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IN SP IRIN G LE ARN I N G President’s Report 2015-2016


M E SSAG E FRO M THE PRESIDENT

I

nspiring learning happens every day on the Trinity campus. It is an essential part of the Trinity experience, where students have access to exceptional faculty, abundant resources and opportunities, and a rigorous yet flexible curriculum within a diverse and healthy campus setting. It has been an exciting year of inspiring learning for me as well. During this first year of my Trinity journey, I have discovered the essence of Trinity through significant conversations on campus and with alumni around the country. It was gratifying to engage with the nearly 1,000 alumni who attended events during my 22-chapter “listening tour.” I believe that by listening and learning—by hearing the many stories that make up the Trinity experience—we can work together to build a shared vision for the future of Trinity University. I am pleased to share with you the 2015-2016 President’s Report, which offers a glimpse at some of the many outstanding accomplishments by Trinity faculty, staff, and students, and sketches our engagement with alumni and the broader community. The University has a wonderful history and is in a strong position to build upon all that has been accomplished. Our goal is to ensure that Trinity University is recognized as a leader in redefining liberal arts and sciences for the 21st century. Trinity Tomorrow, the University’s ten-year strategic plan, places us solidly on that path. One of my continuing priorities is to strengthen and align the University’s institutional identity. As I reflect on all the

C2

Trinity University

Trinity stories that I’ve gathered, I continue to come back to these pillars as the Trinity promise: • Integrated educational choices for a changing world. • Intentional spaces designed for learning and living. • Intensely individualized approaches for our entire student community. We are providing the education needed for the 21st century—for a world that is changing rapidly, for jobs that do not yet exist or have titles, for complex situations that require creative thinking, and for a meaningful life of engagement with our world. My goal is to see that we build upon the momentum Trinity has established and work together to fulfill our mission of providing a transformational educational experience. I underscore my appreciation to all members of the Trinity community for the many ways that they are inspiring learning among our students. It takes all of us working together—engaged in our community, collaborating on our projects, aligned in our goals—to make Trinity University successful. Thank you again for this tremendous opportunity to lead this extraordinary institution. I am honored and grateful for the welcome extended to me and my wife, Kimberly. Best regards, Danny J. Anderson Trinity President


CO N TE N TS

2 Inauguration of Danny J. Anderson

4 Trinity Tomorrow Update

5 University Accolades

6 Scholarship at Trinity

7 New Leadership

8 Community Engagement

10 Alumni Engagement

12 Alumni Attitude Survey Findings

14 Profile of the Trinity Student Body

16 Giving at Trinity

18 State of University Finances

20 University Boards

2016 President’s Report

1


IN S PIR IN G LEA R N IN G The Inauguration of Danny J. Anderson 19th President of Trinity University

“This event is about Trinity—about our connection to its history, our commitment to its ideals, and our confidence in its future.” – President Danny J. Anderson

Trinity Gives Back SATURDAY, FEB. 13, 2016

Trinity University’s culture of civic engagement and social responsibility was celebrated during President Anderson’s inauguration with the Trinity Gives Back volunteer day of service.

2,000

hours of community service

500

faculty, staff, student, and alumni volunteers

12

social service agencies, schools, and parks including Daily Bread Ministries, the San Antonio Food Bank, Haven for Hope, and Any Baby Can


The Great Trinity Experiment THURSDAY, FEB. 18, 2016

The Great Trinity Experiment commemorated the inauguration by holding up teaching and learning as central to the University’s mission. Students, staff, and alumni took to the front of the classrooms, reversing traditional teaching roles. The event allowed members of the Trinity community to engage in the creative, collective, and forward-looking thinking that has long been the University’s institutional signature.

23 courses* led by 61 students, alumni, and staff taught 491 Tiger participants, including faculty, staff, students, alumni, and Trinity Trustees. *including “The Art of Singing,” “Economics with a Soul,” “How San Antonio’s geology defines its water,” hand drumming, anime, coding, and homelessness

Investiture FRIDAY, FEB. 19, 2016

President Anderson was formally installed as Trinity’s 19th president during a ceremony steeped in tradition and academic pageantry. Delegates representing academic institutions from around the country joined the Trinity faculty, members of the Board of Trustees, and the greater Trinity community as participants in the official investiture. The ceremony included performances by the Trinity Chamber Singers and greetings from a variety of University and civic constituents, including San Antonio District 8 City Councilman Ron Nirenberg ’99. Watch President Anderson’s investiture and inauguration speech on the Tiger Network at live.trinity.edu.

19

Danny Anderson was inaugurated as the 19th president of Trinity University

2016 President’s Report

3


“The goal is not simply to implement a plan but to inspire true learning that aligns with the values that have sustained Trinity University since its founding and drive us to have an impact on the future.”

T R IN ITY TO M O RRO W A Strategic Road Map to the Future Trinity University is now three years into implementing Trinity Tomorrow, its ten-year strategic plan. Already, impact of the plan is taking visible roots on the Trinity campus. The plan’s core values and key features embody Trinity’s highest ideals while providing an exciting, carefully designed path for Trinity’s future that builds on its considerable strengths.

