found the beauty of difference,” she says. “We may be different, but it isn’t weird anymore. It’s better. It’s beautiful.” Now in the final year of her ba in Leadership, Ivy isn’t sure what’s next—but she isn’t overly concerned. She has fully embraced the great opportunity she’s been given to live in Canada and study at TWU. “Trinity Western is a great university,” she says. “It’s not just about education. It’s about life.”

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WENDY DELAMONT LEES

A NEW VIEW OF TWU Trinity Western’s groundbreaking recruitment campaign invites you to visit campus virtually BY NELSON BERGEN that sends the campus to students rather than the other way around (though they’re still encouraged to do that, too). Thanks to a new 360-degree video, people all over the world can experience Trinity Western’s campus in the blink of an eye via virtual reality. It dramatically simplifies the decision-making process for potential students who live out-oft w u has l aunched a new ca mpaign

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country. The university�s branded virtual reality (vr) headsets—which arrive as a surprise—are mailed in hand-addressed envelopes to grade 11 and 12 students who fill out inquiry cards at one of twu�s live events. After prospective students receive one of the vr viewers in the mail, they tune their smartphones to twu.ca/vr, insert their phones into their headset, and instantly experience the sights and sounds of Trinity Western’s campus as if they were really there. Inside the viewer, the video responds 1:1 to users’ head movements, so they can look left, right, up, down, and all around. It’s a surprisingly effective and compelling illusion. TWU is the first Christian higher education


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institution in North America to execute a vr marketing campaign of this scale. And campus tours for prospective students are just the start—ideas are already flying for other applications to get alumni, parents, and donors in on the virtual action. “This campaign shows that TWU is continuing to be a thought

leader not only in academics, but also in other areas of the university,” says Adam Rule, TWU’s Senior Marketing Specialist for live events. “In this case, we’re engaging with our constituents to bring together the global community of Trinity Western.” Check out the university’s virtual reality experience for yourself at twu.ca/vr.

“THIS CAMPAIGN SHOWS THAT TWU IS CONTINUING TO BE A THOUGHT LEADER NOT ONLY IN ACADEMICS, BUT ALSO IN OTHER AREAS OF THE UNIVERSITY.”

LIFE LESSONS AND A LOVE OF LEARNING After a 13-year break, Amanda Slater returns to school for an MAIH degree at TWU That’s what finally prompted her to quit her job and return to school a full 13 years after completing her bachelor’s degree. Now, in the midst of marriage, motherhood, a mortgage, and more, she’s pursuing a Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Humanities (maih) degree at TWU—and, for her, the timing couldn’t be more perfect. Slater discovered her love of history and passion for education while earning her ba in Social Studies Education, and always intended to pursue teaching beyond her graduation in 2003. Shortly afterward, however, she got married, started working in sales, and had children. “My plan was always to get my master’s,” she says. “But, you know, life just gets going!” Years went by and, between work and family, Slater began to wonder if she’d ever get the chance to pursue her academic dreams. But it was precisely the moment she felt she'd given up on going back to school when things began to fall into place to do just that. “I feel like that’s part of our process with the Holy Spirit,” she says. “You lay down your own plans, and God picks them up with His own.” With her husband in a stable career and both of their daughters in school, she excitedly enrolled in Trinity Western’s maih program. Now, one year in, Slater�s love of learning continues to drive her forward—and she credits her classes and professors for fostering that. She’s particularly interested in historical theory, especially as it relates to the main focus of her research—Indigenous Canadian relations. “How do we look at Canadian history, our major milestones, and this story we like to tell ourselves?” she asks. “How can we look at it from the different perspective of people who lived here before us, but weren’t part of that process or who�d experienced those events differently?” a m a nda sl ater lov es lear ning .

She’s convinced a greater awareness of Indigenous issues in Canadian history is foundationally important to Canada’s future, which will undoubtedly be impacted by reconciliation efforts, political decisions, land claims, and court cases. And she believes there is still work to be done regarding how those subjects are taught in Canadian schools. “I don’t want students to come to the end of their education and feel as ignorant of that as I did,” Slater says. “Historical knowledge is important to how we do life in Canada.” Looking back, Slater sometimes wonders what took her so long to resume her studies. Why now? “The experiences I’ve had between undergrad and grad school have been invaluable,” she says. “Sometimes, you get to this place in life, and you think it’s all behind you. It’s not. You have many years of opportunities to follow your dream and to go where you believe your journey is taking you.” –NB

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ILLUSTRATION BY VANIA MUSA

DIGITAL SCHOLARSHIP TWU’s first two online master’s degrees remove barriers to adult education BY SHARA LEE

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he internet didn't exist when Trinity Western opened its doors in 1962. Back then, class registration was done by paper and the average student was a 17-year-old freshman. Fifty-five years and 43 undergraduate programs later, twu is taking steps to provide relevant programs for learners whose life circumstances make flexible delivery methods an essential feature. “We’re responding to market needs,” says twu Provost W. Robert Wood, Ph.D. “With technology changing so rapidly, an increasing percentage of adults today are embracing the idea of lifelong learning.” twu currently offers 19 graduate programs, many of which are offered on a mixed-mode basis. A number of programs have already been adapted to suit the busy schedules of their students by compressing classroom learning into a short summer campus residency followed by online classes throughout the year. Although the need to keep learning is front of mind for many adult learners, time is precious—people want to study on their own terms and choose their own schedules. The university is quickly adapting. twu’s first two master’s programs to be offered completely online are the ma in Leadership and the ma in tesol.

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“Adult learners typically have family and career responsibilities, so there is a significant need for programs to be flexible in delivery methods—including evening classes, compressed courses, and multiple ways to access the twu learning environment,” says Colin Madland, Manager of Online Learning and Instructional Technology. “They also need programs that are relevant and applicable to their careers.”

“WITH TECHNOLOGY CHANGING SO RAPIDLY, AN INCREASING NUMBER OF ADULTS ARE EMBRACING THE IDEA OF ONLINE LEARNING.” But why choose a traditional university? Why not the massive online open courses (moocs) offered by Lynda.com or Coursera? “twu has developed a highly interactive online learning environment that will draw online learners into the transformative learning experience that twu is known for,” says Wood. “We’re excited for this new learning environment to be launched this fall.” TWU Online launches in September with the MA in Leadership and MA in TESOL, BA in Leadership (adult degree completion), and the Certificate in Leadership for Christian Organizations. To learn more visit twu.ca/online.


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FIFTEEN YEARS IN THE CAPITAL As Canada celebrates a landmark birthday, TWU’s Laurentian Leadership Centre marks a milestone of its own twu�s Laurentian Leadership Centre (llc) is marking its 15th anniversary. Since 2002, Trinity Western University students have had the opportunity to study, live, and engage in prestigious internships in Canada’s capital. Students gain valuable work experience in internships, which include working in the offices of cabinet ministers and Members of Parliament, the Senate, international ngos, embassies and high commissions, national museums, and even the Prime Minister’s Office. The llc boasts an impressive roster of alumni who have completed the Certificate of Leadership and Applied Public Affairs, including: Jay Dorey, Vice President of Government Relations for Visa; Jared Kuehl, Deputy Head, Global Government Relations, Canada for Shell; Kerala Wall, External Relations Manager for World Vision; Matt Buys, Captain in the u.s. Air Force; Kristen VanderHoek, Senior Director, Communications and Marketing for the Aerospace Industries Association of Canada; and Michael Van Hemmen, Manager of Public Policy for Western Canada for Uber. “The llc offers a small program that has a big impact,” says Director Janet Epp Buckingham, ll.d. “Our alumni have a strong right in the heart of ottawa ,

LLC students enjoy a break from their studies on the steps of the historic Booth Mansion.

record of service and leadership in Canada and around the world. They exemplify the values twu holds dear.” –HM See more LLC Alumni updates on p. 44.

HOLDING DOWN THE FORT Trinity Western House gives students and alumni a home in Fort Langley you ’d be hard pr essed to find a trinit y w ester n gr ad w ho

WENDY DELAMONT LEES

doesn’t have fond, if sheepish, memories of studying for hours in Fort Langley at Wendel’s or Blacksmith Bakery, nursing a single cup of coffee long after it’s cold. No wonder—“Fort Langley looks like the movie version of the perfect college town,” explains Scott Fehrenbacher, TWU’s svp External Relations. “But TWU has never embraced Fort Langley in any formal way.” That changed in October 2016 with the opening of Trinity Western House, the first official TWU space in the historic village. Open to everyone—students, alumni, and even the public—it’s an inviting, comfortable space to while away hours studying, sipping coffee, or socializing (guilt-free). “We’ve annexed Fort Langley as part of our campus,” Fehrenbacher laughs. The space has already held a student art show, March Madness viewing, parent dinners, public lectures, and athletic celebrations. In warm months it will play host to an outdoor concert series and open mic nights on the patio. Everyone is welcome. –ALS

Trinity Western House offers students, and the public, an inviting place to study—and socialize.

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MICHELLE KARST ’15

FACULTY FOLIO

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Dark Glass Theatre's inaugural production, disPLACE, told refugees' stories in their own words.


