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Corona del Mar High School v Volume 52 v Issue 6 v April 2014

Vintage Fashion pg. 0 8

Buttervly

pg. 16

Spritz

pg. 2 8

Vintage


Hey You. Yeah, You.

Visit TridentOnline.net Editors’ Note:

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Hello, you, You need to visit tridentonline.net. Yes, we are talking to you. Not the guy over there picking his nose, and not the girl over there who is reading. You. You need to check out the website, read some articles, see some recipes, find out what’s going on at CdM and around campus. So please, for the love of all that is awesome, visit Trident Online! Emma and Liz

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From the Staff Editors’ Note Dear Trident Reader,

This month, we’re taking a trip back in time to get in touch with our inner hipster—and no, we don’t mean choosing between X-Pro and Valencia. We mean all the way back before computers and Wi-Fi were invented, back when people still said the phrase ‘hotsytotsy’ and George Washington wigs were in style (well, maybe not that far—but you get what we mean). The Trident staff saw a deeper meaning of vintage. We saw vintage as a timeless style, possessing a sophistication that modern trends could never compete with. Nowadays, with constant technological innovations, everything moves so fast that it’s easy to get caught up; but it’s cool to go back and see our humble beginnings. In this issue, we explored the timelessness of past eras. You can read about old school film (pg. 6), fashion (pg. 8), and music (pg. 12). Or you could read about CdM’s Theater department throwin’ it back with their performance of Little Shop of Horrors. Vintage always seems to make its way back to modern times. As Grammy Award-winner Tony Visconti once said, “It is easily overlooked that what is now called vintage was once brand new.” Maybe one day, our modern innovations will be considered vintage—but we know they’ll always carry a timeless quality in our hearts. Stay groovy,

Amanda & Rafah

Staff Adviser

Contact Us

Rafah Ali

tridentonline@gmail.com

Laura Holk Editor-in-Chief

Amanda Penna Editor-in-Chief

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Hannah Schoenbaum Section Editor

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2101 Eastbluff Drive Newport Beach, CA Phone: (949) 515-6023 Fax: (949)-515-6070

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Trident is a student forum used to inform and entertain the students and community of Corona del Mar High School. Opinion articles reflect the views of the writer; they do not represent the beliefs of Corona del Mar High School staff, administrators, or the Newport-Mesa Board of Trustees. Letters to the editor may be submitted to room 224 or e-mailed to the address listed. Trident reserves the right to edit letters based on consideration of accuracy, length, clarity, obscenity, and libel. 2012-2013 ©

Sophia Cianfrani Reporter

Suhaa Dada Reporter

Rourke Funke Reporter

Sophie Ganion Reporter

Elizabeth B. Greenberg Reporter

Connor Mickelsen Reporter

Kyle Rodewald Reporter

Nick Snyder Reporter

Sponsors Thank you to all of our subscribers for supporting Trident. Your donations allow us to continue the production of Trident! Cover photo by

Amanda Penna Editor Photo by Lauren Lamm Table of Contents photo by

rocknrollpeople.com


FEATURE 06

Film

07

Film vs. Digital

08

Vintage Fashion

10

Old Work Ethic vs. New

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The Surfing Evolution

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Vintage Music

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Every 15 Minutes

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Buttervly

18

Mr. Messenger

20

Flagship Programs

22 23

Spanish Trip Changing SAT

ATHLETICS

24 25

Brooke Franson Girls Lax

ENTERTAINMENT

26

Little Shop of Horrors

TECHNOLOGY

28 29 30

Spritz Stroma Robotics Club

GLOBAL

Pg. 12

32 34

Easter April Fool’s Day

CONTENTS

April

2014

Vintage Issue

CAMPUS LIFE


FEATURE

Throwback to Film

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Film Photography Has Been Reborn

n this new day and age it seems that almost anything and everything is possible. To think how progressive technology and computers have developed over the years is astonishing, but other technologies have been around much longer and have developed into something so fast and current that new is now boring. It seems as if “old school” is now the “new school.” In addition, film cameras are making a major comeback and are a part of the vintage style that is popular today. Film cameras are fun to use and are something that are not easy to purchase, let alone develop. People love what they cannot have, and of course with the wide extinction of developing film, it’s becoming well-liked. Nowadays everyone can be considered a photographer. With film, there is no delete button and no personal editing effects right on the camera. As a film photographer, a person receives one shot and one shot only to capture the moment. Using a film camera in itself is an adventure that all are starting to take a part in. “Digital is definitely overplayed. It is constantly used and digital makes photography easy to accomplish. The beauty of film is that it is not digital. With film, you have to know settings for light purposes and how to manually focus. Film creates a better depth of field and enhances the colors. I really enjoy the difficulty it possesses,” said senior Sophie Shambrook. Film does require more precision to operate than digital does. Film takes awhile to learn how to actually use. One who uses film must know how to load and unload film without exposing it to light. The pictures are rarely perfect. One can take a picture with film thinking it will turn out the way one views it, but it can be

blurry or contain white streaks. Each roll is a lesson in itself. Film can make people appreciate the true skill that photography requires and teaches. “In 8th grade I played with film a lot and even attempted to develop my own photos in CdM’s old dark room. It was very hard and required a lot of time management and prepping. The use of chemicals and the importance of dark light made it very hard to even develop. Film taught me the importance of patience in art,” said senior Alejandra Tena. Local vintage camera shops sell and trade older cameras. For example, The Used Camera Store in Costa Mesa features an impressive inventory of used camera gear, film and digital cameras, and even camera inspired antiques. There is no place like it; it sells interesting items that are not typically found in other establishments. This store contains shelves full of old film cameras that are just neat to even look at. For example, The Used Camera store sells cameras tracing back to the 1930s, 1960s Nikon and Canon film cameras, and even spy cameras that were used by police departments. Some cameras are priced at the affordable price of only $20. This store melds the old with the new and one can easily purchase some of their items via eBay. Film is a hobby that requires patience and true ability. Its range of availability has changed and is now prospering. It is not dead but is actually thriving. The urge and curiosity to work with a film camera is becoming extremely favored. Digital has changed the way photography has been treated, but the rebirth of film may influence society as we know it. Film is not the same as it once was, and it may never be, but it is still popular with a large amount of people who will cherish and give it credit that it deserves.

Top: Anscoflex cameras were used most in the 1950’s. Bottom: In 1985 Canon came out with film cameras that allowed interchangeable lenses.

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article & photos by Amanda Penna


FEATURE

Film vs. Digital

A Look Inside the War of the Media Worlds

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Left: A classic film camera on a tripod. Right: A new Canon digital camera competes with the antique.

ollywood has solely shot their movies on one single media—film. They have used nothing else for close to a century, but the tides have turned and a new technology has quickly grown into a cinema powerhouse for the 21st century. This new tech is digital filming, digital cameras have been around for about 30 years, but not until the late nineties have they even come close to taking a part in the film industry. Older cinematographers complain that digital is going to tear apart the framework of the classic, elegant way to shoot the movies of old, but the newer, younger cinematographers thoroughly believe that it is the brilliant new path to the future. Why is it that such a small, insignificant idea like changing the way movies are shot is shaking up a billion dollar industry and uprooting the very foundations of what cinema pertains to? There are a multitude of reasons. First, film is incredibly pricey, unlike its younger counterpart digital. Film crews run through rolls of film like nobody’s business, having to change out a film reel every 10 minutes of shooting. This means that crews have to haul many film cases to everywhere they shoot, which is incredibly challenging if the director wants

to shoot on location in, say, a jungle, or on a mountaintop. Not only is film difficult to work with during the shooting process, editing film is a nightmare. In the days before computer editing, editors would cut up each frame and paste them together, and to color correct they would just paint over each individual frame. This process took an extraneous amount of hours, so it was recently changed to computer editing. The new process requires the editor to turn the film into digital media then import it all onto a computer to edit. If that wasn’t bad enough, the director couldn’t see any of the shots that he took until the following day in the dark room, which makes the director feel powerless under the cinematographer, and dulls his job. However, there are still many die hard film buffs in the field, mainly old cinematographers, but directors and producers too. Christopher Nolan said in an interview that he’ll work on film all the way up to his last production. Whether or not this is to keep the dying media alive or to keep Nolan’s films nostalgic, he didn’t say, but it could be assumed that it was a mix of both. Film has a look to it that digital editors and cinematographers strive for, often times digital movies are heavily edited to make it look similar to its older counterpart. Also, actors heavily prefer film because it gives them a natural break

article by Kyle Rodewald photos by photorumors.com & wikipedia.org (back)

in the filmmaking process. The reel needs to be changed every ten minutes, which allows the actors to take a quick breath in between takes. Even directors prefer film because of the price of each roll, the more time spent in front of the camera, the more costly the production. This forces the actors to be absolutely professional, move quickly and be concise, which makes the takes that are used significantly more meaningful, along with the shooting time much shorter. But, many directors and producers are changing face, the price of film is simply too high, and digital cameras are getting significantly more crisp shots and an even more compact size every year. With the release of 4K, the newest digital pixel count in professional cameras, it seems that it is almost pointless for production companies to backtrack and use film, since the differences in the quality of both are becoming insignificant and unnoticeable for the human eye. The movie industry is undergoing a necessary evil, and using less film in most of the new movies to be produced. This is either a depressing view of the loss of a nostalgic media or a revolution in the film industry that will influence many new changes that are yet to come. Only time can tell what the future of Hollywood is with this newer, cheaper technology.