– Danny Anderson

Experiential learning: Bridging the gap between theory and practice

Productive collisions: A defining characteristic of the Trinity experience

International engagement in an increasingly connected world

Powerful touchstone experiences between students and mentors

The Center for Experiential Learning and Career Success (CELCS) was launched to substantively increase Trinity’s overall experiential learning offerings. CELCS, which includes the Office of Career Services, coordinates Trinity’s Undergraduate Summer Research Program, internships and fellowships, and servicelearning and volunteerism.

The Pathways curriculum was launched in Fall 2015 with an enhanced First-Year Experience. The six-hour credit course, considered a cornerstone of the Pathways curriculum, engages students around a topic of widespread or enduring significance through critical reading and writing, research and analysis, and discussion and presentations.

The Student Success Center (SSC) bridges efforts to integrate students’ holistic growth and development. In its first year, the SSC made significant strides to support Trinity students by offering workshops and one-onone academic coaching, helping students develop new habits that resulted in fewer failed courses, better grades, and enhanced confidence.

152

336

Pathways courses approved

Trinity’s Center for International Engagement (CIE) serves as a central home for the University’s international activities. CIE accommodates the needs of such interdisciplinary academic programs as Mexico, the Americas and Spain (MAS) and East Asian Studies at Trinity (EAST), supports Trinity’s significant population of international students and faculty, and provides leadership for cross-campus initiatives that emphasize international engagement and awareness.

120k

11

13

100

students participated in sponsored summer undergraduate research

volunteer hours completed in the San Antonio community

First-Year Experience topics

Trinity-sponsored international study and research opportunities

40

students participated in SSC workshops

students received one-on-one academic coaching

200

appointments made with SSC, 48% first-years 4

Trinity University


ACAD E M I C RAN K INGS To see progress on the implementation of the Trinity Tomorrow strategic plan, visit strategicplan.trinity.edu.

Trinity’s academic and co-curricular environment is consistently rated among the best in the nation by respected guidebooks and in higher education rankings each year, validating why Trinity University is one of the nation’s top, primarily undergraduate universities.

#1

U.S. News & World Report for Regional Universities (West) for the 24th consecutive year in 2016 Since 1992, Trinity has been recognized by U.S. News & World Report as the top college in the West.

Campus Master Plan to embody values and goals of Trinity Tomorrow A foundational initiative of Trinity Tomorrow, the University’s Campus Master Plan is now nearing completion. Developed to establish criteria that will guide decisions for enhancements, renovations, space usage, and new construction in the coming decades, the Campus Master Plan will have a lasting impact on the Trinity community. The plan will also honor Trinity’s past and look toward the future, celebrating the architectural legacy of O’Neil Ford, Trinity’s campus designer, and his commitment to innovation.

National champs

Tiger Baseball took the 2016 NCAA Division III National Championship.

29

#16

Top 25 Colleges in the South

#96

America’s Top Colleges

Surpassing Rhodes College, Southern Methodist University, Tulane University, and others, Trinity lands the #16 spot in Forbes’ Top 25 Southern Schools. (Forbes, 2016)

Checking in at #96, Trinity is listed by Forbes in the top 100 universities in the U.S. for 2016. (Forbes, 2016)

#8

America’s Most Entrepreneurial Colleges

#2

Highest median salary for graduating students

#6

20 Best Private Colleges for Merit Aid

#37

In an Aug. 2015 issue of Forbes, Trinity was listed as #8 of 50 in the best startup schools in the U.S. (Forbes, 2015)

No. 2 in Texas on the U.S. Dept. of Education’s College Scorecard.

Money magazine, 2015

100 Best Values in Private Universities Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, 2015

alumni Fulbrights since 1990, including 4 Trinity seniors in 2016.

2016 President’s Report

5


Trinity recognized Heather I. Sullivan, professor of German studies, with the Z.T. Scott Faculty Fellowship, the University’s highest award for teaching and advising.

Trinity faculty members are gifted teachers and advisers who have dedicated themselves to working closely with students in and out of the classroom.

5

“Faculty engage students’ unique interests and drive original research that is ultimately published in professionally refereed venues. There’s synergy at Trinity that inspires innovation and integration.” – Danny Anderson

P R O DU C T IV E C O LLIS IO N S

6

Trinity University

Anne Graf

Associate Professor and Information Literacy Librarian Distinguished Junior Faculty Award

Josh Schwartz

SCHOLARSHIP AT TRINITY

The scholarly productivity among the faculty at Trinity University compares impressively with that of major research universities. In laboratories, libraries, concert halls, studios, and theaters, our faculty members make significant contributions to the world of scholarship and creative activity. They enliven their classes with the most current developments in their fields. And they involve students in cutting-edge research on topics such as virtual reality, radiotherapy treatment, computational chemistry, and a humanistic understanding of the color blue.

professors received distinguished achievement awards

This fall, a new publication, IMPACT: Scholarship, Creativity, and Community Engagement at Trinity University, will showcase the contributions made by our community of teachers and mentors to in-depth research, creative arts, and diverse civic and community needs in our city, state, nation, and world. IMPACT magazine will be published in September 2016 and will also be available online at magazine.trinity.edu/impact.

Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Science Distinguished Junior Faculty Award

Diana Glawe

Associate Professor, Department of Engineering Science Distinguished Advising Award

David Ribble

Professor, Department of Biology Distinguished University, Community, and Professional Service Award

Bert Chandler

Professor, Department of Chemistry Distinguished Research, Scholarship, or Creative Work or Activity Award


N E W LE AD E RS H IP “Together we will strengthen Trinity pride, we will stand out as leaders in redefining liberal arts and sciences for the 21st century, and we will ensure the success of Trinity Tomorrow and the Pathways curriculum.” – Danny Anderson

Deneese Jones, Ph.D.

Sheryl Tynes, Ph.D.

A seasoned scholar and administrator, Deneese Jones was appointed vice president for Academic Affairs following a national search. Jones, immediate past provost at Drake University, serves as the University’s chief academic officer. She oversees all academic programs, the development and mentoring of faculty, and implementation of the University’s strategic Trinity Tomorrow plan and the Pathways curriculum. “Deneese is passionate about the value of the liberal arts and sciences. I believe she has the ability to collaboratively shape implementation of the Trinity Tomorrow strategic plan and build upon Trinity’s excellence,” Anderson said. Jones brings to Trinity an extensive, 25-year career in academia as an administrator and professor. She has published articles and books in equity pedagogy in literacy instruction, teacher education and multicultural education, and leadership development. Jones succeeds Michael Fischer, Ph.D., who served as vice president for Faculty and Student Affairs for more than 16 years. Fischer announced earlier this year that he would return to full-time teaching and research and will serve as professor of English at Trinity following a one-year academic leave.

Re-establishing the office of vice president for Student Life, President Anderson appointed an individual widely known at Trinity as a strong advocate for students. Sheryl Tynes will now serve as the University’s chief administrative officer responsible for all areas of student success, including academic support, counseling, health services and accessibility services, as well as student services, including residential life and student involvement. Previously she served as the associate vice president for Academic Affairs. In this role, Tynes has been the individual chiefly responsible for academic policies related to student life and serves as a bridge for curricular and co-curricular goals within the Trinity Tomorrow strategic plan. “Sheryl embodies the spirit of blending student affairs, academic affairs, and student services, which is the cornerstone of the strategic plan,” Anderson said. Tynes, also professor of sociology, joined the Trinity faculty in 1988. She has published numerous peer-reviewed articles related to her expertise in social welfare, social security, poverty programs, and first-generation students.

Vice President for Academic Affairs

Vice President for Student Life

Michael Bacon ’89, CFRE

Vice President for Alumni Relations and Development

Michael Bacon was appointed vice president for Alumni Relations and Development last June, bringing a strong vision, dedicated leadership, and heartfelt Tiger spirit. An experienced fundraiser, development strategist, and Trinity alumnus, Bacon is responsible for providing leadership and strategic vision to all aspects of the University’s fundraising activities and alumni engagement. Previously founder and principal partner of Bacon Lee & Associates, he brings more than 25 years’ experience as a senior-level development and external relations executive. He specializes in the creation and implementation of strategic fundraising programs including capital campaigns, major gifts, and annual giving. “Mike is a role model for Trinity alumni. He is passionate about the University, committed to alumni engagement, and brings his creativity and professional expertise to the goal of advancing the University,” Anderson said.

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EN G AGE D W IT H T H E WO RLD

KRTU 91.7 FM, Trinity’s listenersupported jazz radio station, is

40 years and will broadcast at 32,000 watts.

celebrating

Tigers continued their tradition of participation in the city-wide Fiesta San Antonio celebration.

125

years of Fiesta in San Antonio Tom Payton was named director of the Trinity University Press. Previously the Press’ associate director, Payton has a distinguished career in publishing. Payton succeeds Barbara Ras, who served as director since the Trinity Press reopened in 2002.

15

years in the Battle of the Flowers Parade

14

Trinity Fiesta medals. This year’s depicted Trinity’s Tiger balloon.

12

Trinity Tigers (and 1 LeeRoy Tiger mascot) on Trinity’s float in the Texas Cavaliers River Parade, including Danny and Kimberly Anderson

Every year Trinity University hosts a variety of lectures and other events that enrich the cultural landscape of campus as well as the broader San Antonio community. A few of the noted national and world leaders who came to the Trinity campus in 2015-16 include: JANE GOODALL

DeCoursey Lecture, co-sponsored by the Trinity University Press

ANDREW BACEVICH Maverick Lecture

KEN BURNS

Distinguished Lecture Series

FREEMAN HRABOWSKI III

MLK Jr. Commemorative Lecture, cohosted with the City of San Antonio MLK Jr. Commission

GEN. MARTIN E. DEMPSEY

Flora Cameron Lecture on Politics and Public Affairs

14

endowed lecture series

8

Trinity University

40+

countries have viewed lectures on the Tiger Network

The Trinity Market launched in March 2016 and is open 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturdays throughout the year. The Market features fresh, locally sourced food, as well as education and wellness initiatives.