A TRADITION OF LOVE Humanitas initiatives thrive while maintaining an Anabaptist theological approach BY J.R. FEHR ’09

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umanitas—a latin noun that refers to humanity—is a powerful word with links to Greek concepts of education and the love of what makes us human. Many early Anabaptist leaders were familiar with this idea and, trained in a humanist curriculum, would have been exposed to the best traditions of learning and thought about what it means to be human. Because of these links, the Anabaptist Mennonite Centre for Faith and Learning changed their name to the Humanitas AnabaptistMennonite Centre. They felt that taking on this new name would better communicate the Centre’s vision to connect an Anabaptist perspective to ideas and learning across a broad range of disciplines and perspectives. The Centre was formed out of a partnership between Trinity Western University and the Mennonite Faith and Learning Society. Since the Centre was founded in 2014, director Myron Penner, Ph.D., and his team have sponsored research, on-campus lectures, theatrical productions, and conferences from an Anabaptist-Mennonite theological point of view. “We want to provide content that is meaningful to the intellectually marginalized, to people who are interested in discussing faith perspectives, and to those who aren’t afraid to engage ideas, for example, from philosophy and science,” says Penner. “We want to do that while bringing a perspective from a historically peaceful group.” Since 2014, they’ve been busy pursuing and engaging with a staggering number of relevant topics and ideas. “Right now,” he says, “in addition to raising funds to support our work, the biggest challenge is finding the time to prioritize the things that need to be achieved, and to chase down the great opportunities that are out there.” And those opportunities take all forms: in 2016 Angela Konrad, mfa, Professor and Chair of twu’s Theatre Department in the School of the Arts, Media + Culture (samc), had an idea for a theatre company that would tell stories about human experiences on the margins. To Penner and Konrad, this perfectly aligned with the Centre’s focus on social justice, and Konrad’s idea became Dark Glass Theatre, an initiative of Humanitas. Their inaugural production was an original play entitled disPLACE: Refugee Stories in Their Own Words. “The idea is to use a powerful art form to tell stories of people you wouldn’t normally see, to generate empathy and compassion,” says Penner. The Centre also held a conference in June 2017 at twu called Anabaptist Theology: Methods and Practices, which focused on the theological method, both in its general form and from an Anabaptist perspective. Scholars from across North America and Europe gathered to present papers on a variety of topics related to Anabaptist theology. Penner is now in the process of compiling this research into an anthology, though finding time is a challenge. Regularly invited to travel and speak on these issues, Penner won the Bridging

Two Cultures Grant in 2015. The grant allowed him to visit various universities to speak to science and religious clubs on topics like Doubt; Natural Theories of Religion; and Philosophy, Science, and Religion. Afterward, Penner was able to engage with many scientists, including a scientist who was part of the Voyager space probe team, just as they were collecting data from outside the solar system for the first time.

“PART OF LIVING OUT THE GOSPEL IS ENSURING PEOPLE ARE CARED FOR AND LOVED.” He’s excited by the many opportunities he’s had, through his personal work and the Centre, to engage faith and science and to live out some of the core aspects of Anabaptist-Mennonite tradition. “Part of living out the gospel is ensuring people are cared for and loved. That resonates,” Penner says, adding that he looks forward to bringing more people to the university for further discussions about what it means to live out a tradition of love. Learn more about Humanitas and their initiatives at humanitascentre.org.

CHANGING THE WORLD ON A STAGE New theatre company tells stories from those on the margins A partnership between Angela Konrad, MFA, Chair and Professor of SAMC Theatre, and TWU’s Humanitas Centre has resulted in the formation of an innovative new theatre company. “Dark Glass Theatre grew out of a belief in the power of theatre to change the world,” says Konrad, who has taught at TWU for over 15 years. “And the ways that we want to change the world are rooted in Anabaptist theology, so our partnership is—perhaps literally—a godsend.” Dark Glass Theatre’s inaugural production, disPLACE: Refuge Stories in Their Own Words focused on the lives of refugees coming to Canada. An original production created and performed by TWU students, it ran last winter. A short tour in March 2017 brought it to a few locations in the Lower Mainland, including TWU Richmond. Konrad believes telling these kinds of stories helps build empathy. "When we created disPLACE, we had no idea how hungry people were to hear these stories," she says. "The show's ability to transform perspectives is nothing short of remarkable." –JRF Dark Glass Theatre’s next production premieres in September, with their first professional show coming early 2018.

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ILLUSTRATION BY VANIA MUSA

ICE, ICE. MAYBE? TWU math professor’s research reveals Canada’s ice is melting at a rate that could redefine “a glacial pace” BY AMANDA LEE SMITH

but here are some numbers we can all understand: there are an estimated 17,000 glaciers in British Columbia. These essential ice flows feed bc’s waterways, providing 90 per cent of our electricity. But by 2100—less than a century from now—70 per cent of that ice is expected to disappear into the ocean. If that doesn’t give you the chills, how about this? Around the world, ice melt is expected to boost sea levels by 40 centimetres— enough to cause annual flooding for 100 million people. And that’s just the tip of the iceberg. This urgency is what drives Sam Pimentel, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Mathematics and twu’s resident glaciologist. “Imagine driving between Banff and Jasper and seeing the Columbia Icefield— an iconic Canadian image—completely disappear. It could happen in my children’s lifetime,” he says. Pimentel models glaciers and ice sheets using math to understand their dynamics and underlying behaviours. His ultimate goal is to predict how they might alter under climate change scenarios. A combination of gps receivers on the ice, ground-penetrating radar, and time-lapse photography captured from space gives you probably ar en ’ t a m athem aticia n ,

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Pimentel’s team the data they need to run simulations and make calculated predictions. Their findings offer cold comfort: “If the globe gets its act together and we have a strong emissions target, we can probably save a remnant,” says Pimentel. Fascinated as he is by the movement of ice, Pimentel doesn’t feel the pull of the north. While many of his peers in glaciology live for the thrill of Arctic adventure (“You have to get a gun licence in case a polar bear attacks,” he says), the uk-native is happy to leave his crampons at home. What deeply fascinates him is the math itself. For example, he points to the Navier-Stokes equation—math used to describe the motion of viscous substances. “I find it remarkable that one equation can describe all types of fluid flow—ice flow, or the atmosphere, or the ocean, or the storm on Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, or even the small air eddies when I flap my hand,” he says. “It�s amazing.” Pimentel shares his enthusiasm with Trinity Western students who have the opportunity to assist with research projects, funded by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada grant. Whether they are diving into code, manipulating data sets, or presenting findings, the students are being equipped for future research at the graduate level. He works with them one-on-one to prepare the next generation of scientists and mathematicians who may be the ones to help save Canada’s glaciers. All puns aside, we think that’s pretty cool.


FA C U LT Y F O L I O

“FOR PETER, SCRIPTURE WAS NOT ONLY ANCIENT, IT WAS SACRED.”

In Memoriam

PETER W. FLINT, PH.D., 1951–2016 about the Dead Sea Scrolls that he could write or speak on the subject at the drop of a hat. But what set Peter W. Flint, Ph.D., apart was his rare gift of being able to make often-complex topics engaging and accessible—even lifechanging—for students, the church, and the wider public. Flint arrived at twu in 1995, with his newly-minted doctorate degree in Old Testament and Second Temple Judaism in hand. It didn’t take long for the Dead Sea Scrolls expert to make his mark; he and colleague Martin G. Abegg, Jr., Ph.D., helped grow the Master of Arts in Biblical Studies program, and were integral in the realization of twu’s Dead Sea Scrolls Institute along with Craig Evans, Ph.D. He also formed a different kind of institute—one of the heart—when he he was a prolific schol ar , so passionate

married twu School of Business professor Amanda (Dossett) Flint, mba, cpa-ca, in 2000. In 2004, Flint was awarded a prestigious Tier 1 Canada Research Chair in Dead Sea Scrolls Studies—a position he held until his sudden passing on November 3, 2016. A respected and beloved teacher, mentor, lecturer, colleague, and friend, Flint was posthumously awarded the honorary degree Doctor of Humanities at twu’s 2017 commencement ceremony. “For Peter, Scripture was not only ancient, it was sacred,” says friend, colleague, and Dead Sea Scrolls Co-director Andrew B. Perrin, Ph.D. “His model of scholarship exemplified the idea that exploring the words and worlds of the Bible is not just a vocation reserved for the academic elite but an essential task for all in pursuit of mature Christian living.” –WDL

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PARTNERSHIPS

TIES THAT FLY After 25 years, a former aviation program airplane hits new heights BY WENDY DELAMONT LEES

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plane that was once part of twu’s aviation fleet has found its wings again, thanks to a 25-year-long labour of love. Back in 1990, Erich Munzer, a former member of the Swiss Air Force, was flying his self-built bd4 to Chilliwack—where he and his son Marc were headed for pie and coffee—when he spotted the wings of a Dornier Do27 outside a hangar at Chilliwack Municipal Airport. Following a nerve-wracking landing of the bd4 on Savary Island a few years prior, the Do27 was exactly the kind of aircraft Munzer had started looking for. After brief negotiations with then-owner Trinity Western University, the plane had a new home.

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Munzer didn’t know it then, but the Do27 wouldn’t be his only twu connection; 10 years after he purchased the plane, his daughter Nisha (Munzer ’00) Ganchar, an education major, would graduate from the university. Munzer’s search for a new mode of transport to the family cabin on Savary Island had begun in earnest a few years earlier, thanks to then-11-year-old Nisha’s honesty about that tense landing experience. As the family embarked on the hour-long walk from the airstrip to their cabin, Munzer asked why they seemed so sullen. Only Nisha spoke up. “Well, Dad,” she said, “you’re not very nice on the way here.” Although he didn’t initially admit it, he later realized she was right. “It wasn’t a conscious thing, but I didn’t want to talk on the flight over to Savary Island because the bd4 was very difficult to land on the airstrip—and I had my whole family, everyone I loved, with me in that plane.”