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TRIDENT

April 2014


Vintage Fashion

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The 21st Century is Going Vintage

his day and age is considered the time of modern technology and futuristic concepts, but in the eyes of fashion, we are really going back in time. The idea of vintage fashion is taking classic couture from the past and re-introducing it into present styles and wardrobes. Fashion and females have been an indestructible match since the beginning of time itself, but the boys are stepping it up, vintage, and all. A common 50s inspired look for the young men of CdM

“What I wear to school is mostly inspired by the 50s time period,” —Zade Kaylani.

includes five basic essentials. First, a plain T-shirt or a collared Hawaiian shirt, buttoned all the way to the top button. Second, a light khaki pant or a skinny dark denim. Third, a leather jacket or flannel that is somewhat matching what’s underneath. Fourth, fun socks! “ I have a whole drawer dedicated to odd socks,” said freshman Cameron Shank. Lastly, a hipster hairstyle, simply known as “flow.” Flow is a new term used for the volume and the way one’s hair flows like a wave. This hairstyle of today’s young men relates to the common hairdoobsessed T-bird Gang from the 80s classic movie Grease. Walking down the crowded hallways of CdM, one would expect to see typical Southern California beach attire, but the fashion has been changing. The young women of CdM are slowly substituting their booty-shorts and tank tops to bandannas, petticoats, and pearls. At school, there are two different pathways for vintage looks--casual or classy. Casual vintage attire is inspired by a Marilyn Monroe-like wardrobe. Some typical outfits include an above the knee-length sun dress with subtle jewelry or high-waisted shorts or jeans

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TRIDENT April 2014

article by Sophie Ganion


FEATURE paired with a cute crop-top, and finished with bright white vans or rosy red high-top converse. Messy buns or high ponytails are easy, but stylish hairstyles for a rushed school morning. Classy vintage is inspired by a Jackie Kennedy-like wardrobe. These more conservative outfits would include pieces like pencil skirts, pearls, and nude colored flats. This particular style can be jazzed-up with jewels. Classic emerald earrings and ruby rings can all be found at stores like H&M or Forever 21 for less than $8.00. The Oscars, the Emmys, and the Grammys are all Red Carpet events that have showcased not only the best talent, but also the top fashion of that era. It must’ve the way the beads on the dresses always sparkled against the Red Carpet, as the famous couples walked it, or maybe it was the way “his” tie always matched “her” shawl; the Red Carpet of the past has set the standard for the events of today. Some of the fashion kings of the late 1950s and forward consist of Frank Sinatra, Elvis Presley, The Beatles, and Dean Martin. All of these men took the latest styles of their times and stood out on top, inspiring the men of the 21st century. The time of the great and talented singer Frank Sinatra was also considered the starting point for the iconic skinny tie. The skinny tie is a vintage piece that has recently been sported by John Legend, Justin Timberlake, and “Mad Men’s” Don Draper. Some of the founders and queens of Red Carpet fashion are Grace Kelly, Madonna, Cher, and Elizabeth Taylor. All of these

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women have managed to drop jaws, start trends, and make fashion history. Red, hot lips to match the Red Carpet have never failed and are truly an addiction for female celebrities of today. Another popular craze is a Pixie style haircut; inspired by actress and ex of Sinatra, Mia Farrow and British supermodel Twiggy. “I love the pixie-cut hairstyle on J-Law! I think she looks great,” said freshman Erin Duddy. Where could you find old school sneakers, torn’n’worn Levi’s, and a 80s lace prom dress…all under $25.00? Thrift shops. Thrifting is an easy way to add bizarre, but collectable clothing to your vintage wardrobe. Thrift shops are truly old-fashioned themselves, starting in 1947 in Oxford, England. If there aren’t any remote thrift shops around your community, there are plenty of accessible stores that offer vintage-inspired stock. American Apparel has more of the 80s and 90s vibe, while Urban Outfitters encourages more hippie and indie pieces from the 60s and 70s. Antique inspired jewelry can easily be found discounted in any well-known department store. “CdM is gradually heading into a more vintage direction, and incorporating it into everyday outfits,” said freshman Jane Ewles. You wouldn’t see mini-Marilyn’s walking around campus, but definitely some common similarities to that style. CdM doesn’t have a uniform, but the outfits around school are resembling a classy manner that uniforms provide. By being more vintage, it adds a formal aspect to how people are starting to present themselves on the outside.

Vintage in the Sun

unglasses are not only for protection of the eyes, but they can make or break an outfit. In the summers of the 80s, Rayban sunglasses were the eyewear trend, and came in all colors and styles. Today, they are an easy goto look for a sunny summer day at A Street. By the early 50s, bikinis were the latest and greatest underwater invention in fashion. The retro bikinis of the 60s were usually high-waisted, had a cute print like polka-dots, and had halter straps. This style is back! “I just ordered high waisted bikini bottoms from Target and I

can’t wait to try them out this summer!” said freshman, Sarah Kwon. Sperry Topsiders are a new fad worn by the Sea Kings of CdM, but were also a popular shoe during the 80s. When Sperry’s debuted they were available in a variety of different colors and contrasting laces, and sure enough, they still are to this day. Whether you’re spending the summer on a yacht in Ebay, or driving the Duffy around Balboa, the young men of this generation are happily sporting their Sperry’s in every season. While trying to vamp-up your wardrobe this summer, be sure to look for the classic pieces that showcase vintage vibes.

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photos by Sophie Ganion (l) & http://dustfactoryvintage.com (r)

TRIDENT

April 2014


FEATURE

Old Work Ethic vs. New Work Ethic

The New Common Core Curriculum and Students’ Motivation

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reativity, energy, idealism, technological savvy and sociability. These are all qualities of our generation. Developments like cell phones, emailing, and texting pose new challenges to ethics. How do we apply ethics to technology? They open up a whole new aspect that both enhances and hinders the way we work and interact today. It’s transforming the work environments and can be advantageous and, also very detrimental. No matter what generation you belong to, each one’s success depends on the work ethic of the people. The definition of work ethic being, a belief in the moral benefit and importance of work and its inherent ability to strengthen character. It’s a value based on hard work and diligence. It is also a belief in its ability to enhance character. Accountability, honesty and integrity, the desire to do the right thing are also a part of having a work ethic. In a study published by Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Twenge and Kasser show by looking at three generations that there is in fact a growing gap for today’s young adults between materialism and the desire to work hard. Its what they call ‘the fantasy gap” where the desire for materialistic things is higher but there is less willingness to work hard. In addition, the preliminary results of the 2000 “Report Card on the Ethics of American Youth” are in

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TRIDENT April 2014

Left:“We Can Do It” is an American War Time Propaganda Poster. Right: The Common Core Standards are designed to prepare students for the future.

and the results aren’t encouraging. The survey is conducted every two years by the Josephson Institute as part of its’ “Character Counts” campaign. Students answered questions about everything from relationships, to school habits, to theft and violence. The results then were alarming with 7 out of 10 students reporting that they had cheated on a test at least once in a 12-month period, and 73% admitting to lying repeatedly. Well, certainly these figures are

Work Ethic is a belief in the moral benefit and importance of work and its inherent ability to strengthen character.

discouraging, but also what does this say about the adults who are role modeling for and raising the younger generation? Why is the end result more valued than the process? Success more than growth? Is the solution as simple as opening the lines of communication? It is a proven fact that when adults listen, when there is an open dialogue between parent and teen, issues are better resolved and compromises more readily reached. This “change of work ethic” has, in part, occurred due to a change in the skill sets needed for a successful future. With the

advent of the Common Core Standards, math and language arts students will soon no longer have the option of filling in the bubbles on a standardized test. This will not only affect learning in the classroom, but also studying after school. Major concepts will be covered in the classroom, but the student will have go more in depth in their personal studies. This, once again, emphasizes the importance work ethic. The aim is to, over time, develop critical thinking in students. Students are going to learn to problem solve. An ability we all need no matter what we choose to do in life. Some people are wondering, why the need for change? But a quick look around at how the world, specifically technology, is changing and evolving and it seems the question should rather be, why not change? The skill sets needed for success in the future have changed and students need to be given the opportunities to learn them. In essence, every generation has a work ethic that pertains to their needs. Belief about work ethics seems to vary over time and place. Some older people go on about the tragic loss of moral values from their generation, while others don’t seem to share in that opinion. Either way, the rule of thumb seems to be to strive to be the best you can be. The parents of one generation need to pass down their best traits so that their children can use them to develop traits of their own. This way we will not experience devolution of our work ethic.

article by Rourke Funke photos by wikipedia.org (l) & corestandards.org (r)


FEATURE

The Surfing Evolution

How Surfing Has Evolved And Its Effect on the California Culture

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rom the surfin’ safari to the golden beaches, Southern California is widely known as the surfing hub of the world, but few know why. Let’s get some backside air on the surfing world. The surfing culture in California dates back to 1959 when Duke Kahanamoku, moved to Newport Beach. With Hawaii becoming a state that same year, Kahanamoku, who was a surfing legend in Hawaii, traveled along the California surf breaks to introduce the public to surfing. But surfing as a lifestyle didn’t reach it’s exploding point until the early sixties. In the sixties, the surfing culture of California really began to take off, along with the evolution of surf music. With movies coming out of Hollywood, all about surfing, like Beach Party, The Endless Summer, and Gigdet, people all around the world began to develop an interest in surfing and in Southern California. Beaches from San Diego to Santa Cruz became packed with surfers trying out this new cool pastime. While at the beach trying to catch a wave, one would be surfing with as many as ten surfers on a wave at the same time. It was all the rage. During this time, surf music began to takeoff as well. The loud, wet, and drippy chords of surf music were a big hit to many surfers in this era. The beginning of surf music can be traced back to two different places. In Orange County, one of the main starting points, the bands had songs filled with the sound of full reverberation. The other place was L.A. County, where its sound relied less on the loud vibrations and more on the lyrical and melodic focus in the music. When these two types of music combined, they created what we now know as classic surf music. Bands like The Beach Boys and Jan & Dean were two of the most popular bands. As most people know, The Beach Boys’ music has endured the test of time. But in the 1970s surf music’s popularity finally saw its decline. This happened because of the social and political situation at the time. Surf music didn’t really start up again until the late eighties with bands like Sublime, Los Straightjackets, and The Phantom Surfers. The music that these bands played was more of a synthesis of reggae and punk rock with both fast and slow beats.

Huntington Beach, also known as Surf City, is where some of the best surfers from around SoCal go to surf.

