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Seasol presents

Botanic Gardens Australia & New Zealand th 8 Congress Inc. 22-25 October 2017 | Adelaide Botanic Garden

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Contents 2 Contents 3 Welcome 8 Keynote Speakers 14 Information 16 Congress Programme at a Glance 21 Field Trips 24 Social and Networking Functions 25 2018 Congress 63 List of Presentations

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Welcome A warm and sincere welcome to all. What a great pleasure it is to host you here in Adelaide. It is you, the delegates, who have made this 8th Congress of Botanic Gardens Australia and New Zealand (BGANZ) possible - my genuine thanks. We’re also here through the generosity of Seasol, our naming sponsor for this wonderful Congress, which embraces the essence and aims of BGANZ. I hope you’ll have a truly enjoyable and enlightening time over the next four days. There’s no doubt the Congress’ diverse programme covers a vast chunk of what botanic gardens do, from education, to saving threatened plants, and beyond. The Organising Committee hopes you will be inspired throughout the Congress and use it as an opportunity to network with likeminded people, who are equally passionate about plants. Indeed, many of the delegates here will have roles very similar to your own, given the incredible representation from botanic gardens across our two great and inspiring countries. I encourage you to get to know each other, and share the immense knowledge that you and your colleagues have accumulated. This is also a time to ensure you convey your passion for plants and their fundamental importance to sustainable life in our dear world. Explore the opportunities faced by botanic gardens to ensure we survive the ever-changing political and natural climates, and let’s discuss how, collectively, we can ensure the mission of botanic gardens to conserve plants will continue for all future generations to come. Finally, a great thanks to the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium of South Australia for hosting this 8th BGANZ Congress.​

Dear Colleagues and Friends, On behalf of the Staff of the Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium (BGSH), I am delighted to welcome delegates to South Australia for the 8th BGANZ Conference. It is a great privilege for us to be hosting such a significant event. These gatherings are an extremely important opportunity to bring together representative’s from botanically focussed organisations to share ideas, discuss problems being addressed through the work of botanic gardens, showcase efforts being undertaken around the theme of ‘Preservation: Exploring and Adapting’, strengthen networks and explore opportunities for collaborations. I would like to thank our sponsors, and all of you who have contributed to ensuring that this conference will be a great success. October is a lovely time to be visiting South Australia and we hope you will find time in your busy schedules to unwind and enjoy this beautiful city and surrounds and visit Adelaide, Mount Lofty and Wittunga Botanic Gardens. Dr Lucy A. Sutherland Director, Botanic Gardens and State Herbarium

John Sandham BGANZ President Chair of the 8th Congress organising committee.

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A foreword from Seasol to all delegates Seasol manufacture and market Australia’s favourite liquid seaweed along with a range of liquid fertilisers, soil conditioners and recently released slow and controlled release granular products with the unique benefits of soil improving microbes. Seasol commenced operations in Mowbray Tasmania in 1974 after developing a unique process of liberating the beneficial properties found in Bull Kelp which was washed up on the shores of King Island and the North West coast of Tasmania. Over the past 43 years we have invested significant funds in Research and Development proving the benefits of Seasol to the commercial grower and the home gardener, pioneering the segment and showing that improved plant health and yield can be achieved with the use of a highly refined organic seaweed.

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At Seasol, we were green and organic a long time before it became fashionable and we want every gardener, be they commercial, enthusiast or novice, to reap the rewards of watching a crop perform better than before, or the simple pleasure of planting a garden and enjoying the many benefits it can bring. As a company, we care about our people, as we care about the industry in which we operate, for without the two, Seasol would simply be a name. We are delighted to sponsor the Botanic Gardens Australia and New Zealand 8th Congress, and believe that all botanic gardens around the world provide a most valuable green space in some otherwise very grey and barren landscapes, but more importantly can motivate everyone to plant a plant.


Thanks to all our sponsors Naming Sponsor

Keynote Speaker Sponsor

Emerging and Early Career Sponsors

In Kind Sponsors

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Locations

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1 Bicentennial Conservatory (Opening night)

3 Goodman Building (Education Room and Theatre)

2 National Wine Centre

4 Schomburgk Pavillion (Social Night)

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Keynote Speakers

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Living Collections: Bridging Research, Education, Conservation, and Aesthetics’ (joint presentation with Sin Yeng Wong) Peter C. Boyce Peter Boyce’s interest in plants, botany, and aroids began in his early teens. Peter joined the staff of Kew Gardens’ Herbarium in 1987 and for the next 15 years worked on temperate European and tropical Asian aroids. Outputs during this time included a book on The Genus Arum and co-authorship of The Genera of Araceae with Simon Mayo and Josef Bogner. After resigning from Kew, and a spell living in SW France, Peter moved to Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo researching and writing extensively, interspersed with periods in Thailand to complete the Flora of Thailand Araceae account (published in 2012), and as a visiting researcher at the University Sains Malaysia, Penang, resulting in the co-authored The Araceae of Peninsular Malaysia published in 2011. Peter is currently an associate of the Department Biologie I - Systematische Botanik und Mykologie, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Germany, and the Institute for Tropical Biology and Conservation, Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Malaysia, and an Honorary Research Fellow of the Institute of Biodiversity and Environmental Conservation, University of Malaysia Sarawak (UNIMAS), Malaysia. Additional to extensive fieldwork much of his research output is based upon a living research collection of more than 5000 accessions. Peter also has an active interest in Hanguanaceae (Commelinales), and Tacca (Dioscoreales: Taccaceae). Peter is author or co-author of over 300 publications, many of them in collaboration with Wong Sin Yeng, and sits on the Board of Governors of the International Aroid Society.

The important multiple roles of botanic gardens’ living collections are frequently neglected or even absent from gardens’ integrated plans. More disturbingly, with the exception of an often indifferent “looking good in August” type feature, plant collections as a whole are frequently side-lined entirely by high-profile corporate and public education programmes on gardens’ websites. This downgrading – purposeful or otherwise – of the usefulness of rigorously documented well-curated living collections and the role these collections serve and outputs they enable in the greater scheme of gardens’ “deliverables” is increasingly overlooked, especially during times when financial constraints may be dominating attention. Drawing on extensive living-collection based research and education profiles, together with experience gained through collaborative links with botanic gardens maintaining living collections with a strong tradition of utility in Europe and the USA, the speakers will highlight the benefits of establishing, expanding, maintaining, and utilizing a critically sourced and meticulously curated living collection as a means to underpin formal and promote public education, enable ex situ and ultimately in situ conservation, facilitate world-class research and not least provide material for gardens’ aesthetics that link together all these elements.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Peter_Boyce2 https://scholar.google.com.my/citations?hl=en&user=axdKMxsAAAAJ http://www.botanischestaatssammlung.de/index/project_index.html https://www.flickr.com/photos/araceae_of_sunda/collections/

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Experiences from the Advancement Programme of the National Botanic Gardens Lae Papua New Guinea Michael Lovave Michael works with Papua New Guinea Forest Research Institute (PNGFRI) as Curator of the National Botanic Gardens (LAE) in Papua New Guinea. He has been with the PNGFRI for over 16 years, three years as Curator. He holds a Masters Degree in Environmental Sciences from Tohoku University in Japan (2007). Michael is a botanist and has explored many rural parts of PNG for floristic surveys and collected more than 2000 plant collections which are now specimens held at the LAE National Herbarium. History of Botanic Gardens in Papua New Guinea The first botanic garden in Papua New Guinea was established by the German administration in Rabaul in the early 1900s, and was at that time regarded as one of the most promising botanic gardens in the tropics. The garden was further developed after the annexation by Australia but the 1937 volcanic eruptions of Rabaul, followed by the events of the Second World War, brought about the complete destruction of this fine garden. Development of the present garden, now known as the National Botanic Garden in Lae, began in 1949 by the Forest Botanist John S. Womersley. The site evolved in conjunction with the National Herbarium to provide a consolidated centre of Botanic research. The National Herbarium was constructed to house the nation’s collection of preserved plant specimens whilst the Gardens were built to create an area where the country’s living collection of flora could be displayed. The gardens and herbarium are considered to be an integrated unit for conservation, education and recreation with both facilities considered essential to the others success.

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The original site next to the War Cemetery contained only about 26 hectares, but further clearings of postwar coconut plantation and the remaining strips of forest along the escarpment increased the area to its present size of 56 hectares. By the early 1950s permanent buildings and a nursery had been established, and the propagation and cultivation of both indigenous and exotic species intensified. A few trial blocks of timber tree species were planted in the lower area. Towards the latter part of the 1950s the ponds in the lower area was constructed and planted with waterlillies, and later animal cages and enclosures were added. By then the garden was already a major attraction to the residents as well as visitors to Lae. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s the garden was well known both nationally and internationally as one of the most beautiful botanic gardens in the tropics, thus helping Lae to claim the title as the “Garden City” of Papua New Guinea. But by the early 1980s funding for the botanic garden began to decline sharply. The number of curatorial staff was reduced from eight to two by the end of 1980s, then to a single officer in the early 1990s, and finally to zero by the beginning of 1994. In 1999 after some improvements the garden was opened to public.


Botanic gardens: the opposition and the opportunity Professor David Mabberley Professor David Mabberley, successively Director of the University of Washington Botanic Gardens (Seattle USA), Keeper of the Herbarium, Library, Art and Archives, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew (UK) and Executive Director of the Royal Botanic Gardens & Domain Trust in Sydney. With degrees from both Oxford and Cambridge David Mabberley has had a distinguished career in academia, the public service and private enterprise and is recognised as an eminent botanist, historian and authority on botanical art. Currently, he is an Emeritus Fellow, Wadham College, University of Oxford, and Extraordinary Professor at the University of Leiden, The Netherlands. David Mabberley is a prolific author with over 300 publications including 18 books. The indispensable Mabberley’s Plant-Book is a classic botanical reference which gives an overview of the world’s flora and is currently in its fourth edition (2017).

Abstract In the face of the sixth and fastest mass-extinction on this planet, the western world is in the grip of an anti-intellectual populism resulting in the dumbing-down of education, the traditional means for social mobility and betterment on the one hand, and the blind economic rationalism that grasps ‘the price of everything and the value of nothing’, on the other. In the west, long-lived organisations with assets of long life-cycles (e.g. trees) seen as ‘old-fashioned’ and traditional, are threatened by ‘the system’ as never before - yet elsewhere they are burgeoning. This conundrum will be examined in the light of different world-views and aspirations for ordinary people, whose well-being now and in the future must be paramount in thinking about the role of botanic gardens today. Despite the pusillanimity of many governments (and boards of trustees), the rising tide of concern by young people worldwide, anxious for education and reacting against the myopia of those in power with regard to their future - and the future of the planet, offers hope and an enormous opportunity for botanic gardens.