A short time after he purchased the Do27, the Savary Island airstrip was closed permanently due to a non-airplane-related incident. For a number of years, the plane remained untouched. But about 15 years ago—just after Nisha graduated from twu, Munzer began refurbishing it in earnest. He kept the original call letters, c-gtwu, in part because of Nisha’s twu experience. Though she originally planned to attend the University of British Columbia (ubc), Nisha applied at Trinity Western after coming home from a trip to Europe to find she hadn’t been accepted at ubc. She figured she would do a year at twu then transfer. “You don’t realize the ways in which God is directing your path,” she says. “He puts you where you need to be. The experience changed my life completely.” At twu, Nisha says, her faith grew and deepened. “Being at twu gave me a new direction, a new perspective on how to live out my faith daily.” She went on to finish her degree at twu. Over the years as Nisha taught elementary school in Abbotsford, her dad slowly repaired and refurbished the Do27. In September 2016, Munzer took the completed bird on its first flight in over 25 years. “My dad is such an adventurer—someone who always stepped out of his comfort zone,” Nisha says. “He built a plane then restored another one. He taught my brother and me that we could do anything we put our minds to.”

Leave a legacy

“HE BUILT A PLANE THEN RESTORED ANOTHER ONE. HE TAUGHT MY BROTHER AND ME THAT WE COULD DO ANYTHING WE PUT OUR MINDS TO.”

Use your assets during your lifetime and leave a portion to Trinity Western University in your will.

For more info contact Inga Warnock | p: 604 · 513 · 2168 | e: warnock@twu.ca TWU.CA/INVESTMENTS

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PA R T N E R S H I P S

MICHELLE KARST ’15

The School of Nursing's new SIM lab gives nursing students next-level clinical training.

BRINGING THE HOSPITAL TO THE CLASSROOM New simulation lab gives nursing students hands-on learning beyond clinical hours BY HANNAH MARAZZI ’15 t w u school of nursing gr aduates ar e k now n for their

commitment to compassion and the highest quality care, whether they are working in major city hospitals or emergency outposts in war-torn nations. Founded in 1993, the School receives over 200 applications each year for just 50 freshman spots. Hospitals are eager to hire Trinity Western nursing grads and, as a result, the program has doubled in size since it first began. “Patients, physicians, and other nurses say, ‘Your students just go that extra step. They look into the patient’s eyes. They introduce themselves. They treat you like a person,’” explains Sonya Grypma, rn, Ph.D., Dean of twu’s School of Nursing. Almost four years ago, Grypma and her team decided it was time to augment the cutting-edge training twu offers by taking clinical training to the next level. “We decided to make a real push to

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“WE HAD AN IMMEDIATE AND OVERWHELMINGLY POSITIVE RESPONSE FROM DONORS, RAISING OVER $300,000 WITHIN A WEEK TO BUILD OUR STATE-OF-THE-ART LAB.” complement clinical learnings in the hospital by providing increased rigorous opportunities for on-campus clinical learning,” she explains. So when the School of Nursing undertook a curriculum refresh, the plan for an augmented lab space went into motion. “We had an immediate and overwhelmingly positive response from donors, raising over $300,000 within a week to build our state-of-the-art lab,” says Grypma. “It was quite remarkable. The university and the Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences as a whole


PA R T N E R S H I P S

MICHELLE KARST ’15

NEXT GENERATION INVESTMENTS Care centre owners put stock in holistic training while giving nursing students a boost

championed and supported our efforts to expand the handson, educational opportunities we wished to provide for our students.” In the summer of 2016, all of the fundraising, planning, and dreaming for a new high tech lab came to fruition, effectively doubling the previous lab space. The lab boasts two spaces with six to seven beds each. In addition, there is a new simulation lab which has a high fidelity responsive mannequin, a two-way mirror, filming equipment, and simulation tools to run case scenarios for students in every year of their program. The opening of the new lab in fall 2016 marked the beginning of a new era for twu nursing students, in which clinical skills are fostered even more comprehensively in a realistic, yet risk-free environment. “Simulated learning complements learning in clinical settings and may ease the pressure on clinical sites to accommodate student-learning needs,” says Grypma. “These experiences offer invaluable opportunities to enrich and enhance learning, as well as to increase student confidence.”

In partnership with TWU, the Froelich family has established the Northcrest Care Centre Scholarship. Established in memory of the family’s recently deceased business partner, the scholarship gives two nursing students the opportunity to receive $2,500 toward each academic year. The Froelich family saw the impact TWU made in the lives of their children: Justin (’11, now Regional Director, British Columbia Development at TWU), Jordan (’02), Kimberley (Froelich ’91–‘92) Ironmonger, and son-in-law Clint Ironmonger (’94), and wanted to give back. As co-owners of a frontline residential care facility that provides long-term and dementia care for over 100 seniors, the Froelich family knows first-hand the valuable contribution that nursing staff can have when they take a holistic approach. Committed to the vision of TWU’s nursing program, the Froelich family sees this scholarship as a way to invest in godly, Christian leaders in the healthcare sector. Says Justin, “Our family sees this as a way of mentoring and sowing back into the next generation and into Trinity Western itself.” –HM

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PA R T N E R S H I P S

Artist's rendering shows phase I of the new residence hall, which will welcome resident students this September.

MAKING ROOM New residence hall gives growing student body a place to call home BY WENDY DELAMONT LEES on a new residence hall—the first new residence building on campus since Robson Hall was constructed in 1995. Thanks to a new recruitment initiative (see story p. 4), twu has seen a significant increase in new undergraduate students, bringing with it an increased need for campus housing. “The university is breaking beyond its traditional audience,” says Scott Fehrenbacher, Senior Vice President, External Relations. “People all over North America—from the Maritimes to California—are coming to Trinity Western.” In the 2016–17 academic year, many double-occupancy dorm rooms were converted to triple-occupancy to accommodate student this spring , trinit y w ester n univ ersit y brok e ground

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residents. Even with this, the university turned away nearly 80 upperclassmen seeking housing. “When students are asked to find off-campus housing in an already-saturated market, there is evidence to show that student experience and learning outcomes are affected—which in turn would shape any plans for growth,” Fehrenbacher says. “With a further rise in enrolment forecast for fall 2017, the need for phased additional housing has become critical.” The new residence hall, located adjacent to Fraser Hall, will add an additional 130 beds, with plans to phase in an another 280 beds over the next several years. “twu offers a unique combination of academic rigour and uncompromising faith-based values,” says Fehrenbacher. “Students want what the university has to offer. I feel a personal obligation to provide that experience for all who want to attend because of the eternal consequences a twu education could mean for every student.”


PA R T N E R S H I P S

WENDY DELAMONT LEES

Businesses all around Fort Langley are offering Spartans Club discounts to TWU students, staff, and faculty.

PERKS AND REC New “Spartans Club” program connects TWU with Fort Langley community with several businesses in Fort Langley called the Spartans Club. Students and staff can show their university id and receive discounts at participating establishments. Justin Froelich, twu’s Regional Director, British Columbia Development, explains that the program is designed to bring value to the twu community, but also, he says, “We want to put a face to the school and to interact with the community in a positive way.” Local businesses have embraced the partnership, offering perks and incentives to twu patrons. The Trading Post, a favourite local eatery, even named a burger after the Spartans. “In the fall, when you go and purchase it, you’ll get two free tickets to attend a Spartans t w u has r ecently begun a partnership

“WE WANT TO PUT A FACE TO THE SCHOOL AND TO INTERACT WITH THE COMMUNITY IN A POSITIVE WAY.” game of your choice,” explains Froelich. Ultimately, it’s part of a bigger push to bring twu into the community and foster the energy of a college town right in the Fort. “We want Fort Langley to feel like an extension of the campus,” Froelich says. –JRF

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MARK JANZEN

ATHLETICS

Spartans track and field athlete Jordan Gin competes at the 2015 University of Washington Sundodger Open at Lincoln Park in Seattle.

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“HE’S SOLID. HE’S A HUMBLE GUY WHO ALWAYS SHOWS UP TO TRAINING AND JUST GOES ABOUT HIS WORK. HE NEVER TAKES A DAY OFF—BOTH IN RUNNING AND IN LIFE— AND HIS TEAMMATES LOVE HIM.”

JUST DOING IT Focus runs in Spartans track and field athlete’s blood BY MARK JANZEN

A

t first, Jordan Gin doesn’t quite understand the question. For someone so driven, the notion of balancing it all isn’t daunting—it’s just what you do. So when the third-year runner is asked how he balances track and field with his business studies, philanthropic trips, volunteer coaching, and medical aspirations, the inquisition is perplexing. He just does it. “That’s Jordan Gin,” says Mark Bomba, Trinity Western’s endurance director for track and field. “He’s just solid. He’s a humble guy who always shows up to training and just goes about his work. He never takes a day off—both in running and in life—and his teammates love him.” To put it into context, Gin is the type who sees summer break as an opportunity to study for the mcat. His father is a doctor, and his brother is on the cusp of finishing medical school. This kind of focus is in Gin’s blood. Gin largely grew up in Nepal’s central Himalayan country, where his parents served as missionaries with the Evangelical

Alliance Mission. He went back two years ago to help rebuild homes after the devastating earthquake in 2015. In 2016, he again returned to Nepal, this time to work with local biomedical engineers researching the feasibility of developing Nepalese-made oxygen concentrators for local hospitals. The idea was to help provide lower-cost medical supplies by developing businesses in Nepal that can make their own equipment. And alongside this impressive lineup of volunteerism and academia, he runs. He has a near-perfect gpa but he’s also respected for the dedication to his training and to the squad. This past season, he was part of the team that won Trinity Western’s first ever men’s track and field Canada West championship, and was also a member of the Spartans men’s cross country team that earned both a second place finish at the national championships and its first-ever conference title. He’s the type of person who can have a whole article written about him without needing to say a word on the matter. He would never tout his many accomplishments. He just does it—all of it. That’s Gin.