Even with these changes, surfing and music remain tied together. The other aspect of surfing is the equipment. There are only two things that one would need to go surfing, the board and board shorts. When surfing was first introduced, here in SoCal, the boards were long and the shorts were short. But, as time passed, the boards got shorter and the shorts got longer. Early boards were made of wood, extremely heavy, and typically clear coated. Current boards are made with space age foam, epoxy, and fiberglass. And the sky is the limit for colors and graphics. Popular shapers are Al Merrick, Gerry Lopez, and Rusty Preisendorfer. Their boards have wild colors and very recognizable labels. Surfboards have also become a lot lighter and smaller which allows the rider to do cooler surfing tricks like aerial maneuvers. Freshman Elijah Speier said,“Because of this innovation in surfboard fabrication, it allows me to control the board easier, as well as to do more super righteous tricks. It’s super sick.” When surfing started in SoCal, the boards had one center fin. Australian Simon Anderson came up with the idea of three fin thrusters. With this creation, it allowed surfers to have the most control and stability of their board. When surfing on a single fin board, it would be harder to turn tightly, but with the triple fin setup, a surfer could make quicker and more precise turns because the board could get on its rail further. Another item that most surfers wear is a wetsuit. When surfers started to wear wetsuits, it allowed them to surf anywhere and any time. In 2000, surfers even decided to surf in Antarctica for the first time. Here in SoCal, the swells are the best in the winter. Before people started to wear wetsuits surfing was a summer sport. Now when the swells are good more surfers hit the water. Because of the popularity of surfing in Southern California, now everybody around the world wants to look like a SoCal surfer. If one ever goes to somewhere in Europe or Asia, they are bound to see tons of people wearing Southern California surf clothes from companies like Quicksilver, Volcom, and Hurley. Surfing is a significant influence in the whole world. Without surfing introduced to California by Duke Kahanamoku, the surfing lifestyle and culture would not be the same.

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article & photos by Nick Snyder

TRIDENT

April 2014


FEATURE

Vintage Music

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The Sound Is Coming Back and Influencing Artists Everywhere

intage music has no clear definition, period of time, or precise sound; it means something different to all those who hear the term. Some may think of vintage music as representing bands such as The Clash or The Rolling Stones, while others may think of nostalgic jazz from the beginning of the

20th century. If you ask a group of people what the first band they think of when hearing the term vintage music, nearly all participants would give a different answer. Personally, I automatically think of Led Zeppelin. Although I may not personally relate or even understand their lyrics, I still feel drawn to their unique and enticing sound. To me, Led Zeppelin embodies characteristics that I would define as vintage and timeless. To someone else, Led Zeppelin could represent none of those characteristics; that is why I find the idea of vintage music so interesting. Often vintage bands are considered to have music that never gets

old, and is forever timeless. Many people define a timeless band or song differently than another would. “[To me, a timeless band has] the right combination of originality and universality,” said English teacher Kira Quesnell. Junior Konrad Lyle added that “Appeal is what makes a song or a band timeless; how many different music styles a band touches on and how many people relate to the songs that they play. I would say it’s pretty rare to find something that is actually timeless. Although there are kids that listen to the music from their parents’ generation, few kids listen to the classics that our grandparents listened to. Timeless in today’s world is music that has survived a generation, or at most two.” Lyrics are often an important factor in creating a song that is timeless and can relate to people from more than one generation. The words in a song, although not always understood, are a vital role in creating a story that one can listen to over and over again. “Lyrics have to be applicable to the human experience or make the audience question one’s plight here on Earth. [Timeless] lyrics

Rock n’ Roll first got popular during the 1950’s. Since then, it has continued to drive current music and artists.

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TRIDENT April 2014

articles by Maddie Tenebaum


FEATURE are words that express what all of us have endured or emotions that we have felt. ‘(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction’—everyone’s felt a lack of satisfaction with what they have in life. Timeless songs have a poetic feel to their lyrics,” said English teacher Laura Holk. Vintage music has inspired a majority of current artists and serves as an example for aspiring artists. Currently, many bands attempt to capture the vintage sound and style with their own new twist. This has allowed for a unique progression in the music industry. “You have to respect the classics, if not then you’re only hurting yourself. Not only was it probably the best music of all time, but it can teach a musician a lot about chord progressions and baselines that turn an alright pop song into something timeless,” said senior Kyle Rodewald. To stand out in the music industry and make a lasting impression, artists often create their own revolutionary sound and style. In doing so, the artist creates an example in which several other bands imitate and aspire to be like. These artists are set apart from the majority, and create a lasting impression on the generations to follow. “Bands that are pioneers in their style and sound are timeless. Like Elvis and his thrusting hips and flashy outfits—no one had done stuff like that before. Jim Morrison’s poetic lyrics and psychedelic sound of The Doors’ have been, and still are, the inspiration for many other artists,” said junior Rachel Wagschal. As vintage music is considered timeless, the sound of it often surfaces in todays’ artists. “Vintage sound is coming back. You can listen to the Arctic Monkeys to get that same sound,” said Christian Freire, who considers the Beatles and Johnny Cash as vintage. Vintage music can bring out the heart-thumping passion and excitement of the listener generations after it was released. As a society we should not overlook the music that has provided inspiration and a muse for what we listen to every day.

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The album cover for ‘Ghost Stories.’

‘Ghost Stories’ Coldplay’s Sixth Album

fter three years of silence, Coldplay has announced that they will be releasing their sixth album, ‘Ghost Stories’ on May 19th. The album is rumored to be a “stripped-down, more acoustic collection,” in comparison to the bands’ past albums. “I can’t wait to hear their new album. I love Coldplay; they have tons of talent and their songs make me so happy,” said junior Andie Wright. Coldplay released a music video for the song “Midnight,” on February 25th and then the song “Magic” on March 3. On the same day “Magic” was released, Coldplay announced the upcoming arrival of ‘Ghost Stories.’ The album will contain nine songs, five of which have never been performed or released. ‘Ghost Stories’ will be released by Parlaphone and Atlantic Records in North America. This will be the first full album that Coldplay has released with Atlantic Records. The album was recorded throughout 2012 and 2013 and was finished in the beginning of 2014. Extended and special editions of ‘Ghost Stories’ will be sold at Target starting May 19th, and the album will be released on iTunes the same day. Make sure keep your eyes out for this highly anticipated album!

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photos by rocknrollpeople.com

TRIDENT

April 2014


CAMPUS LIFE “Casualties of Drunk Driving�

Ben Palitz suffers fatal injuries as the result of a drunk driver. He did not survive the crash.

Nicholas Carter Sam Denning Samantha Jones Paul Breslin Eliza Britt Benjamin Palitz Terra Osterberg Charles Griffin Gavin Allen James Sprake Peter Bush Charlotte Boyse Sophia Forino Olivia Peterson Natalie Sullivan Quinn Bassler Zoe Condon Jules Pouch Kathryn Pridemore Somer Som Braden Brahs Driver: Ricker Hausam

Emergency responders attend the victims of the accident and prepare to transport a casualty to the hospital.

The Grim Reaper surveys the crash and the three people that will not survive the effects of drunk driving.

Firemen cover the deceased, Zoe Condon.

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TRIDENT April 2014

photos by Lauren Lamm & Kyle Rodewald


CAMPUS LIFE

Every 15 Minutes The Consequences of Drunk Driving

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wo cars, three people dead, and one in prison for driving under the influence that caused the triple fatality. This was the Every 15 Minutes program, a simulation of a terrible accident in front of our school. Featuring well-known students around campus, the horrific spectacle was meant to hit home for the audience. By showcasing kids lying in pools of realistic blood next to mangled cars with police and emergency respondents surrounding them, the program reminded spectators of the dangerous consequences of drunk driving. The event itself was heralded as a major success for organizer Laura Mayberry and officer Vlad Anderson, with both students and administrators praising the effectiveness of the program. Daniel Patterson was particularly pleased with the performance, calling it “the best one our school has had.” His praise was certainly deserved, as the entire program went off without a hitch. Senior Hannah Bagdasar spoke at length about Every 15 Minutes. She said, “It was a really awesome program. The realism makes it difficult to watch, but it’s something that happens all the time.” Calling the event her “biggest fear as a high school student” Bagdasar stated “that kind of shock value is what we need in order to prevent things like this. Drunk driving has to be prevented by students like us, and this helps kids at our school remember that.” The faces in the audience never looked away from the tragic scene and displayed only somber looks. The meticulous planning by several members of the CdM community, namely Anderson and Mayberry captivated the juniors and seniors. The two coordinated the event with the city police and the district. Mayberry took the reins of running the program this year, collaborating with ASB to put the event together. The entire planning process was excessively complicated in order to ensure safety and realism. Mayberry, Anderson, and Denise Banning, coordinated with the school administration, the district, and city officials to make this happen. The program took months to plan in advance with the date of the “crash” kept a secret until it happened to drive home the point that tragedy could strike at any time. In addition to the spectacle of a car crash, the organizers hosted a parent meeting to inform parents of the specific and everevolving dangers that driving under the influence could have for teenagers. Anderson described the meeting as “an opportunity for parents that are unaware of the danger of drunk driving.” Anderson went on to say that “parents often just accept that teenagers are going to drink, but they misunderstand all the

dangers associated with that.” During zero, first, and second periods, the Grim Reaper visited classrooms to claim its dead. An officer from the Newport Beach Police Department read a description of the student before escorting the victim out of the room. At the beginning of third period, a 911 call blared over the PA system to announce the crash that occurred on Eastbluff. ASB advisor Gary Almquist then directed the students to the crash site to witness first-hand the process of rescuing the injured, pronouncing someone dead, and cleaning up after a tragic accident. After the initial crash, a funeral was held the following day for those that “died.” Kevin Weed from the music department played the bagpipes as a coffin was rolled in to the gym. Students who were snatched away by the Grim Reaper followed the coffin to place a single red rose on the casket. The audience then watched a video that summarized the crash and showed what happened when the injured were taken to the hospital and when the drunk driver (played by Ricker Hausam) was booked on second degree murder charges. The victims read letters to their parents, expressing their love. Parents read aloud obituaries to an audience for a poignantly emotional effect, bringing a deeper level of realism and sadness to the shock of a crash. By simulating the worst outcome of driving under the influence, the Every 15 Minutes program hoped to prevent the accident that everyone saw. The point of the striking realism and bloody effects was to motivate students to act before a situation like a car crash could occur. Hopefully, the statistic of every 15 minutes someone dies from drunk driving could be lowered by the awareness of tragic consequences. The students of Corona del Mar should remain vigilant to keep our community free of danger on the road by not drinking and driving. The accident portrayed by the program should never become reality.

Students watch the rescue crew as they survey the crash site and check on the victims.

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article by Connor Mickelsen

TRIDENT

April 2014


Buttervly

CAMPUS LIFE

Be Understood. Traumatized Teens. Empowering Rape Victims. Love Yourself.

Junior Ella Farion is Buttervly’s club leader. She is a victim of sexual assault and started the club to share her story.

