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Corona del Mar High School v Volume 52 v Issue 4 v February 2014

The Hashtag Movement pg. 10

Daily Hashtags pg. 14

Era of Narcissism

Hashtag

pg. 2 6


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Editor’s Note:

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Sup CdM! Congrats, you’ve made it through half the year. Yeah, we know you’d rather it be over now, but we here at Trident Online are still going strong. Yeah CdM, we’re still here. And we want you to visit our site! The entire Trident staff works tirelessly to bring you articles, photos, and videos. So come watch some of broadcast’s finests, read some articles about whats going on at school, or look at some sports shots. Just do it! From your Online Editors, Liz & Emma

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From the Staff Editors’ Note Dear Trident Reader,

Whether we’re in line at a grocery store or taking an Instagram photo of a scrumptious lunch (ready to hashtag #dank), we use hashtags nonstop. As social media has exploded in popularity, hashtags have become a wildly popular way of expression among CdM students. In the Hashtag Issue, the Trident staff explores the variety of hashtag uses, and how social media has affected the Millennium Generation, or what many call the “App Generation.” In this issue, you can read about how hashtagging has completely changed our modes of expression, inside and outside of social media. Delve into the spirit of #love (page 6) or learn about the cycle of hashtags—and how they only live once (page 17). Even though most of us cannot last a day without our favorite social media sites and our hashtags, that’s just another unique trait of our generation. It’s February, the month of love, so #love away, feel #blessed, take #selfies, and don’t forget to hashtag. #WeLoveYou,

Rafah & Amanda

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FEATURE 06 08 09 10 12 13 14 15

Love

16

Shred

17

The Cycle of Hashtags

18

Fashion and Beauty

20

Photography

21

Seniors and Their Hashtags

ATHLETICS

Selfie Hashtag The Hashtag Movement BFFL Procrastination Daily Hashtags

22 23

Life on the Court Super Bowl

ENTERTAINMENT

24 25

Coffee Shops & Computers Chicago P.D.

TECHNOLOGY

Celebs

26 27

Era of Narcissism The Science of Sleep

GLOBAL

Pg. 24

28 30

Hashtags Around the World Illuminati

CONTENTS

February

2014

Hashtag Issue

CAMPUS LIFE


#l ove T M he

ost

Popular Instagram Hashtag of 2013

W

hen a large group of students were asked what they thought the most commonly used hashtag on Instagram is, not a single student guessed #love. The majority of students guessed it was either #blessed, #tbt, or #selfie. When junior Chance Sneary was told the most used hashtag of 2013 was #love, he said, “#love? Really? That’s surprising I’ve never actually seen someone hashtag love before.” The majority of students had the same reaction as Sneary. Many students questioned why #love was so popular considering hardly anyone from CdM has seen it on their Instagram News Feed. Hashtags.org defines #love as something that “may refer to romance, relationships, familial love and any person, thing, situation or event that makes you feel giddy inside.” Often it is said that the word love is used too often, and the fact that #love is the most commonly used hashtag perfectly exemplifies this theory. If our society uses the word love in such excess, does it detract from the true meaning of the word? Well, there are many underlying meanings in the expression “I love you.” When one says those three words to a friend of theirs, the hidden expression is “I love you as a friend.” Saying, “I love you” to a friend is much different than saying “I love you” to someone with whom one is romantically involved. Because the two contexts are so different, overusing

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February 2014

article by Maddie Tenebaum


FEATURE #lovewhereilive the word “I love you” in a casual situation does not detract from the romantic definition. The contrasting relationship between the two contexts of “I love you” is perfectly exemplified by the following situation. Often relationships sprout from close friendships. The two people may have casually said, “I love you (as a friend)” before the romance developed. Once a relationship starts, the two people most likely would stop saying, “I love you” until a deep romantic connection thoroughly blossoms. “I think saying ‘I love you’ encompasses that gut-feeling, which is what love really is,” said junior Brandon Huang. Often society looks at the words “I love you,” as a declaration of a serious relationship. If one says, “I love you” too early in the relationship it can be the kiss of death. “I think couples should wait to say ‘I love you’ until both people are over the stage of lust and desire. You should know that you love them for both their inner and outer selves,” said junior Natasha Urakhchina. To contrast this idea, senior Nicola Kundanmal stated, “I think that it honestly doesn’t matter if it’s “real” love or not. If someone is compelled to say those words, they are obviously feeling

“Couples should wait to say ‘i love you’ until both people are over the stage of desire.”

—Natasha Urakhchina

strongly and will most likely reach the “real” point soon enough, if they weren’t there to begin with.” Whether you’re using the word love in a formal or casual context, don’t be afraid to overuse it. If you have the gut feeling and feel giddy towards a person or thing, just simply say you love it. It’s much easier to love something than to hate it. People often even sarcastically say “I love them” to avoid saying they dislike someone. In addition to expressing an emotional connection, love is often used to describe locations and scenic views. A hashtag that is commonly used among CdM students is #lovewhereilive. This hashtag is the cliché way to caption a sunset picture. Next time you’re at Big Corona, snap a picture of the sunset and add the typical hashtag. If you want to be even more “Newport Beach” add #blessed to the caption as well. This Valentine’s Day spread the love, even if you don’t have a significant other. Let’s keep #love as the number one most used hashtag on Instagram.

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photos by Amanda Penna (l), Maddie Tenebaum (r)

TRIDENT

February 2014


FEATURE

#

s

e

l f

i

e

The Social Media Driven Teenage Craze

O

ur social media driven youth continues to shock the populous with the development of yet another slang term; the selfie. A selfie, according to Urban Dictionary, is a picture one takes of themselves with an outstretched arm, usually planned to be uploaded to a form of social networking. The selfie, which has been incredulously declared an official word in 2013 by Oxford dictionary, has transformed immensely into an iconic symbol of present day pop culture. The first widespread usage of selfie-styled photography was the MySpace picture circa 2005. This photograph, typically set in a bathroom mirror with a flash glared self-portrait, seemed to fade out with the emergence of the more formal Facebook profile picture as the decade proceeded. It wasn’t until 2010 when developing technology caused the revival of selfies that our current idea of a selfie began to form. Apple’s design of the iPhone 4 and its utilization of a front facing camera completely revolutionized the process. This easier mode of capturing a shot of yourself, and the growing popularity of applications (primarily Instagram), ushered in the current age of selfies. Recently, Apple has designed their latest iPhone 5s with a clearer and sharper selfie camera, equipped with outstanding clarity. Also, modern apps such as Snapchat have made the selfie a necessity, rather than an option, for application usage. With Snapchat, selfies aren’t used as a cheesy profile picture, but merely as an entertaining or funny image to send to your friends. The eruption of Snapchat has created deviations from the selfie’s first purpose of MySpace appeal. These variations has revolutionized the selfie in many aspects. “It seems as if condescending older people tend to think teenagers are naive for taking selfies,” stated junior Natalie Wilde, “I completely disagree with their dismissal of the selfie. It is just an easier way to take a picture if there is no one available to capture it,” Wilde added The modernized term of the selfie has come to include the

“group selfie” or taking a picture of a cluster of people with the front facing camera of a phone. It is no longer a self portrait, but an image of a group of people. Does that make it any more socially acceptable? “If I’m with a few of my friends and everyone wants to be in the picture, it tends to be the only option,” Wilde explained. “You’ve got to do what you’ve got to do; everyone does it anyways.” Even though Teenvogue says that 91% of teens have posted a selfie, these pictures aren’t solely reserved for narcissistic adolescents. Many celebrities and icons have taken a part of the selfie craze, with Miley Cyrus leading the ranks with over 120 selfies. Political and religious figures such as President Barrack Obama and the Pope have also partaken in the act. Taking seflies is an inevitable growing trend with pictures featuring the hashtag #selfie on Instagram at over 70,000,000 posts. Variations of #selfie has sparked events such as #selfiesunday where girls (or boys) post pictures of themselves on Instagram under this hashtag. #Selfie has also led to a more drastic current event, the #selfieolympics. The Selfie Olympics is the first fad of social media in 2014. This trend is one where celebrities and average people can post pictures of them in their most extreme selfie taking pose. There is no clear way to win, but the goal is to take the most ridiculous and out of the box selfie possible. The Selfie Olympics aren’t limited to Instagram, and also come equipped with their own Twitter handle. “How strong is your selfie game?” The Twitter bio asks the billions of social networking obsessed humans. The development of the selfie portrays the immense power that a little bit of creative thought and a lot of social media has over society. For the acceptance of a once judged activity to become so widespread, social media’s power of control and manipulation is clearly mammoth. As a society, we are constantly learning and accepting new trends. So even though we are a technology, hashtag, and selfie crazed generation, we are inventing and discovering new techniques one step at a time.