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AT H L E T I C S

SCOTT STEWART ’92

MARK JANZEN

MARK JANZEN MARK JANZEN

Left, centre right, and bottom right: TWU's Spartans men's volleyball team celebrates its second consecutive U SPORTS national championship. Top right: The Spartans women's volleyball team earned bronze at U SPORTS nationals this past spring.

REPEAT PERFORMANCE Spartans men’s volleyball team earns its second straight national title BY MARK JANZEN Carter Bergen jumped the highest, which is unsurprising since he has one of the best verticals on the team. Adam Schriemer didn’t quite seem to know what to do, even though this was the second time in a row he had won it all. It was a perfect end to a near-perfect season for the Spartans men’s volleyball team. With Ryan Sclater (�17)—the u sports Player of the Year—and Aaron Boettcher teaming up for a match-winning block in the championship bout, Trinity Western secured its second straight national title. bl ak e scheerhoor n fell to his k nees in utter ecstasy.

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The victory capped an unbeaten playoff run that saw twu win both the Canada West and u sports banners. “We had a team we knew was good enough to win if everything fell into place and worked out. And for us, everything did fall into place and everything did work out,” says Spartans volleyball coach Ben Josephson (�03). “Of course there were bumps along the way, but the team kept overcoming challenges and kept moving forward. This group completed every objective they set out for and did it in a fashion honouring to God and honouring to our program.” The victory eradicated any doubts of a dynasty. The men’s volleyball team has won four of the last seven national championships, played in six of the last eight national finals, and now has five u sports crowns—joining the Spartans women’s soccer team, which has also earned five national titles, as the two most decorated teams on campus.


AT H L E T I C S

GOT CHOCOLATE MILK? Spartans raise a glass to celebrate academic achievements at Trinity Western University, and it involves chocolate milk in fancy glass flutes. The Spartans call it the Chocolate Milk Club. Carter Bergen, a third-year volleyball player, had witnessed the gathering more than once, but from the outside. He wanted in, but he hadn’t yet reached the necessary requirement: only Spartans student-athletes with a gpa of 3.5 or higher are invited for a chocolate milk toast. A gpa of 3.7 is the threshold to be a u sports Academic AllCanadian or a bcihl Academic All-Star, so the Chocolate Milk Club is both a recognition of success and an encouragement to push towards to the finish line. Beyond chocolate milk—one of the few tasty beverages that fall within nutritional guidelines set by twu’s dietary coaches—athletes are also given a pack of Extra gum with a sticker that reminds them that, “a little extra effort goes a long way.” Cheesy? Maybe. But on campus it’s also a legitimate badge of honour—something to strive for. This year, when Bergen received the invitation to join the annual toast, it was about a lot more than a hit of protein and carbohydrates. “I had walked by and seen other people get the chocolate milk, so it was definitely nice to get into the club this year,” Bergen says. “The best part was the professors who were there. ev ery ja nuary ther e ’s a ritua l

Cheers! Spartans celebrate academic success with a chocolate milk toast.

They were more excited seeing me there than they are when they’re cheering at games. It was cool to have a special time to really celebrate academic success.” Last year, 86 Spartans athletes received an invitation to the Chocolate Milk Club. Over the last 10 years, 246 Spartans have been named u sports Academic All-Canadians or bcihl Academic All-Stars, boosting their numbers every single year. In 2015–2016, the athletics department had an all-time high of 55 athletes who achieved the honour. This year’s Chocolate Milk Club numbers suggest 2016–2017 will go down as yet another record year for the Spartans. –MJ

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MercyMe frontman turned a tragic childhood into a legacy of praise and is bringing it to TWU’s new worship arts program

I

WRITTEN AND PHOTOGRAPHED BY WENDY DELAMONT LEES

t’s a Thursday evening and the Abbotsford Centre is filled to capacity. Sound and light fill the arena, illuminating and thrilling the crowd with hi-tech visual effects. At centre stage, MercyMe’s Bart Millard isn’t just singing—he’s leading nearly 8,000 people in worship. While the setlist predominantly features songs from the band’s latest cd, Lifer, it also includes many of MercyMe’s long list of hits. As the band plays their iconic song “I Can Only Imagine,” the crowd lifts its collective voices and hands in praise alongside Millard’s. For nearly 24 years, Millard and MercyMe have been at the forefront of the Christian music scene—and this fall, Millard will bring his considerable skill and passion to Trinity Western as the Senior Advisor for the university’s brand new worship arts program.

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“WHO CAN SAY WHERE THE ‘NEXT THING’ IS GOING TO BE. BUT I CAN TELL YOU FOR SURE, IT’S GOING TO BE WHERE THE BODY OF CHRIST IS FLOURISHING.”


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“AS A WORSHIP LEADER AND A SONGWRITER, ALL YOU WANT IS TO CREATE MUSIC THAT OUTLASTS YOU.”

REDEEMING GRACE If not for God’s grace, Millard may never have written a single song. Raised by an abusive father after his parents divorced, Millard often bore the brunt of his father’s anger and frustration. As a young child, he was beaten several times a week and as he grew older, the beatings were replaced by verbal abuse. When Millard was a freshman in high school, his father was diagnosed with cancer. “This was bittersweet for me,” he says, “because part of me thought all of this [abuse] would come to an end. The other part of me was devastated because this was my dad.” In the midst of his illness, Millard’s father gave his life to Jesus and the change was undeniable. In a home where the family had never prayed—even on Thanksgiving or Christmas—his father now prayed and read the Bible all the time. “I had a front row seat to watch how the gospel could change someone,” Millard says. “My dad went from being a monster to being a man who was desperately, passionately in love with Jesus Christ. It changed my life forever.” His father passed away in 1991. “I rejoice in knowing my dad will be a much bigger part of my future than he ever will be of my past,” says Millard. ETERNAL SOPHOMORE From his early teens, Millard knew he wanted to be a worship leader but enrolled in college to appease well-meaning relatives who felt he should have a career to fall back on. “The last thing you want to hear, as a 19-year-old, is that you’re going to fail,” he says. “What a novel concept—to feel like I’m being called, by the God of everything to lead worship.”

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The year after his father passed away, Millard was working with a local praise band and took what he calls “a fatal semester off ” to start MercyMe. “I’m eternally a sophomore,” he jokes. Yet despite never having completed his degree, Millard has a passion to pour into the next generation of worship leaders. “Where I grew up, if you have good hair and know three chords, you can be a worship leader at a really big church,” Millard says. “It’s sad but it’s true. It doesn’t take much to say, ‘I can lead worship; I can sing someone else’s songs.’ There’s more to being a leader than just being able to sing someone else’s songs in front of people. “I learned all of this stuff over the last 23 years,” he continues. “But now, here I am at a place like Trinity Western, where we can teach students everything I had to learn the hard way.” BEST KEPT SECRET So just how did the Texas-born husband and father of five become involved with a small university in Langley, bc? Turns out Scott Fehrenbacher, twu’s Senior vp, External Relations, and Millard have been friends for years. Before coming to twu in 2016 Fehrenbacher was with Arizona’s Grand Canyon University, where he and Millard built a highly successful worship arts program that grew to 150 students in just a year and a half. When Fehrenbacher invited Millard to visit twu’s campus, Millard didn’t hesitate. “When Bart is around university students, he just beams,” Fehrenbacher says. “He has the ability to teach and connect with students in a meaningful way. He’s passionate about how God can use music to touch a person’s soul.”


Not only did Millard love the location (“I was blown away,” he says. “It’s one of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been”), he felt an immediate connection with twu’s faculty, staff, and students. “Trinity Western is the best kept secret in Christian higher education,” he says. “It’s a small school that is making a huge impact.” Enrolment in the new worship arts program will be capped at 25 incoming students per year, giving students access to personalized mentoring and attention. Each semester, there will be a lineup of guest speakers, including top artists and producers—as well as hands-on experience in churches. And they’ll have the opportunity to be part of a worship band that performs as the opening act on a national tour. (A multi-city tour with popular Northern Irish band Rend Collective has been scheduled for 2018.) “There’s a huge demand for worship leaders that isn’t being met in the current marketplace,” Fehrenbacher says. “Bart has found a way to share his heart and create a legacy. It’s a great convergence of mission.” CAN YOU IMAGINE? “My perspective on everything has changed from when I got started,” Millard says. “I see my kids getting older and I want to be part of something that has a lasting impact. It’s overwhelming to think that a song like ‘I Can Only Imagine’ is still around and, hopefully, it will still be around long after I’m gone. That’s a really cool feeling. As a worship leader and a songwriter, all you want is to create music that outlasts you.” Penned a few years after his father’s passing to help him process his grief, the emotionally compelling “I Can Only Imagine” is the first-ever song in the Christian genre to go platinum; by 2014, it was certified double platinum—something Millard never foresaw when he sat down to write the song. Part of what he hopes to accomplish through twu’s worship arts program is to help create an environment in which students can excel in a community of like hearts and minds. “If you’re a worship leader, you want to be where worship is taking place,” Millard says. “Who can say where the ‘next big thing’ is going to be,” he continues. “But I can tell you for sure, it’s going to be where the body of Christ is flourishing. twu is an environment where believers can come together and flourish. Imagine sending out worship leaders who know what they’re talking about and are fully equipped to bring the message of Christ to the world. “It’s pretty amazing to think that Trinity Western is equipping students to serve the church better, knowing who they are in Christ and having a spiritual foundation,” Millard adds. “This is what we’re about. The most important thing to us is advancing the kingdom of God.” BRINGING IT BACK “Worship is the total life of the Christian believer—the most important thing we do in our relationship with God,” says David Squires, ph.d., Dean of twu’s School of the Arts, Media + Culture (samc). Squires knows a thing or two about worship; the musiciancomposer, who initially taught at Trinity Western from 1981–1990, spent 11 years as a worship pastor prior to returning to the university in 2002. Armed with that experience and a heart to see students equipped to lead, Squires spearheaded the launch of a popular