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Living Collections: Bridging Research, Education, Conservation, and Aesthetics’ (joint presentation with Peter Boyce) Sin Yeng Wong Sin Yeng Wong is currently a senior lecturer in Universiti Malaysia Sarawak, one of the two federal universities in Malaysian Borneo, as well as an associate of the Harvard University Herbaria, an Honorary Research Scientist of LudwigMaximilians Universität, München, and a research fellow of Universiti Malaysia Sabah, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia. Sin Yeng’s research involves taxonomic and molecular systematic studies of Araceae especially Tribes Schismatoglottideae, Homalomeneae, Areae and subfamily Monsteroideae (Araceae), and Tacca (Dioscoreales: Taccaceae). She is also involved in the floral biology of these taxa with together with the investigation on the pollination strategies, including pollinator guild partitioning and its role in taxagenesis. Her publications, now exceeding 110 papers are published in various international journals. She recently published a book on the Aroids of Borneo in the Malay Language with the Hall of Language and Literature Malaysia (Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka Malaysia). All her research projects are fully funded by the Ministry of Higher Education Malaysia.

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Abstract The important multiple roles of botanic gardens’ living collections are frequently neglected or even absent from gardens’ integrated plans. More disturbingly, with the exception of an often indifferent “looking good in August” type feature, plant collections as a whole are frequently side-lined entirely by high-profile corporate and public education programmes on gardens’ websites. This down-grading – purposeful or otherwise – of the usefulness of rigorously documented well-curated living collections and the role these collections serve and outputs they enable in the greater scheme of gardens’ “deliverables” is increasingly overlooked, especially during times when financial constraints may be dominating attention.

Drawing on extensive living-collection based research and education profiles, together with experience gained through collaborative links with botanic gardens maintaining living collections with a strong tradition of utility in Europe and the USA, the speakers will highlight the benefits of establishing, expanding, maintaining, and utilizing a critically sourced and meticulously curated living collection as a means to underpin formal and promote public education, enable ex situ and ultimately in situ conservation, facilitate world-class research and not least provide material for gardens’ aesthetics that link together all these elements.

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Wong_Sin_Yeng https://scholar.google.co.uk/citations?user=vDPi68IAAAAJ&hl=en https://expert.unimas.my/profile/1027 http://www.botanischestaatssammlung.de/index/project_index.html


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Information

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Helpful information and logistics Conference Venue The National Wine Centre of Australia, Hackney Rd & Botanic Rd, Adelaide Registration The registration and information desk is located at the entrance foyer of the National Wine Centre and will be open for the duration of the Congress. Note: On Sunday 22 October, the registration desk will be situated at the Bicentennial Conservatory, Adelaide Botanic Garden. Contact: 0488 445 029 Please note ALL attendees to BGANZ 2017 must be registered. Conference name badges are required when attending sessions and social functions. Conference Materials The conference app contains all programme details, presenter biographies and all abstracts. The app can be downloaded by scanning the QR code below or at the following kaigi.eventsair.com/attendeeapp/bganz-congress-2017/attendee/

Information for presenters and session chairs Presenters are asked to report to their session room 20 minutes prior to the start of the session to check that their presentation is correctly loaded and to meet with the Session Chair. All presentations are required to be pre-loaded. Presenters should sit in the front row on the seats marked ‘Reserved’ during the session. At the start of the session the Session Chair will introduce themselves, the topic of the session, and the general format for the session. Oral presenters have been allocated 30 minutes, which includes strictly 25 minutes for presentations and five minutes for questions/ changeover. Rapid Fire talks are allocated 5 minutes. All presenters will be introduced by the Session Chair as per their details in the programme in the Conference Handbook.

Internet Access We are pleased to offer complimentary wi-fi access throughout the conference venue. Conference Secretariat Kaigi Conferencing and Events

Session Chairs will be responsible for ensuring the session runs strictly to time as delegates may wish to move between rooms to listen to different presentations.

Level 1, The Realm 18 National Circuit, Barton ACT 2600 T: 0488 445 029 | E: bganz@kaigi.com.au Disclaimer The organisers of the 8th BGANZ Congress, including the Conference Secretariat, will not accept liability for any damage of any nature sustained by participants or their accompanying persons for loss or damage to their personal property as a result of the 2017 conference and exhibition or related events. All details contained in this Conference Handbook, the accompanying Book of Abstracts and the conference app are correct at the time or printing. Privacy Information provided during conference registration will be used to administer the Conference, including accommodation, catering, transport, support and exhibition. Data obtained will remain the property of Kaigi Conferencing and Events and BGANZ.

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Congress Programme at a Glance

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Sunday, October 22 2017 1.00pm

2.00pm

1.00pm

2.00pm

1.30pm - 4.00pm

BGSH Collection Curators and Tours of Adelaide Botanic Gardens by Friends of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens Bicentennial Conservatory, Southern Entrance

3.00pm

Tours of 45 minute duration leaving every 30 minutes. Final tour leaves at 3.30pm

1.00pm - 4.30pm

Registration by Friends of the Adelaide Botanic Gardens Bicentennial Conservatory, Southern Entrance

4.00pm

3.00pm

4.00pm 4.30pm Official Opening Welcome to Country - Katrina Powers

Bicentennial Conservatory 4.50pm Formal Speeches

5.00pm

5.00pm

5.00pm - 7.00pm

6.00pm

Brazilian Dance Fusion and Sambatuka Refreshments Bicentennial Conservatory

7.00pm

6.00pm

7.00pm 7.00pm Refreshments and event concludes

PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT.

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Monday, October 23 2017

7.00am

7.00am

7.00am - 7.45am

BGANZ Council Breakfast Meeting

8.00am

8.00am 8.00am- 8.45am

Registration Wine Centre Foyer 8.45am - 9am Acknowledgment of Country and Welcome

9.00am

9.00am

9.00am - 9.45am

KEYNOTE 1 David Mabberley 9.45m - 10.30am

10.00am

10.00am

KEYNOTE 2 Peter Boyce & Wong Sin Yeng 10.30am - 10.45am Morning Tea Connections to Collections Chair: David Sole

With a little Help from our Friends Chair: Dale Arvidsson

Simply Science Chair: Phill Parsons

Aboriginal Connections John Bentley

Bioregion Working Group Paul Tracey

Australia’s Ex-situ Collections Judy West

NZ Threatened Plant Collections Jack Hobbs

Eye on Nature Micheline Newton

Seed Images Brook Clinton

Backyard to Biolinks

Rediscovering our own Rhodos

Chris Russell

Robert Hatcher

Ex-situ Seed Caroline Chong

Carnivorous Plants Greg Bourke

Help from our Friends John Zwar and Cherie Gerlach

Practical Solutions to Ex-Situ Conservation Stig Pederson & David Taylor

11.00am

12.00pm

1.00pm

11.00am

12.00pm

1.00pm

12.45am - 1.30am

Lunch

2.00pm

3.00pm

Social Climber - Media Dale Dixon

More than Volunteers John Bentley

Care for the Rare John Arnott

Inspiring Chinese Visitors Stephen Speer

Wildlife Gardening Laura Mumaw

Verification of Diospyros Nicky Fidler

Financial Sustainability Simon Spellicy

Scholarship Success Steven Halliday

Botanical Ageism James Shugg

2.00pm

3.00pm

3.00pm - 3.20pm Creating more diverse and inclusive organisations Lucinda Hewitson, Diversity Inclusion 3.20pm - 3.40pm The Culture of SA Police & the strategies required to achieve gender equity Grant Stevens, SA Police Commissioner 3.40pm - 4.00pm

BGANZ AGM John Sandham & Eamonn Flanagan

4.00pm

4.00pm

4.00pm - 4.15pm Afternoon Tea

5.00pm

4.15pm - 6.00pm*

4.15pm - 6.00pm*

Botanic Records Education Network Michelle Newton & Aaron Harrson

Botanic Records Officer Network Allan Matchett & Nicky Fidler

4.15pm - 6.00pm*

Professional Development John Sandham & Kelly Bramhill

4.15pm - 6.00pm*

Demographic & Diversity John Arnott & Tarnya Van Driel

6.00pm

5.00pm

6.00pm 6.00pm End of formal proceedings for the day 6.30pm - 8:00pm Schomburgk Pavilion Refreshments and tours of the Museum of Economic Botany with a very special must see guest!

Hickinbotham

Broughton

Ferguson

Education Room Goodman Building

Lecture Room Goodman Building

As these groups only have the opportunity to meet every two years the time allocated for these groups is to allow enough time for the completion of business. Groups that complete their business are welcome to finish earlier ** Sponsored by the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources

*

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Tuesday, October 24 2017 7.30am

Check In Goodman Building Lecture Room

8.00am

FIELD TRIP TWO

8.00am

8.00am Depart Goodman Building 9.30am Arrive Currency Creek Arboretum

9.00am

FIELD TRIP ONE 8.00am Depart Goodman Building

9.00am 8.30am Arrive Wittunga Botanic Garden

9.30am - 9.45am Morning Tea

9.30am - 9.45am Morning Tea

10.00am

10.00am 9.45am

Depart Wittunga Botanic Garden

11.00am

11.00am 9.45am - 12.30pm

Tour Currency Creek Arboretum

12.00pm

1.00pm

10.45am - 12.30pm

12.00pm

Mount Lofty Botanic Garden

12.30pm - 12.45pm Travel to Goolwa Hotel, Goolwa

12.30pm - 1.15pm

1.00pm

Lunch

12.45pm - 1.30pm

Lunch Goolwa Hotel, Goolwa

1.15pm

Depart Mount Lofty Botanic Garden

1.30pm Depart

2.00pm

2.00pm 1.55pm - 3.15pm

Tour Cox Scrub (self-guided)

1.45pm - 3.45pm

3.00pm

WAITE Arboretum

3.00pm 3.15pm -3.30pm Afternoon Tea

4.00pm

3.45pm - 4.00pm Afternoon Tea

3.30pm

4.00pm Depart WAITE Arboretum and return to

Depart Cox Scrub and return to Goodman Building

Goodman Building

6.00pm

4.00pm

6.00pm 6.00pm - 8.00pm

Small Bar Tour East End Adelaide

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Wednesday, October 25 2017

8.00am

8.00am

8.00am - 8.45am

Registration

9.00am

9.00am

8.45am - 9.30am

KEYNOTE 3 Michael Lovave 9.30am - 10.15am

democracyCo Emily Jenke and Emma Lawson

10.00am

10.00am

10.15am - 10.30am Morning Tea

11.00am

12.00pm

Connections to Collections Chair: Paul Tracey

Role & Identity Chair: John Arnott

Simply Science / Education Chair: Lesley Hammersley

Plants Plus Nurseries Mandy Thompson

Adapting to Climate Change Michael McNabb

Oliveating Olives John Siemon

The Calyx Christiana McGhee

Surveillance Activities Greg Fraser

The Impact of Invasive Pathogens Brett Summerell

Conservatory Design Peter Byron

The Living Classroom Michael Connor

Poke-Tanical Ngaire Gilligan

Who are your Visitors? Stephen Speer

Look Both Ways Jimmy Turner

ASBP Damian Wrigley

11.00am

12.00pm

12.30pm - 12.45pm Lunch

1.00pm

Major Events Panel Chair: Paul Tracey

Role & Identity / Interpretation Chair: John Arnott

Connections to Collections Chair: Lesley Hammersley

Cultural and Commercial Events Panel Session Nadia Parker, Thomas Finnerty, Kris Charlton and Phil Rankine