49 24+ $99,932 Saturdays per year

vendors

operational grant from the USDA for farmers market promotions and programs


“Our partnership with San Antonio not only projects Trinity into the life of the city, it nurtures community engagement and provides our students with valuable opportunities to expand their learning.” – Danny Anderson

Trinity’s Health Care Administration department, ranked

#10 in health care

management by U.S. News & World Report, celebrated

50 years and 2,000

Trinity English Professor Jenny Browne was selected as the 2016-18 poet laureate for the city of San Antonio. During her tenure as San Antonio’s poet laureate she will promote literacy and the understanding of arts and culture throughout the community.

master’s-degree graduates, many of whom head some of the

The Tiger Network, providing

finest hospital and health-related

live streaming and video

operations in the country.

archives of sporting events and guest lectures, launched

L. Paige Fields, an expert on corporate governance, finance, and insurance, was named dean of the University’s School of Business. The Dick and Peggy Prassel Professor of Business Administration, Fields is committed to developing a School of Business that will strengthen Trinity’s business program while reinforcing the University’s liberal arts mission.

in September 2015 with

41,792 views to-date.

Trinity had a front row seat during the 2015 San Antonio Rock ‘n’ Roll Marathon. Trinity’s campus was mile 6 along the 26.2-mile course.

#1

Mark Greene ’14 won the race in 2 hours and 30 minutes.

66

Trinity Tigers participated in the Dean’s Half Marathon Challenge.

+200

Tigers came to cheer the marathon runners on!

857 $1,300

pounds of food and

Trinity’s MAT and School Leadership candidates will benefit from the newest professional development school for Advanced and Creative Learning. Trinity and the San Antonio Independent School District have partnered to establish the Advanced Learning Academy, a new Pre-K-10 academy for students who seek an academic challenge with greater depth, complexity, and opportunities for acceleration. The academy serves as the newest professional development school and learning laboratory for Trinity’s aspiring teachers and principals through the University’s nationally recognized Masters of Arts in Teaching and Master of Education Leadership programs.

collected for the Kayla Mire Food Drive in conjunction with the dean’s challenge.

2016 President’s Report

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ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT

LIS TE N I N G TO UR Trinity alumni had opportunities to engage with the University on several levels—from the Alumni Attitude Survey, to the Tiger Enrichment Series, to visits with President Anderson. During his first year in office, Anderson visited 22 alumni chapter cities across the country hosting receptions as part of his “listening tour.” Anderson met with nearly 1,000 alumni during the tour, where he solicited feedback about how the University can make the Trinity experience better for future generations of students and to collect stories about the impact of the Trinity experience on their lives and how it prepared them to make a difference in the world. “I wanted to connect more deeply with the Trinity essence. I believe that by listening and learning—by hearing their stories, our stories— alumni can help me shape our path,” Anderson said.

ANDERSON’S PRESIDENTIAL TOURS

Attended

Youngest Class Year

Albuquerque

27

2014

1944

Arizona

22

2001

1962

Atlanta

38

2012

1953

Austin

77

2013

1953

Bay Area

31

2015

1965

Chicago

43

2017

1972

Colorado

22

2014

1963

Dallas

95

2013

1964

Fort Worth

40

2014

1956

Houston

120

2015

1960

Los Angeles

28

2010

1975

New England

17

2014

1972

New York

45

2015

1971

Oklahoma City

31

2016

1970

Portland

26

2012

1953

San Antonio

152

2015

1944

San Diego

18

2003

1963

Seattle

31

2013

1977

St. Louis

20

2003

1962

Tennessee

29

2014

1984

Washington D.C.

50

2015

1959

West Texas

24

2007

1971

Chapter

10

Trinity University

Oldest Class Year

The listening tour gathered feedback on two questions. Here are excerpts of some of the responses:

What did Trinity do for you? “Trinity taught me how to think rationally and analytically. It exposed me to many different points of view, academic disciplines, and great minds. The highlight of my time at Trinity was the relationships I developed with all the excellent faculty.”

“Trinity gave me a sense of belonging, and a feeling that I was part of a pretty special place. It was not elitism, but I felt that I was part of something unique.”

What one thing would you like to see Trinity do? “Increase alumni engagement with well thought-out, personalized, professional outreach.”

“Maintain the highest quality faculty, and maintain the culture that has made Trinity so special for so long.”

“I appreciate Trinity being ranked #1 in the West for it seems all of history. I would hope the long-range goal is for Trinity to be a nationally recognized liberal arts leader.”

“Be bold and tireless in telling Trinity’s story.”