worship studies minor. But the program was put on hold in 2010 while the university went through a redesign process. Even though there wasn’t an official program, churches still looked to Trinity Western as a source of potential worship leaders. “The church has a crying need for worship leaders and worship pastors,” Squires says. “Not just bodies, but trained, skilled, theologically-prepared, artistic leaders who can lead the church in its regular worship life. We also have a whole bunch of young people who, at the age of 17 or 18, are feeling called to a ministry of worship leadership. We want to bring those together and in a way that benefits both.” In 2016, the university set out to establish a new worship arts program—not just a minor, but a robust program specifically designed to equip students who feel called to lead worship. The new program—with input from Millard—is expressly designed to ensure students receive the transformational educational experience of a lifetime and, in turn, enter the workforce fully prepared to have an impact on the church, the community, and the culture at large. “The most important thing we do in our relationship with God is worship,” Squires says. “Not singing on a Sunday, but the worship life of following God and living for Him.”

“THE CHURCH HAS A CRYING NEED FOR WORSHIP LEADERS AND WORSHIP PASTORS.” A PASSION FOR WORSHIP On the now-dimly lit stage, Millard shares his own faith story, from the days of abuse at his father’s hands, to finding his voice, to founding MercyMe. Woven through his poignant testimony is a singular message: Jesus Christ knows what you’ve been through and He’s with you. Millard explains that, for him, writing songs is like therapy. “It’s the blessing and the curse of being a songwriter.” While the band plays softly, Millard shares openly about the challenges of being a parent to a child who has a chronic disorder; Millard’s son Sam was diagnosed with Type i Diabetes at the age of two. As he shares his heart, Millard is candid: even he gets frustrated at the reality that Sam’s condition will never go away. Yet his deep faith remains evident. The song “Even If ” was written to remind him—and others—that God is sovereign. “God was worthy long before any of those circumstances showed up,” he tells the audience. “Even if He went silent and never said another word, God is still worthy to be praised. He’s our greatest hope in the midst of trials.” That belief spurs Millard on to do all he can to help mentor future leaders who will share that message—and further the Kingdom. “We were created to be worshippers,” Millard says. “The only thing we take with us when we leave this place is our ability to worship.” For more information on TWU's new Worship Arts program, visit twu.ca/worshiparts.

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THE KEY TO A FUTURE A group of TWU students is taking responsibility for the future of a refugee family BY AMANDA LEE SMITH

U

nless you are prone to losing it, you probably never think about your house key. It’s one of the smallest things you own, so you can easily forget that it’s also one of the most valuable. For people who have been displaced from their homes and countries—refugees escaping war, famine, or persecution—a house key is so much more. It’s a daily reminder of what’s been lost. When refugees are forced to leave their home, they lock it up and pocket the key with a faint hope that one day they’ll be able to use that key again. But for most, that’s not the reality. Instead they spend months, years—or even decades—in limbo. Some return home to find rubble and others never see their country again. That key becomes a symbol of the houses, communities, families, and roots that have been left behind. Second-year student Jordan Koslowsky is transforming the key into a symbol of hope. If you visited campus during this past spring semester you would have seen the shape emblazoned on shirts, donned by hundreds of Trinity Western students. It may be an unlikely fashion trend, but it’s one that speaks to a big, passionate vision that has taken hold of much of the student body. Koslowsky and a new student-run organization, the Trinity Refugee Awareness Campaign (known on campus as trac), are working towards a day very soon when they’ll give a refugee family a new key to a safe, lasting home in Canada.

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A MOUNTAINTOP MOMENT During summer 2016, the 19-year-old international studies major was in Israel and Palestine as part of a twu Global Projects trip. On a day trip, the group hiked up Mount Hermon. Now a ski resort, it is believed by many to be the site of the transfiguration. The mountain sits near the intersection of Israel, Lebanon, and Syria, bordered by the undof zone—an 80-kilometre-long strip of land that acts as a buffer zone between the Israeli-occupied portion of the Golan Heights and the rest of Syria. Looking across the terrain, Koslowsky was struck by the proximity to Syria; the country at the heart of the conflict we only ever hear about was literally a 15-minute drive from him. “Because I was born in Canada—which I did nothing to deserve —I’ve lived in safety,” Koslowsky explains. “But walking distance away I knew there were innocent people being hurt by a brutal conflict, where there are chemical attacks on children.” In that moment, he says, the Syrian crisis felt very real. A week later in Bethlehem, a taxi driver he had befriended took Koslowsky on a motorbike tour of the region. It included a stop at the Aida Refugee camp, where Palestinian children ran out to inspect the strangers. Tall and tanned, but blonde-haired, Koslowsky believes he was taken for an Israeli. Spurred by decades of conflict that landed their families in this very camp, a man encouraged the children to throw rocks. One little boy even shook a butter knife at him.


JORDAN KOSLOWSKY

WHEN REFUGEES ARE FORCED TO LEAVE THEIR HOME, THEY LOCK IT UP AND POCKET THE KEY WITH A FAINT HOPE THAT ONE DAY THEY’LL BE ABLE TO USE THAT KEY AGAIN. BUT FOR MOST, THAT’S NOT THE REALITY. A giant keyhole and key make up the gate at Aida Refugee Camp.

He returned a few days later and met families who were displaced when the State of Israel was formed in 1948, nearly 70 years ago. While there, Koslowsky took a photo of the camp’s gate—a giant keyhole with a fittingly oversized key resting above. But these refugees have much more than a key reminding them that they may never return to their homes. “The camp is right beside the separation barrier between Palestine and their former homeland in Israel,” he says. “There’s a physical barrier reminding them of what they’ve lost.” RIGHT ON TRAC Back home, Koslowsky and his fellow students were encouraged to respond to what they saw and experienced through Global Projects. Koslowsky says he initially didn’t know what form his response would take. “I Googled and brainstormed with my mom,” he says. “At first, I thought maybe I’d just volunteer, but I like to push myself. And I knew Trinity Western had so much capacity to help—it’s a really generous and intentional community.” He had a few ideas, which he bounced off Paul Rowe, Ph.D., professor and coordinator of Political and International Studies at twu. Rowe was impressed by his drive. “A lot of us, we see the problems out there—we’re aware of the issues—but we feel powerless because the problem seems too big,” says Rowe. “One of the things I suggested to Jordan was to create some kind of doable accomplishment on campus. And he took me at my word.” That was November 2016. By January 2017, Koslowsky not only

had a solid idea, he had a name, an engaged volunteer team (so many, in fact, that he has volunteers to coordinate the volunteers), established partners, and a network of twu alumni offering help and guidance. They also had a logo—that key—reminding everyone what they are working towards. In fact, trac has three goals: sponsor a refugee family through fundraising initiatives, settle the family in the Fraser Valley, and create ongoing volunteer opportunities for twu students who have a heart for refugees. Through Canada’s Private Sponsorship of Refugees Program and a partnership with the Mennonite Central Committee (mcc) these goals are well on their way to fruition. trac officially launched in February and in just over two months exceeded their fundraising goal, raising $26,563.43. Campus events and t-shirt sales mean the wider twu community are not only involved—they’re walking billboards for the cause. Though happy about its quick success, Koslowsky now finds himself trying to balance his heart for the crisis with the needs of managing a team: “The vision of helping a family has evolved into a remarkable amount of administration and people wrangling,” he says. With Rowe as faculty advisor, Koslowsky now oversees a 14-person leadership committee. It’s an active and committed team. “We have a bigger team than many nonprofits,” he says. They’ll need it. Now that they’ve reached a certain fundraising threshold, mcc is selecting a family that will be a good fit.

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The view from Mount Hermon that prompted Koslowsky to consider the refugee experience.

Once that family arrives, the real work begins. For a full year, the trac team is responsible for every aspect of settlement: housing, furniture, food, clothing, transportation, paperwork—everything. They have already started planning and allocating responsibility. “I don’t want to perpetuate the stereotype of millennials—that we run in, discover the commitment level required, and then quit,” says Koslowsky. “At the end of the day, myself and the settlement team are going to be on call—even if we are in the middle of an exam and someone needs to go to the hospital.” He acknowledges that there are moments when it’s easy to lose sight of what they are really working towards. In those moments he pauses and reminds himself: “We call them ‘refugees’ but they’re actually mothers, fathers, students, kids—just like us.” At the beginning of the spring semester, everyone in Koslowsky’s dorm wrote a letter to himself outlining goals for the four months that would follow. In April, they got to re-read that letter. One of his dorm mates, a member of the trac leadership team, had stated his goal simply: “To be one step closer to hugging our refugee family.”