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February 2014

article & photo by Krista Schildwachter


FEATURE

#Hashtag

The Evolution of the Hashtag

I

n a world revolving around social media, it is hard to imagine that some people do not understand what a hashtag is or how they work. Most CDM students probably use hashtags at least one a week. But where did the hashtag start? Who began the whole hashtag craze? Starting at the very basics, a hashtag is a word or phrase that is proceeded with a hash mark or pound sign (#) and used to identify messages on a specific topic. By using a hashtag it allows the photo, tweet, post, etc. to be searchable using the same hashtag. Some of the top hashtags are #friends, #tbt, and #love. The hashtag actually started as a pound sign, used on many cell phones and dial pads, and then Twitter began using it. The first ever hashtag was #barcamp posted by Chris Messina in August of 2007. The tweet read, “How do you feel about using # (pound) in groups. As in #barcamp [msg]?” Initially, Twitter founder, Evan Williams, told Messina that hashtags were too nerdy. Because of this one

Instagram is one of the most common social media sites where hashtags are used. Most CdM students have an Instagram.

‘too nerdy’, individual tweet, people all around the world are using hashtags to communicate with people everywhere. After hashtags proved to be successful, other social media websites and apps begun to use the hashtag. One example of this is a photo taken by freshman JT Russell, when the CdM football team won Battle of the Bay. His caption stated, “Looks like we own it now. #BOTB #weownit” One social media website that uses hashtags often is Instagram. On Instagram the user takes a photo, write a caption for the photo, and post it so all of the user’s followers can like and comment on it. Using hashtags also add the photo, to an archive of photos with the same hashtag as. When searching #selfie, the user gets access to tons of other photos of people taking a picture of themselves. Even though it seems like such a simple act, using a hashtag adds to the world of never ending hashtags. So, next time a hashtag is used, remember where it all came from and where it started.

Helpful Tips While Using Hashtags 1.

Be relevant: If you tag a photo #photo it won’t make your picture stand out. But if you use something like #CdM you might attract more followers. Be creative: By using #Seadm instead of #cdm while at the Corona del Mar state beach you might also attract more followers as well as likes, favorites, etc. Don’t over do it: Once you start using hashtags more often, you might start to use them more and more, and once you notice you will be starting to write full sentences in hashtag. Be observant: If there is a certain hashtag craze going on you could add the hashtag to your most recent post to have more people look at your posts. Be Yourself: Last but not least, forget about the top four tips and do what you want to do.

2. 3. 4. 5.

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article & photo by Nick Snyder

TRIDENT

February 2014


FEATURE

The

Hashtag

M ovement

H

Why Do Hashtags Matter?

ashtags are like bangs; some can pull them off, while others (ehem, Facebook) cannot. In all seriousness, hashtags have become one of the most common methods of expression in the social media world. Used to connect posts with a common topic, hashtags are the internet’s new sensation, and are attached to nearly every post on social media sites like Twitter (who was the first to embrace hashtags). But hashtags have been significantly more popular on some social media sites than others. For example, hashtags have elemental to the success of social media like Twitter and Instagram, but have actually negatively affected Facebook. Hashtags were popularized on the premise of connecting like posts among an (often) unlike audience. This ideal meshes perfectly Posts tagged with with Twitter and Instagram’s forums hashtags on Facebook because these social media sites are designed for public exposure. In other actually decrease in words, users of these sites expect (and popularity, and are want) their posts to, at some extent, less likely to go viral. become public—especially when a hashtag is used. Twitter and Instagram allow users to connect with stores, celebrities, businesses—and hashtags do well to connect posts among such a diverse audience. Similarly, Tumblr and Pinterest users primarily interact with strangers, whose profiles are mostly anonymous (in terms of personal information). Tumblr and Pinterest connections are connected based on the contents of each profile rather than the identity of the profile’s creator. That’s why hashtags, which connect posts and profiles of similar content

together, work with these websites. With Facebook, on the other hand, users expect to mainly interact with their existing friends and family, or perhaps mutual friends. Facebook isn’t a forum to meet strangers and share recipes or craft ideas. Facebook isn’t a forum to directly follow celebrities and publicly reach out to them. Facebook users have typically been encouraged to maintain the highest level of privacy, because if you want to interact with someone on Facebook, you’re already friends with them; it’s not often considered a public place to share and find new people to talk to. Hashtags essentially contrast the essence of privacy (since they share your post for the public to view), and this is problematic for Facebook. So problematic that, according to Facebook analytics firm EdgeRank Checker, posts tagged with hashtags on Facebook actually decrease in popularity and are less likely to go viral. (Not to mention that they’re typically obnoxiously and irrelevantly used. Maybe it’s a sign that all social networking sites should just stick to the one thing they do best.) Many students found Facebook hashtags ineffective. “I think hashtags on Facebook are useless. I’ve never seen anybody use it unless they’re being sarcastic,” said senior Shiva Mizani. Not only have hashtags revolutionized the social media culture, but their influence has spilled over into our everyday lives, especially in advertisements. Hashtags provide the perfect, cost-free way to involve consumers in marketing, since the hashtag is essentially publicity for the brand. During the 2013 Super Bowl (the most watched television event of the year, and undoubtedly the best exhibit of commercials in one show), 50% of commercials implemented a hashtag, the most

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February 2014

article by Rafah Ali


FEATURE

Top: Facebook’s implementation of hashtag has spurred many comical internet ‘memes’ like this one above. Left: Senior Allen Chen is commonly heard talking about hashtags and exclaiming, “#HRC!”

popular of which were #Doritos, #CalvinKlein, and #TheKiss (taken from GoDaddy’s infamous commercial). Outside of the Super Bowl, though, countless commercials air with a catchy hashtag relating to either the commercial or the brand. TV shows have implemented hashtags slightly differently. Oftentimes shows use their hashtags to promote the show generically like #BreakingBad, #Bachelorette, or #SNL. On the other hand, some shows use hashtags periodically throughout the show depending on the content of the scene, like Pretty Little Liars’ #PoorSpencer or #MonaKnows. This type of hashtag use not only engages viewers, but connects viewers across the world, giving fans a new way to interact with other fans. Hashtags have undoubtedly changed the way consumers and merchants interact, and as all successful business tactics are, hashtags have been chased down and utilized by nearly every industry. In the grand scheme of things, the fact that hashtags are such a prominent aspect of our lives says a lot about the current teenage generation— sometimes called the iGeneration. Hashtags seem to draw a bold, black line between our parents’ generation and ours, showing that the ideals of today’s teenagers have changed radically from that of the past generations. “I’ve tried to explain hashtags to my parents, but they don’t understand why you need to put a hashtag. They think I’m crazy when I use hashtags,” said senior Allen Chen. Our parents (or at least my mom) will never quite understand the harmless nature of a hideous #selfie on Snapchat (it’s going to be deleted forever in three seconds, mom, and no, my face isn’t going to stay like this). Nor will non-social media users

understand the appeal of getting the most likes possible on each photo—another popular use for hashtags. The ten most popular hashtags are perhaps most revealing of our generation and hashtag use in general. Six of the top ten were a sort of self-endorsement—#me, #like, #follow, #cute, #followme, and #tagsforlikes. At the end of each post, many people include a long series of selfendorsing hashtags (meaning ten or fifteen), like the ones on the right—just to get more ‘likes’ from he en ost strangers browsing those hashtags. Which brings me to ommon ashtags the conclusion that, as 1. #love a generation, we’re a bit narcissistic. We crave 2. #instagood ‘likes.’ We crave attention. 3. #me We use hashtags to get both. Perhaps justifiably 4. #like so, for we live in an age 5. #follow of constant posts all competing for limited 6. #cute attention. In the age of 7. #photooftheday aggressively pursued individuality, I suppose 8. #tbt it seems appropriate that 9. #followme our generation would use hashtags to try to fit 10. #tagsforlikes themselves into the public eye—something our parents’ generation rarely did. Regardless of the generation gap, it’s clear that hashtags are becoming increasingly popular around the world. Who knows what the internet’s next fad will be?