Preserving History Jessica Hood

Learning About threatened Plants Jenny Guerin

Interpretation Undressed Jacqui Kennedy

Whip Bird Walk Robert King

2.00pm

1.00pm

2.00pm

1.45pm - 2.15pm Encouraging Botanic Gardens to Do More Conservation

Paul Smith 2.15pm - 2.45 Seasol

Alick Osborne

3.00pm

3.00pm

2.45pm - 3.15pm Botanic Gardens Open Day

Paul Tracey & Peter Byron 3.15pm - 3.45pm Conclusion of Congress Business / Chair Next Stop Wellington BG 2019, John Sandham and David Sole 3.45pm - 4.00pm Afternoon Tea

4.00pm

5.00pm

New Council Meeting

Adelaide Zoo

State Herbarium

4.00pm

Museum of Economic Botany

BGSA Education Initiatives Little Sprouts Kitchen Garden Learning Programme & Stewardship of Endemic & Endangered Species (SEEDS)

7.30pm - 11.30pm

8.00pm

8.00pm

BGANZ Official Dinner BGANZ Awards MC Michael Mills National Wine Centre, Exhibition Room Evening Concludes

Hickinbotham 20 BGANZ 8th Congress

Broughton

Ferguson

5.00pm

Lecture Room Goodman Building


Field Trips Please note that pre-registration for field trips is required. Field Trips are included for all full registration fee types. Attendees are requested to meet at the Goodman Building Lecture Room by 7:30 AM

Field Trip One

Field Trip Two

Mt Lofty Botanic Garden, Wittunga Botanic Garden and Waite Arboretum Take a tour of the Mount Lofty and Wittunga Botanic Gardens which, along with the Adelaide Botanic Garden, form the Botanic Gardens of South Australia.

Currency Creek Arboretum and Cox Scrub Visit the Currency Creek Arboretum, which is run by Dean Nicolle who specialises in eucalypt research. There are over 800 different eucalypt species to admire. During this trip you will also visit Cox Scrub Conservation Park, which is classified as an IUCN Category III protected area with over 350 plant species recorded, over 80 species of birds, 15 species of mammals, 11 species of reptiles and 6 species of frogs.

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At Seasol we are in the business of growing and nurturing! And not just plants, but strong communities, a happy healthy workplace and a sustainable environment. We think everyone should have the opportunity to enjoy some kind of garden or grow their own food and to do it naturally. We want every kid to get their hands dirty and discover that tomatoes don’t grow in the supermarket. And we want all of you to feel confident that you can create a beautiful garden in the wet, the dry and everything in between. So we make products to help you do just that. Beyond the home garden, our products have been trialled and tested in fields by farmers,orchardists and commercial growers who have been using our products for over 40 years. Seasol’s garden product range is designed to make your garden sing! From our signature garden health treatment Seasol, to organically based fertilizers and soil conditioners and innovative water saving products, we make it possible to create a beautiful, productive garden in any conditions. We also make it possible for farmers and commercial growers to grow healthier crops, improve soil health and deliver higher yields with greater efficiency. Seasol started as a small Tasmanian based Seaweed Company. In 1984 it was purchased by Eric Haynes, a coal miner from England who had migrated to Australia with his wife Molly in the 1950’s. At the time the company was manufacturing and selling a product called Seasol, a plant health tonic and soil conditioner made from Bull Kelp (Durvillaea potatorum) washed ashore on King Island. Although not widely recognized, the product was generating significant interest locally among farmers and commercial growers who saw improved growth and quality in their crops when Seasol was applied.

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Today Seasol is still 100% Australian made and owned and organic. Eric remains a driving force behind the business, along with his daughter and Company Director Lisa Boyd. The company employs over 60 people and is the only seaweed company on the home garden market that takes its product from harvest to manufacture. The commercial arm of the business continues to thrive and with significantresources going into R&D, Seasol is proud to be associated with some of the biggest farms and commercial growers in the country. Having pioneered the seaweed category, we are passionate about our products, but we are equally passionate and committed to our people. It’s the people who have made this business successful and as we strive to be recognised as a workplace of choice (quite uncommon in the manufacturing sector) we are very clear about the environment we want to maintain... an environment that is safe, fair, fun, supportive, honest and respectful...an environment where everyone is heard, and everyone gets to share in the company’s success.


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Social and Networking Functions Monday Social Night A night of networking, refreshments and exclusive after hours tours of the Museum of Economic Botany, with a very special must-see guest... Meet at Schomburgk Pavilion, Adelaide Botanic Garden.

Proudly sponsored by Coopers Brewery and Jacobs Creek Winemakers. Included in full registration and Monday day registration fees. Tickets for guests can be purchased for $35.

Tuesday Night Small Bar Tour Capped at 40 guests

Come and explore some of Adelaide’s famous small bars! Be led along on a secret route, where you can let your hair down, have a drink, enjoy some food and network with congress delegates, while experiencing four popular small bars in Adelaide’s East End. The tour runs from 6 pm – 8 pm, and delegates will spend approximately 30 minutes in each bar, before following your guides along the route to discover the next bar.

The tour includes a complimentary drink, complimentary nibbles, and a drink voucher that can be used towards any drink at any of the bars along the tour. Drink specials are also available throughout the night for you to purchase your own drinks. We look forward to taking you on a journey through Adelaide’s popular East End, and showing you some of Adelaide’s favourite small bars and night spots!

The small bar tour is capped at 40 guests, so get in quick if you want to be part of it!

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2018 Congress Congress Presentations - Abstracts

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Living collection verification, a case study of Diospyros. Dr Nicola Fidler1 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia Biography: Nicky joined the Botanic Gardens of SA in 2000, after returning home to Adelaide following a PhD at the University of Queensland in the field of molecular plant pathology. She oversees Collections Policy and teaches botany in the Education programme. The verification process applies the blowtorch of scientific credibility to the information we supply to visitors on our display labels. A large proportion of any Botanic Garden’s Living Collection is trivially easy to verify but the remainder represent a greater or lesser technical challenge to time-poor horticultural and botanical staff, who may also lack specialist expertise with respect to many genera. The Botanic Gardens & State Herbarium of South Australia’s Living Collection holds approximately 30 species and subspecies of Diospyros, a large pantropical genus in the family Ebenaceae.

A request for more information from Botanic Gardens Conservation International prompted examination of the whole collection, which is shared between the three Gardens of our estate. For just over a year, to capture the full cycle of flowering to fruit development, extensive photography, a pressed collection and leaf specimens for DNA barcoding were completed. Confirmation of most species was straightforward. However, mature plants assigned to the South African species D. whyteana displayed two clearly different growth habits, flower forms and fruits. Immature specimens were difficult to distinguish. Plants with compact shrubby habit, shiny leaves and (on the females) tiny flowers that develop into fruits which split to reveal red berries are D. scabrida, while taller specimens with duller leaves, larger cream flowers developing into green bladder-like fruits are D. whyteana.

Simply Science 2 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

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More than volunteers John Bentley1 Friends of The Melton Botanic Garden, Melton South, Australia

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Biography: John is President of the Friends and is managing the Friends in the developing the Melton Botanic Garden. John passionately manages a great team, oversees projects and helps make connections with many community groups to help build the garden. John is currently a member of the committee of the Australian Association of Friends of Botanic Gardens and a member of Plant Trust Committee which approves and registers National Plant Collections. The Melton Botanic Garden is a wholly community initiative and is being developed by volunteers on a 26ha site. However, much of the development would not have happened without the networks that have been built with community and businesses to establish partnerships. The most important partnership has been the long standing Work for the Dole (WftD) programs. These programs have been running for over 6 years with the Friends being seen as one of the most successful WftD initiatives in the region.

The presentation shows through various projects how the WftD participants have completed garden beds, built and installed structures, undertaken maintenance, propagation and other horticultural and landscaping tasks in the garden. These programs have been essential to the development of the MBG showing the numerous projects that have been completed. Integral to the success is the management of the programme by FMBG and the employment provider to produce the outcomes. Over the years projects undertaken by the Team include: Bushfoods Garden, Victorian Volcanic Plains Garden, Western Australian and South Australian Gardens, Southern African Garden and revegetation along Ryans Creek. The cooperation between the volunteers and WftD Team members in undertaking projects and tasks results in improving respect and good working relationships. The presentation discusses the keys for a successful WftD project in the aspects of management, people and negotiation. WftD partnerships with the Melton Botanic Garden has allowed local unemployed people to build on knowledge, skills and relationships through meaningful tasks and projects.

With a little Help from our Friends / Learning from Inside Out Broughton Room October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

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Scholarship success A journey from the USA to a garden blog. Steven Halliday1 1 Sydney Living Museums, Sydney, Australia Biography: Since 2009 Steven has played an integral role in maintaining Sydney Living Museums green spaces and gardens. In his role as Horticulturist you might find him at any one of Sydney Living Museums 12 properties completing a variety of tasks. In 2016 I was lucky enough to be awarded the inaugural Ruth Pope Scholarship from my workplace, Sydney Living Museums (SLM). This saw me visit the USA for two weeks visiting historic gardens and attending the APGA annual conference in Miami. My research goals for the trip were to look into volunteer utilisation, how to get information from the garden to the screen, website components and improvement of my horticulture knowledge. Meeting with staff at each property I was able to get an insight into some of the areas we were lacking at SLM, to discuss and learn from their successes. I would like to present on the story of my success of the scholarship trip from the beginning to now. That includes a basic run down of where I visited in the USA and what I discovered at each property, and a mention of my visit to APGA and meeting Australians from BGANZ. The main focus of the presentation will be on what happened after my return, how presenting my findings at an all staff meeting turned into further presentations and then onto creating a garden blog. From scratch I have been a large part in initiating an SLM garden blog, from the design stage to writing and photographing for posts I was involved. The blog is due to launch in the next few weeks and by October I should have lots to share with BGANZ. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on my abstract.

With a little Help from our Friends / Learning from Inside Out Broughton Room October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

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Social climber – building an engaged presence with social media Dr Dale Dixon1 Botanic Gardens & Centennial Parklands, Sydney, Australia

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Biography: Dale Dixon is a botanist and horticulturist with over 30yrs experience. He has worked in Far North Queensland, the Top End of the Northern Territory and most recently as the Curator-Manager of the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney. More and more people are turning to social media for news, information and entertainment. If you don’t have a presence on Face Book, Instagram, Twitter or the myriad of other platforms then you are most likely missing out on a valuable way to share relevant information relating to your passion or organisation. Using Twitter as an example I will discuss and share the tips and tricks to build a highly engaged worldwide audience of like minded or interested ‘plant’ people. The presentation with discuss all aspects of a ‘good’ tweet from message content, images, hashtags, tagging other users and replying to followers. I will also discuss how to manage your account ensuring you get engaged followers.