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“BECAUSE I WAS BORN IN CANADA, WHICH I DID NOTHING TO DESERVE, I’VE LIVED IN SAFETY.” As of June 2017, that goal is a reality. trac has been matched with a refugee family of five from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, who could arrive in Canada any time in the next four to 12 weeks. They’ll be welcomed with more than a dozen pairs of open arms— and their own set of house keys. “Whenever it gets draining and I don’t want to send another email or follow up with another team member, that’s the moment I think of,” Koslowsky says—that moment when a family, forever displaced, can hold a new key in their hands, perhaps alongside their old key; not forgetting what’s been left behind, but looking ahead at the hope of building something safe and new in Canada.


! s t n e r a Hey, P Get involved. Stay connected. We’re sure you’ll come to love this place as much as your students do! Æ

Join our online community on Facebook: TWUPARENTS.

Æ

Encourage your students with a Touch of Home gift package.

Æ

Connect with other parents in your area at TWU Parent Chapters.

Æ

Open your home for a TWU event, or invite a group of students home for dinner.

LEARN MORE AT TWU.CA/PARENTS

PARENT & FAMILY NETWORK 1.888.817.3759 | TWU Switchboard 604.888.7511 twu.ca/parents

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Nourishing friendships: sharing meals (and hearts) around the dining table. Rachel Barkman snapped this photo of Dwell attendees (clockwise from lower left) Danaea Godard, Erin Carlson, Madison Ogilivie, Laine Mostert, Meghan Bustard ’11, Kat Grabowski ’12, and Michelle Karst ’15.

DWELLING IN COMMUNITY Nine photographers, four days, one island

BY ANGELA LEE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RACHEL BARKMAN ’12

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ometimes you need to go farther to get closer to the things that matter most. Rachel (Raymond ’12) Barkman earned her B.Ed. from twu but has since cultivated her passion for photography into a burgeoning career. Her wedding and engagement photos have made the radar of a number of commercial brands. But photography can be solitary work. “Being creative often means being your own worst critic, and it can be easy to fall into a spiral of self-doubt when comparing yourself to your peers,” she admits. “Dwell on Pender” is the creative retreat she dreamt up out of a desire for deeper community with her photography peers. In February of this year, Barkman and eight other photographers and videographers set out from Tsawwassen through the Southern Gulf Islands to Pender Island, bc. There, they discovered the air to be a restorative and reviving blend of crisp forest scents and salty ocean breezes—perfect for photography nature walks, a picnic on a windy ocean-side bluff, and hiking the high cliffs for spectacular views.

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Mostly though, the group—which included a few twu alumnae, but who otherwise only knew each other professionally—began each day with worship and the Word, and shared personal stories around the kitchen table and fireside hearth in their homey lodge overlooking the shoreline. “There is something about being in the same space together for a length of time that really helps the walls come down,” says Barkman. “There is a sacredness in sharing meals together, unwinding around the fire before turning into bed, or enjoying coffee in your pjs without makeup or pretenses.” A big believer in community since her days at twu, Barkman recalls friends and faculty rallying encouragement and prayers around her on her toughest days. “twu is where my passion for community first began, and it has grown to impact how I minister to and interact with people in all areas of my life.” Barkman says finding community demolished the idea of competition within the group of peers and instead “lifted up Christ.” The group is already planning other ways to build relationships within the industry. “Our passion for photography was the starting point for the bonding that occurred on our trip, but our faith and stories are what really drew us together into sisterhood.”


“TWU IS WHERE MY PASSION FOR COMMUNITY FIRST BEGAN, AND IT HAS GROWN TO IMPACT HOW I MINISTER TO AND INTERACT WITH PEOPLE IN ALL AREAS OF MY LIFE.”

They've got it covered: Barkman (second from left) arranged to have a casual goods company help sponsor the getaway.

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ASHLEY LINTELL

RESEARCH, REGENERATION, AND IMAGINATION TWU alumnus contributes to what may be the world’s first human head transplant BY HANNAH MARAZZI ’15 “the brilliant young Canadian chemist”—and while it’s an accurate assessment, it might be most precise to describe William Sikkema (’14) first and foremost as a student of the world. A graduate of twu’s Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Sikkema has garnered widespread mention for his contribution to a surgical team called HEAVEN—the “HEad Anastomosis VENture” project. Under the leadership of 52-year-old Italian surgeon Sergio Canavero, this team will attempt to undertake the world’s first head transplant. “I’m a very, very small part of that team,” Sikkema says. The nanomaterial that Sikkema has developed—termed Texas-PEG— may be used to assist in restoring motor control in the transplant patient. Texas-PEG, developed through experiments at Rice University with Sikkema’s supervisor James m. Tour, Ph.D., is best described as “a graphene-based biocompatible neural scaffold” that guides the cellular reconnection of a severed spinal cord. the nationa l post has ca lled him

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Sikkema credits part of his current path to his time spent at twu, where he established a foundation on which to undertake his current research. “Trinity Western’s lab environment is fantastic,” he says. “I think that’s what most prepared me for being a researcher. Dr. Julia Mills, Dr. Chad Friesen, and Dr. Dennis Venema allowed me to do research at twu. They taught me to think like a researcher, to work in a lab, and to think about science in a broader fashion.” As a current Ph.D. candidate at Rice University, Sikkema continues to work on the cutting edge of science, under the guidance of Tour— serendipitously, the very individual who first inspired Sikkema to pursue science by way of a 2006 National Geographic article. In the future, Sikkema plans to engage in research around optic nerve regeneration. It’s complex work that requires a deep understanding of science—but when asked about the most rewarding part of his research, he says, “It’s exciting to be working on something that captures the imagination of people and gets them to ask more interesting questions of the world.” We can’t wait to see what happens.


TWU ALUMNI

TWU’S BIG FISH IN MARINE BIOLOGY Lifelong love of marine mammals shapes alumna's career path BY HANNAH MARAZZI ’15 (’13) was only 11 y ears old when she had her first encounter with a whale in the wild. But she can recall the moment in vivid detail. “He had the perfect orca fin,” she says. “It was straight. It didn’t have notches, and it had a beautiful curve on its leading edge.” A graduate of twu’s Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Zwamborn loved whales long before she saw their beauty in person. “My parents say I started showing affinity for marine things at a very young age,” she laughs. With the dream of becoming a marine biologist, Zwamborn arrived on twu’s campus in 2009, eager to take the first step forward—a Bachelor of Science honours degree in biology, with an emphasis in ecology and a minor in environmental studies. Today, she works in the only lab in Canada conducting research on pilot whales. Citing the influence of faculty such as Karen Steensma, M.Sc., and David Clements, Ph.D., Zwamborn is grateful for the mentorship and field study opportunities that were a part of her twu experience. “Some of the major things I found beneficial about twu were the small class sizes and the opportunities to be a part of the unique research that was happening,” she explains. At Trinity Western, Zwamborn invested her time in creative ways—including serving as President of the twu Environmental Alliance, a student-run program that continues today. She is most proud of the efforts that she and the other members of the program made to bring students together from across the disciplines, bound by a common commitment of environmental stewardship. Zwamborn also completed a Masters of Biology at Dalhousie University. Her thesis examined the vocalizations of long-finned pilot whales in Western Canada. “We study their behavioural patterns and how they communicate amongst their family units,” she says. “While much is known about orcas and sperm whales, there�s still so much that we don’t know about pilot whales.” Researchers have been unable to find a distinctive call that links pilot whale family units—a surprising fact that makes this species different from the bottlenose dolphins and orca whales to which they are often compared. “We also found that repeated calls are produced more in certain behavioural contexts, such as socializing,” Zwamborn says. “They are produced more often when there is a greater number of whales around, suggesting that they might function in the coordination and cohesion of the whales within a group setting.” These days, Zwamborn takes every opportunity to be out in nature, among her beloved whales. In the past few years, this has included contributing to the fieldwork of a doctoral student on the social networking of sperm whales off the Galapagos Islands and serving as a stranding volunteer for Marine Animal Response Society on the East Coast. Additionally, Zwamborn has taught a marine mammal field course in Washington State with Au Sable Institute of Environmental Studies. eliz abeth z wa mbor n

Elizabeth Zwamborn’s love of whales has taken her around the world, from the shores of Nova Scotia to the Galapagos Islands.

Most recently, she worked with the Federal Department of Fisheries and Oceans on a Halifax-based photo id project for endangered northern bottlenose whales, in a remote location off of northeastern Vancouver Island. But, Zwamborn admits, pilot whales still hold her heart. “I have unfinished business with them,” she laughs. This fall, she returns to Dalhousie to pursue her doctorate degree, where she’ll further study the “WHALES ARE behaviour and health of pilot whales. While there are other long-term projects A SYMBOL OF with pilot whales taking place in the HOPE FROM THE Strait of Gibraltar, the Faroe Islands in PAST, A SYMBOL Norway, and New Zealand, Zwamborn notes that studying long-finned pilot OF RESILIENCE, whales is a challenge as these species AND A SYMBOL often “live far offshore, in deep waters.” OF WHAT CAN BE While Zwamborn is quick to DONE BETTER.” point out the many environmental and academic benefits of marine biology, there is no doubt that her dedication to her craft remains highly personal and hopeful in nature. “There is this idea that whales are a symbol of hope from the past, a symbol of resilience, and a symbol of what can be done better,” she says. “For me they represent a peace and a completeness that we don’t often have in our lives.”