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photo by Rafah Ali

TRIDENT

February 2014


FEATURE

#bffl

F

This Month Celebrates Best Friends for Life

ebruary is a month where we celebrate love and happiness, but sometimes in that mess of emotions, we forget the people who have always had our backs: our best friends. This month, amiability will not go unrecognized. During February, the world can put their differences aside and join together in the celebration of International Friendship Month. The hashtag #bffl, or “best friends for life,” has become popular on all methods of social media. Often, people will tag a photo with this hashtag when they are posing for a selfie with their best friends. On Instagram, nearly 800,000 posts have been tagged #bffl. This is also a very popular hashtag on both Twitter and Facebook. The best way to show a friend you care about them is by being the best friend you can be in return. A friendly gesture, or even a courteous compliment, can go a long way. Throughout the month, try to rekindle your old friendships and enjoy the healthy relationships that you have developed. “I can always count on my best friends to be there for me,” said freshman Jodi Parker. When friends work together as a team, the sky is the limit with what they can accomplish. For instance, in the Harry Potter series, three best friends Ron, Harry, and Hermione work together to battle all the evil forces of dark magic. Each friend possesses unique characteristics or abilities that benefit the team in multiple life-threatening situations. Their impenetrable bond and great teamwork keep them and the people they care about alive. As individuals, their vulnerability makes them easy targets for Voldemort and the Death Eaters, but when united, they are unstoppable. In athletics, when the members of a

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February 2014

Freshmen Julia Shard, Jodi Parker, Brooke Gelgand, Gabby Lau, Katie McCullough, and McKyla Beuttler have been best friends since elementary school..

team fail to collaborate and do not work well together, the whole team falls apart. This month, get to know the members of your team and try new team bonding activities to bring you even closer. Trust and teamwork are two of the most important aspects of a healthy friendship and a successful team. International Friendship month gives friends the perfect opportunity to grow closer than ever before. In some special cases, best friends grow so close that they develop a form of best friend telepathy. These friends can sometimes read each other’s minds just by making eye contact across the room. They typically work very efficiently together. For example, in the Disney movie Monsters Inc., best friends Mike Wazowski and Sulley are the recordholding dynamic duo when it comes to scaring. Even when these two monsters run into some rough patches in their friendship, involving a human child, an evil monster or two, and getting banished to the icy tundra, the trusty partnership still pulls through and manages to

improve the workplace for all their monsters co-workers as a result. When friends put their heads together to work toward a common goal, the possibilities of what they can accomplish are endless. One of the most selfless forms of friendship is to volunteer for those who are less fortunate. Once you learn to be a friend to someone who is in need, the true meaning of February will be clear to you. Sure February is a month about love, but love can be expressed in many different ways. For example, if you love soccer, then organize a drive to collect used soccer gear to send to kids in a third world country. The feeling you get when you volunteer to help others is unforgettable and who knows, maybe you will find a new best friend, thousands of miles away. They may be annoying and embarrass us on occasion, but our friends can bring out the best in us. A best friend is someone who can always cheer you up, always make you laugh, and always make you want to post a hilarious selfie with them on Instagram. Don’t forget to tag it #bffl.

article by Hannah Schoenbaum photo courtesy of Jodi Parker


FEATURE

#Procrastination

Too Bad the Flu Shot Can’t Cure Senioritis.

A

word of forewarning, this very article was submitted late into “Trident News,” which portrays the unfortunate irony of the way almost every senior does their work. The closer this school year is to coming to a close, the more widespread the cases of “senioritis” become; and if nothing is done to help prevent the spread of this highly contagious illness of personal well-being, then many students will suffer in the longterm. Some students have claimed to just stop caring and say that they are excited for the first semester to come to a close. Senior Harrison Yale said, “Once second semester starts, the rest of high school should be easy. I just can’t wait to finish my finals.” The disease is quite widely spread affecting groups in all walks of life on campus, even in those that most would assume are trying to excel in their classes. Senior Jared Eckenweiler said, “I didn’t

Left: Juniors Nicole Lloyd and Mclain Campbell check their cell phones instead of working in ASB. Above: Senior Kris Beyrooty checks Facebook, realizing his class is empty classs due to a “senior ditch day.” Looks like the rest of the seniors in his class are procrastinating.

even know that I had a test in my AP Government class today.” The sad truth comes out in every student at CdM.

“Once second semester starts, the rest of high school should be easy.”

—Harrison Yale Most of students’ time is spent online, wasted on websites like Facebook and Youtube, instead of studying for important classes that will have a major effect on their future. One website, “theuselessweb.com” seems like it was dedicated to students that suffer from procrastination. It offers a wide variety of websites at the click of the

mouse. The simple layout of the website only has one button that says: “Take me to a useless website please” and from there a student could spend hours looking at hundreds of different absolutely pointless websites. Some students at Corona del Mar claim to enjoy these online destinations. Junior Patrick Ong said, “I love these websites, they are my favorite because they are hilarious.” The power of procrastination must be quelled in order to help the future of most students at Corona del Mar. Some say that it has gone too far and completely demotivated them. Senioritis is such a powerful illness to some that even one student, senior Raymond Zhu said, “I just want to lay down and cry after school sometimes.” Hopefully scientists can cure the disease before it consumes all of the seniors on our campus, and it is too late to turn back. All the hope of humanity rests in the balance of what most assume to be legitimate hard work.

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article & photos by Kyle Rodewald

TRIDENT

February 2014


FEATURE

Daily Hashtags

A Hashtag For Every Day of the Week

A

dmit it, it’s something we all have grown to love to do—hashtagging. In shorter terms, a hashtag is used to express a funny word or phrase that relates to a picture or status, which is started by putting a “number sign” in front of it. While doing your hourly checks between Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter you will quickly find a common hashtag or two for that specific day. These usual daily phrases can be shown in two different ways; one form is to shorten or abbreviate it to a few letters, like “#tbt.” Another form is to actually spell it out, like “#throwbackthursday.” In all shapes and forms, social media seems to let people know exactly what day it is, solely based on what the “Hashtag of the day” is. It’s a muggy Monday morning; your eyes are still hazy and squinted, as you try to take a quick peek at your InstaFeed. Miraculously, your eyes seem to re-adjust and be wide-open to see picture after picture of Ryan Gosling, Channing Tatum, and Zac Efron. All these pictures started with the common hashtag, “#mancrushmonday.” Celebrities, singers, TV show stars, and models fill-up all of Instagram, as people showcase who is their leading “dream” man at the moment. Freshman Raine Finley admitted, “I’ve posted a #mcm of my celebrity crush, Zac Efron…I love him so much!”

Rewinding to 10 years ago, when Instagram or Facebook wasn’t available, there was no way to post a status, picture, or even a hashtag. Luckily, we are now in the 21st century, and people are more up-to-date with everything about anything that’s going on. #Tranformationtuesday is a way to make a collage of two pictures; one from “way back when” and one recent one, normally a “selfie,” which is basically a picture of you, taken by you. On the left side of the collage, people paste the older picture, and on the right side they paste the newer picture. So, now people can see how much you’ve changed (hopefully for the better) over all these years. Posters start to get the crave to post around the middle of the week. Ever since the iconic Geico Insurance commercial, released in May 2013, showcasing the “hump-day camel,” Wednesday has become known simply as “Hump Day.” The common saying, “getting over the hump (of the week)” has hatched into the social media world as #HumpDay. Posts with this hashtag can consist of a steaming Starbucks coffee, a tired picture at work, or a struggling shot of you trying to “get over the hump” of the week. #Throwbackthurday (#tbt) is probably the most common hashtag. It gives posters an excuse to find pictures from all stages of growing-up; like the “chubby-cheek” stage, “toothless wonder” stage, or the classic “butt-naked baby bathtub” stage. Another #tbt topic is old pictures of friends as pre-K pals. Freshman Ethan McGrath said,

“My favorite #throwbackthursday picture is when I was seven, toothless, and on a boat with my family.” Fridays truly are fun days, and people tend to share what they’re doing for Friday-night-fun with #FridayFUNday. In CdM’s case it could be a picture at the Friday night football game, followed by a #wewon or #fridaynightlights (obviously). Other Friday feed pictures consist of concerts, dinner with friends, or even fun things-to-do at home. They are fuzzy, lazy, and considered a great cuddle buddy; and every Saturday they make their social-media debut with #Caturday. Although it isn’t one of the most-popular hashtags, it’s slowly crawling up to the popular page. #Caturday is a purrrrfect excuse to post a picture of your pretty pet cat. Self·ie [sel-fee]- a photograph that one takes of oneself with a digital camera or a front-facing smartphone, tablet, or webcam, especially for posting on a socialnetworking or photo-sharing website. Whether during the summer, hanging out with friends, or even a quick snapshot that your Mom took of you, it’s never hard to find that “super-cute” picture that you want every one of your Facebook or Instagram friends to see. Now you know the full, weekly guide to find the perfect hashtags for a full week. Hashtags truly have added to the obsession madness of social media, but people still choose to be “addicted.” So, happy hashtagging!