TIGER ENRIC HMENT SERIES

“My appreciation for the enormous pride alumni hold for Trinity has grown considerably, as I have learned a great deal about the University and its history from the people who experienced it first-hand.” – Danny Anderson

ALUMNI AMBASSADORS

Former National Alumni Board chairs and chapter presidents Carol ’83 and Dave Mansen ’76 just completed their third year as Trinity’s Alumni Ambassadors. As Alumni Ambassadors, the Mansens travel to major cities where Trinity alumni are located. They launched their visit program in Colorado in March 2014. Visits to 10 cities followed in the Southwest and West Coast, and they continued their journey to Chapter cities on the East Coast in 2015-16. Trinity’s Alumni Association is grateful for their continued engagement with alumni around the country.

The Office of Alumni Relations launched “Tiger Enrichment”—a lifelong learning webinar series to provide Trinity alumni with a continuing education service. The webinar series, currently scheduled for every other month, is designed to engage prominent alumni experts, Trinity faculty and staff, and other recognized specialists to share their expertise and research through a regular forum. President Anderson was the featured speaker for the first webinar on February 29. Anderson helped alumni see the big picture of the University as he shared his thoughts and impressions of his first year as Trinity’s 19th President. More than 85 alumni across the country attended the webinar. They greatly appreciated the opportunity to participate in a live conversation with the President. Political Science Professor David Crockett, an expert on U.S. presidential elections, was the second speaker for the series. On April 28, Crockett attempted to explain and bring clarity to the various dynamics that lie behind the fast-approaching 2016 presidential elections through his presentation “Handicapping the 2016 Presidential Race.” More than 70 alumni from four time zones attended his webinar.

Trinity launched the Tiger Network this year to provide Internet access to sporting events and academic or guest lectures for alumni, parents, friends of the University, and others unable to be present. Nothing says “Tiger Pride” like being able to be on campus even when you can’t physically be on campus – a result that can be achieved through live-streaming events. The goal of Tiger Network is to raise the profile and visibility of the Trinity campus by increasing alumni engagement and reaching a broader external community. Watch archived events, including Tiger Enrichment webinars, at live.trinity.edu.

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95%

ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT

AL U M NI AT T IT U D E S URV E Y

“Trinity graduates are articulate, independent, analytical, and insightful; they are willing to take the calculated risks required for creativity and innovation.” – Danny Anderson

18,449 surveys

1,086 responses

5.8% response rate

What is most important about being a Trinity alumna/us?

THIS IS WHAT TIGERS TOLD US ...

93%

GOOD OR EXCELLENT

TO GREAT

Trinity’s Office of Alumni Relations participated in the Alumni Attitude Study (AAS), a national, multicollege research study in Fall 2015, to develop a deeper understanding of what alumni value and to learn how the University might better engage alumni. The results of the survey, along with feedback from President Anderson’s listening tour, will help Trinity build on its lifelong connections with alumni.

RATE THEIR DECISION TO ATTEND TRINITY A GOOD DECISION

POSITIVE OPINION OF TRINITY UNIVERSITY VS. 91% OF PEERS

94%

AGREED: THE VALUE OF A TRINITY DEGREE IS THE MOST CRITICAL ASPECT AFFECTING THEIR OVERALL OPINIONS OF TRINITY

12

Trinity University


WHAT TIGERS SAID BY ERA: Woodstock/ Vietnam (Prior to 1973) are the most likely alumni to attend alumni and University events.

End of Cold War (1981-1993) see the greatest value by keeping in touch with Trinity through the Trinity magazine, alumni chapters, and monthly e-newsletter AlumNet.

Post Watergate (1974-1980) say accomplishments of alumni have the most significant impact of their overall opinion of Trinity.

<1973

1980

Affinity Group Activities

Student Recruitment

1993

Post 9/11 (2000-2008) are the most tuned into Trinity’s social media presence.

2000

National Comparisons In a national comparison, alumni have above-average perceptions of:

Mentoring Students

3

Electronic Revolution/ Dot Com (1994-2000) alumni who are the most comfortable with e-mail correspondence from the University.

WAYS ALUMNI WANT TO BECOME INVOLVED AT TRINITY

•• The value of a Trinity degree

•• Accomplishments of Trinity students

•• Trinity’s scholarship opportunities

•• Trinity’s national rankings •• Accomplishments of faculty •• Accomplishments of alumni

What Tigers said about giving to the University: The most compelling reason for Trinity alumni to give back to the University is to provide financial support to Trinity University students. This is considered very

important by every segment in this survey. The general perception among Trinity respondents, and all school respondents, too, is the people who give

to Trinity or any school tend to be people who want to give back to their alma mater, wealthy alumni, people loyal to the University, and older alumni.

Post Great Recession (after 2008) are the most likely to promote Trinity to others on a regular basis. Sixty percent of all respondents say they promote Trinity regularly.

2008

today

HOW CAN WE IMPROVE? While a majority of alumni respondents have a positive opinion of Trinity, they also indicated areas where Trinity can work to improve, including: More alumni and alumni association involvement in improving the student experience and with career mentoring. Increased opportunities for alumni who live farther from campus to participate in virtual events. Creating a more robust Trinity alumni network that includes stronger career networking for career transitions even years after graduation. Expanding Trinity’s national profile. Alumni want to know that the value of their degree is greater to them today than the day they graduated and they want to understand what the University is doing to increase that value.