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“THE DEMAND WAS THERE AND THAT LIT A FIRE UNDER US.”

TECHNICAL SUCCESS Alumni-led initiative revives TWU computing science program BY J.R. FEHR ’09

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hanks to the combined efforts of several Trinity Western alumni, the university has relaunched its computing science program. Ryan Hanawalt (’02), a graduate of the original program, decided to spearhead this initiative when he recognized a skyrocketing market demand for technical training. After the 2008 market crash, enrolment for computing science plummeted across North America, forcing twu leadership to pause the program. Eventually the market rebounded, but the program was not resumed. Several lower-level courses were still available, but students who wanted to pursue a full degree in computing science needed to transfer. “I was on an advisory council for the University of the Fraser Valley,” says Hanawalt. “They have a policy that they can’t turn any [qualified] student away. But they couldn’t physically fit them all.” This meeting was the catalyst for Hanawalt. “They were struggling to fit people and twu didn’t even have a program,” he says. Hanawalt and a few others partnered with Arnold Sikkema, Ph.D., Chair of Mathematical Sciences at twu. They met on a quarterly basis from 2014 to 2016 to discuss ways to support the faculty and offer insider insights. The alumni group wanted to help make the courses more applicable and relevant. “We were established and things were going well, but there still wasn’t a program,” says

Hanawalt. “Where was it all heading?” In January 2016, a survey showed that most students who were going to pursue a computing science degree elsewhere after their second year would choose to stay if twu offered the program. “The demand was there and that lit a fire under us,” says Hanawalt. “So we put forward a proposal to the academic senate.” Hanawalt says that they had been told that the financial risk to the university might be too high, so as part of the proposal, they offered to cover the faculty costs for the first year or two by fundraising with alumni. “We showed them the data and explained how there was no reason to refuse,” he says. “And if finances were an issue, we’d back it.” Within 30 days, the proposal was accepted. Hanawalt and his team went out and raised the necessary funds. “I think we put in just short of $100,000,” says Hanawalt, adding that about 60 per cent of the funding came from alumni, and 40 per cent came from Christian leaders in the sector. With this funding, they were able to help offset additional faculty costs, set up the senior labs with better equipment, and aid with recruitment and marketing. Hanawalt is amazed with how everything came together. “I feel like we moved mountains quickly in what could be a slow academic environment. We’ve taken a big step, and there’s lots of opportunity.” Fall 2016 saw the highest enrolment in computing science of any year before. Hanawalt encourages those at twu to look for opportunities to intermix disciplines and take some computing courses if they can. “Tech is the biggest sector in bc right now. It’s only going to grow.”

Alumni (including Ryan Hanawalt ’02, middle left, and Stuart Schellenberg ’04, top right), faculty (Professor Herbert Tsang, P.Eng., Ph.D., bottom right), and friends celebrate the relaunch of TWU’s computing science program.

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WENDY DELAMONT LEES

THE ENVIRONMENTAL PHILOSOPHER How TWU’s MAIH helped a humanities major pave a new career as an environmental philosopher BY SHARA LEE (’17) didn ’t choose en v ironmenta l philosophy—the study of the moral relationships of human beings to the environment and its non-human contents. It chose her. In fact, when the English and philosophy major first applied to the Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Humanities (maih) program at Trinity Western University, her study aspirations leaned far more classical. “I was interested in ancient Roman plays,” she laughs. For Beresford, it was twu’s faculty coupled with the interdisciplinary aspect of the program (students can choose to concentrate in either English, philosophy, or history, but broadly study all three) that a nna ber esford m a

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allowed her to explore this non-traditional subject. “It’s hard to separate them,” says Beresford. “The faculty at twu are so passionate about what they do and have a strong love of truth. This gave me the ability to think outside the box when choosing my thesis.” Recently, Beresford was “surprised and humbled” to be accepted to the School of Environment, Resources and Sustainability at the University of Waterloo, where she will pursue her doctorate degree under Dr. Stephen Quilley. She was also awarded a $100,000 grant over four years to study the subject she loves. As for the end goal, Beresford says she would love to work in academia but ultimately wants to research ways in which humans can live in balance with nature. “I don’t believe humans are inherently selfish or greedy,” she says. “We’re also not separate from nature. This is our home, too. We should be able to live in it. Our God, who is the source of all that is good, put us here-and it wasn’t by accident.”


TWU ALUMNI

ALUMNI UPDATES We hear, time and again, that you love connecting with fellow alumni. In this issue reconnect with a published poet, blood pressure expert, and playwrights making their Fringe debut. Read more alumni stories at twualumni.org/the-column.

1973

1997

1998

MIKE GREIG is living in Kelowna, BC, but

DOUG ATHA started as full-time, tenure-

also spends part of his time on the coast in White Rock. He has been married for over 20 years and has five children. He’s now mostly retired and loves travelling. Mike is looking to connect with classmates of the 1971–1973 period. Get in touch through Alumni Relations.

track faculty in the School of Graduate Studies at TWU in August 2016. He is responsible for stream direction for the Christian Ministry and Nonprofit track of the MA Lead program. He’s very happy to be back at TWU.

2 HILARY (CARTMELL) BERGEN and her husband Marc, along with their children, Hannah and Ben, just returned from living overseas for the last four years in Jakarta, Indonesia. While there, Hilary and Marc taught at an international Christian school. They recently returned to the Fraser Valley and are setting up home in Abbotsford, BC. Hilary will be teaching sixth grade at MEI middle school starting in September.

1977 JOHN FISCHER and his wife Kathy are

busy with ministry to the homeless and the disabled. Kathy is one of the directors for the Open Door Mission in Omaha, NE, while John works with Crossroads of Western Iowa as a counsellor for the mentally and physically disabled. John would love to hear from any of his former classmates. Get in touch at: yojoefis@ frontiernet.net.

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1 FRANK KURZ says, “Our Lord continues to shower His blessings on my family. Rhonda and I celebrated the birth of our fifth grandchild, Friedrich, on March 23, 2017, and 2017 marks the 10th anniversary of the founding of the Fire Technicians Network (www.firetechs.net). With God’s help and grace, a national certification programme—Canada's first dedicated training centre for technicians engaged in inspecting, testing, and servicing buildinglife safety equipment and systems—is finally going to be realized.

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2000 GREG STEINKE, MD, MPH recently co-authored a book on reducing blood pressure, 30 Days to Natural Blood Pressure Control: The No Pressure Solution. After graduating from TWU, Greg married Heather in 2003 and went on to complete medical school and residency at Loma Linda University in California. He became a family medicine 3

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physician with a Master’s in Public Health and has been practising both clinic and hospitalist medicine since he finished his residency in 2010. He enjoys conducting health classes and seminars in areas such as smoking cessation, heart health, diabetes, and other chronic health issues many North Americans suffer from. He and Heather have two children and live in Oregon.

2007 NORMAN and ROSANNA (WOOD '09) VAN EEDEN PETERSMAN have moved to

Richmond, BC, from Vineland, ON, with their two-year-old son Elliott. Norman has begun serving as the pastor of the Vancouver Associated Presbyterian Church.

2010

How To Adult: The Musical is about their experience after graduating from university and trying to figure out how to exist in the world outside of a dorm room. The show runs Sept 8–18, 2017, at the Cultch Historic Theatre. Tickets are $14 plus membership at tickets. vancouverfringe.com.

2011 5 CLAIRE (HORTON) FITCH has had a great time travelling, investing in friendships and church, and spending time outdoors since graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing. In 2012 she went back to school and completed her Emergency Nursing Specialty at BCIT. She now holds a permanent position as an ER Registered Nurse at Langley Memorial Hospital. In August 2016 she married her wonderful husband, Chris.

2015 DAMIEN KUREK finished his last semester

in Langley in the fall of 2014, and moved with his wife Danielle to Ottawa while she attended the Laurentian Leadership Centre. After an amazing experience, they moved back to the family farm in Alberta, but not for long. Only a couple of months after graduation, Damien was offered a job at the Legislature in Regina, SK. In the meantime, they welcomed Matthew James Kurek into the family. Damien says: “TWU was an amazing part of our lives, building a strong foundation for our family, and giving me the skills I needed to succeed in the workplace and community!”

4 Theatre alumnae ELEANOR FELTON and AMY DAUER (’14) have created and are producing a new musical that will be part of the 2017 Vancouver Fringe Festival.

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Grace Williams’ (’06) laugh is full and infectious, impressing those around her with the warmth with which she approaches life. Founder, Board President, and Executive Director of Children of the Immaculate Heart—an organization that offers housing and rehabilitation to trafficked women and children—Williams exudes a warmth that is a relentlessly hopeful witness. Williams’ earliest interaction with trafficked women came in her first year at twu. “I joined Street E—now Street Light—and worked with the prostitution ministry. I only did it for a year, but when I accepted this calling six years later, I felt a sense of returning to that early foundation.” That call came on a pilgrimage through several missions in California—Williams’ home state. She heard friends share their vision to see healing for victims of trafficking. “It was just one of those moments that clicked and I thought: I want to be a part of this,” she says. She went on to found Children of the Immaculate Heart in 2013. The San Diego-based ministry is run by a collaborative team that seeks to meet the spiritual, emotional, and psychological needs of its residents. It’s a space where vulnerable former victims of trafficking can garner case support, therapy, and the medical and holistic psychiatric help needed to begin rebuilding their lives. Williams feels privileged to witness this healing every day as she supports survivors of profound trauma. “What�s broken in each of our clients is the ability to connect personally, and trust,” she explains. “Being part of rebuilding that is the best.” Nevertheless, she remains pragmatic. “We can’t fix everything for them. We can facilitate it for them, we can be here for them, provide for their needs, but they have to take ownership of that healing,” Williams says. “That’s hard to watch. There has to be a lot of flexibility and patience.” –HM

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A year of student street ministry lays the groundwork for one alumna to care for victims of human trafficking

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REKINDLING A PASSION TO REBUILD LIVES

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We want to recognize the partners who sponsored Alumni Weekend 2016 PRESENTING

S PA RTA N

S U P P O RT I N G

A D D I T I O N A L S U P P O RT E R S

Smart, Savvy & Associates, To learn more about the work of Children of the Immaculate Heart, including their new residential treatment centre for underage survivors of human trafficking, visit childrenoftheimmaculateheart.org.