Connections to Collections 2 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM


With representation Australia–wide, Arborgreen is recognised as Australia’s first choice supplier for professionals engaged in the arboriculture, Landscape, Revegetation and Environmental industries. Our Mission is to provide a superior range of products and solutions to professionals in the industry, to assist them conduct their business to the highest standard, within budget and to the specified time frame. This is assisted by our national procurement team who ensure that our products are selected from only the highest quality manufacturers worldwide. Arborgreen’s continual research and development ensures that we are continually providing our clients with the latest and greatest products. It’s how we make sure we continue to be relevant to YOU! At Arborgreen we conduct business based on our core values of honesty, respect & integrity. Our commitment to exemplar customer service and continual improvement means that you don’t have to look anywhere else. We would love to work with you & share the Arborgreen experience! Our 30 years in the industry means we can be trusted to deliver ….come on…try us!

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Achieving financial sustainability through cultural tourism Simon Spellicy1, Mr Andy Lown1 1 Sandwalk Partners Pty Ltd, Paddington, Australia Biography: Simon Spellicy has a 25 year career with international experience gained in Senior roles globally. His primary focus has been in tourism, hospitality and service industries, including at Sydney Opera House. Simon has proven business turnaround and change management success in both the private and public sector. We will discuss strategies for cultural institutions to find new local, domestic and international audiences as well as sustainable revenue streams, including by working with the tourism sector. Sandwalk’s passion is unlocking opportunities that create realisable value for Australia’s leading visitor attractions, cultural institutions and entertainment venues. Examples of recent projects include developing market ready, commercial visitor experiences that are aligned with cultural purpose, addressing funding gaps from declining support from Government and corporate partners, and delivery of tourism engagement strategies to deliver new revenue streams. 


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The focus of the discussion will be on developing market ready, commercial visitor experiences that are aligned and integrated with your core cultural purpose and to deliver new revenue streams. A key facet is developing cooperative, strategic partnerships with other institutions, content providers and commercial operators. We will share knowledge of how to highlight efficiencies, new opportunities, and how to leverage existing assets to enhance current, and develop new experiences to increase visitation, participation and commercial returns.

Connections to Collections 2 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM


Innovation in conservatory design Peter Byron1 1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia Biography: Peter has been the General Manager at the Australian National Botanic Gardens since 2010 and is responsible for the operations of the Gardens in areas such as management of the living collection, major projects, visitor services and corporate services. The Australian National Botanic Gardens has used a number of innovative approaches in the design of a new tropical Conservatory. A national design competition was used to attract the best of Australia’s architects to design the Ian Potter National Conservatory. The design competition used a two staged approach to firstly short-list design teams and then finalists presented design concepts that were assessed by an eminent panel of judges.

The Conservatory will showcase Australian tropical plants and will also feature threatened species from Kakadu and Christmas Island national parks that have never before been cultivated. The Conservatory is planned to open to the public in 2019 and will be a major new attraction for the Australian National Botanic Gardens. The Conservatory will be one of the first projects from the Australian National Botanic Gardens’ Masterplan released in 2015.

Connections to Collections 3 Hickinbotham Hall October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

The winning design by architects CHROFI is an entirely new approach to Conservatory design. Instead of the traditional glass envelope design, the Conservatory features a layered skin that acts as a high performing insulative structure. Within the Conservatory, a series of rooms provide a variety of immersive spaces to experience the living exhibit.

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Inspiring Chinese visitors to come to our garden

Joseph Banks’ Florilegium Botanical Treasures from Cook’s First Voyage by David Mabberley, Mel Gooding. Afterword by Joe Studholme The first full-colour publication of the botanical illustrations commissioned by Joseph Banks, with commentaries. Published by Thames & Hudson

Stephen Speer1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia

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Biography: Stephen Speer has over 20 years experience in science-based communication and visitor experience programs with CSIRO and the Australian National Botanic Gardens. For the past ten years he has led the Visitor Experience team at the Gardens growing the visitor experience With significant increases in visitation from Asian countries in the past year, China represents an emerging international market to Australia. Chinese visitors want an authentic Australian experience that includes nature, food and shopping. We saw this as an opportunity to ensure our botanic garden was included on the travel itinerary for Chinese tour groups and free and independent travellers. Join us to learn how you can inspire and attract Chinese visitors to your gardens.

Connections to Collections 2 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

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Available from The Diggers Shop (Adelaide) and all good bookstores


Who are your visitors?

Understanding what motivates (or doesn’t motivate) visitors to your garden. Stephen Speer1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia

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Biography: Stephen has over 20 years experience in science-based communication and visitor experience programs with CSIRO and the Australian National Botanic Gardens. For the past ten years he has led the Visitor Experience team at the Gardens growing the visitor experience. Everyone desires to visit a botanic garden – or so we think? People are not all alike, they have different attitudes and preferences on how they spend their leisure time or where they visit on a holiday. Understanding what groups of like-minded consumers (or marketing segments) desire, allows botanic gardens to develop experiences, products and programs that target particular segments of the community. Therefore meeting the needs of these particular market segments – resulting in stronger community support, increased visitation and possibly increased revenue. Through visitor surveys and market research the Australian National Botanic Gardens is developing a better understanding of the experiences, products and programs motivating people to visit the Gardens. This knowledge has informed the Gardens marketing strategy and programme development, resulting in increased programme participation. Do you know what motivates people to visit your garden?

Connections to Collections 3 Hickinbotham Hall October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Plants plus: The role of botanic gardens nurseries beyond the curated collections Mandy Thomson1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria Cranbourne Gardens, Cranbourne, Australia

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Biography: Mandy has worked for over 20 years in the Horticulture industry. Mandy has held a number of roles at the Cranbourne Gardens including Public Programs Officer, Volunteer Coordinator and Horticulturist. Her current role is Team Leader Nursery Cranbourne Gardens. The RBGV Cranbourne Gardens Nursery plays an obvious role in supporting the Australian Garden collections and other horticultural programs. Perhaps less obvious is the potent role that the nursery plays in support of the Engagement and Impact agenda of the gardens. Over the past few years the Cranbourne Gardens Nursery has produced plants for a range of innovative and relevant outreach programs, taking the nursery well beyond the garden gates to the community. This paper will highlight our approach to connecting with community through the supply of plants to community gardens, bush food harvests and horticultural therapy programs. These have been the product of collaborations both internally and with the wider community. Our mission ‘every interaction advances the understanding and appreciation of plants’ has been animated by the Gardens Nursery though our involvement in the programs.

Connections to Collections 3 Hickinbotham Hall October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

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The living classroom: Create an outdoor learning space to establish a lifelong connection with plants Michael Connor1 Botanic Gardens , Wollongong, Australia

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Biography: Michael is coordinator education at WBG. He is best known for incorporating theatre into the Garden’s science based education programs. He also brings historical figures back to life, e.g. Courtney Puckey, to encourage visitors to engage with the Botanic Garden. The Discovery Centre at Wollongong Botanic has developed an exciting new programme for local schools, community groups and families called the Living Classroom. The programme aims to encourage a human connection with plants, by establishing spaces that are alive with useful plants (fruit, vegetables and herbs). This living classroom is a special outdoor learning, space made from recycled pallets, old furniture and living plants. The pallets are used to create no dig gardens and garden walls. The plants can grow out of, and over any structure in the living classroom, even in an old bath tub, or on old bicycle. Plants can even be grown in an old boot or car tyre. The living classroom when it is finished will be a great play area, learning sight and performance space.

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The Living Classroom project encourages children to spend more time learning outdoors, away from their mobile phones and screens, and to give them an opportunity to grow their own food. They will gain an improved knowledge and understanding of the natural world and to enjoy, and be inspired by plants. It will help them to develop an understanding of sustainability and plant conservation, and the important role of Botanic Gardens in this area. But most importantly they will be encourage to be innovative and creative and to enjoy themselves; by doing this there is every chance that they will learn and establish a lifelong connection with plants.

Role and Identity Broughton Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM


Cultural and commercial events: Panel session What are the opportunities that cultural and commercial events can bring to botanic gardens? What challenges do these events present and how can we overcome the challenges, to create successful events which achieve our objectives. Panel moderated by Nadia Parker, Event Program Coordinator, Botanic Gardens of South Australia Nadia Parker1 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia Nadia Parker is the Event Program Coordinator at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia. She has 10 years’ experience working on public events, across a range of areas including production, marketing and programing. She has worked on many of the major public events in Adelaide, including the popular WOMADelaide, Adelaide Fringe, Cabaret Festival, Australian International Documentary Conference and more. Nadia oversees and facilitates all major commercial events in the Garden including large concerts and festivals, as well as smaller arts and cultural events including performing arts, fitness and music. She also develops and produces new events for the Garden, including Heirloom Weekend, Love Notes, Wittunga 40th Anniversary and KIS in the Garden. Thomas Finnerty2 Botanic Gardens & Centennial Parklands, Sydney, Australia

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With over 16 years’ experience in the events industry, Tomás Finnerty is the Manager of Major & Special Events at the Sydney Botanic Gardens and Centennial Parklands, the largest open-air events space in Australia. Responsible for managing a venue hire business of over fifty high-profile major and special events per year, Tomás works with event clients and key stakeholders to deliver safe, enjoyable and quality events to over 1 million patrons at Sydney’s most iconic outdoor venues.

Cultural & Commercial Events Hickinbotham Hall October 25, 2017 12:45 AM - 1:45 PM

Kris Charlton3 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

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Kris has been in horticulture for over 10 years, obtaining his horticultural and landscaping qualification whilst working in the private sector in Melbourne, and his arboriculture and project management qualification whilst working with Adelaide City Council. During his time at Adelaide City Council he worked on a number of large community events within the park lands and gardens, including Clipsal 500, Adelaide Fringe and the Garden of Unearthly Delights. This experience led to a great understanding for how events operate within a living landscape that is to be preserved. Kris is currently the Horticultural Supervisor at the Botanic Gardens of South Australia, where he works closely with the Event Program Coordinator to bring world class events and attractions to the Garden. Phil Rankine4 Space Events, Adelaide, Australia

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Phil Rankine is currently Adelaide’s busiest promoter, with his company Space Events bringing some of the world’s biggest music acts to Adelaide. Phil established the concert series at Botanic Park which has featured concerts by James Taylor, Santana, Stevie Nicks and the Pretenders, Yusuf Cat Stevens and Lionel Richie. Previously he produced the ‘A Night at Coopers’ concert series at Coopers Brewery, with concerts by John Farnham and Kate Ceberano, Elton John and Sting and Paul Simon. Phil is also the lead producer of ‘The (M)other Life’ musical, which is currently in pre production for a West End season in London in 2018. Phil has a Bachelor of Business from the University of SA and is an Adelaide local.