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February 2014

article & photos by Sophie Ganion


FEATURE

#Celebs

Celebrity use of Social Media

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All types of celebrities, from Justin Bieber to the President, use social media.

f you have an Instagram, Twitter, or Facebook, chances are you’re following or keeping up with one or more celebrities. Celebrities, especially singers or band members, use this to their advantage, promoting their selves or their music. Of course, this is not how all celebrities use social media. Many celebrities use their social media account to reach out and connect with their fans. When they connect with their fans, the celebrity appears less of a star, and more of a human. This helps them build a personal or emotional relationship with their followers. Selena Gomez loves connecting with her fans and often comments back them on her instagram. Some celebrities have also seen social media as a chance to create awareness for problems in the world. For example, Leonardo DiCaprio has promoted a petition to help save Antarctica’s oceans over twitter. Other celebrities such as Lady Gaga, Justin Timberlake, and Usher article by Sophia Cianfrani photo by Mashable.com

used social media to raise over one million dollars for the Keep a Child Alive Foundation. Other celebrities are more interested in using social media for self-promotion rather than doing good. With the use of Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook, celebrities can promote their own interests and gain fans. Of course self-promotion is not necessarily a bad thing, singers and songwriters can advertise their music by making posts on social media sites. Singers and songwriters can advertise their music by making posts on social media sites. For example, Justin Bieber has made multiple posts promoting his new movie “Believe”. Obviously, celebrities’ lives are incredibly busy so it must be challenging to find time to use social media. Many celebrities hire social media managers to make posts for them. This is not only a strategy used to save time, but it also keeps fans happy when stars post constantly. Celebrities also have to avoid saying things online that they may regret later. This includes

bashing other stars, stating incorrect information or even something as small as just spelling something wrong. All of these things have caused celebrities to loose fans and receive rude and hateful comments. There are differences between how regular people and celebrities use social media. We have the freedom to post what we want to post and when we want to post. Some celebrities seem to think that they can only make posts related to their music or if they act, the upcoming TV shows or movies they are promoting. Many fans become irritated when a celebrity posts too many pictures having to do with their personal lives. Unlike most stars, we can use social media to connect with our friends while celebrity accounts are overrun with comments from fans they have never met. There are endless possibilities of how celebrities can use social media. Whether they use it for good, for bad, or not at all can influence how we think of them as stars and as people.

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STUDENT LIFE

#Shred

Newport Beach Teenagers Spend Their Winter Surfing on the Sand

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ki Week is among us, and you know what that means, snowboarding and skiing. Around this time of year we are stacking our boards on top of our car, piling suitcases up in the trunk and heading up to the mountain. Many of us take advantage of Ski Week as a time to actually go skiing or snowboarding and to get our #shred on. Even if you’re not a professional snowboarder or are riding the ski lift to a double black diamond slope, that doesn’t mean you don’t #shred. You don’t have to be a pro to use this term because you speed down the slopes in your own way. Freshman Cara Leonard said, “I have been snowboarding ever since I was little and now I go on black diamonds, I #shred all day, every day.” Some shredders start in their youth and others when they’re older but either way, everyone gets their shred on. To show proof of their #shredding, many people post on social media apps such as Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, or Tumblr. Shredding is the act of snowboarding or skiing in an aggressive way and using all your effort in that act. When posting a photo of you snowboarding many Instagramers use #weshred, #shred, or #shreddingthegnar. Some top mountains near the SoCal area in which you can shred include Mammoth, Big Bear, Aspen, and Lake Arrowhead. Although the snow is not as heavy and slick as it is around the holidays, that doesn’t stop people from getting up to the slopes. Freshman Faith Wosoughkia said, “I like going boarding

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during ski week in Big Bear on black diamond mountains because I like daring slopes not just for snowboarding but to get my shred on.” Although the snow is light, Wosoughkia still enjoys going snowboarding. Shortly after snowboarding at Big Bear, Wosoughkia did not forget to post on Instagram a picture of her on the ski lift saying “Yeah I #shred.” Shredding isn’t only used around winter time, it’s used in various seasons such as summer and fall. In the summertime, classic Newport Beachers will use the term when going to “shred the gnar” at the beach, and use their GoPro to capture the moment while in a barrel. One of the newest forms of shredding takes place in Egypt. This process is one of the most unique phenomenons and consists of a snowboard or even cardboard of similar length. Snow or water is not required for this type of shredding. Egyptians call it sandboarding and slide down some of the best sand dunes in Cairo and Dehab. Sophomore Hannah McClintock said, “I have never heard about this type of boarding, but it sounds so exhilarating.” If only Newport Beach had the kind of sand dunes that Egypt has. As you can see, everyone can shred all around the world. Between, surfing, snowboarding, skiing, and sandboarding they all offer the same kind of adrenaline that runs through your body as you board down an enormous slope. There’s no specific level to shred, so whether its snowboarding or sandboarding don’t forget to get your #shred on.

There are many different ways to shred. During the winter, teenagers often shred the snowy mountains while snowboarding or skiing. One may even enjoy sand shredding.

article by Aleah Berger photos by www.mountainphotographer.com


STUDENT LIFE

The CHashtags ycle of Hashtags Only Live Once

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veryone is familiar with the popular #yolo, and ironically, like many trendy hashtags, it only lived once. The hashtag trend was originally created on Twitter to place in front of a phrase to quickly find other posts on that same general topic. Through the creation, hashtags have soared into popularity and certain topics were able to quickly spread around the world. It all started in 2011, when the song “The Motto” popularized the phrase “yolo.” This song was rapped by Drake and Lil Wayne and featured the phrase “you only live once,” which was then followed by “yolo.” The phrase skyrocketed and became a commonly used phrase. Soon afterwards, “yolo” was seen all over social media and even on clothing and accessories. It even made it in Oxford American Dictionaries’ in its shortlist of 2012 English Word of the Year. Some people even made this their own motto, like Zac Efron, who even got a tattoo of the phrase on his right hand. #Yolo reached its height popularity when it went from being used in social media to being spoken aloud. Teens would usually say this phrase before doing a “risky action.” This became the cause of many dangerous accidents. People justify committing them because they only live once, and want to live it to the fullest. At the peak of its popularity, #yolo was tweeted 388,000 times a day. 408,000 of the total #yolo tweets were about drinking and driving. Ervin McKinness, a 21-year-old aspiring rapper tweeted about how he was drinking, tweeting, and driving all at the

same time. He reasoned he was doing it because of YOLO. About half an hour later, McKinness died in a car crash allegedly due to drunk driving. Also, “yolo” was used to have us push our own boundaries and try something new or that we were scared to do. “I had never imagined myself going to go indoor skydiving. The idea of ‘flying’ in a giant plastic tube terrified me. Yet when I got a chance to do it at a friend’s party, I thought, ‘Eh, why not? Yolo!’ It seemed harmless enough and

Freshman Jayme Chow jumps into a freezing pool fully clothed. Talk about #yolo.

it is quite a novel idea to be able to ‘fly’ in a wind tunnel and so I did it and it was incredible and exhilarating. I can’t wait to do it again,” said freshman George Lee. Some students just thought it was fun to say out loud or used it sarcastically

as a joke. “I have said yolo as a joke and sarcastically but usually when I am only around friends,” said senior Jessica Chow. “My friends and I would randomly put it into our conversations to make it funny or at awkward moments to end the silence,” said freshman Haley Cohen. As quickly as “yolo” rose to fame, it descended back down. As the phrase was being overused everywhere, “yolo” began to lose its original meaning. “I don’t think people say it anymore, but when they do, it actually makes more sense then when people would use it more randomly,” said Chow. #yolo has been replaced by other trending items like #swag or #tbt. #tbt referring to “Throwback Thursday,” is most commonly used on Instagram. On Thursdays, it is popular to post a picture from a past event whether as a baby, the past summer, or even just a few weeks prior. Usually the photo is of the person’s youth and receives several comments on how cute the person used to look at that age, or how they remember that event. There are over 137 million posts with the #tbt on Instagram and over 36 million with #throwbackthursday. This idea was so popular, other days with relating hashtags were created like #memoriesmonday, #flashbackfriday and #selfiesunday. Just like #yolo, most hashtags go through a cycle of popularity. It starts with everyone using them. Then they become popular and people post them in social media and in everyday life. After awhile, they are slowly replaced by another hashtag. While many hashtags do ride to the peak of the cycle for quite some time, it just proves that hashtags truly only live once.

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article & photo by Elizabeth B. Greenberg

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February 2014


STUDENT LIFE

#Fashion

and

#Beauty

The Intersection of Hashtags and Trends

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ashtags are a creative way to discover people, stores, products, or basically anything someone may be intrigued in. With endless hashtag phrases to browse, fans of almost anything can discover pictures, videos, or people that share same interests. Fans of beauty or fashion have most likely scrolled through #ootd at least once or twice online. Whether on popular social apps or websites like Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube, #ootd, or “outfit of the day,” has been used for quite some time now. This hashtag was born around the same time several other mainstream tags were becoming popular, and soon after the trend began, fashionistas rapidly started using #ootd and even #ootw, or “outfit of the week.” On YouTube, these hashtags can be searched and videos of people will show the outfit(s) that they wore that day or week, usually explaining where they bought it as well. On Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr, these tags can be shown through pictures, which simply shows what the person wore. One does not need to be a clothing know-it-all to post outfits under these hashtags. Even if there are doubts that others will like an outfit, it is impossible to tell what will be popular next, and who knows if something seemingly small posted could spark a worldwide fad. Trends change everyday and they are not always easy to keep up with, however, style will never go out of season. Everyone has different style, but clothing choices through the centuries have shown the kinds of clothes that people buy more often than others. Through the years, fashion has changed drastically, and a big influence of this change has to do with social media and everything people post through it. No matter what time era it is, clothes have always been something that several people love shopping for in their free time. More shopaholics live in this generation than ever before, especially taking into consideration that people on TV and in magazines continuously rise the expectation of beauty and looks. This past year, some of the most popular clothing stores people go to for style have included Lululemon Athletica, H&M, Urban Outfitters, Forever 21, Nordstroms, and much more. Around

school, students sport an array of clothes from different brands that include Brandy Melville, PacSun, and RVCA. Although these shops are fun to stroll through at the mall, ever since websites were created, online shopping has been something many people enjoy entertaining themselves with in the comfort of their own home. Online shopping has certainly increased interest by teens and adults alike these past several years. With all of this improving technology, the internet makes finding outfits and accessories easier to find. We have already witnessed examples of how technology has been closing down movie stores and bookstores with businesses like Netflix and the Kindle, so who is to say this will not happen with clothing stores? If online shopping continues to increase, statistics show that almost 40 million dollars will be lost in retail by the next 20 years. This will not only affect retail workers, but the consumers as well. It is proven that online shoppers tend to purchase more things online than they do in an actual store, which is sure to bend the economy in shipping services favor like UPS and Amazon. “Lately I’ve been ordering more things online. It’s fun and is sometimes cheaper than in the store," said freshman Priya Gandhi. One example of a hashtag friendly website used by many lovers

Doc Martens, as shown above, have been selling millions of shoes since 1960 all the way up until now. The most common color sold is the simple black.