2016 President’s Report

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2,278 undergraduates

206 graduate students

2,484 total students enrolled Fall 2015 52.3% female (undergraduates) 47.7% male (undergraduates) 70.5% students from Texas (undergraduates) 7.3% students from outside U.S. 66 countries represented in student body 40% students of color 1263 average SAT score 28.9 average ACT score 29 National Merit Scholars enrolled 237 students studied abroad

$29,390

average financial aid package per undergraduate student

$46.7 million

institutional financial aid awarded by Trinity University to undergraduate and graduate students

14

Trinity University


S TUD E N T P R OF I L E

T R IN IT Y W E LCO M E S G ATE S M ILLE N N IUM S CH O LAR Magdalena Blancas selects Trinity University as her college home

M

agdalena Blancas remembers the day she learned that she had been named a Gates Millennium Scholar for Trinity University’s Class of 2019. It was a Monday in April and the two other semi-finalists from Loretto Academy in El Paso, Texas, had received word via mail the previous Saturday. One had been named a scholar and the other had not. Blancas, called Maleny by family and friends, sat distracted in class. What happened to my letter, she thought. Where could it be? Unable to focus, Blancas decided to check her email. At the top of her inbox there it was. She had been named a scholar. “I stood up and screamed,” Blancas says, laughing. “I ran around the classroom, the hallways, and I went to my teachers and called my family.” When she got home after school, the letter was waiting for her. For whatever reason, it had been late. Blancas’ father presented it to her when her family went to celebrate at dinner that evening. A Gates Millennium Scholarship (GMS) Award provides support for the cost of a student’s education that is unmet after scholarships and self-help aid. Among other criteria, eligible applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.3 on an unweighted 4.0 scale or must have earned their GED,

must meet Federal Pell Grant criteria, must be a minority ethnicity, and must enroll for the first time in an accredited U.S. university or college. Since she was a child, Blancas says she has always known she was going to college. She says that her parents, alumni of the University of Texas at El Paso, were very proud when she received the news. Blancas says she chose Trinity after she went on a college “road trip tour” with her family. She immediately fell in love with the campus and was impressed by how friendly everyone was to her. “I felt at home,” Blancas says. “Even when I arrived for move-in day, it wasn’t a hard transition because everyone has always been so good to me.” As a GMS scholar, Blancas is eligible for graduate school funding in the areas of computer science, education, engineering, library science, math, public health, and science. Leadership development programs also offer opportunities for personal, academic, and professional growth. Blancas has her sights set on becoming an accounting major. She says that she is drawn to the major because her mother is a bookkeeper and because she has enjoyed helping her mother in the past. Jane Johns, the junior and senior counselor at Loretto Academy, says that Blancas

has an admirable work ethic and is a very honest person. She says that Blancas was a calculus tutor at Loretto and that underclassmen really valued Blancas’ instruction. “Kids requested Magdalena, who would be at tutoring every day without prompting,” Johns says. “She got their phone numbers, calling them and encouraging them to come.” In her first year on campus, Blancas took “Inventing Mexico” for her First-Year Experience, which she says already taught her more about her own culture. She also took courses in microeconomics, accounting, and religion in the United States. Blancas says that she has become fast friends with her suitemates, all from different Texas cities, and her hallmates. She adds that what she is most excited about college is making friends and meeting people from different cultures. Since 2012, Trinity University has welcomed seven Gates Millennium Scholars. The GMS program is funded by a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to provide outstanding African American, American Indian/Alaska Native, Pacific Islander, Asian American, and Hispanic American students with significant financial need to complete an undergraduate education in any area of interest and graduate studies in specific areas of study.

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G IV IN G I M PACT

Trinity University Business Affiliates chair John Malitz ’75, Malitz Construction, received a Trinity Fiesta medal from President Anderson at the Networking and Appreciation Reception this spring. More than 50 corporations and foundations partner with Trinity through the Business Affiliates program by providing scholarship support to Trinity students.

“This school has given me opportunities beyond what I thought was even possible. Every person on Trinity’s staff, has lifted me to believe that I can accomplish anything I set my mind to. Your family, one of many generous alumni families, only furthers my belief that Trinity University is the greatest educational institution on the planet.” – Chloe Bales ’16, Lubbock, TX upon receipt of the Gilbert Cuellar Jr. ’76 Endowed Scholarship

Providing the Trinity experience that establishes a lifelong journey of discovery and growth would not be possible without the generosity of alumni, friends, parents, faculty, staff, businesses, and foundations. Your gift to the University supports a variety of efforts that make the Trinity experience rich, rewarding, and life- and mind-changing, including: scholarships for deserving students, research or teaching resources for dedicated and innovative faculty, exceptional academic programs, and so much more.