My name is Ella Fairon; I am a junior at Corona del Mar High School, and I am a rape victim.” Rape. A word that has become increasingly prevalent in modern day society. Rape. A word whose growing frequency of occurrence is horrific. Rape. A word whose presence is disgustingly challenging to destroy. Rape. A word and a pressing issue which society has been too uncomfortable too raise awareness about, until now. Most victims of sexual assault across the nation and globe justifiably find it difficult to share their story with society. The constant internal struggle and the painful memories that the reminder of such abhorrence generates is unbearable. However, Ella Fairon, CdM junior, realized that for every story shared there is a deeper level of awareness reached. After months of unbearable loneliness following her abuse, Fairon decided to take a courageous step out of the shadows, shatter her silence, and become an advocate for rape victims everywhere. In her fearless drive to spread awareness and prevent sexual assault, Fairon has founded an organization called Buttervly. Buttervly, which stands for Be Understood. Traumatized Teens. Empowering Rape Victims. Love Yourself., is a growing community of high school students that unite as a safe haven for victims and attempt to increase society’s knowledge about assault and prevention. “I’m the first high school student to start something like this,” Fairon explain, “In the beginning, my biggest fear was not being supported and that my peers would look at me differently, but I took a leap of faith. All I want to do is help people and be a strong example for other people who have experienced the same pain as me.” Buttervly predominantly embraces the segment of the motto that highlights the necessity of “Loving Yourself.” According to Fairon and other anonymous accounts of sexually abused people, the ability to remain confident and proud of who you are after such a traumatic incident is nearly impossible. “At times following the rape, I didn’t even understand myself. I

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article by Krista Schildwachter


CAMPUS LIFE would say I was the lowest form of a human being and I couldn’t look at myself in the mirror. I truly developed a deep-rooted hatred for myself,” Fairon bravely shared. Many victims, like Fairon, experience severe PTSD, depression, and suicidal thoughts. “I had been planning to take my life,” Fairon said, “My assailant made me believe I was worthless. I had to keep reminding myself of what I had to live for.” Fairon’s brothers were her only motivation to keep fighting and keep breathing. When she faced the deepest sadness of her depression, she said she would think of her three younger brothers and how much they loved her. To remind herself of her beacons of hope, she would draw three small butterflies of her forearm to represent the positivity in her life. “I used to think how painful it would be for those sweet, innocent boys to grow up knowing their one sister was beaten, raped, and then killed herself. I loved and love them so much that it kept me sane, and it helped me survive,” Fairon said. There are countless numbers of suicidal victims of rape, sexual abuse, and sexual assault who don’t have any thoughts of positivity to hold on to. Fairon first took on the project of Buttervly to stand up for those without any happiness left in their lives. “I survived because I am really strong, but some girls and boys aren’t. They aren’t strong enough to survive, and suicide can’t be a resort. Suppressing the memory didn’t help me; victims need to learn to love themselves and acknowledge that they are still powerful, beautiful, and strong,” Fairon said. Buttervly urges people to confide in those around them and makes it known that they’re other victims who are dealing with the same conflicting and disturbing emotions after their sexual assault as well. This club aims to spread awareness to prevent future horrors and let the world know that rape will no longer be tolerated. Fairon pleads to victims nation-wide to join her, “I want to shatter the silence because we deserve to be heard. Young, old, male, and female. It’s not right, and it stops now. Share your story, be an advocate, set yourself free.” As CdM students, it is in the student body’s power to join the organization and help increase the level of knowledge about rape. Buttervly has a Twitter, Instagram, Facebook page, and Tumblr for further information about the club and Fairon’s story. Fairon, who can be recognized by the three (now permanent) butterfly tattoos she has engraved onto her forearm, can be seen walking around campus, strong and proud to be herself and happy to be alive.

Did You Know?

2 Every

97 minutes an American is sexually assaulted.

percent of rapists will never spend a day in jail.

82

0

percent of victims say that rape permanently changed them.

percent of the time is rape ever “okay.”

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photos by Krista Schildwachter

TRIDENT

April 2014


CAMPUS LIFE

T

ed Up with

A Smile

Beloved Math Teacher Steve Messenger Is Ready for Retirement After Thirty Years of Teaching n thirty years as a CdM math teacher, NCDM Youth and Government founder and lead advisor, sports fan, arts supporter, and Academic Pentathlon and Key Club advisor, Steve Messenger has left his mark on the school. After graduating from CdM in 1976, Messenger was excited to return to his alma mater as a teacher. Believe it or not, Messenger originally studied to

“My ties seem to often bring smiles because of the humor and because many of them take students back to a happy memory, like my Lion King ties.” — Steve Messenger

become a social studies teacher, but when he applied for teaching jobs, there was a shortage of math teachers and a surplus of social studies teachers. “I always excelled in math, so I took the choice that would get me teaching the fastest and I have really liked the challenge,” said Messenger. Since then, Messenger has brought great success to CdM. He was the founder of the NCDM Youth and Government delegation. Over the years, his delegation went from less than ten delegates to a whopping 176 delegates, with many more on the waiting list. One of his greatest challenges as a teacher was making Youth and Government visible and understood on campus. He hoped to get a large portion of the student body involved in the program to provide a “stress-free oasis” for the students of CdM, where unconditional support was given to every member of the Y&G family.

“This sense of support leads to a rapid increase in self-confidence which then unlocks the hidden talents that students might otherwise fear to demonstrate,” said Messenger. Messenger is a well-respected face on campus and he is a role model for many of his students. This, unfortunately, is the last class to have the privilege of learning from Messenger’s teachings. After years of careful consideration, he has decided to retire from teaching, effective next school year. “It was time. I need more personal time due to health issues and I have a voluminous bucket list,” Messenger said. Many staff members and students hope that Messenger will change his mind and continue teaching. “While I am reasonably certain that I am done in the classroom, I would love to come back at a later time to enjoy the incredible activities at CdM,” he said. Messenger loves to travel, so his retirement will give him more time to explore the world. This December he will be visiting South America with his brother and his sister-in-law. His plans for retirement include: two years of extensive travel, then volunteer work, hopefully involving his twin passions of history and travel. Though he has no particular location in mind, his favorite places to travel are anywhere that he can talk to new people. “Seeing the world through the eyes of others, especially those from different cultures, is a life changing experience,” said Messenger. The one place that Messenger has always desired to travel to is outer space. “I would love to become a space shuttle astronaut. I have been all over the world and seen many spectacular views in my travels, but I’ve yet to see the whole world at once,” he said. Traveling into outer space would just be another item on the long list of Messenger’s accomplishments. “I’ve sky dived, bungee jumped, heli-skied, and sued UCLA and won, but a very recent experience is at the top of my list. I

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article by Hannah Schoenbaum


CAMPUS LIFE

Left: At the Youth and Government conference in Sacramento, Messenger poses with freshman delegate, Lauren Oberreiter. He in sporting his red, white, and blue M&M’s tie to start the Sacramento conference in style. Right: NCDM member Janelle Nguyen compiled NCDM delegates’ notes to Messenger as a farewell present. There’s a gift he’ll never forget.

encouraged my NCDM delegates to come out in mass to support the girl’s basketball team, who always had much smaller crowds than they deserved,” said Messenger, who has been one of the biggest girl’s basketball supporters over the years.

“The reason we all interact so easily is that we all share a commonality; we share our love

Mr. Messenger. He is the glue that holds NCDM together

for

and the heart and soul of our delegation.

He will be deeply missed next year. ” — Janelle Nguyen

“It was the third quarter of a quarter final playoff game that it happened. NCDM came pouring through the door and filled the stands. At first the team was in disbelief but then their spirit rose along with the spirit of the crowd. A twenty-point deficit was

erased and we won in the final seconds. The joy the players felt in being mobbed on the court by the fans lifted my heart. I’m big on pure unadulterated, chemical free joy!” Messenger exclaimed. Messenger always tries to provide inspiration for his students and put himself in their shoes. CdM is hyper competitive in both academics and athletics, which leads to a very high stress level. One way that Messenger helps get his students get through a stressful day at school is by lightening the mood with his decorative neck ties. “My ties seem to often bring smiles because of the humor and because many of them take students back to a happy memory, like my Lion King ties. My holiday ties also seem to be a hit. The last two years I have worn the ‘12 Ties of Christmas.’ I think subconsciously I wear these ties to say that teaching is a profession, but if you’re doing it right there will be lots of fun and playfulness involved,” said Messenger. His three favorite ties are his Berkeley tie, his “KISS” tie, and his “I Heart Y and G” tie, which is his absolute favorite. Messenger will be a lasting legacy on campus. His passion for learning has inspired a whole generation of CdM students and the school will not be the same without him. Even though another teacher will take over his math classes after his retirement, they will have some big shoes to fill. Steve Messenger is one of a kind and he is truly irreplaceable.

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photos by Hannah Schoenbaum

TRIDENT

April 2014


CAMPUS LIFE

Flagship

Programs

Two New Pathways: PAMA and the International Academy

I am very excited that we are finally moving into the 21st century,” said Spanish teacher Tori Hughes about the International Academy. Beginning next fall, Corona del Mar will be offering two new pathways: a restructured Performing Arts and Multi-Media Academy (PAMA) and the new International Academy. PAMA is directed towards students with artistic minds, while the International Academy is directed towards students with a focus in business and foreign language. As of now, PAMA is a small learning community that focuses on performing arts and multi-media with courses that are tailored according to the students’ interests. PAMA is run by the English Department, despite the fact that it is an art academy. President of PAMA Shelby Gautler recalled that the English department thought, “wouldn’t it be cool to have all of these artistic-minded kids together in one English class?” So, throughout high school, PAMA members are required to take a college prep English class together and in junior year, they take an Honors English class. PAMA students are also required to take college prep US History class in their freshman year. Gautler commented that although the idea of having a central English class is great, it causes a number of scheduling conflicts for students who have their mind set on certain classes. The PAMA English class is only offered one period, so administration has to build a students entire schedule around that class. Gautler, along with many of her fellow PAMA members, loves that PAMA creates a core group of friends that students will have throughout high school. Gautler said, “PAMA is a very closely-knit community where kids do a great job of working with each other in their different pathways.” Beginning in Fall 2013, PAMA will be restructured. Instead of being headed by the English department, the Fine Arts will now be in charge. Ms. Scott affirmed that PAMA will be, “more focused in all the disciplines of the program, like dance, drama, the visual and digital arts, and music.” PAMA will allow for all of the teachers at CdM in those categories