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article by Victoria Hill


STUDENT LIFE of online shopping is Wanelo. Standing for Want, Need, Love, this site is used by approximately 1.3 million people per month who enjoy buying not only clothes, but also a collection of household items and beauty merchandise. On this site is a collaboration of over 9,500,000 products and 200,000 online stores to browse through available all in one place, which makes it easy to melt the time away scrolling endlessly though their categories. Wanelo’s success has earned founder Deena Varshavskaya two million dollars and growing. Varshavskaya’s site has also been made into a free app with over 1.5 million downloads on mobile devices. Another online store, Etsy, sells handmade creations sold by people from all over the world. From here, people can start a business making and selling their own items and crafts. Some other websites that have quirky fashion, which are growing in popularity, include Choies, Necessary Clothing, ASOS, and Lookbook. A few of the clothing tops they sell even include the #ootd printed along the front. It is almost always fun to shop online, however, other unique websites allow fun ways to discover fashion. On a website known as Polyvore, anyone that makes an account has the option to put together their own outfit. On a layout that users have the ability to customize, an outfit can be placed completely designed by them. If they would rather not go through the trouble of compiling their own outfit, then they can still search Polyvore for endless fashion inspiration. There is even an option to search specific looks under hashtags. Although original, Polyvore is not the only website where one can digitally put together a design or wardrobe. Other sites to customize clothes are Apliiq or Zazzle. Many websites and stores stock up on clothing based on the season. Even though the weather in CdM is not too chilly in winter, do not tuck away any knitted sweaters yet. Our strange weather may still have a few cold days tucked into the month, which means there is still hope for scarves and beanies. "I wear a lot of clothes I got during winter in spring, minus the thick jackets," said freshman Audry Rawitch. A few winter and early spring accessories often seen around campus include UGG boots, army boots, knee socks, and oversized hoodies. Boys do not tend to change up their closet for the season, usually sporting pants, a T-shirt, and on colder days, a jacket. This winter, clothes have not been the only hashtag making an appearance on phone and laptop screens everywhere. Makeup, hair items, and other beauty products have been showing up under several obvious tags as well, such as #makeup. Although there are not as many shortened, catchy hashtags for makeup as there is for clothing, they are still being used in websites, pictures, and videos alike all over there internet. When hashtags and fashion apps trend in the U.S each season, other countries tend to get involved with the fads as well. The fashion in America is unique, yet still contrasting to shops in foreign places such as the UK. Across the pond from us in England, a popular store known as Topshop has been selling clothes to girls and boys alike since 1964, and since then has

This top from Obey is printed with camo and styled with a loose sweater. These type of outfits can be viewed all over campus.

transformed into a multinational retailer which specializes in not only clothes, but shoes and jewelry as well. Early last year, this British line of clothing opened its first Topshop in Los Angeles at the Grove, an outdoor shopping mall. Although foreign countries have had some influence on what we wear, the U.S. has also made a statement on clothes. American brands such as Nike and Victoria’s Secret have been seen worn by citizens and famous people alike for years now. Both companies make over two billion dollars per year internationally, which definitely says something about how popular their products are. This also proves that although these brands have been sold for years now, they are still being modeled and worn daily. Trends in hashtags and in fashion have certainly made their own statements recently, and who knows, maybe the next style-related trending tag will be something completely different than anything we have ever seen.

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photos by Victoria Hill

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February 2014


STUDENT LIFE

#PHOTOGRAPHY Transform your Smartphone Photos Afterlight This app is perfect for any photo editor. It has simple features like filters (there are 56 to choose from) and frames (75 different options). Amateur photographers can edit a photo by using these in seconds. For the more advanced photographer, there are 15 adjustment tools to edit the contrast, exposure, shadows, temperature, and 66 textures including light leaks and grainy films. After editing your photo, Afterlight allows users to export their finished photo directly to social media sites including Instagram, Flickr, Facebook, and Twitter, or just to the Camera Roll. The best component of this app is that instead of just using one filter, it allows users to use as many as they desire. This filter combination feature can create a unique image that other apps may not be able to create. Purchase this app for $0.99.

Tangent Tangent is the most creative app I have ever used. The main function of the app is to add shapes to a photo, which sounds pretty basic, but there are so many different shapes and ways you can customize them, unlike most other apps. After uploading a photo to Tangent, one can then choose from 35 shapes, patterns, and blends, 70 versatile shapes, 68 background patterns, and 350 dazzling combinations of blends and colors. Once the photo is finished, upload it to social media or save it for later in your Camera Roll. Even if you are not looking for an app that adds shapes to photos, just playing around with Tangent can really transform photos into something you never thought you needed a photo app for. The best part of the app to me is the feature that allows you to adjust the opacity of a shape. This is convenient because it can frame a photo with a cool shape, but by changing the opacity to low, the shape does not overpower the photo. Purchase this app for $1.99.

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A Beautiful Mess Elsie and Emma, creators of the blog “A Beautiful Mess” released their first app named after their blog. Elsie and Emma were inspired to make this app so that people could edit apps quickly and easily without uploading photos to Photoshop, a complex photo editing program. Photoshop is great for pros that. This app truly has it all, from crop sizes and high-resolution photos, to collages and photo borders. Also, it has custom designed filters and cool fonts to add onto a photo. This app can also upload photos directly to social media sites or your Camera Roll. My favorite part about this app is Elsie and Emma’s hand-drawn doodles that you can place on your photos. There’s a wide variety of art you can choose from, and sometimes something as simple as an arrow or heart can really spice up a photo. Purchase this app for $0.99.

Diptic Diptic is the ultimate collage and layout app. Just to start off, it has 165 set layouts, but after selecting one, you have the ability to completely customize it by editing the border size and color, adding a texture, changing the corners, and adjusting the curves. Although I personally do not use this app for anything besides the layouts, you can adjust your photo with 14 in-app filters and a few other basic editing tools like contrast and exposure. Upload your completed photos to social media or the Camera Roll after editing. The most useful aspect of this app is that you can have multiple photo projects open at the same time and switch back and forth between them. This makes photo collaging easier, because with most other apps only one photo collage can be edited at a time. Purchase this app for $0.99.

articles by Lauren Lamm photos by Apple.com


STUDENT LIFE

Seniors and Their Hashtags

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#JfeelmeeMahaloSmith

enior Jamie Smith has taken the simple Hawaiian term of “mahalo” to a whole new level. Though mahalo means, “thank you” in Hawaiian, Smith barely uses the term for simple mannerism, but instead to goof around with friends. This past summer, fellow senior Camden Blower introduced her to the saying, and “mahalo” has stuck ever since. “I love saying mahalo for two reasons. First, I love saying it because it annoys people, it’s funny to watch people get happily angry about it. Secondly, I mostly say it because it makes people laugh, and I love to make people laugh. How I use mahalo definitely pertains to my outgoing and fun personality,” said Smith. This non-surfer preaches “mahalo” just as a

simple hello to people and loves to scream it. Along with her friendly personality and cheerful hashtagging, Smith is also involved in many different clubs at school. Smith is an active member in the new One Direction Club as well as Caring Cards. Smith also is a part of the girl’s varsity lacrosse team; she has been on varsity for three years. With her love of sports, Smith is also a snowboarder. She does not just participate in it for fun either; she will be snowboarding for the Northern Arizona University team. “Jamie’s mahalo obsession relates to her playful, weird personality. Nobody but Jamie would obsess over a phrase like ‘mahalo you surfer’ everyday,” said senior Kacie Kline. If you see #JfeelmeeMahaloSmith or Smith throughout the hallways make sure to give her a nice big mahalo.

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Senior Jamie Smith’s hashtag #JfeelmeeMahaloSmith, reflects her funny and outgoing personality.