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Look both ways Jimmy Turner1 Botanic Gardens & Centennial Parklands, Sydney, Australia

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Biography: Jimmy Turner is currently the Director of Horticultural Management for the amalgamated Botanic Gardens and Centennial Parklands, which includes the Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, The Australian Botanic Garden Mount Annan, The Blue Mountains Botanic Garden Mount Tomah and Centennial Parklands. An inside view of the journey we are on to bring our 200 year old botanic garden’s living collection to current relevance. Botanic Gardens are measured by their Living Collections, yet how do we make them relevant in the modern era? In my opinion an internal view focussed solely on PRESERVING the collection at all costs causes friction with visitor needs and funding. There is delicate balance every garden has to find between becoming a parkland or display garden to attract visitors and the ever necessary need to be conservation repositories and scientific institutions. This requires us to look outside our fences as well as inside.

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I’ll be sharing the fascinating journey the Royal Botanic Garden & Domain Trust has undergone over the last 4 years in evaluating and reorganising its horticultural management, and the balance we hope to achieve between maintaining our living collections and engaging visitors. Will be discussing the review we have gone through including staffing, living collections & thematic planning, stocktaking & mapping, “sacred” plants, garden evaluations, tree sponsorship, display horticulture & The Calyx, interpretation & labelling, visitor engagement and use of the garden for major events.

Role and Identity Broughton Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM


Botanical ageism - Large old trees & botanic gardens in the anthropocene James Shugg1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

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Biography: James Shugg is an arboriculturist with Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria. He curates the eucalypt collection at Melbourne Gardens. His love of the Australian landscape and innate interest in the life it supports are preoccupations that he finds increasingly compelling. Large old trees perform vital ecological functions that are unique to their cohort, but they are disappearing rapidly from Australian and global landscapes. Their loss is likely to result in the further drastic decline and/or extinction of associated organisms and ecosystem functions. There are serious implications for biodiversity with landscape scale impacts that may even affect the functioning of the biophysical earth system.

Large old trees are defined and some of the characteristics that make them especially valuable are described. The status of large old trees, as informed by literature review, is briefly examined in relation to urban landscapes, agricultural landscapes and forests. Drivers of decline are described and actions required to arrest this decline are identified. Botanic Gardens are increasingly involved in ecological restoration activity around the world. Large old tree focussed conservation and restoration activity by Botanic Gardens organisations is advocated here. Urgent action is needed to prevent the loss of large old trees from many landscapes but institutional inertia is considered an impediment. Nineteenth century literature and philosophy is referred to for some insight as to how this inertia may be overcome.

Simply Science 2 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

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The Calyx: Connecting with plants through art and technology Christina Mcghee1 Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, Sydney, Australia

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Biography: Christina McGhee (B.Education (Primary), B.Liberal Studies (Biology, Art History & Theory)) develops and runs excursions for school students and events for families in The Calyx, a horticultural exhibition centre showcasing plants and plant science to the public. In 2016 The Royal Botanic Garden Sydney opened a spectacular new horticultural exhibition centre, The Calyx, to celebrate the Gardens’ 200th birthday. The building, designed as a multi-functional exhibition and events space, showcases plants from across the globe and contains the largest contiguous green wall in the southern hemisphere. Designed to have a rotating schedule of exhibitions, it opened in July 2016 with the inaugural exhibition Sweet Addiction: The Botanic Story of Chocolate. It has since contained a short-term floral display All About Flowers and the second major exhibition, opening September 2017, Pollination: A Love Story. In addition to an exhibition and function space, the building has a dedicated classroom allowing exciting new education programs to engage visitors with plants.

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Educators interpret the museum-style exhibition space as part of school excursions and holiday programs and use the classroom for handson activities, however the main success has been using technological learning tools to facilitate learning objectives, particularly in the creation of artworks. Utilising the Garden’s iPads, participants use iPad apps and photography to make digital artworks and scientific diagrams or create artistic interpretations of plants, and share them on the classroom’s large LCD screen. The creative responses are linked to themes within the exhibition and are a powerful method of extending and strengthening the participants’ engagement with plants. Join The Calyx Education Coordinator for practical activities for engaging students with plants through art and technology.

Connections to Collections 3 Hickinbotham Hall October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM


Oliveiating the problem: weeding out the olives John Siemon1 Australian Botanic Garden, Mount Annan, Australia

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Biography: John has spent the last 15 years working for the Royal Botanic Gardens Sydney managing laboratories and science infrastructure including the construction of the Australian PlantBank. John was appointed the Curator Manager of the Australian Botanic Garden in 2014. African Olive, Olea europaea subsp. cuspidata (Wall. ex G.Don) is a species introduced to Australia for horticultural purposes in the mid 19th century. Thriving on heavy clay soils the trees create a dense shady canopy that excludes the growth of native understorey plants resulting in the species being declared a noxious weed in New South Wales and South Australia. At the Australian Botanic

Garden at Mount Annan the woody weed has progressively consumed up to 80 hectares of the Garden. The prolific seeding species, which produces up to 25,000 fruits per tree, is now been squeezed out through a concerted effort to eradicate this species from the Garden’s landscape. Learn about the strategies being used to weed out the olive, including forest mulching, restoration methods and why a herd of goats were hired to eat their way through the olive forest.

Simply Science/ Education Ferguson Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Coopers Brewery Coopers Brewery is Australia’s largest remaining family-owned brewery, and although much has changed since the early days of brewing in wooden barrels, the family name remains synonymous with exceptional quality beers. Coopers ales, stout and lagers are lauded for their consistent, traditional quality, unaffected by the hand of progress. Coopers welcomes the BGANZ delegates to Adelaide’

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Care for the rare: Exploring the feasibility of establishing a multisite conservation collection in Victoria John Arnott1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria Cranbourne Gardens , Cranbourne, Australia

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Biography: For over 30 years John Arnott has worked in a number of significant public garden including the Melbourne, Zoo the Geelong Botanic Gardens and more recently the Cranbourne Gardens. John has been an active member of the BGANZ community. The Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria and BGANZ Victoria is exploring the feasibility of establishing a multi-site conservation collection of Victorian rare and threatened plant species, which would be held at a number of regional botanic gardens across the State. The project has been branded “Care for the Rare� and dovetails into an existing Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) programme of the same name. The BGCI programme provides free, easy-to-use interpretation resources that any garden can use to clearly communicate conservation stories of threatened plants in their collections.

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The first stage of the project, an assessment of the Victorian rare and threatened flora for inclusion in the project, was completed in 2016. The second stage of the project is to seek expressions of interest from regional botanic gardens to participate in the programme. This would be facilitated through onsite inspections and assistance in the development of specific Conservation Collections Plans for each participating garden The final stage/s of the project, plant production and distribution of plant material to participating gardens, are yet to be fully scoped. The Working Group will actively be seeking funding support to implement these stages. This paper will discuss the project and detail how RBGV and BGANZ Vic is looking to increase the capacity for regional botanic gardens to participate in a meaningful way to facilitating a plant conservation agenda.

Simply Science 2 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM


From backyards to biolinks: the role of RBG Victoria in urban greening Chris Russell1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Cranbourne, Australia

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Biography: Chris Russell is the Executive Director of Cranbourne Gardens, a division of the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria dedicated to the conservation, research, education and display of Australian plants and ecosystems, including the award-winning Australian Garden. The Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria’s Cranbourne Gardens is located 45 kilometres south of Melbourne’s central business district on the city’s rapidly expanding urban fringe. It comprises a large and highly valuable area of conservation land alongside a contemporary landscape display of Australian plants, called the Australian Garden. Together these areas cover 363 hectares and provide examples of both intact, remnant indigenous ecosystems and a created garden showcasing Australia’s remarkable flora. This pairing of attributes

provides a unique opportunity, indeed a driving necessity, for Cranbourne Gardens to influence the composition and character of the landscapes beyond the boundary to create a green ‘botanic precinct’ connecting the Gardens to the surrounding neighbourhoods both physically and functionally. Scientific research conducted by the Gardens is used to inform an adaptive management approach to the conservation of natural areas on site and the greening of surrounding public open space, whilst the inspiration and education provided through the Australian Garden display and programmed public activities aim to foster the creation of sustainable home gardens using native plants in our local community.

Connections to Collections 1 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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The SENSW Bioregion Working Group, botanic gardens and land management agencies achieving plant conservation success Paul Tracey1, David Taylor2 Wollongong City Council, Keiraville, Australia, 2Australian National Botanic Garden , Canberra, Australia

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Biography: David has been the Curator Living Collections for 5 years at the ANBG Canberra, and Paul has been the Curator at the Wollongong Botanic Garden for 7 years, both believe in the benefits of working collaboratively on plant conservation actions. Established in 2013, this partnership is made up of a group of Botanic Gardens working with the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage on conservation actions for threatened species located within the NSW South East Corner bioregion. The SE NSW Bioregion working group as it is now known officially, is a group of Botanic Gardens working in partnership with the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage and in collaboration with land managers and custodians, with the aim to improve the trajectory for, and seek greater knowledge of the rare and significant flora and the biota they support within this bioregion. The group achieves this vision by using each other’s strengths, knowledge, expertise and resources to expand its ex-situ conservation actions on threatened and significant species as well as prioritising action and avoiding duplication across living collections.

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Despite the partnership being established only 4 years ago, the success of this partnership has seen recognition from Land Management agencies that the ex-situ conservation actions of botanic gardens are vital to species survival with conservation outcomes for a number of threatened species. The presentation also highlights the additional benefits being realised through knowledge and resource sharing, joint promotion and access to resources though an inter-government partnership that individual agencies would not otherwise have.

With a little Help from our Friends Broughton Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM


Are Australia’s ex-situ plant collections conservation ready ? Dr Judy West1, David Taylor1, Martin Henery1, Dr Zoe Knapp2 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia, 2Australian Biological Resources Study, Canberra, Australia

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Biography: Judy West is the Executive Director of the Australian National Botanic Gardens. Botanical expertise includes plant conservation biology with research interests primarily in systematic botany. The ex-situ collections held at the Australian National Botanic Gardens – both living plant and seed collections – represent more than 300 EPBClisted threatened plants. Most botanic gardens hold ex-situ collections not only for display and education purposes, but also for conservation, offering different means of ensuring the survival and long term status of threatened species. In order for the ex-situ collections to be effective for conservation, recovery activities and useful for a range of research options, they should represent the genetic diversity of the species in the wild. To better understand what we hold in our collections, we developed a methodology to assess ANBG threatened species living plant and seed collections to determine their

genetic representativeness. These analyses indicated that the majority of EPBC-listed threatened plants are represented in the ANBG’s collections by fewer than five putative genotypes. Using a small proportion of these threatened species as targets, we explored different means to improve the genetic diversity of the exsitu collections within our botanic garden. This phase of the project stimulated a number of unexpected positive outcomes that will be beneficial to other botanic gardens in managing their ex-situ threatened plant collections, aiming to provoke thought and consideration of how and why we collectively prioritise, manage and triage our ex-situ collections. This project represents a key first step in supporting targeted development and enhancement of exsitu collections of priority threatened species in Australia as a resource for potential recovery efforts. Results will inform future development of Australia’s Plant Collection.