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TRIDENT April 2014

article by Lauren Lamm


CAMPUS LIFE to guide PAMA members throughout high school. Before, the teachers in these areas of arts had very little to do with PAMA. PAMA will no longer have a core English class together, which will open up their schedules so that they are not limited to taking certain classes. Scott said that students could always take art throughout high school, but students that really want to have a PAMA experience show that they have completed an academy pathway by staying with their disciplined art for all four years. In PAMA students’ junior and senior years, they will begin working on a hands-on portfolio or a production to showcase their work. This comprehensive project will take the place of their “Senior Project.” Gautler said, “PAMA is going to be a program next year that colleges will be able to look at and say, ‘Wow, this PAMA student is really great.’” The International Academy is program geared more towards students looking for a pathway based business and language. The idea of an “international academy” has been considered for at least the past two years, according to Social Studies teacher Laura Mayberry. Mayberry said, “A few years ago, I had written a proposal for the International Academy, but it didn’t get much attention.” Mayberry thought her proposal did not get much attention because CdM administration didn’t have the ability to fund all of the sections of the program and were unable to fit it into the schedule. In February 2013, there was a meeting about the international pathway, and this time the community was excited about the program, according to Mayberry. “A lot of people were saying the same things that were in my Academy proposal, like language, international focus, and (other ideas) that revived my idea of the International Academy,” said Mayberry. The CdM Principal’s Council along with Ms. Scott, Ms. Mayberry, and Ms. Hughes collaborated to finalize the idea of the Academy. The International Academy will tie together World Languages and Social Studies. Mayberry said, “The idea is that there will be an international focus. The way the world is changing is that if you want to do business and you want to be competitive, you have to do International Business. So, it really helps to have an idea of places, politics, and an idea of global situations to know where it is good to have a business and how it’ll function.” In order to prepare for international business or other relative

“PAMA is going to be a program next year that colleges will be able to look at and say,

‘Wow, this PAMA student is really great.’” —Shelby Gautler

subjects, students in this academy will take a pairing of courses throughout high school. The Academy will encourage students to take a language starting in eighth grade so that by their junior or senior year, they will be able to take their language at the Advanced Placement (AP) level. Hughes said it has always been her goals, during the past 25 years she has worked at CdM, to have foreign language start at a younger age. Hughes said that the younger the student, the more natural it would be to learn the language. Her ultimate goal is to have the language studies implemented in elementary schools. French, Mandarin, and Spanish in eighth grade next year will now be open to all students. Students in Spanish will also be eligible for a seal of bi-literacy, according to Hughes. CdM is also adding four new courses: AP Comparative Government and Politics, AP Human Geography, AP Computer Science, and Mandarin. A future course that is being considered is Pacific Rim Studies. Another main aspect of the International Academy is that juniors will work in internships in their junior and senior years. “Students will either do something with a local international company or actually do something overseas,” said Scott. Hughes said that finding students in the Academy jobs would actually allow them to use their language skills and that ultimately, “Either community service or traveling abroad should be a part of the requirements.” PAMA and the International Academy are just the beginning of developing pathways at CdM. According to Scott, the Math and Science Departments are already thinking developing pathways of their own. These pathways will guide students to specializing in their interests to show universities what they want to study after high school.

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photos by Lauren Lamm

TRIDENT

April 2014


CAMPUS LIFE

Malaria? Yellow Fever? What kind of school trip is this?

Pre-travel Precautions for Spanish Department’s Peru Trip

A

group of 16 students, teachers, and families spent their Spring Break on the ultimate adventure through Peru’s Incan ruins and fascinating Amazon rain forest. The group had a long trip ahead of them, filled with tours of the Sacred Valley, hikes to Machu Picchu, and canoe trips through the jungle. It would have been a shame if the students had to miss out on these fun activities because they had failed to prepare for the trip. Luckily, they all came prepared, and every student was able to enjoy everything that Peru had to offer. A month or two before the departure date, the travelers learned of the deadly diseases that could be found in Peru. To avoid these diseases and have a more enjoyable vacation, everyone made a quick stop at the travel clinic, where they received vaccines for typhoid, yellow fever, and hepatitis A. Most travelers also requested prescriptions from their physicians for malaria pills, altitude sickness pills, and antibiotics for extreme stomach viruses. Though it was very unlikely that the travelers would contract any of these deadly diseases on the trip, it was better safe than sorry. Since a small portion of the trip was spent touring the Amazon, the travelers also had to be wary of mosquitoes because they could carry malaria. Travelers went to all costs to avoid mosquito bites. Malaria pills were a given, but some even went to the extremes of wearing full mosquito nets over their bodies or drenching all their clothes in permethrin, to keep the mosquitoes away. Several students even bought clothes from travel

Many of the shots, pills and other precautions are suggested for the safest possible trip to Peru.

stores that actually had insect repellent mixed into the fabric. Although the malaria pills offered protection from the deadly disease, they did not offer protection from the sun. If one forgot to wear sunscreen while taking the malaria pills, the drug could have a chemical reaction with their skin, making them orange from head to toe. Students did not want to look like one of Willie Wonka’s Oompa Loompas, walking through the streets of Peru, so it was important that they stocked up on sunscreen before the trip. Another issue in Peru was that the tap water was unsafe to drink. Hepatitis A could be contracted through contaminated water. Because of this health risk, the travelers had to buy cases of bottled water to keep in their hotel rooms. Everyone was so preoccupied by the uncleanliness of the tap water that they resulted in brushing their teeth with bottled water. Everyone had to have a water bottle on hand to stay hydrated, especially when in Cusco, which was nearly 11,200 feet above sea level. The transition from Lima to Cusco was difficult because of the extreme

change in altitude. Travelers were happy to have their altitude sickness pills while touring Machu Picchu because there was a grueling hike up to the ruins. Local Peruvians typically drink coca tea or chew on coca leaves to help ease altitude sickness. Many travelers have found this technique to be very useful. Despite all the health risks that came with traveling to Peru, the experience was well worth the extra precautions. Led by Spanish teachers Shondra Pulido and Elisa Ramirez, the group departed from the pool parking lot at 7:00 AM on April 4, and arrived in the beautiful capital city, Lima, at 12:43 AM. Students were privileged enough to see the exotic flora and fauna of the Amazon, walk the Inca trail to see the ancient ruins of Machu Picchu, and experience the local South American culture and cuisine of Peru. They even got to visit a local school for Peruvian children. Additionally, students were given the experience to practice the Spanish that they had learned in their CdM classes. In the end, everyone stayed healthy and had an unforgettable Spring Break experience.

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article & photo by Hannah Schoenbaum


CAMPUS LIFE

Coming Soon in Testing

F

2016 Brings Changes in the SAT

ast forward to 2016 and several things come to a student’s mind: the election, hover boards, “Saw XXVI,” the fourth season of Sherlock, and for many, adulthood. But freshmen should definitely add another change to the list events to look forward to in 2016: major SAT alterations. The College Board decided to make some monumental revisions to the Scholastic Aptitude Test. Now, this isn’t your run of the mill test, so these won’t be some average changes. According to the College Board, the test will focus on “the few things shown by current research to matter most for college readiness and success.” So basically, the test asks more relevant questions, such as real life math and context vocabulary questions. Listen up freshmen and middle schoolers! These SAT changes affect you. The SATs will revolve around what is taught in the best classrooms in the country and will try to be more beneficial to students as they apply for colleges and jobs. These changes reflect the common core standards, and are taking in account the new way of teaching to have a new way of testing. Don’t worry about memorizing hundreds of terms; vocabulary will be given in context in order to reflect the close reading skills taught in the classroom. The SATs from 2016 and on will ask students to use their ability to interpret, synthesize, and use evidence from a variety of sources. They will also be asked to support some of their previous answers in the English portion using textual evidence found in the passages provided.

article by Elizabeth A. Greenberg photo by gpb.org

The assessed skills of using evidence are essential in colleges and careers. The essay will analyze a passage and explain how the author creates their argument, supported by evidence. The even bigger change is the essay is now optional. But don’t decide to skip on it yet; some school districts and colleges require the essay portion. The math portion of the exam in 2016 will revolve around three areas of math: Problem Solving and Data Analysis, the Heart of Algebra, and the Passport to Advanced Math. Sounds fun, right? But knowledge and skill in these areas are required in countless majors and careers. Again, the new test is designed to test students on skills that will be useful in the future, and math is always key. Problems, in both math and English, will be grounded in real-world contexts. The English portion will include charts, graphs, and passages in social studies, the humanities, and science. For math, students will be given a situation and asked questions about it, requiring higher thinking to put the situation in mathematical terms. Another change in both tests is analysis in science and history. Students will be asked to analyze, correct passages based on given evidence, and solve problems about recent events, history, and science. Study up on the founding documents, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, and the Bill of Rights, because they will show up on the SATs starting in 2016. There will now be no penalty for wrong answers. So guess away and leave nothing blank on the test. The test will also be out of 1600 instead of

2400. The Math and English sections will each be worth 800, and the essay, since it will be optional, will be graded separately. Not to stress anyone out further, but some jobs are asking for job applicants SAT scores. Most companies who ask at all for the scores, such as Goldman Sachs Group Inc. only ask new college recruits, but some companies go as far as to ask senior sales and management applicants. Even people in their 40s and 50s are being asked for their score of a test they took Saturday morning in their junior year of High School. Crazy right? Why does one test make such a difference in the outcome of people’s lives? It is crazy, and in most cases it is not true. A person who does terribly can be a successful human being, and a person who gets a perfect score can have problems finding a beneficial job. If people do well on the test, then they will most likely do well in college and later on it a career simply because that is what the new SAT will focus on. But doing badly on one test in your junior year will neither make nor break you. It’s your junior year, and it’s one test. So, if your eyes are wide, nails digging into your scalp as you pull your hair due to stress, don’t worry about it. Study hard, try your best, and that’s all you can offer the world. Remember, a number will not define you. This test will not define you. The day you take your SAT will not be a defining moment in your life, and the story of how you got your score will not be a story to tell the grandkids. A test is a test. It might be different in 2016, but it is still just a test. That’s what the T in SAT stands for: test.