Legacy Scholarship

Senior Associates Herb Stumberg ’81 and Mary Pat Stumberg meet Ana Ruiz ’16 at the Scholarship Reception. Senior Associates annually have an opportunity to meet the students who benefit from their generosity. Unrestricted gifts like these have an immediate impact on the campus and provide much needed scholarship funding to outstanding students.

Marina Schweitzer ’19 is a third-generation Tiger. “My mother and grandmother are Trinity alumnae, so Trinity has always been a big part of my family,” Schweitzer said. After visiting a number of colleges, the potential communication major chose Trinity primarily because of the opportunities the University offered for her area of study. She was one of several students this year to receive the Trinity University Legacy Scholarship. Launched in 2013 through a gift by Trinity Trustee and alumnus Steve Mach ’92 and the Mach family, the scholarship honors Trinity’s strong tradition of generations of families sharing in the Trinity journey. Scholarships are awarded to students who are children, stepchildren, or are direct lineage grandchildren of those who hold degrees from Trinity.

51

students have received this scholarship since 2014, and 33 will be receiving the scholarship this fall. 16

Trinity University


FIVE-YEAR GIVING TOTALS

$13.6M

$12.0M

6,000 Donors

5,803

5,604

$13.5M

5,845

$10.9M 5,981

$11.4M 6,079

Total Number of Donors

4,000

2,000

0

1,347

1,444

1,563

1,726

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

14.5%

13.7%

14.9%

15.7%

15.0%

1,522

DONORS BY THE NUMBERS

6,079 donors

$11.4M raised in gifts and pledges

Number of New Donors

Percentage of Undergrad Donors

24-HOUR CHALLENGE SPARKS RECORD SINGLE DAY OF GIVING On Oct. 28, 2015, Trinity challenged alumni, faculty, staff, parents, and students to take part in the first ever Trinity University 24-Hour Giving Challenge. To encourage participation, a group of anonymous donors pledged to donate $24,000 if the Trinity community was able to make 480 donations in 24 hours. While many other top universities have held similar challenges, Trinity had never attempted anything like it before. The support from the Trinity community on Challenge Day grew quickly, setting a high bar for our highest single day of giving on record. Trinity twice increased its goal for the number of gifts because of the generosity of our donors.

855

donors combined for

895 donations. More than 100 gifts made by current Trinity students.

Organizations

3,304

Alumni

$5,059,036

1,099

Friends

$3,142,619

Alumni

931

Parents

$1,464,392

Parents

300

Organizations

$805,519

Friends

258

Students

$779,055

Estates / Trusts

171

Faculty / Staff

$103,319

Faculty / Staff

16

Estates / Trusts

$4,635

Current Students

Donations spanned almost

8 decades of Trinity

graduates including alumni from the early 1940s. Gifts for Trinity totaled almost

$160,000.* *including the match

2016 Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report

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Trinity University


Students Key Beneficiaries of Trinity Endowment

FINANC IA LS The University has established a strong tradition of conservative and balanced budgeting as part of sound financial planning. Highlights from the 2015-16 audited financial statements include: • Net tuition revenue increased by 2%. • Gifts supporting operations increased by 19%. • The endowment distribution for FY 2015-16 was $38.4 million and distributions from Funds Held in Trust by Others was $6.8 million. • Net income from operating activities equaled $5.7 million against a budget of $5.4 million. • Expenses include compensation increases reflecting our continued focus on maintaining competitive faculty and staff compensation as well as additional funding for the Trinity Tomorrow strategic plan initiatives.

2015-16 REVENUE

$128,877,296

$43,937,927

Tuition Revenue, Net

$45,887,690

Investment Income

$22,165,782

Auxiliary Enterprises

$5,709,468

Grant Revenue

$5,472,140

Other Income

$5,704,289

Contributions

2015-16 FUNCTIONAL EXPENSES

$123,211,446

$44,458,692

Instructional Services and Research

$28,397,023

Institutional Support

$20,083,201

Student Services

$14,645,324

Auxiliary Enterprises

$12,988,244

Academic Support

$2,638,962

Public Service

University responds to congressional questions regarding endowment’s role in higher education On March 2, the U.S. Congress instructed Trinity and 56 other private colleges and universities to respond to 13 questions about their endowments. The Senate Committee on Finance and the House Committee on Ways and Means sought detailed information on how the University manages and uses its endowment to deliver on its educational mission. Trinity’s endowment, valued at $1.14 billion as of May 31, 2015, supports student financial aid, student and faculty scholarship, and other operational costs. It also ensures Trinity’s margin of excellence. The endowment has allowed the University to develop quality programs, recruit eminent faculty, maintain the best facilities, and deliver greater value to students than would be possible with tuition dollars alone. In fiscal year 2014-15, endowment revenue contributed 35 percent of the University’s operating budget, essentially subsidizing every student’s Trinity experience— even students who pay full tuition. Beyond the numbers or statistical points of comparison, the endowment is an investment in students and faculty. In a letter and detailed response to the committees’ questions, President Anderson describes “the critical importance Trinity’s endowment makes in the University’s historic quest to provide a high-quality education to generations of students at an affordable price.” Read the full letter and response at gotu.us/EndowmentResponse.