Assante Financial Management, Young Real Estate Group, Com Pro Business Solutions

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LLC ALUMNI UPDATES In honour of the Laurentian Leadership Centre's 15th Anniversary, we thought we'd share a few updates from our LLC alumni! KRISTIAN (SP03) and SARAH (GOSHULAK FA02) Pederson welcomed their third child, Elijah Hughes on August 23, 2016. ANDREA BONILLA (FA04) recently relocated to Los Angeles to work at MGM as the Audience Development Manager for a new startup, LightWorkers, launching in September 2017. LightWorkers was started by Roma Downey (Touched by an Angel) and Mark Burnett (Survivor/The Voice/SharkTank) with MGM. LightWorkers has set out to inspire and brighten the world through uplifting, positive storytelling and entertainment. JOSHUA PETERS (FA06) is excited to be marrying his best friend, Alicia Swinamer, this August in Chester, NS. TWU alumni are invited to drop in on their BC reception on Sunday, August 20, 2017 at 2 pm in the Atrium at the TWU's Langley campus. They'd love to see you. RSVP to Joshua’s mom, Cathy, at ca.peters@telus.net or 604.828.2689. Professionally speaking, Joshua worked with the Vancouver International Auto Show team and pulled off their best auto show to date (March 2017), at the Vancouver Convention Centre with a record-setting 115,000+ attendees. The 98th annual Auto Show returns March 28–April 1, 2018 (contact him for tickets). RYAN LONG (SP07) and Erin have recently joined a missions organization called InnerChange, a Christian order among the poor, and will be moving to Glasgow, Scotland where their family will be ministering to their neighbors in a high poverty area. They hope to make this move in November 2017.

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DUSTIN ENGEL (FA07) lives in Calgary, AB, with his beautiful wife Maria and two sons, John and James. He works as a manager with Alberta Infrastructure and serves with the Calgary Highlanders, a Canadian Armed Forces Infantry Reserve Unit.

EVAN MENZIES (FA10) and his wife, Sarah, had their second child, Victoria Hope, on May 12, 2017.

JULIANNE YEAGER (SP08) had her second little girl last summer and is now back at work as a lawyer at Yeager Employment Law in Vancouver, BC.

MORGAN HAYDUK (SP12) says: “I am embarking on a new adventure with the Los Angeles Clippers. I am joining as a member of the Corporate Partnerships team and I am tremendously excited to be part of this exceptional NBA franchise.”

AUSTIN JEAN (FA08) has just become permanent in his position at Global Affairs Canada as a media spokesperson. His photography business continues to grow with two shows this year so far—one in Montreal, and one at Arlington Five in Ottawa (a coffee shop near the Glebe). NICOLE DEN HAAN (FA09) is not a coffee drinker, but now she tastes it all the time. She’s discovered that making coffee is like chemistry, but with taste as an added factor. She has learned the difference between an Americano and a drip, and has taken over the reins as the manager of Matchstick Coffee’s third and newest location in Vancouver, BC, on Main Street. Since starting out as a barista-intraining, she continues to consider this part of her MA recovery program and is moving from her head to her hands in the world of well-made coffee and croissants. ALEX YOUNG (SP10) and her husband, Matt, had their first baby, Georgia Rose Young, on March 8, 2017.

TARA TENG (FA 11) welcomed baby girl Skyana Ocean Anne into the world on January 29, 2017.

ALEXANDRA (VANKEVICH SP13) HUDSON is now working at the US Department of Education as special assistant to the secretary. RACHEL SIMMET (SP13) is currently in Luwero, Uganda, on a six-month contract doing social media and communications for a maternal health NGO. DANIELE NEVE and COLIN BUSCHMAN (BOTH FA13) celebrated their wedding on May 19, 2017, and are excited to start their lives together in Ottawa. As Colin continues his work on Parliament Hill, Daniele has finished her time working for the LLC and is looking forward to beginning an MA in Counselling & Spirituality at St. Paul University this September. JORDAN SCHROEDER (FA14) just finished his second year of law school at UBC and is currently working at ICBC as a summer articling student. He and his wife moved back to Langley in June 2017.


alumni weekend hr iv in gT og et he r T

September 15-16, 2017

Reconnect with old friends. Rekindle the memories. Rediscover the community that you love. Alumni Weekend is the event of the year for any TWU alum. Featuring the prestigious Alumni Distinction Awards Gala, class reunions, alumni pop-up shops, food trucks, a kidzone, and much more—this is a weekend you won’t want to miss.

twualumni.org/alumniweekend

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TWU PEOPLE JEFF GAMACHE

J

eff Gamache (�95, �09) more or less grew up in a gym. So it’s not surprising that the former Spartan and two-time alumnus was recently named director of twu’s prestigious athletics program. Born and raised in Three Hills, ab, where his dad served as athletics director of Prairie Bible Institute, Gamache was a gifted hockey player who dreamt of playing in the nhl. That dream came to an end when his parents wouldn’t allow the then-14-year-old to move away from home to pursue that sport. “I shook my fist at God,” he remembers. “I asked, ‘Why did you give me this gift if I can’t use it?’” Yet even at that age, Gamache realized that hockey had become his god. “I knew my faith couldn’t be just half way—it was all or nothing,” he says. “If it wasn’t hockey, then maybe it was something else.” At 16, he and his family moved to Quadra Island, bc, and Gamache went from a small Christian school to a large public one, where he continued to hone his basketball and volleyball skills. Ironically, it was his non-Christian guidance counsellor who first suggested Trinity Western might be a good fit. That guidance counsellor was onto something; as part of the Spartans men’s volleyball

team, Gamache won two provincial championships. He also met his future wife and fellow education major Jennifer Davies (’95) playing “roommate roulette” on a dorm date. After he graduated, Gamache—who completed his ma in Leadership at twu in 2009—served as head coach for twu’s men’s volleyball team, then as assistant coach under Ron Pike while he completed his pdp at Simon Fraser University. He then taught at Langley Christian and Mennonite Educational Institute, where he also served as vice principal. Now, he’s back at his alma mater. “Being a Spartan is in my blood,” he says. “It’s foundational to where I am today. “Being a champion is not just about winning national championships,” Gamache continues. “You can be a champion in many areas of life. Being a twu Complete Champion is about pursuing all that God has created you to be in all facets of your lives. What matters most is who we are in Christ.” -WDL To date, TWU's Complete Champion ApproachTM has produced 465 Academic All-Canadians—exceptional student athletes who maintain an academic standing of 80 per cent or better while playing varsity sports.

WENDY DELAMONT LEES

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BACK 40

ROOMS OF THEIR OWN Operation Cheakamus brought first-ever dorms to campus BY J.R. FEHR ’09 in the summer of 1962, trinity junior college (tjc) looked like little more than an abandoned farm. Overgrown vegetation and blackberry bushes covered the property, with weeds growing as high as window level in some areas. There was a long list of things that needed to be done—chief among them, providing a place for students to live. The buildings that would become the first dorms were brought to the tjc campus two years earlier through a building mover and early supporter, who saw an opportunity to provide buildings at a low cost for the proposed school. He facilitated an agreement—later dubbed Operation Cheakamus—to dismantle and re-purpose 10 buildings that had been used as part of a camp constructed for

PHOTO COURTESY TWU ARCHIVES

Constructed from pre-fabricated buildings from a former construction camp— and meant to be temporary—TWU's first-ever dorms were in use for 15 years.

the Cheakamus River Hydro-Electric installation. Two moving companies and a group of volunteers dismantled and transported the buildings, navigating through the rugged Squamish mountains. Thanks to that effort, the buildings, valued at about $25,000 in total, were donated to the school at a cost of just $137—the price of meals for volunteers. The pre-fabricated buildings sat, unfinished and unused, for two years—until tjc’s founding president, Calvin B. Hanson, arrived on campus with his family. Once again, a crew of volunteers laboured tirelessly to get the dormitories livable again, expecting they would just be temporary units. Little did they know that these dormitories would remain in use for over 15 years. Bit by bit, the farm began to resemble a school, and when classes officially started on September 17, 1962, there were 17 students enrolled. Thanks to the hard work of the pioneering crew, each of those students had a place to sleep.

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Magazine CANADA Trinity Western University 7600 Glover Road Langley, BC V2Y 1Y1

US Trinity Western University PO BOX 361, Lynden WA 98264-0361

Send requests, change of address, and/or comments to magazine@twu.ca. Share the love! Please read and pass on.

blue wolf

Acrylic on Canvas 36”x 36” by Joel Gajdos ’17

Profile for TWU

TW Magazine - Issue 28  

TW Magazine - Issue 28