Simply Science 1 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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Learning about the threatened plants of South Australia Dr Jenny Guerin1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia

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Biography: Seed Research Officer at the South Australian Seed Conservation Centre since 2009. Previously held post doc positions in the University of Adelaide Dept. of Horticulture, Viticulture and Oenology and CSIRO Division of Horticulture working on pollination and seed development. The South Australian Seed Conservation Centre has been collecting and storing seeds for over a decade and has approximately 75% of the threatened flora of South Australia conserved ex-situ. Over years of field work staff members have collected seeds from wild plant populations across the state. However, not everyone is able to travel to remote areas and see these significant plants growing in their natural habitat. The Centre strives to provide opportunities for the public to learn more about our threatened flora through the Seeds of South Australia website, school education programs, plantings in the Botanic Gardens and growing plants for reintroduction.

Connections to Collections 4 Ferguson Room October 25, 2017 12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

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Seeds of South Australia Dan Duval1, Thai Te2, Rex Croft1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, Nature Glenelg Trust, Mt Gambier, Australia

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Biography: Dan has worked as the Senior Seed Collection Officer at the Seed Conservation Centre since 2003 managing the seed collection programme and has extensive experience in plant identification, seed collection and germination research. The Seeds of South Australia website is an online resource designed to provide information and images from field work and laboratory studies conducted by the South Australian Seed Centre since 2003. The content includes photographic images of plant species in several life stages from seedlings to mature plants, with detailed pictures of flowers and fruits and microscopic images of seeds. Also included are descriptions of plant and seed anatomy and information about flowering times, seed ripening, seed collection and processing, viability, dormancy mechanisms and germination protocols. A tool for seed identification and comparison of plant or seed images has been built in. Each species page has a link to the entry in the State Herbarium Census of South Australian Plants and Australia’s Virtual Herbarium distribution data. Data is also displayed for IBRA subregional distribution and status and work is in progress to search by subregion. The initial focus of the website is on threatened plant species and will fill a knowledge gap in the identification and utilisation of native seeds from the state.


Toro Australia is a leading supplier of quality, innovative irrigation and landscape equipment solutions to the residential, commercial, municipal and golf markets. Established in Australia for over 40 years, Toro has built an enviable reputation for innovative solutions to everyday watering and landscaping needs. From irrigation system design through to installation and commissioning, Toro provides ongoing support and personalised advice to end users. Our extensive range of irrigation products include Australian made drip tube and mini sprinklers, spray pop-ups, control systems, sensors and filtration. Toro also offers a wide range of mowers and turf care equipment for the commercial, municipal, golf course, construction and underground utility markets. Designed to deliver outstanding results, our investment in the latest technologies helps make every project profitable and reliable. Our extensive range of professional-grade products are available from our national dealer network, comprising over 500 irrigation outlets and 140 equipment outlets. 53 Howards Road Beverley SA 5009 Phone: 08 8300 3633 Fax: 08 8445 9705 Email: info.au@toro.com Website: toro.com.au

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NZ botanic gardens and threatened plant conservation Jack Hobbs1 Auckland Botanic Gardens, Auckland, New Zealand

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Biography: Jack Hobbs has been Manager of Auckland Botanic Gardens (ABG) since 1997, and he has held other prominent roles including President of the Royal NZ Institute of Horticulture. His focus as Manager includes fostering sustainability initiatives and developing effective partnerships. This presentation outlines the collective role that NZ botanic gardens play in protecting plant biodiversity in NZ, and how Auckland Botanic Gardens is creating awareness of the plight of threatened plant species to diverse audiences through themed plant collections and interpretation. Also highlighted is the specific contribution NZ botanic gardens can make in a new partnership with the NZ Department of Conservation (DOC).

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In April 2017 BGANZ-NZ group signed an MOU with DOC to improve collaboration on mutually important conservation projects. It is envisaged this new partnership will deliver improved outcomes for threatened plant projects in NZ. The MOU recognises the unique contribution botanic gardens can play in the conservation of threatened plant species. In particular botanic gardens have horticultural and propagation expertise that can be applied to ex situ conservation through curating living plant collections and seed banking of threatened plant species. This work will be facilitated through the MOU, as will collaborative threatened plant research projects.

Connections to Collections 1 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM


Eye on nature, making the ordinary extraordinary Micheline Newton1 Auckland Botanic Gardens, Auckland, New Zealand

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Biography: Micheline Newton is Visitor Services Manager at Auckland Botanic Gardens and she is a trustee of NZ Gardens Trust. Her role enables her to realise her passion for connecting people and plants . This paper highlights the value of collaborative partnerships as exemplified by ‘Eye on Nature’, an event delivered by Auckland Botanic Gardens (ABG) and the Manukau Beautification Trust. The art of survival; Incredible Edibles; Clear Cool Creatures, these are just some of the themes explored through this highly successful annual event. The event brings various partners together to foster creative thinking about the environment. It is made up of various elements including three school-only activity days (1500 kids), art competitions for kindergartens, cooking competition for senior students, wearable arts competition and fashion show. The finale is a family event (10,000 attendees) where partners from the community and environmental organisations enjoy a fun day sharing their stories and activities at the Gardens.

Eye on Nature provides an opportunity for many community organisations and groups to promote their environmental messages. It also connects them with other like-minded individuals and organisations and leads to sharing of resources and ideas. The environmental messaging resonates with families who attend the schools days and family event and inspires them to actively engage with nature and consider environmental solutions in their everyday lives. Enduring collaborative relationships have also been made as a result of the event enabling further public engagement.

With a little Help from our Friends Broughton Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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Carnivorous plants - The most important plant group in your living collection Greg Bourke1 Blue Mountains Botanic Garden, Mount Tomah, Australia

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Biography: Greg has been fascinated with nature since he was a child but it was carnivorous plants that really captured his interest. Author of two books, Greg has traveled extensively in Australia and SE Asia studying this unusual group of plants. Did you know there are over 260 species of carnivorous plants across Australia and New Zealand? In fact there is a native carnivorous plant growing within a few kilometres of your botanic garden. Come on a journey around the region from subalpine habitats to the tropics

and arid deserts where you’ll meet some of the rarest, strangest and hungriest plants in the world all of which have turned the tables on the animal kingdom. Learn how this unusual and diverse group of plants can not only become an important part of your living collection but how they can capture the imaginations of the next generation of botanists, conservationists and horticulturists.

Connections to Collections 1 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Jacobs Creek Jacob’s Creek™ is one of Australia’s leading wine brands, offering quality contemporary wines with great varietal expression since its launch in 1976. Jacob’s Creek is the place where Johann Gramp planted his first vines in 1847, thus founding the Gramp & Sons business and a history of winemaking innovation over 170 years ago.

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Adapting a world-renowned botanical landscape to climate change: Landscape succession strategy, Melbourne Gardens Michael McNabb1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

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Biography: Michael McNabb is the Manager Horticulture at the Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria and has been working in the horticulture field for over thirty five years. Scope of responsibilities include horticultural maintenance, living plant collections, turf and nursery management programs. Melbourne Gardens comprises of 38 hectares of living plant collections containing 48,000 specimens from 8,400 taxa originating from a broad geographical distribution across the globe. Melbourne’s climatic predictions for 2090 indicate significantly hotter and drier conditions. In response to these threats, and to manage the risk of diminishing water supplies and an aging tree population, the Gardens have developed a Landscape Succession Strategy (LSS). The purpose of the LSS is transition of the existing landscape towards the projected climate of

2090, whilst retaining heritage character, species diversity and green space for future generations. Development of the LSS included mapping of landscape microclimates, auditing of living plant collections against future climate suitability, and implementation of more efficient irrigation. While the outcomes of the LSS are still emerging, early results are encouraging. A mean cooling effect of 2°C in some zones of the landscape have been identified; about 65% of the 5,000 plant taxa reviewed have been deemed to be ‘suitable’ for 2090 climate conditions; and landscape water use research has informed water use efficiency. The long life spans of living assets and projected climatic changes require well-directed management decisions towards achieving an effective vegetation succession. The LSS is a valuable planning framework to integrate the protection of the urban landscape against climatic risks, and provides a reference for other botanic gardens to consider as a climate adaption template to maintain viable green landscapes into the future.

Role and Identity Broughton Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

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Ex-situ seed conservation and research planning: priorities and progress for threatened and significant plants. Dr Caroline Chong1,2, Tom North1, Dr Lydia Guja1,2 National Seed Bank, Australian National Botanic Gardens, Acton, Australia, 2Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research, CSIRO National Research Collections Australia, Acton, Australia

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Biography: My current projects include developing strategic ex-situ plant conservation plans and research on the seed storage and germination requirements of Australia’s native flora. Research background: Seed banking, plant survival strategies, population variation and evolution in changing environments. Ex-situ conservation actions, including seed banking and plant cultivation as living collections, are integral to safeguard plant resources, enhance our botanical knowledge and address national and international commitments to preserve threatened species. At the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG), as at Botanic Gardens globally, seed and plant resources made available through

ex-situ conservation efforts include germplasm, image data and biological trait data that promote scientific research, horticulture and education and inspire public engagement with plant conservation. These resources are critical to evaluate the potential for threatened species recovery and to employ co-ordinated in-situ and ex-situ conservation strategies as our natural environments continue to change. In this presentation we will synthesise and discuss priorities for ex-situ conservation and research using Commonwealth National Parks threatened and significant species and current programs at the National Seed Bank, ANBG, as case studies. We will touch on common questions including “How do we prioritise ex-situ conservation and research for significant plant species? What biological knowledge gaps and resource gaps need to be addressed to drive ex-situ conservation plans?� Further linkages and potential opportunities for collaborations across research centres to foster strategic ex-situ conservation plans will also be highlighted.

Simply Science 1 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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Making Aboriginal cultural connections happen John Bentley1, Damien Loizou2, Joanne Layton3 Friends Of The Melton Botanic Garden, Melton South, Australia, 2Djerriwarrh Health Services, Melton, Australia, 3 Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency, Melbourne, Australia

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Biography: John is President of the Friends and is managing the Friends in the developing the Melton Botanic Garden. John passionately manages a great team, oversees projects and helps make connections with many community groups to help build the garden. John is currently a member of the committee of the Australian Association of Friends of Botanic Gardens and a member of Plant Trust Committee which approves and registers National Plant Collections. The Melton Botanic Garden initiative and partnership with the Aboriginal community involving the Djerriwarrh Health Services Melton Men’s Aboriginal Group, Aboriginal Parent’s Group and Friends of the Melton Botanic Garden creates a safe space for Aboriginal people to connect to Country, through ceremony spirit dreaming through art symbols and dance.