2016 President’s Report

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TRINIT Y U N IV E R S ITY BO ARD S BOARD OF TRUSTEES

Sharon J. Bell Ted W. Beneski Walter F. Brown Jr. Clifford M. Buchholz ’65 Miles C. Cortez ’64 Douglas D. Hawthorne ’69, ’72 Gen. James T. Hill ’68 George C. Hixon ’64 Walter R. Huntley Jr. ’71, ’73 John R. (J. R.) Hurd E. Carey Joullian IV ’82 Rev. Dr. Richard R. Kannwischer ’95 Richard M. Kleberg III ’65 Dr. Katherine Wood Klinger ’72 John C. Korbell Oliver T.W. Lee ’93 Steven P. Mach ’92 Robert S. McClane ’61 Melody Boone Meyer ’79 Marshall B. Miller Jr. Michael F. Neidorff ‘65 Thomas R. Semmes Paul H. Smith L. Herbert Stumberg Jr. ’81 Jessica Thorne ’91 Lissa Walls ’80 ADVISERS Leslie Hollingsworth ’88 Alumni Adviser

Rev. James Freeman ’83

Synod of the Sun Representative

NATIONAL ALUMNI BOARD Erin Baker ’99 Sean Benton ’10, ’11 Tina Kaye Bird ’88 Jeremy Boyce ’03 Carolyn Wease Brown ’61, ’68 Amy Turlington Chambers ’89 Mark Cheng ’01 Colin Chapman ’90 Michelle Lippman Collette ’06 Doug Conyers ’97 Jeanne McGee Culver ’82 Mary Downey ’80 Carol Wright Folbre ’81 Cesar Giralt ’07 Jill Garrison Grace ’85 Leslie Hollingsworth ’88 Tracy Holmes ’84 Kay Smith Jordan ’64 Lindsay Anhold Lew ’97 Mark Montalbano ’95 Patricia Phalen Pringle ’88 Patrick Pringle ’87 James Sanders ’98 Becky Sweet Schweers ’58, ’85 Adam Simmons ’09, ’10 Frank Shiels ’80 Nick Shockey ’09 Terris Tiller ’00 Chris Warren ’78 Alyson Rose-Wood ’03 Anne Walthall Wright ’74 Ann Carpenter Zuk ’79 FACULTY LIAISONS Jennifer Henderson Amer Kaissi

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Trinity University

2015-2016

BOARD OF VISITORS

April A. Ancira ’02 Michael A. Bacon ’89 George P. Becknell Lyn H. Belisle ’72 Jack Beigler Sardar Biglari ’99 James M. Blakemore ’77 Alexander Briseño ’71 John E. Dudley ’66 Thomas E. Evans ’84 Dr. Homero R. Garza ’71 C. Hays Glover III, ’77 Charles L. Gottsman ’69 Marshall Hess ’88 William C. Huber ’88 Dr. Victoria Jennings ’67 Peter Louis Jennings ’64 Erik L. Johnsen ’79 Christopher M. Kinsey ’79 Carolyn H. Labatt David Maloney Tammie Maloney Todd McCracken ’88 B. David McGanity ’76 Joe C. McKinney ’92 Lawrence P. Moon ’76 Heather M. Morlang Pummill ’98 Manuel Pelaez-Prada ’97 Helen Hogan Perkins ’57 Linda Tarpley Peterson ’66 Donald R. Philbin Jr. ’84 Denny M. Post ’78 Col. William D. Rasco Dr. Christine C. Renier Michael J.C. Roth Dr. Katharine C. Schlosberg ’82 Cynthia L. Schluter ’88 Thomas Schluter ’85 Robert N. Shaw ’69, ’72 Sebastien Solar ’05 The Honorable Polly Spencer Barbara Anne Stephens ’66 Maj. Gen. William K. Suter ’59 Dr. Scott Wheeler Tinker ’82 Dr. Ana Unruh Cohen ’96 William S. Von Behren ’78 Scott G. Walker ’70 Lora K. Watts ’79 Philip A. Wetz ’73


“Life’s persistent and most urgent question is ‘What are you doing for others?’” – Martin Luther King Jr.

TH AN K YO U! Trinity donors make a Trinity education possible.

Access Trinity’s Donor Honor Roll online at donors.trinity.edu

64%

of the cost to deliver a Trinity education is covered by tuition dollars. The remaining expenses are covered by donations and endowment interest.

59%

of all alumni gifts are under $100. Every gift is appreciated!


Office of the President One Trinity Place San Antonio, TX 78212-7200 RETURN SERVICE REQUESTED

“We are connected to a remarkable past. We are committed to an ambitious mission. Therefore, let us move into the future with confidence. Let us gain energy from accepting our freedom and responsibility to share our future, to re-invent Trinity University.”

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Trinity University

– President Danny J. Anderson

Trinity University President's Report, 2015-2016