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April 2014


ATHLETICS

S

Batter Up, Ocho

Freshman Brooke Franson Dominates on Varsity Softball

he’s lean, mean, and a softball queen. A new player of the girl’s varsity softball team has been dominating this season, both offensively and defensively. Freshman Brooke Franson has been playing softball since she was 5 years old. With her hard-work and dedication throughout the years, Franson has been showing her talents this season. With her big bats and strong arm, hopefully Franson can help CdM softball become unstoppable. Franson has been playing at the competitive level of travel ball since she was 12 years old. OC Banzai, a 12 and under team, was Franson’s first year of experience in travel ball. Now 15 years old, Franson has been a part of Pure Fastpitch for two years. In the beginning of 7th grade, Franson decided to really push herself in softball. Therefore, she joined travel ball. Travel ball in softball requires a lot of dedication, blood, sweat and tears. The secret on receiving a softball scholarship is to become a player on a travel team. Most softball players are on travel because they are eager to receive one. No doubt, softball stars participate in both high school and travel at the same time. It becomes non-stop because players want as many college coaches as possible to witness them play. Franson hopes to one day be recruited as well. During high school season Franson and her travel team do not play games but merely practice. “High school and travel softball are extremely different. It is so different due to the level of play and atmosphere. Both require a lot of work, but high school is more fun as travel is very competitive. A showcase game in travel ball can either make or break your chance on playing in

college,” said Franson. On varsity’s team, Franson starts and plays third base. Although she loves playing third, she also enjoys first base. On her travel team, she plays first base. Out of it all, Franson really loves crushing the ball. “I enjoy every aspect of softball but I mostly favor hitting. I like batting because it gives me more of a chance to show off my power as a player,” added Franson. As the clean up hitter, Franson hits quite well. This season her batting average is .435 and her on base percentage is .480. Her goal this season is to keep her batting average above a .400. By the looks of it, it seems reasonable that she can. “Brooke is a great overall player. Her dedication to the game and her teammates sets her a part. As a player, she has great drive and a hard work ethic. She is one of the strongest players on the team. She is loyal to her teammates and the program,” said varsity coach Carly Smith. Franson hopes to improve while on both travel and high school. One day Franson would like to play at the college level, preferably Division 1. Right now, Syracuse University is her number one college choice. As a freshman, she has already started the recruiting process. Even though it is very tough, she has been emailing coaches and attending tournaments to receive exposure. “Honestly, Brooke is a great all around player. Coming in as a freshman she has been a huge pick up for the team. We all really love her,” said junior Sydney McKeown. Besides softball, Franson also enjoys music, writing and photography. Her favorite bands include the Lumineers, Train, and the Neighbourhood. She loves to tweet and frequently keeps up with social media. Her goals throughout

high school are to keep good grades and continue to get better at softball. All in all, she hopes to stay focused but have fun and make friends. Franson, better known as “Ocho,” has made a big impact on the team. Girl’s softball has already beat their winning record and Franson, along with the entire team, hopes to at least win one league game this season. Good luck to Franson, her future, and girl’s softball. Maybe this year is their year to truly make an impact on the program.

Freshman Brooke Franson has been playing softball since she was 5 years old.

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article & photo by Amanda Penna


G irls

L acrosse A Fresh Start for the Sea Queens

I

f you think basketball is fast, try watching a lacrosse game. Lacrosse, also known as the fastest sport on two feet, is said to be the fastest growing sport in America. Originally, lacrosse was a male dominant sport but recently girls and women’s lacrosse have become more popular. Currently, CdM has three girls’ lacrosse teams, freshman/ sophomore, junior varsity, and varsity. Of course CdM also has multiple boys’ lacrosse teams. Although they are the same sport, major differences in the rules and how the games are played vary in girls’ lacrosse. Physical and stick contact is limited and their protective gear is different than gear of male lacrosse players. Instead of full body padding they wear small facemasks called goggles. Women are also allowed to have two more players on the field than men do. Men’s Lacrosse began with Native Americans playing with handmade gear. However, women didn’t play lacrosse until it was first introduced at a school in Scotland in 1890. At first, men and women played with the same rules and the same amount of protective gear. It was not until later that the sport was altered to fit the genders of the players. At CdM, girls’ lacrosse is a popular sport, and it’s still growing. We currently have three teams while many other schools have none. For girls lacrosse the season

article by Sophia Cianfrani photo by cdmseaqueenslax.com

began at the end of February. Still, this doesn’t stop the athletes from practicing. Many girls play off-season lacrosse to prepare them for tryouts and the upcoming season. “Lacrosse is an energetic and very physical sport where I can act as a different person on the field,” said CdM varsity lacrosse player takes part in a game against the sandstorm. Katie McCullough, a member of the girls’ freshman/sophomore because all teams have weekly games and lacrosse team. McCullough enjoys playing some tournaments scheduled throughout on the team and also played off-season the year. lacrosse along with many other girls. By simply watching this sport you Because the CdM girls’ lacrosse team wouldn’t be able to guess how difficult it has just begun their season, only a few is. Lacrosse requires a great amount of games have been played. The varsity team skill, speed, and hard work. You may have had a good start to their season with two heard lacrosse called “the fastest sport on wins and one loss. Hopefully all three of two feet”. This longstanding nickname has our schools teams will have a successful stuck with the sport for years. Some would season. argue that other sports such as ice hockey A great part of lacrosse is that you can or basketball are faster, but it will most play it virtually anywhere. All you need likely always be referred to as ‘the fastest is a stick, a ball, goggles and a field. CdM sport on two feet’. girls’ lacrosse plays on the fields of local Lacrosse is an interesting sport to play elementary schools and high schools. and it is almost as much fun to watch. They practice after school everyday and Make sure you watch some of the CdM sometimes make use of the CdM weight girls’ lacrosse games and show support for room. All of this practice is important your school.

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April 2014


ENTERTAINMENT

Little Shop of

Horrors

Upcoming Spring Musical that Will Make You Gasp, Awe, and Laugh Out Loud

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classic movie from the eighties featuring a blood drinking alien plant, “Little Shop of Horrors”, will be playing in our own Little Theater. This spooky, comical and romantic movie will definitely make people “gasp … awe, and… laugh out loud,” drama teacher Jackie Colgate stated, but warns that “this play has dark humor.” Even if you have seen the movie, you will notice alterations to the play, including the ending. There are no guarantees about what might have happened to the original story of the movie. “Plus, there is nothing like live theater where there are no ‘do overs’ like Hollywood. It’s real deal,” Colgate said. Due to the dark humor and the language used in the play, Colgate recommended students from ninth grade and above to see the play. The middle school students and siblings of CdM students are not limited from watching the show; however, parents and students should be aware of all the profane lines they are going to hear during the play. As much as the cast is excited to prepare for this play, Colgate’s reason behind choosing Little Shop of Horrors is because “[it’s] a classic that many know and love,”

said Colgate. The actors and crew have been rehearsing and dedicating every night, Monday through Thursday, to prepare for the show. Even though this is tough on students because of clashes that may happen with school work, most of the actors and crew members find it worthwhile. “I think this is going to be a great show… I am really excited,” said sophomore Dana Kadifa. Four students and a parent are taking their own time to construct their own Audrey II, which is the alien plant that is featured in this play. Most high schools will borrow or rent props, but our CdM crew is building their own, making this project even more special for the students and the teacher. This year’s first spring musical has been put together by numerous students and their tremendous efforts. The cast and the crew have been working since beginning of February to put this play all together by end of April. Those cast members consist of Caleigh Wells as Audrey, Chris Diem as Seymour, Brayjonn Brooks as the alien plant, Max Remington as Mr. Mushnik, Mason Amdor as Orin, Maia Mohammadi as Ronnette, Mellisa Ulkumen as Wanda, Emily Arenal as Chiffon, Gianna Schott as Taffeta, Olivia Kamalski as Crystal and Dana Kadifa as Jewel. The crew consists

of Georgina Laube, Hadley Piper, Arthur Pescan, Diana Place, Savanna Bachelder, Cole Rowerdink, Claire Holland, Sarah Greengard, Violette Remington, Max Remington, Kendall Peterson, Daniel Ginsberg, Phoebe Evans, JR Santoro, Renata Ingerson, Rory Gaudio, Sarah Marshall and Courtney Marshall. Although it has been Colgate’s first year teaching at CdM and directing her first musical, she has not faced any problems with the actors or the crew, rather she is delighted with her crew. “I could not ask for a better cast and crew. This is my first musical at CdM and I am in awe with the talent and dedication these students give to their art. They are truly an all-star cast! I couldn’t be happier with each and every one of them,” added Colgate. Even the students agree Colgate has been a great director. “Ms. Colgate is an amazing director. She is full of many wonderful ideas. She is very energetic and enthusiastic about everything, which helps us be better at what we are doing,” stated Kadifa. Come out to support the theater department and see our own amazing and talented CdM students perform in the new spring musical, “Little Shop of Horrors” playing on April 24th to 26th and May 1st to 3rd.

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article by Emma Sung


ENTERTAINMENT

The cast is frightened by the alien plant, Audrey II. The Little Shop of Horrors cast is excited to show case their play in April and May.

Little Shop of Horrors: The Movie

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he musical comedy film, “Little Shop of Horrors”, was released in 1986, and directed by Frank Oz. Distributors include Warner Bros Pictures and receieved approximately $36,537,228 in box office. This movie stars Rick Moranis, Ellen Greene, Vincent Gardenia, Steve Martin and Levi Stubbs. The story begins when the main character, Seymour, decides to help the failing Mushnik’s Flower Shop by displaying an unusual plant he owns. Character, Seymour Krelborn, is in fact a lonely nerd that receives constant criticism from Mr. Mushnik while having a huge crush on his co-worker. He later names the plant Audrey II, after his admirer, the co-worker. Audrey II successfully attracts customers, but Seymour gets worried when it starts to wilt. By accident, Seymour pricks his finger and a drop of blood falls onto the plant. This leads him to discover that Audrey II is nourished by blood. Audrey II starts growing and Seymour’s blood alone is insufficient, which soon influences him to extreme measures to feed the alien plant. Different filming locations include Pinewood Studios, Iver Health, Buckinghamshire, England, and the United Kingdom. Oz’s crew did not want to shoot on location as it would tamper with the viewer’s mood of the film. In addition, songs and sequences from the original off-Broadway show. This movie is also available on Netflix.