The presentation shows through the recently created Bushfoods Garden and especially the Victorian Volcanic Plains Aboriginal Plant Usage Garden, the Indigenous Peoples Garden and indigenous plantings how we have created a sense of connection through the plant collections to medicinal, ceremonial, food source plants and other plant uses which had been lost for decades through the colonization process of this Country. These connections are fundamental to create meaningful connections for our First Nation people and to build the bridge to reconciliation. It is important for Aboriginal Australians to rebuild their culture, ways of knowing and being to Land, Waterways and Country. These partnerships with botanic gardens allow Aboriginal people to build on knowledge through equitable experiences. The gardens also provide information to visitors who seek to understand Aboriginal culture and their plant use. These cultural connections are demonstrated in this presentation by the creation of the ceremonial circle, art work and mural, Aboriginal community activities and the plantings.

Connections to Collections 1 Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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Rediscovering our own Rhododendron(with a little help from our Friends) Robert Hatcher1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Crafers, Australia

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Biography: Horticultural Supervisor at Mount Lofty Botanic garden currently,40 years in Horticulture in total both in Australia and overseas mainly in PNG, with a wide interest in many plant groups. Have been National and State President of the Australian Rhododendron Society. After the IUCN red list of Rhododendrons was brought out in around 2010 the Australian Rhododendron Society started making plans to attempt to collect new material of the Australian Rhododendron species from the peaks of Far North Queensland. After several attempts on their own and coming up

With a little Help from our Friends Broughton Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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against a Queensland Permit system that would only deal with Universities or similar institutions a partnership with James Cook University and Australian Tropical Herbarium was formed in 2013. Funding was gained from the Ian Potter foundation to fund research into the flora above 900 metres altitude in Far Nth Queensland to enable this partnership to collect new material of the Australian species in several locations in Queensland. This has been an interesting journey in terms of navigating the twists and turns of getting legitimate collection permits for the purposes of enhancing Botanic garden collections. This presentation will be about that journey.


Seed images - highlighting a vital part of botanic gardens’ living collections and research Dr Brook Clinton1, Dr Lydia Guja1 The National Seed Bank, Australian National Botanic Gardens; CSIRO, Canberra, Australia

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Biography: Dr Brook Clinton, imaging technician at ANBG and with CSIRO National Collections and Marine Infrastructure. I’m excited about the promise of collections digitisation to enable great research but also to incite curiosity and appreciation more widely. Digitised images supplement traditional biological collections and add valuable insights to the research that is carried out using these collections. Aside from the scientific value of digital images they are also an effective communication aid that incites curiosity and enthusiasm in new and varied audiences. At the National Seed Bank at the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) we have begun the digitisation of our conservation seed collections by taking high-resolution images of diverse seeds and fruits. The images form part of the record of accessioned

and curated seed collections and therefore contribute to the wealth of data that already exists for these particular species of Australian flora. Additionally, the seed images are research materials in their own right and are providing new and finely detailed trait data that is useful in taxonomic, ecological or conservation research. We will present some of the data collected to date and discuss the potential for new explorations of computer-aided morphometric analysis to reveal details of the biology of seeds that previously were inaccessible to measurement. While the preparation of seed images is a valuable research activity, perhaps equally as valuable is the fact that these images can be used to tap into the curiosity and enthusiasm of wide and varied audiences. We will conclude by sharing how our seed images have successfully been used as a scientific outreach tool and to inspire wonderful works of art.

Simply Science 1 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

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democracyCo Emma Lawson, Emily Jenke1 1 democracyCo Emma and Emily will be running a mini workshop to help conference participants codesign ways in which botanic gardens can work together to raise the profile of their collective work. The session will involve a particular focus on ways in developing ways that they might work together to involve the broader community. Biography Emma Lawson (co-CEO) is a policy and community engagement expert. She has worked at the highest echelons of the Public Service in SA and abroad. She offers an unparalleled understanding of the workings and challenges of government as well as extensive networks. Between 2010-2014 Emma headed up the Government’s centre for community engagement– the Participation and Partnerships team. Under Emma’s leadership the team was recognised by the United Nations, receiving a second placing in the category "Fostering participation in policy making through innovative mechanisms". Her team also received an award from IAP2 International for best practice community engagement and a commendation from the Future Gov 2.0 awards for leading use of social media by government in Asia Pacific and was recognised nationally for the best open data initiative ‘Unleashed’. She led the development of a policy called 'Better Together' which acts as a guide for public servants in the State government on how to effectively and successfully engagethe community.

Emma was a political adviser to the State Government in SA between 2005 and 2007. She also worked for the Upper House of Parliament in NSW running parliamentary inquiries, in the United Kingdom for the National Health Service and headed up a policy team within Cabinet Office negotiating agreements with the Federal Government in the areas of education, training, housing and Aboriginal affairs. Emily Jenke (co-CEO) is one of Australia’s most skilled engagement practitioners and an accomplished and talented facilitator of nearly 20 years. Emily enjoys a long term and trusted role with the Department of the Premier and Cabinet, having worked with them on their flagship engagement and democracy initiatives since 2010. In the last 12 months Emily has run 4 separate Citizens' Juries in SA (including the Safe Sharing of Roads Jury), and over her career spanning 18 years, has worked on many deliberative approaches at state, federal and local government level. Emily is highly regarded as a specialist in deliberative practice by her clients and peers and before creating democracyCo ran a thriving business in SA in this field. Emily also offers networks across Australian and internationally. Emily has an interest in the environment and for the last 8 years has sat on the SA Murray Darling NRM Board where she has driven an agenda equipping the board to put community at the centre of decision making. Emily is now the Presiding Member of the SA Native Vegetation Council and also runs a distinct and widely known boutique food business Talinga Grove with her family (husband Paul and three great kids) on the beautiful Fleurieu Peninsula.

democracyCo Hickinbotham Hall October 25, 2017 9:30 PM - 10.15 PM

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Wildlife gardening: strengthening community connections through caring for nature and place Laura Mumaw1 Gardens for Wildlife Victoria, Melbourne, Australia

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How might we collaborate with our communities to garden for conservation and in the process, foster native biodiversity, social connections, and human wellbeing? Laura will share insights from her many years in the zoo industry, her recent PhD research using Knox Gardens for Wildlife as a case study, and her current role with Gardens for Wildlife Victoria to stimulate fresh thinking about how botanic gardens can be a part of community partnerships that lead wildlife gardening programs. Wildlife gardening refers here to planting indigenous species, removing environmental weeds, adding habitat features like water and nesting

hollows, retaining mature trees, and protecting indigenous regrowth. It builds on domestic gardening, a nurturing relationship with nature that many urban residents have. Laura will describe key features that engage and support residents to wildlife garden to help conserve indigenous species of their municipalities, and the role of local government, community nurseries, and friends groups. She will show how a land stewardship ethic and purpose can emerge from wildlife gardening, and the effect wildlife gardening has on human wellbeing and connections with nature, place and community. Botanic gardens are well placed to be part of a new community-partnership form of wildlife gardening.

With a little Help from our Friends / Learning from Inside Out Broughton Room October 23, 2017 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

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Whip bird walk redevelopment Robert King1 Sunshine Coast Regional Council, Sunshine Coast, Australia

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Biography: Robert King is a Horticulturalist at Maroochy regional Bushland Botanic Garden, with an interest in Botanic Garden Horticulture. Whip Bird Walk Redevelopment update: I would like to give a short update on the Whip Bird Walk Redevelopment in the Maroochy Regional Bushland Botanic Garden. Project Background The original Whip Bird Walk was created in 2005 as a quick addition for the sculpture garden opening. In 2013 landscape architect Emma Baker from Delve Consulting was engaged by the SCC for the MRBBGARDEN to reinvigorate the

Whipbird Walk.in April 2015 Emma completed her drawings and concept work and the SCC, in partnership with the Friends, began implementing Stage 1 of the upgrades. Whipbird Walk will become a unique draw card for families to visit the Garden with few children’s walks available in the Southeast Queensland. The site called the Whipbird Walk is located in the south eastern corner within the Maroochy Regional Bushland Botanic Garden, Tanawha. It is a short (several hundred metres) looping trail beginning at the eastern lawns area, and entering into the natural remnant vegetation area, which is uniquely wild in the Botanic Garden. The main pedestrian pathway gently climbs up the Syncarpia ridge, splits into three separate loops and passes through the sclerophyll forests travelling down to the gully and into other vegetation zones.

The total upgrade to the Whipbird Walk includes: •

Remediation work on existing trails,

New entry statements,

Monkey Vine Village for selfdirected, interactive, nature based discovery opportunities for children.

Other upgrade areas Orientation Recreation Area Sensory Trail & Whipbird Walk Entry Outdoor Classroom Area and Observation Seating Area.

Connections to Collections 4 Ferguson Room October 25, 2017 12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

Practical solutions to the challenges of ex-situ conservation Steg Pedersen1, David Taylor2 Booderee Botanic Gardens, Australian National Botanic Garden

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Biography: David Taylor is Living Collections Curator at the ANBG Canberra. Steg Pedersen is curator at Booderee Botanic Gardens; both are working to improve opportunities for better ex-situ collecting for conservation and research potential as part of the SE NSW Bioregion working group. Many threatened plant species are typically grown from seed for use in research; as exsitu security; for re-introductions, landscape enhancement translocation and offset actions, with the aim of improving the trajectory for and gaining a better understanding of the species in question.

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However, propagation from seed is not always possible due to difficulties in obtaining viable seed, whether it can be readily germinated and cultivation and / or established. A practical alternative is the use of non-seed methods, primarily growing plants from cuttings or tissues culture. The key challenge whatever method is adopted is ensuring there is a traceable link to parentage and origin of the plants cultivated. This was the challenge that faced the south east NSW Bioregion working group as they mapped out how they would tackle the collection of over 5 threatened species of Pomaderris. Essential to underpin the specialised techniques are a standard agreed ex-situ procedures including a checklist for contacts for areas being visited, including communities and custodians.

Simply Science 1 Ferguson Room October 23, 2017 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM


‘Gotta find them all’ – how jumping on the social phenomena bandwagon can bring about effective botanical education Ngaire Gilligan1 Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coottha, Brisbane, Australia

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Biography: Ngaire Gilligan worked as a high school secondary science teacher, a biological control scientist (weeds) and an environmental educator before gaining her current role as the Education and Interpretation Coordinator for the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, Mt Coot-tha. The Pokémon Go craze that reinvented the Pokémon card game for our electronic savvy youth contains a number of core elements that make it an extremely attractive model for environmental education activities. For once, it is possible to turn the tables and encourage children to leave their electronic devices behind and embrace the wide open spaces with nothing but their imagination, a pencil and a piece of paper.

Poke-tanical is a school holiday activity developed in 2016 to take advantage of the Pokémon Go craze. At a basic level it involves children (aged 5-13) exploring different areas of the Botanic Garden with a ‘map’ in search of a range of plant and animal species found living there. An interactive battle element educates children about the problems posed to native species by weeds, feral animals and human activity. Run every school holidays, sessions of Poke-tanical have run at capacity for the past 12 months with no lessening in popularity. Each session is attended by over 100 participants, with strong evidence of a high level of repeat attendances by children from one holiday period to the next. Through exploring how Poke-tanical utilises the core elements that make Pokémon Go so popular, it is possible to develop an effective framework from which to create engaging children’s educational activities at a Botanic Garden.