#WednesdayNateDay

Y&G board member, soccer star, and drummer, senior Nate Pozin keeps himself busy in many different activities.

ednesday, better known as hump day, is not a favored day to most. Although it may not be favored, Wednesday is not all bad because that means it is #WednesdayNateDay. CdM student Nate Pozin’s friends started this hashtag approximately two years ago, as a way to share funny photos of their buddy. The hashtag is just something funny that relates to how well liked and respected Pozin truly is among his peers. “He is the best overall guy I know. Nate is really funny, a true stud, and I love him like a brother,” said senior Blake Sudeck. Pozin isn’t just well known because of his hashtag; he is also involved in many different activities on and off of campus. Pozin has been a part of the boy’s varsity soccer team for two years and plays outside defense (outside back). He is also involved in Youth and Government and has been a delegate all four years of high school. He has been an NCDM board member for two years and is also a political party chair of the Wonka

party. Not only is Pozin an athlete and a Y&G delegate, he is also a drummer for the band called Point Loma. “I’ve been playing with Andrew Francini since we were in fourth grade and then in the summer going into 10th grade, we met Kyle Mohan through cross country and realized that he played bass guitar, so the three of us got together and started writing songs. As a group we’ve played at House of Blues, Whiskey A-Go-Go, restaurants, cafes, and parties,” said Pozin. Pozin and band Point Loma traveled to India in the summer of 2012 and recorded a full-length album, currently available on iTunes. With their success as a young band, they were even able to raise $1500 for Y&G last year at a concert at City Hall. “Nate is the type of guy who wants to try new things and get stuff done. Everything he sets his mind to he not only completes, but he goes above and beyond to perfect it,” said senior Mohan. Pozin, known as a well-liked guy, has been successful both academically and socially. A true team player in soccer, Y&G, and Point Loma, his involvement in so many things has made him the great guy that is he known to be.

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articles & photos by Amanda Penna

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February 2014


ATHLETICS

Life on the Court:

Boys’ and Girls’ Basketball

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Left: Senior Robby Bracho goes for a layup against Newport Harbor. Above: Sophmore Natalia Bruning catches a pass from senior teammate Kate Thompson.

lways exceptional, Boy’s Varsity Basketball sets a new high every year. And now is no exception. With a four-to-one league game score, the boys have already proved themselves worthy of recognition. With fast pace and fluid motion, the boys easily bring the ball down the court for a layup. Through teamwork and determination, they set the standards for the game. There are seven seniors on the varsity team this year: Kevin Manchester, Tyler Lopp, Connor Sage, Robby Bracho, Jeff Johnston, Blake Flamson, and Quinn Bassler. With their leadership and of course skill, the boys team can make it happen. Coach Ryan Schachter has coached here at CdM since 2007, and has led out varsity boys team to several victories and trophies. The tallest player on the team is Junior Ryan Moss, at six feet and seven inches. Though this gives some players a huge advantage, height is not everything. The shortest the Sea Kings get on the varsity team is five feet and eleven inches. Height is definitely a factor in the success of CdM, but compared to their skill with the ball and their great team atmosphere, it’s not their only asset. The youngest player on Varsity is Sophomore Sam Kobrine. At Battle of the Bay, the boys had an intense game against Newport Harbor at our home court. The boys had a huge win, with a final score of 76-50. The boys really sunk the sailors. Already extraordinarily exceptional, the boys are sure to go

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extraordinarily far. With a sterling reputation, CdM Girl”s Varsity owns the court every season, including this one. With a 68% winning average, the girls are in good shape this season. The team line up this year is nearly identical to last year, losing no players, and gaining sophomore Melody Yoo, who was on the JV team last year. “I’m really excited to be on Varsity this year,” Yoo commented, “It’s a more serious atmosphere, but its great to be playing at a higher level. And everyone is pretty supportive and nice.” There are three seniors this year as opposed to last year’s lack of senior leadership. Kate Thompson, Keaton Gaughan, and Chanel Wosoughkia are the seniors on the team, helping their fellow players in leadership and commitment. Mark Decker, an AP Psychology and World History teacher, has coached Girls’ basketball here at CdM since 2006, and through his knowledge and love of the game, has lead them to several wins. Sophomore Natalia Bruning is the tallest player on varsity, reigning in at six feet and three inches tall. Her height, along with her skill with the ball and her habit of making shots, gives the girl’s an extra advantage. “It’s nice being tall,” Natalia smiled. “It’s super helpful is basketball, obviously.” With an exceptional game at Newport Harbor, the girl’s won Battle of the Bay with a final score of 44-23. The girls keep up with the exceptional name of Corona del Mar, so give your Sea Queens a shout out!

article by Elizabeth A. Greenberg photos by Elizabeth A. Greenberg (r), Dailypilot.com (l)


ATHLETICS

S uper Bowl At One Point, It Just Got Sad

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he Super Bowl was the number one offense versus the number one defense. The Legion of Boom delivered against the Denver Broncos, the final score 43-8, Seattle

Seahawks. It was a disaster from the very beginning; the sloppy snap from the Broncos handed the Seahawks a safety, giving them two points and the ball back. In the first half Seattle’s defense, the best in the NFL, intercepted two of Payton Manning’s passes, one of which lead to a 69-yard touchdown by Seattle linebacker Malcolm Smith. Then in the second half, Percy Harvin returned the kickoff for an 87-yard touchdown, sending the score to 29-0. Both stellar plays were made in 12 seconds, each setting the tone for the two halves. Sloppy and shaky, the Bronco’s plays were no match for Seattle’s defense. On the flip side, it was as if the Bronco’s defense was not even there. It looked like they were swatting flies with chopsticks: the Seahawks just slid through the Broncos, easily and proudly. Russell Wilson, the Seahawks quarterback, completed 18 of 25 yards in only his second NFL Season. Those 18 passes made 206 yards and two touchdowns to Doug Baldwin and Jermaine Kearse. The only touchdown from Denver came in the last play of the third quarter, when Manning passed to Demaryius Thomas with a 14 yard scoring pass. A two-point conversion pass sent Broncos score to 8, versus Seattle’s 36 points. Seattle outplayed Denver in every aspect:

article by Elizabeth A. Greenberg photos by nj.com (top), youtube.com (r)

their offense was more successful than Denver, and their defense remained the best. The final score was 43-8, Seattle Seahawks. Seattle Seahawks linebacker Malcolm Smith is the Super Bowl XLVIII MVP. Smith truly deserved the win with nine tackles, five solo, and two passes defended. He also scored a touchdown off of an interception, and recovered a Bronco fumble, leading his team to another score. Smith is the third linebacker to win the Super Bowl MVP award. Other aspects of the Super Bowl were not as disappointing as the unexciting blowout of a game. Bruno Mars and the Red Hot Chili Peppers gave a great performance. Unlike Madonna and Beyonce, this year’s Half time show was not just a bunch of insanely choreographed dances and stomping around; Mars’ performance was an actual performance, with live singing listeners could dance too, pleasing everyone. Bruno brought the pop jazz mix, and the Chili Peppers brought some red-hot rock. Ending with a touching tribute to out troops, Bruno did a spectacular job. Something that was disappointing: the weather. What happened to the record low temperatures? It was colder in each of the teams’ home stadiums than in New Jersey. At least a freezing atmosphere and maybe some snow would make the game a bit more interesting. But a constant, non-disappointing aspect of the Super Bowl is the comradeship it brings in the nation. The myriad amount of viewers unite America, and whether people watched for the game or the commercials, it’s a topic that will arise the next day.

Game Day Ads Budweiser’s “Puppy Love”

Going with the traditional inter species friendship, Budweiser stuck to what they are good at: beer and adorable animals. The horse and dog combo will hopefully remain a constant, and so will the “awes” of people who watch for the ads instead of the game.

Coke Controversy

Upon airing, Coke’s commercial immediately met with controversy and angry viewers, threatening to boycott the franchise. Apparently America the Beautiful can only be sung in English? Come on guys, tolerance! It was a nice commercial; get over yourselves!

Doritos Time Machine

Doritos kept with their fan made commercials, and this one was excellent. Utilizing the classic pairing of a clever kid and a dumb dad, plus a cute dog, this ad made everyone happy.