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photos by Emma Sung (top), godzilla.wikia.com (bottom), & www.anivide.com (back)

TRIDENT

April 2014


Are

You Ready

to

W

ith Spritz, the newest speedreading technology, one could read Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables (a 1,448 page novel) in a mere 8.85 hours. Assuming, of course, they didn’t fall asleep. Or sneeze. Spritz, a Boston startup, has been testing and developing their methods (in what they called “Stealth Mode”) since 2011, and recently released their masterpiece: a method to revolutionize reading as we know it. When we read normally, our eyes spend most of the time refocusing and adjusting to each new word and then interpreting its meaning. But what if our eyes didn’t have to move at all? Spritz employs this idea ­­­­­­­­­­­­­by screening the content one word at a time, using what they call “Redicle” technology to help readers read at up to 1,000 words per minute (wpm). Here’s the science behind it. In essence, each word has a sweet spot, more formally known as the Optimal Recognition Point (ORP), typically located slightly left of the center of the word. The eye looks for this point while scanning the word, which triggers the brain to process the word. Our eyes must go through this movement (called a saccade) each time we move from word to word, making reading awfully time-consuming. In fact, Spritz argues that only 20% of our time is spent processing content, whereas 80% is consumed by the saccades. In addition to flashing only one word at a time, Spritz also highlights the ORP of each word in red, thereby focusing and guiding the reader’s eyes.

Spritz also employs a new take on the idea of Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP). Usually, with RSVP, words are either left aligned or centered. With Spritz, the words are successively oriented so that each ORP lines up (further indicated with a dashed line on the ORP), minimizing the time, effort, and space required to read. Of course, the simplistic fonts, display size, and duration of each word plays a crucial role in the viewer’s understanding. Because the eye can only focus on approximately 13 characters at a time, Spritz only uses 13 characters, chunking long words accordingly. Spritz’s algorithms accounts for different word lengths and the time needed to interpret each word. The average reader reads at 220 wpm. Spritz has many available speeds, starting at 250 wpm, and increasing in increments of 50 wpm until 1000 wpm. The speed can be easily customized based on the user’s abilities or preferences. Spritz claims that as users become acclimated to the technology, their reading speed increases (both inside and outside Spritz technology). There are currently other speed-reading technologies on the market which help the reader to skim, take a mental “snapshot,” or avoid sub-vocalization (talking to yourself while reading). However, Spritz claims superiority over these methods because it can be mastered in minutes, unlike other techniques, which must be continually practiced. Spritz isn’t currently in the form of an app. At this stage, the startup is testing the waters, encouraging people and developers alike to start using the technology. On March 21, it released a program called PoweredbySpritz™, essentially providing

all the tools for developers to take Spritz technology and apply it elsewhere. The technology will first be used in the Samsung Galaxy S5 and Gear 2 (a smartwatch), but Spritz hopes to soon expand its technology to other media—ebooks, wearable technology, or even televisions. Currently available in English, Spanish, French, German, Russian and Korean, with more languages being developed, Spritz is looking to be implemented worldwide. The company officially launched at the Mobile World Congress on February 24 and acquired $3.54 million in seed funds by mid-March. Led by serial entrepreneurs Frank Waldman (CEO and Co-Founder), Maik Maurer (CTO and Co-Founder), and Jamie Locke (VP Operations), Spritz has ambitious hopes for the future. Spritz hopes to acquire 1 billion users, and eventually plans to implement a “nominal fee to use Spritz app, sort of like WhatsApp,” said Waldman. CdM students had mixed feelings towards this innovation. Some students were fascinated by the prospect of speedreading, like senior Blake Henson. “I think it’s so cool that you can read up to 1,000 word per minute,” he said. “Schoolwork would become so much easier.” Other students felt less strongly about where technology is taking reading. “I’m always going to like the feeling of turning the page, and reading at my leisure, without some machine flashing words at me. It seems impractical that I could look away and miss a sentence,” said junior Lauren Nakamura. Remember way back in 2007, when the Kindle transformed reading? Talk about paper becoming vintage…

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article & photo by Rafah Ali


SCI/TECH

i got an eye on you

Stroma Medical’s Newest Technology Permanently Changes Eye Color

With Stroma Medical, a brown eye (like the one on the left) can be changed to blue (like the one on the right). This procedure takes only 20 seconds, results should show in 2-4 weeks.

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rom brown to blue in just less than 20 seconds, this procedure will not fail to please. The process can permanently change the hue of your eye color and is identified as a safe mechanism. To the people who wish to have an eye color that matches and defines you better, or for the thrill of change, Stroma Medical will leave you satisfied. The Stroma Medical Corporations mission is to design, develop, and distribute a state-of-the art system providing physicians and patients with a safe and effective method for permanent eye color, which is why the release date is not yet known. The corporation is a late-stage research and development company and has patented a non-invasive procedure to change eye color from brown to blue. The process takes place in the doctor’s office with only a topical anesthetic and takes less than 20 seconds to complete. “I think the whole thing is pretty cool. It’s interesting because Stroma doesn’t take a huge amount of time to

article by Aleah Berger photo by Rafah Ali

actually complete,” said freshman Ashley Wagschal. The color change will occur gradually over the following 2-4 weeks and is suitable for all races and nationalities. Although it is not commercially available anywhere in the world, the board of Stroma Medical is working to fix any possible situations or problems the procedure could eventually have before going national. All people are born with blue eyes, but just after birth a thin layer of pigment covers the front iris of the eye. Between green, brown, hazel, or shades of blue, everyone has a slip of color that attaches to the iris. In Stroma Medical’s position, in the case of brown eyes wanting blue eyes, the Stroma laser disrupts layers of pigment on the eye, causing the body to initiate a natural and gradual tissue-removal process. Once the brown pigmented tissue is removed, the patient’s natural blue eyes are revealed. The procedure begins with the patient sitting in front of the Stroma laser, with his or her head is stabilized. The doctor will instruct the patient’s attention to a tiny animation about one foot from

the untreated eye while the process is completed, then they will treat the other eye. The inventor and scientist Gregg Homer, invented the method of changing one’s eye color, and around 2009, he knew it was possible. Stroma Medical Corporation located in Laguna Beach, California, is the product of the permanent eye color changing procedure. Although the procedure sounds painful and irritating to the eye, Stroma involves no incisions or injections of any kind. The only device used in the entire process is a tool used to help keep the patients eyelid open during the procedure and the application of a mild medication, not to mention that there is little to no contact with the patient’s eye. The board of Stroma Medical said, “We will release the product when we and the governing regulatory bodies are satisfied with the safety and efficiency of the procedure.” Stroma Medical has only undergone limited study in humans, and no adverse events have been reported to date. So, if you ever want that “natural” eye color change, keep your “eye” out for Stroma Medical Corporation.

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April 2014


Robotics Club

Paving the Way to Futures in Technology

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t is not every day you see a club dedicated to building robots and computer coding, but thanks to freshmen Amanda Cooper and Jordan Heineman, our school is proud to have one. “As robotics is becoming more and more common in workplaces, we thought it would be a good idea to expose our peers to this amazing field and get a head start in making contributions to the future of robotics and engineering,” said Cooper. Robotics Club meets at lunch every Tuesday through Thursday in Mr. Selby’s room. A typical day involves the members working on a current project. Some past projects include robotic arms and a rover with an Arduino microcontroller. A Arduino microcontroller is an open-source physical computing platform, which acts an environment writing board. Currently, they are working with model helicopters. Their goal is to redo the helicopter’s wiring and give it a new “brain” by using the Arduino microcontroller. Also, they will control the motors through computer programming

rather than using a remote control. If all goes well, they are hoping to make it into a quad copter. A quad copter is a helicopter with a base in the center and four “legs” with propellers protruding out of the base’s sides. During lunch the club have been out behind the 300 building going through some test runs. There are different roles for everyone, from taking part in the building team or the programming team. “We like to expose people to all aspects of robotics; nobody just stays on one team, so we alternate on a daily basis. Teamwork is one of our main philosophies in Robotics Club so our more experienced members do a good job teaching our newer members. It is a good system, as our new members learn both the skills they are being taught by the experienced members as well as collaboration,” said Cooper. The building team constructs the robot parts. This consists of assembling circuit boards which takes days for the club, considering the lunch time restrictions. Once the several different boards are made, and the rest of the robot is put together, it is up to the programming team to

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TRIDENT April 2014

article by Elizabeth B. Greenberg


SCI/TECH

Amanda Cooper

Co-Presidents Jordan Heineman (left) and Amanda Cooper (right) of the Robotics Club.

finish it off. The programming team spends their time on computers coding all of the instructions for the robot being produced. They program the robot’s information on how to turn in different directions, and even on how to sense obstacles and avoid them. This year, the Robotics Club is planning on competing in the 2014 RoboPlay Challenge using Linkbots. A Linkbot is a modular robotic platform that allows users to Linkbots and other accessories to complete various tasks. The competition arena and specific challenge will be kept secret until the day of the competition. Using their skills, they will try to get the highest score for each task. “We are excited to see other teams and organizations who share our passion for robotics at the competition. For future years, if we are able to receive enough funding, we plan on entering first, a robotics competition in which we are able to build our own robot with

supplied parts and program it to do more complicated tasks. Ultimately, we’d like to make it to a national competition to give recognition to CDM Robotics. As the field of robotics grows, so does the interest. We will have a lot of competition, but with hard work and perseverance, we hope to come out on top,” said Cooper. Those who have any interest in learning about robotics whether having previous experience or not, are encouraged to join at any time. “When I joined the club, I was really excited. I previously knew how to write computer code, so that is what I mainly do. I also help teach others with no experience in coding on how to. I enjoy being a part of this club, and am so happy I got to meet so many amazing people with the same interests as me,” said freshman Nicky Sandoz. All in all, CdM’s Robotics Club is enjoyable to many and is sure to be constructing new machines in the future. Hopefully, they will be bringing home a win from the 2014 RoboPlay Challenge.

Amanda Cooper is not your ordinary teenage girl. She is co-president of the Corona del Mar’s Robotics Club, a musician and even a track and field athlete. She created the Robotics Club with one of her best friends Jordan Heineman, to share their love of electronics with others. “I’ve been very glad to witness the teamwork and spirit shown at our club every meeting. Robotics shouldn’t be an extra source of stress on top of school. Instead, it should be fun and be come an outlet for stress. Every meeting I get to walk into a room of people who are happy to be there and aspire to learn more and work harder. Most importantly, to work together, and that truly is a phenomenal thing to have,” said Cooper. Cooper has been playing piano for 10 years and is also a part of our esteemed Madrigals choir. She is an alto and is very close to the group of fellow singers. “It is hard to overstate the impact Amanda has had on my life. She encouraged me to join Madrigals and the CdM throwing team, two of the many things she is great at. She is also a very friendly person and well liked by everyone,” said Heineman. Cooper is also on CdM’s track and field varsity throwing team. In addition, she has even gone to the Junior Olympics several times for discus and hammer throw. Cooper has competed in Las Vegas, Nevada amongst our region where she got 1st place for discus. She has also traveled to Baltimore, Maryland, for nationals where Cooper got 10th place, also in discus. Her life philosophy is, “I want to look back on my life and see that I was happy, and I think that by making the right choices, working hard, and surrounding myself with people I love, I can reach that goal.”