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ENTERTAINMENT

Coffee Shops & Computers

How Social Media Has Affected Coffee Shops Forever

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t seems like a new “match made in heaven,” the haunting aroma of fresh brewed coffee, paired with the usual daily posting, commenting, liking, and hashtagging on all social media accounts. Coffee shops and cafés are the newest places to sit back and relax with your laptop, while scrolling through Tumblr with one hand, and enjoying a steaming cup of deliciousness in the other. Thankfully here in the OC, we have an abundance of cafés and coffee shops to fit all electronic and edible desires. “My favorite coffee shop is obviously Starbucks because the drinks are great and I can bring my computer to shop online, watch TV shows like “Gossip Girl”, or study for finals,” said freshman Jane Ewles. While scrolling through your Facebook on a late Sunday morning, you might notice a shocking number of pictures involving coffee mugs or delicious breakfast pastries. (Social media posters tend to bring out their inner “Foodie”, and try to get the most artsy pictures of their breakfast burrito or oatmeal as possible). Latte art is something truly “Insta-worthy,” and is trending more and more. Famously known for their ultra-fresh coffee, Portola Coffee Lab in Costa Mesa is where one can find these commendable caffeinated

creations. The perfect combination of delectable and artistic can create a yummy and stunning Facebook cover photo. Another social media “popular page drink” in the fall is, the Pumpkin Spice Latte from Starbucks Coffee. Pumpkin Spice lovers will start to post selfies with their lattes, followed by #PSL. Freshman Alexandra Sefarian said, “I love Pumpkin Spice lattes; once, I saw a Starbucks to-go coffee mug that had #PSL printed on it.” If it’s not a good “cup-o-Joe” or out of this world oatmeal that lures techie customers to these yummy hang-outs, then it must be the one other obvious bait--free Wi-Fi. Free Wireless Internet to social-media addicts is a dream, considering that it means unlimited feed refreshing, posting, and web-streaming, free of charge. Starbucks coffee is basically the overall founder of having the free Wi-Fi service, and now other cafés and coffee shops are trying to attract customers like that too. Starbucks employee Leah said, “Having free Wi-Fi adds to the coziness and good studying environment that Starbucks has to offer. Even when my Internet at home was down, I could come here and easily access Internet like I would’ve had at home, just like our customers do every day.” Some cafés were less-than-thrilled when they discovered that some regulars

were taking advantage of being able to “stream for free,” by buying less and less food or drinks, but surfing the web more and more. Make sure that if your favorite coffee shop provides Wi-Fi for their costumers, that you order more than just a cup of water. Libraries are quiet, calm, and what seem to be a perfect studying sanctuary. A major attribute that libraries lack is the feel of coziness of a large cup of chamomile tea or a cinnamon espresso while you study. “I love going to Alta Coffee Shop for a couple hours to finish up homework and study for finals, and grab a quick sandwich or cookie,” said freshman Katie Derevere. Cafés are becoming very enticing to students with the ideas of having “Tea with Trig,” “Frappuccino with French,” or a “Muffin with Math.” Studies prove that a change of scenery while studying for exams activates the brain to focus and remember more. Coffee shops and cafés are now housing social media posts, statuses, pictures, and tweets. No matter what occasion for being at your local Starbucks, if it’s unleashing your inner food-blogger or using free WiFi for hours on end. Social media always seems to be the epicenter of it all, it’s cool, it’s trending, it’s where the social media lovers create and become inspired.

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article & photos by Sophie Ganion


C hicago

P.D.

The Windy City’s Police Department Now Airs on NBC

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bsessed with “Law and Order: SVU?” Love the thrill, the intensity, and the good cop, bad cop action? Well, get ready—a new series of a whole new show is airing on NBC called “Chicago P.D.” Dick Wolf, the producer of other highly ranked crime, drama, and law television shows like “Chicago Fire”, is now producing a brand new series for criminal lovers. In the show, District 21 of the Chicago Police Department is made up of two distinct units. One unit consists of typical uniformed cops, but the other (the show’s primary focus) is called the “Intelligence Unit.” Unlike regular cops, these crime stoppers combat major offenses like drug trafficking, high profile murders, organized crime, assault, and beyond. “I really enjoy watching the show ‘Law and Order Special Victims Unit.’ I like it because it has that element of mystery and it’s really easy to get caught up in the story, because it’s so exciting. I heard about ‘Chicago P.D.’ and watched the first show and loved it. It is a lot better than ‘Chicago Fire,’” said senior Ellen Naurse. “Chicago P.D.” will give viewers a different feel of the action that takes place in police departments. The show is being filmed in the “Windy City”, for a more, “real life” Chicago environment feel. The stars of the new series consist of Jason Beghe as Sergeant (squad leader) Hank Voight, Jon Seda as Detective Antonio Dawson, Jesse Lee Soffer as Detective Jay

article by Amanda Penna photo by http://www.nbc.com/chicago-pd/

Halstead and, Sophia Bush as Detective Erin Lindsay. Previously an actor in Chicago Fire, Beghe is now bringing over his bad cop vibe into “Chicago P.D.” as the main character. Known for his raspy voice, Beghe’s character often gives off a tough guy vibe, which is fitting for his role in “Chicago P.D.” To some, spin-offs of shows can be confusing and very different from a regular episode. But with Beghe playing Voight, his bad cop reputation appears exactly as it did on “Chicago Fire.” Voight, known as the dirty cop, does side deals and beats up people for money, putting him ahead of the Intelligence Unit in this show. In the first episode, Voight and his four detectives track down dope dealers and members of a cartel. With the intensity of bloody violence, heartfelt emotions to a young boy in a gang, the murder of one of their own, the fight between different units, and the kidnapping of another detective’s (Antonio) son, this episode made it hard to blink without missing something important. “Since the show is a spin-off it does get a little confusing to watch. I did not watch a lot of “Chicago Fire,” so Voight’s character is a tad confusing, but overall it seems like an interesting show,” said senior Payton Gronnerud. The first show, Stepping Stone, received

very mixed reviews. David Hinckley of The New York Daily News called “Chicago P.D.” Dick Wolf ’s “best-focused” work since the original “Law and Order.” On the other hand, some critics like Entertainment Weekly’s Samantha Highfill had different thoughts. She claims that “it was good for what it is, even if you don’t like procedural cop shows, you still might enjoy it. It certainly isn’t boring, but it also hasn’t found its groove just yet.” Dick Wolf ’s crime related television shows are so great because of the embedded stories of each individual character. As a “Law and Order: SVU” fan, I have complete confidence in Dick Wolf, the plot, and the actors in “Chicago P.D.,” and am confident that they can make this show just as great as all of the others; maybe even better. The show’s thrill and action will keep you at the edge of your seat for an entire hour every Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.—watch it and see for yourself.

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SCI/TECH

Era

of

Narcissism In this New Day and Age, Narcissism has Become More Widespread So #getoveryourselves

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acebook is the new diary, Instagram is the electronic photo album, and Twitter is the new conversation outlet. Now more than ever, more people are able to showcase themselves on social media as a happy, unique individual, who seems to be confident, radiant and high achieving. Most or if not everything posted on their walls of the social media are about them, hence the era of narcissism. Compared to any other time periods, we have shown more devotion to ourselves. Usage of words such as “‘unique,’ ‘individual,’ ‘self,’ ‘feel,’ ‘choose,’ and ‘get’ increased significantly over time. Words like ‘authority,’ ‘belong,’ and ‘pray’ are more rare than before,” according to Patricia Greenfield, a psychology professor. These words are often transferred into our common slangs, such as #selfie. This narcissism era was only possible for our generation because of our enhanced access to the internet and more ways to form connections with people around the world. “We have seen that through the use of social media and different forms of technology that narcissism has became predominant in our world especially in the American society and in any other advanced countries… and we can see that narcissism wouldn’t be as predominant in cultures in less advanced regions such as North Korea and Africa,” said sophomore Daniel Ginsberg. More commonly, we use the internet to our advantage, to share our talents and abilities and to promote businesses. This allows for a larger audience, universal spread of ideas and influences to and from people around the globe and allows students to receive positive influence and motivation from people, who are #oneofakind. Other teenage influences are apparent in today’s popular teen

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February 2014

Sophomores Aimee Nyugen and Aryna Armand admire their gorgeousness when they go to the bathroom.

literature and commercials. Current teen literatures emphasize a special capability of the main character and their uniqueness as an individual. Individual emphasis can also be seen in commercials such as L’Oreal’s slogan, “because you’re worth it.” This “has come to epitomise banal narcissism at early 21st century capitalism; easy indulgence and effortless self-love all available at a flick of the credit card,” stated Geoff Mulgan from The Guardian. Although people find advantages to the new technology and self-indulgence from personally favored products, some say it has been harmful to children and the way they think of themselves: confident, special and superior. More and more teenagers are demanding individualism and seeking attention for egotistical reason. In some cases, to the point of narcissistic personality disorder, which makes them “believe that they’re superior to others and have little regards for other people’s feelings,” said Mayo Clinic staff. The child is not blamed for being egotistical because their egotistical character is sometimes driven by their desire to be unique and an individualist and numerous adults are often falsely complimenting their children for their existence rather than saving those compliments for their monumental achievements and capabilities. Children get trophies for just showing up to sports practices instead of winning championships. However, this does not mean one can express individualism only when achieving a significant award. Alternative ways of expressing oneself can make someone a unique, idiosyncratic individual. Sometimes appreciate the people around you and give them some credit for what they deserve. Each person has a different way of expressing themselves to become an individual. The best tip is to be yourself, and you will be like no one else. article by Emma Sung photo by Elizabeth A. Greenberg


SCI/TECH

The

Science of

S

Sleep

Complex Sleep Cycles Explain Why We Are Always So #Tired

leep. Something that every high school student constantly feels deprived of and constantly yearns for more. Whether you have stayed up late cramming for a unit test after hours of regretted procrastination or have woken up before zero to put finishing touches on a project, it is guaranteed you have all felt exhaustion at some point. But what is really going on during those hours of apparent unconsciousness? What few people know is that your brain is often still hard at work. Within the last 60 years, scientists have discovered that there is in fact a science to our sleep patterns. A normal night’s sleep can be divided into two types of consciousness: rapid-eye movement and non-rapid-eye movement, REM and NREM respectively. NREM sleep can be subdivided into N1, N2, and N3. Each stage varies in brainwave activity and depth of sleep. N1, or light sleep, is the entrance to sleep. People in N1 are commonly confused if woken up because it is the stage where one begins to lose clarity and logical reasoning on situations around them. N2, the second stage of sleep, is where most adults commonly spend the majority of their sleeping time. Studies have shown that after a person has undergone N1 and N2 of NREM sleep, they will move into REM sleep. This is the sleep that constitutes an active mind. As article by Suhaa Dada photo by http://25.media.tumblr.com

the title rapid-eye movement suggests, this is the time during a sleep where one’s eyes are moving rapidly. However, arms and legs are experiencing a type of paralysis because of signals sent by the brain to obstruct muscle activity. This phase is when we experience vivid dreams. After we have experienced REM, our bodies complete the third stage of NREM, better known as N3. N3, the stage where our sleep is the deepest, shows

“When I don’t get enough sleep,

I find it harder to concentrate in class.” — Madeline Jenkins this is where our hearts slow down, our temperature cools off, and our breathing slows. Studies show that N3 is the most restorative stage of sleep because it signifies slow brain waves and little or no dreaming. The cycle of NREM to REM and back to NREM repeats itself approximately every 90 minutes. Getting few hours of sleep decreases the number of sleep cycles we have a night, which is why it is recommended for teenagers in high school to get

approximately 8-9 hours of sleep. Not only is proper sleep essential for teenagers to grow to their full strength and height potential, it is also necessary for students to function and think properly at school the next day. In the midst of her junior year, Matilda Bress understands the struggle of not getting enough sleep, “Most nights I finish studying at midnight or later,” said Bress. Senior Madeline Jenkins has a similar sentiment to Bress, often finding herself awake at unreasonable hours in attempt to finish studies and achieve to her highest potential, “Mornings are especially rough when my eyelids feel as though they were made of lead. When I don’t get enough sleep, i find it harder to concentrate in class.” Being sleep deprived can lead to serious problems in the future. Studies have proven that teenagers that do not get about 8-9 hours of sleep are more prone to serious acne, stress, aggression, and weight gain. If a driver is sleep deprived, their concentration can equal a person who has a Blood Alcohol Content of .08%, which, by the State of California, is considered drunk driving and a felony. In order to prevent sleep deprivation, there are many things a high school student can do. Try taking an afternoon nap before activities or homework, avoiding procrastination to ensure an earlier bedtime, and keeping a running todo list to prevent disorganization.

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GLOBAL

Hashtags around the

N

W

rld

Social Media Affects Everything

ew innovations, however revolutionary, have often earned the title of being “the new something”. The iPod was “the new Walkman”, the car was “the new horse and buggy”, but there is nothing to compare social media to. It is the new way of interacting with our fellow man. Social media is truly and completely brand new. And hashtags are something totally unique to that medium. These inventions have brought us to an age where crowds of thousands will gather because of 140 characters appearing on their phones, an age where you can tweet to the President of the United States or the Pope of the Catholic Church. All over the world, from the freest nation that ever was to the middle of a communist empire, social media and it’s invaluable hashtag are thriving and evolving. The accessibility and simplicity of the technology makes using social media a viable option for nearly everyone. The power now in the hands of anyone that wants it is tremendous. Social media sells cars, services, and ideas. It has toppled governments and built (and destroyed) reputations. And every single day someone does something new. article by Connor Mickelson photo by http://sf.densilporteous.com/

With a new hashtag comes the beginning of a new movement. Social media has forced itself into the spotlight of the world. The use of twitter, Facebook, and Instagram exploded from the Silicone Valley in America to the rest of the world. In the recent past, these social media tools have become the weapons of revolution and rebellion. Although the West was the initial breeding ground for any popular hashtags, the rest of the world has more than caught on. In 2011, the Arab Spring saw Facebook and Twitter become the method of organization for the rebels trying to overthrow their leader. The movement to “free” the Middle East has only matured since then, however, as #freeiran and #iranazad are trending in the top 40 hashtags right now. Junior JR Santoro said of his Twitter feed, “Some tweets I see are all in Arabic or some other foreign language. It makes me excited to see the entire world participate in something as familiar and simple as twitter. It’s such a fun time-killer for me, while these people use it to talk about popular revolt in their home country. It’s amazing”. Of course, hashtags around the world are not constrained to political uprisings. Many more lighthearted hashtags populate the Top 40 list on any given day. #allifeelislove and #signsofbeinglonely

are some favorites at the moment. The interesting thing is that the Top 40 hashtags list features hashtags of all sorts of languages. That means that social media isn’t just an American phenomenon. Top hashtags include hashtags in French, Spanish, Japanese and even Arabic. The culture of hashtags has evolved beyond their initial, simple function and have become political rallying cries. This past year, many hashtags have made it to the forefront of people’s minds. #NowIsTheTime was a political movement in 2013 to push for gun control in an attempt to curb gun violence after a tragic school shooting. A new trend in the realm of hashtags is their incorporation in the media. People now tweet at news corporations like CNN, and FOX News in an attempt to have their tweet responded to by the anchors. This then fuels the hashtag’s popularity. The hysteria surrounding the current topic of political discussion is even more intense with voices from around the world chime in. Hashtags have changed the world as well as evolved themselves. While social media is still restricted in places like China, the parts of the world that do have access have embraced this newfound tool. People have started and ended revolutions using a simple hashtag.

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GLOBAL

The History of the Mysterious Organization

I

lluminati actually refers to several groups, real and fictitious. The historical reference is to the Bavarian Illuminati that was conceived during an enlightenment-era May 1, 1776. The original motives were to oppose superstition, prejudice, the influence of religion over public life, the abuse of state power, and the support of gender equality and women’s education. The Bavarian leader, Charles Theodore, disbanded this secret society in 1785 and the Illuminati only became more specter-like and secretive. Whether the original group survived or not, in the subsequent years they were still vilified and held responsible for the French revolution. The next use of Illuminati refers to the numerous organizations acting under, or claiming to have links to the original Bavarian Illuminati. Such groups have been associated with masterminding events and planting agents in various places of influence and power all in order to control world affairs and gain political power and sway. The Illuminati are responsible for some of the most widely known and intricate conspiracy theories. Crazy as this seems the people, or, at least the majority of them, propagating these views are not raving lunatics. People have the tendency to be paranoid and think shadowy forces

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Unnoticed by many, our very own Corona del Mar High School has a sign with the Masonic symbol by the office parking lot.

are behind major world events. People use these theories to act as a substitute to the idea that our world events occur in random. But really when looked at in a different sense, the economic world is majority controlled by big corporations companies, and governments. The truth is, even the wildest conspiracies have some sort of logical base to them and some have even turned out to true. The mafia was virtually unknown until the 1960s, and their extent of control over politicians, businesses, and even the CIA where still unknown. The list goes on with various things such as the Watergate Scandal where conspiracy theorists suggested that underhanded dealings had taken place, it was only in 1974 that the White House tape recordings linked president Nixon to the break-in and forced him to resign. Abraham Lincoln was the victim of an assassination conspiracy, as was Austrian archduke Franz Ferdinand, gunned down by a Serbian secret society known as the Black Hand. And these scandals are not biased towards large companies and corporations. Electric cars have been a viable alternative since 1996 but were nearly completely destroyed by large oil corporations and car companies like general motors. Only now after 20 years has the electric car made a come-back in the form of Teslas and Fiskers, along with various models

from big car manufacturers like Chevrolet, Ford, Nissan, BMW, Honda, Toyota, and Volkswagen. The real problem is distinguishing the reality from the trash heap. Social media and the Internet have not made any of this easier; they are one of the foremost elements in circulating propaganda. Many CdM students do not know much about secret societies, because of all the false rumors publicized through the internet. The Illuminati is especially ambigious, because they are so old, much of the information about them on the website is heresay. “All I really know about the Illuminati is that they are associated with shady dealings,” said freshman Evan Kramer. The rule of thumb is, the larger and more complicated a conspiracy is, the more people it involves, and is therefore less likely a truth. This combined with the fact that there is no evidence that the original Bavarian Illuminati survived its suppression in 1785 means it is extremely improbable that they have survived until present times. But once again there is nothing stopping similar secret societies from calling themselves “Illuminati” nor does it stop them from following in their goals. So whether you choose to seek for order in this world by believing in masterminded events, or scoff at these conspiracies, only a few really know the truth.

article by Rourke Funke photos by Rourke Funke (Top), Worldpress (back)


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