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photos by Elizabeth B. Greenberg

TRIDENT

April 2014


GLOBAL

Springing into Easter More Than Just Chocolate Bunnies

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article by Victoria Hill


A

nnually, households spend over 14 billion dollars in total to celebrate Easter, which is enough to hire a popular band for a private concert nearly 28,000 times. However, there is a lot more to this holiday than simply floral decorations and bundles of colorful flowers. For many, Easter Sunday consists of Easter egg hunts, mini pieces of golden wrapped chocolates, and fuzzy white rabbits. These days, this holiday is so commercialized that several children are not aware that it is a religious day. In fact, it is the most religious celebration of all. “When I was little Easter always meant going to church and eating brunch with my family. The best part though for me were the egg hunts. It was a cute little game that I always enjoyed participating in with my cousins,” said senior Kimmia Naaseh. This year, on April 20th, Christians everywhere will celebrate Easter, which in religious terms is the resurrection of Jesus Christ three days after his crucification, recognized during Passover. So, what do jelly beans, peeping chicks, and color dying eggs have to do with the rise of Christ? The commercialization of Easter began in America in the 1870’s. Since then, it has become secular and has been helping markets everywhere rake in cash with bunny ears and bags of candy. Yearly, U.S. candy makers produce over 90 million chocolate bunnies and 16 billion jelly beans for Easter. These multi-flavored beans of sugar first became an Easter treat in the 1930s after being pointed out by merchants that they closely resembled eggs. Today, Easter has the second highest candy sales next to Halloween. The first recorded Easter took place in the second century with completely different meaning than the modernized version. The word Easter derives from Eastre, or Eostre, an Anglo-Saxon goddess of spring and fertility worshiped by early Christians whose symbol was the rabbit. This spring divinity is one of the main reasons why the famous Easter egg bunny was brought to a

GLOBAL household name. “I loved egg hunts and getting dressed up in my pastel color dresses on Easter Sunday, but I never really understood how bunnies and eggs connected with the religious aspect to it, but I had fun anyways” said senior Charlotte Boyse. As those who partake in this holiday know, rabbits are a familiar icon which play a major role in celebrating, but what do eggs have to do with it? Long before Jesus himself even walked the Earth, the egg signified rebirth and renewal by pagans in several Eastern and Middle Eastern cultures. It soon became a common practice for Greeks, Chinese, Persians, and Egyptians to exchange dyed eggs after a long winter. This symbolized a sign of new life and new beginnings. The root of decorating eggs is an old tradition dating back to late 19th century Russia, where royalty gave one another jewel encrusted eggs on Easter. Other wealthy and high members of society soon took part in gifting these expensive decorations from other cultures as well. The famous artist who first made these lavish eggs was goldsmith Peter Carl Fabergé. As many may imagine, hundreds of years ago, those participating in Easter did not have plastic colored eggs to snap open and hide treats. Instead, peasants would boil eggs and dye them with leaves and flower petals. Originally, it was most common to stain them red, for this symbolized the precious blood of Christ. Coloring eggs with designs and bright neon shades is a modern adaptation and is not directly involved with Christianity itself. As celebrating Christians know, Lent is a period of 40 days preceding Easter devoted to abstinence and fasting in remembrance of Christ’s fasting in the wilderness. This is another attributing reason why eggs are so popular during this time, because it is a banned food during Lent and is considered a treat to indulge in afterward. It did not take long for Easter egg hunts to evolve from these traditions. Parents would arrange games for children which included rolling eggs down a hill and hiding them to be found. The most famous

egg rolls and hunts are held on the White House lawn every year and is also a main event in the backyard of millions of Americans nationwide. A question still pokes at the back of people’s mind after hearing the history of rabbits and eggs involving Easter. How did it become involved with the religion? Around the time that Easter was solely religious, Roman Catholic Church leaders attempted to make Christianity more attractive to non-Christians by involving stories and spring fertility rituals that included the goddess Eastre and the popular trend of egg giving. Their idea worked, for nowadays baby chicks and bunnies are plastered over the face of Easter’s original purpose. When the idea of Easter first came about, it was determined to be celebrated the first Sunday after the Paschal full moon, which is theoretically the first full moon occurring on or after the spring equinox. The Saturday and Friday before Easter, known as Good Friday, usually consists of preparation. Families decorate the house with flower wreaths and the smell of pastries and other aromas for a feast waft through the house. Children decorate their Easter egg baskets with ribbons, flowers, and shredded paper to cushion their goods. These few days also give Christians time to pick an outfit to wear for their morning Sunday mass. This anticipation of a bunny and candystuffed eggs is a normal ritual here in the U.S., but in other countries, it may seem odd and almost unrecognizable. For example, in Switzerland, a cuckoo bird delivers the Easter eggs, not a rabbit. In different parts of Germany, the children wait for an Easter fox, chick, rooster, or stork. In Haux, the people of this southern French town prepare a giant omelet consisting of 4,500 eggs that can feed up to 1,000 people. Easter is celebrated by several different people from hundreds of cultures all around the world, religiously and not. Even though this holiday has an expansive history, in the end, the Easter egg bunny will always be a widely known icon loved by many here in the United States.

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article & photo by Victoria Hill

TRIDENT

April 2014


GLOBAL

April Fool’s Day

A Fun-Filled Day with a Mysterious Origin

S

Left: In the Hulton Archive, Getty Images illustration on the left dating back to 1770, youngsters tie a kite to a man’s wig in celebration of April Fool’s Day. Right: Senior Kyle Rodewald is unaware of an April Fool’s Day prank being played on him.

ince elementary school, we have played pranks on our friends, siblings, and even teachers on April 1. Every year, on April Fool’s Day, people all around the world grow suspicious of the unlikely tales they are told by friends and inevitably question anything out of the ordinary for fear of falling victim to an aggressive, “April Fool’s” shouted in their faces. April Fool’s Day is, for the most part, a silly and harmless globally acknowledged event. One thing, however, still remains in question. How did this nonsensical day come to be and why is it acknowledged around the world? The most common, well-known possibility of the origins of this day comes from France. In the 1500s, France decided

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to change their calendar to match the Roman calendar. This would ensure the New Year to start on January 1, rather than on April 1 as it had done for years. Since iPhones and computers were not invented, ideas such as these were communicated around towns very slowly. It took long amounts of time before everyone was informed of the calendar change, but those who lagged behind and kept starting their year on April 1 started to be referred to as April’s Fools. These people usually tended to be the country folk and those who lived in rural areas where word of mouth traveled slower. Alex Boese, curator at the Museum of Hoaxes in San Diego completely disagrees with this theory. After studying the holiday’s origin, he has come to understand that “the day that the French

celebrated the beginning of the year legally was Easter day, so it never really was associated with April first.” Boese believes that the historical significance of April Fool’s Day is nothing more than a time-withstanding European festival of pranking and pretending in the springtime. Joesph Boskin is a professor of American Humor at Boston University. He played a prank on the Associated Press and was published saying that he believed that April Fools Day originated from Roman Jesters in the Third and Fourth Centuries AD under the rule of Constantine I. According to Boskin in his faulty story, during that time, the jesters persuaded the rulers to allow one single day in which a jester would rule the kingdom. That day was April 1 and the jester in charge

article by Suhaa Dada photos by NationalGeographic.com (l) & Suhaa Dada (r)


GLOBAL proclaimed the day would be a day full of humor and jesting. However, Boskin was just pulling an April Fool’s Day prank on the readers of the Associated Press. However jokingly some professionals have referenced April Fools Day, references to this event are found in literature dating as far back as the 1500s. Allusions to the holiday can be seen written by a French composer and poet, Eloy d’Amerval in 1508, a Flemish writer, Eduard De Dene in 1561, and an English writer who collected notes on popular customs and superstitions, John Aubrey, in 1686. Although the specific origins are not known, it is clear that the day was founded at least 500 years ago. Because of the widespread participation of April Fool’s Day, thousands upon thousands of pranks have been pulled on April 1 throughout the years. Some pranks have been extreme while others remain transparent. Although people should know to expect humor on April 1, many people have been easily fooled by the antics of pranksters.

In New Zealand in 1949, Phil Stone, a DJ for a popular radio station told his listeners to beware of the wasp storm headed towards Auckland. He told them that they needed to take precautionary measures to prevent themselves from falling victim to the dangerous creatures and advised his listeners to wear their socks over their pants to work, and to smear large amounts of honey on their front doors. Hundreds of people listened to him in fear, and many were largely annoyed when they found out that it was all a prank. April 1, 1991, comedian Rich Little was recruited to impersonate Richard Nixon’s voice. National Public Radio’s Talk of the Nation exposed Nixon’s plan to be running for President again. His slogan was to be, “I didn’t do anything wrong, and I won’t do it again.” Despite what would seem obvious in this ironic slogan, people still phoned into NPR to express their emotion on the subject. The public was later taken out of the dark and Rich Little’s prank was exposed. On April 1, 1996, The Taco Bell

Corporation bought ad space in major newspapers proclaiming they had purchased the Liberty Bell. They advertised that they were going to be renaming it the Taco Liberty Bell. Thousands of outraged American citizens immediately called the National Historic Park in Philadelphia, home to the Liberty Bell, to exclaim their disdain and horror. Only a few hours later, The Taco Bell Corporation revealed it was all a joke. This year will be no different in continuing the tradition of April Fool’s Day. The world will be participating in pulling heinous pranks on their peers. The worst part is that many people often get away with it. “April Fool’s Day is just a day for joking and fun. Even though we’re in High School and it may seem childish to some people to partake in the jokes and the pranks, I still think it’s a lot of fun,” said Senior Paul Breslin. Although the origins of April Fool’s Day may be hazy, the future of it remains clear; you can never be too suspicious on April 1!


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Trident April 2014