Simply Science/Education, Ferguson Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

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Interpretation undressed – it’s in the bag! Jacqui Kennedy1 Botanic Gardens & Parks Authority, Perth, Australia

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All gardens pride themselves on the things they do well. It may be horticultural displays, interpretive signage, public artworks, publications, scientific discoveries, outstanding retail and food outlets, or maybe sponsorship and partnerships. It could be the quality of their education programs, guided walks, volunteer teams, the commercial success of their marketing and events, or maybe it’s their nursery propagation skills with challenging species, or perhaps it’s all about their landscape design and tranquil ambience. Whatever it may be, all gardens can share their triumphs and learn new things by sharing ideas.

Role and Identity/ Interpretation Broughton Room October 25, 2017 12:45 PM - 1:45 PM

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So how well is your garden doing at ‘interpretation’ and how effective are you at engaging the community? For instance, do you educate by stealth? Entertain and delight? Inform and educate? Do you evaluate and refine? Create and celebrate? Do you have a new artistic installation that tells a story, maybe a spectacular suite of signs, a theatre show or a new public education programme? Jacqui Kennedy from Kings Park & Botanic Garden, Perth WA, will reveal some tried and tested interpretive strategies and asks you to think about your ‘pride and joy’ interpretation examples to share with the group. By rummaging through this mixed bag of ideas, you will feel inspired to interpret your gardens in new and exciting ways, so visitors are engaged, connected and willing to support you and the environment generally. Be brave and dare to be different!


BGANZ’s potential role in the International Plant Sentinel Network Greg Fraser1 Plant Health Australia, Canberra, Australia

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Australia’s geographic isolation provides a natural barrier from many exotic pests that could damage our plant production industries and our unique natural environment. Isolation, however, is not enough given that pests can enter through natural means or by being brought into the country with the increasing movements of people and goods. Australia therefore has a rigorous biosecurity system operated in partnership between governments, community and industry to further mitigate risks from exotic pests. Established in 2000, PHA is a public company that facilitates decision making and funding for effective responses to emergency plant pests. PHA also independently advocates for and adds value to, the national biosecurity system. Utilising the Emergency Plant Pest Response Deed (EPPRD), a legal instrument that brings together governments and industries in formal response arrangements, PHA ensures that national incursion responses are timely, science based, transparent and effective. Botanic gardens and arboreta are in a unique position to provide vital information regarding plant health and thus contribute to the safeguarding of the world’s flora. This has been recognised with initiatives such as the International Plant Sentinel Network (IPSN). By surveying plants growing in botanic gardens and arboreta outside natural ranges, especially in countries

with similar climates, this programme provides a unique opportunity to monitor for presence and activity by non-native pests and diseases. The aim is a partnership to provide an early warning system of new and emerging pest and pathogen risks. Member gardens will help to provide scientific evidence regarding known quarantine organisms and potential new risks to inform plant health activities and thus help safeguard susceptible plant species worldwide. During 2016 Plant Health Australia developed an innovative cloud based system for monitoring pest activity. Functioning as a virtual coordination centre, the system enables multiple providers who hold information on nominated pests to easily and securely upload surveillance data. The information is automatically collated and a seamless integrated picture of pest status provided back to registered users and stakeholders. To enhance plant pest surveillance for plant conservation this system has the potential to support existing record management systems, increase cooperation between botanic gardens and facilitate a low-cost mechanism for exchange of information and creation of knowledge. It could provide an early warning system for botanic gardens and the wider community by identifying new pest and pathogen risks to a country’s native flora.

Role and Identity Broughton Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM

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Promoting our relevance: The importance of embracing the Botanic Gardens Australia and New Zealand Open Day Peter Byron1,3, Paul Tracey1,2 BGANZ Council, Wollongong Botanic Garden, Wollongong, Australia, 3Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia

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Biography: Paul Tracey is currently the BGANZ NSW Council member, and is also part of the open day working group. Paul is also the Curator of the Wollongong Botanic Garden and firmly believes in the need for Botanic Gardens to strongly promote our work in plant conservation at every opportunity to ensure we remain relevant to our funding bodies, but to also ensure greater public awareness on the importance of plants in supporting our everyday lives. Peter Byron currently holds the role of the BGANZ Treasurer, and is part of the open day working group. Peter is also General Manager of the Australian National Botanic Garden in Canberra and responsible for the operations of the Gardens in areas such as management of the living collection, major projects, visitor services and corporate services. Held recently for the second time, the BGANZ Open Day provides an opportunity for the 170 plus Botanic Gardens across New Zealand and Australia to come together on one day of the year to showcase to the broader community the important work we do.

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With the support of the Botanic Gardens network, BGANZ is dedicating time and resources toward this event with the aim of developing it into the key marketing and promotional platform to highlight the collective importance of all Botanic Gardens across the two countries, particularly educating a wider audience about the unique and critical role Botanic Gardens have in conserving plants and why that is so important to them. In its first two years the BGANZ Open Day has been an overwhelming success in terms of member gardens participation, community feedback and media exposure, but there is still opportunity to improve in terms of commitment within the sector to ensure it grows into a recognised environmental awareness event. The presentation will reconfirm the objectives of the event, debunk the myth’s and highlight to members BGANZ future plans to secure corporate sponsorships for this event and how this in return will benefit member gardens.

Promoting our relevance: The importance of embracing the Botanic Gardens Australia and New Zealand Open Day Hickinbotham Hall October 23, 2017 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM


With a little help from our friends John Zwar2,3, Cherie Gerlach1 The City of Port Augusta, Port Augusta, Australia, 2The Friends of The Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden, 3Port Augusta City Council’s Reference (advisory) Committee

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Biography: Cherie Gerlach was appointed Manager of The Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden in 2014. She has a background in media, communications, community engagement and marketing. Since her appointment she has built strong relationships to benefit the garden, by supporting staff and volunteers to achieve great things on limited funding, and has raised the Garden’s profile. John Zwar OAM proposed the establishment of The Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden in 1981 whilst in the role of Superintendent of Parks and Gardens at Port Augusta. He established a Friends support group for the proposed Garden in 1984 and after a great deal of lobbying, promotion and fund raising stage one opened in 1996. He is President of the Friends group, a member of Council’s Reference Group for the Garden and currently lectures in horticulture and related fields at TAFE SA. A very brief outline of the history of the Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden at Port Augusta SA including the role of friends in lobbying for the garden will be presented. Has this journey always been easy? The ebbs and flows from the Friends perspective of being passionate, but having limited control and influence has resulted in challenges when dedicated Friends interact with the bean counters and bureaucrats. From a management perspective discuss the benefits of working with Friends and some of the challenges of managing expectations with delivery, and more recently the issue of compliance through WHS for volunteers and Friends. Retaining and attracting volunteers is crucial (valuing them is a really good start).

Engaging Friends and allowing them to have influence in key decision making areas has enabled us with limited resources to be able to expand the garden, add to collections, host events, and conduct research projects. We also have defined roles and both parties respect these. Inspiring Friends is a two way street with volunteers and staff inspiring each other through working jointly on projects and sharing knowledge. The strength gained from Friends/ volunteers and staff working together can also enable the Friends to be a political force and have influence in shaping the future of the garden and selling the importance of the garden to decision makers. An example is the situation where Council considered closing the Garden last year. The political climate can change rapidly and needs careful management. Friends Corporate Memberships have also enabled the community to take ownership of the garden and see that their corporate dollars have been put to good use in developments such as The Arid Explorers (nature play) Garden. Their voice can have political clout when times get tough. Inspiring younger generations is critical. We started out with occasional kids activities, then a ‘find the animal walk’ was established as well, and now the hugely successful Arid Explorers nature play children’s garden has inspired a new demographic to visit. Young children bring with them young parents and many more people in their 30s now visit the garden with young children.

We inspire new Friends and volunteers by recognising and acknowledging their input through special thank you events such as morning teas, barbecues and discounts in our popular Bluebush Cafe and well stocked gift shop which includes a plant nursery? In summary, fostering the relationship between management, Friends and paid employees has ensured that the AALBG not only exists, but is able to develop and improve beyond what would be possible on our modest budget. Exploring new relationships (Botanic Gardens of SA, University of Technology Sydney and other research projects) allows us to fulfil our charter and share knowledge. Adapting to an ever changing financial and political climate means we have to plan ahead, prove our worth and succeed and our strong partnerships have enabled us to do this well.

With a little Help from our Friends, Broughton Room, October 23, 2017, 10:45 AM - 12:45 PM

Do we operate a garden or a tourist facility, or both? Proving our worth as a tourist facility enables us to maintain a significant collection of plants. As with all botanic gardens there is a balance between the two and adding to and improving our plant collection and displays attracts real plant enthusiasts, as well as general visitors who we hope leave at least a little more informed about the plants they see whilst enjoying the garden setting.

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Encouraging botanic gardens to do more plant conservation: tools and approaches Dr Paul Smith1 Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI), ,

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Biography: Paul was appointed Secretary General of BGCI in March 2015. Prior to this he was Head of the Millennium Seed Bank at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew for nine years. Paul trained as a plant ecologist and is a specialist in the plants and vegetation of southern Africa. Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI) has recently carried out a survey looking at how botanic gardens define themselves and how they measure success. The survey results suggest that the botanic garden sector is robust and healthy and that the core botanic garden activities related to scientific research, conservation, collections and education are central to the missions of most gardens. However, the survey also revealed that institutional measures of success are primarily to do with visitor numbers and funding, not collections, education, science or conservation. BGCI’s view is that the loss of plant diversity is the most urgent issue that the botanic garden community needs to address, and that botanic garden collection policies, scientific research, education and conservation activities should be focused on avoiding plant species extinctions. Furthermore, conservation impacts and outcomes should be amongst the highest institutional measures of performance and success. To this end, BGCI is promoting a cost-effective, rational and collective approach to plant conservation in botanic gardens worldwide. This involves the establishment of taxonomically focused consortia of botanic gardens working together to conserve challenging groups of species (e.g. oaks, dipterocarps etc.) and technical consortia sharing knowledge on disciplines such as red listing, seed conservation and ecological restoration. In addition, BGCI is launching an accreditation scheme incorporating all of the essential elements of a botanic garden, with special focus on programmes, activities, and capacity geared towards plant conservation. Benefits of accreditation include preferential access to specific funders.

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David J Mabberley AM, one of the world’s foremost botanical scholars, Painting by Numbers reveals Bauer’s innovative colour-coding technique for the first time. Ferdinand Bauer is seen by many as the greatest natural history painter of all time. Hand-picked by Joseph Banks, Bauer accompanied Matthew Flinders during his circumnavigation of Australia, and lived in New South Wales and Norfolk Island. This fascinating new study of Bauer’s work includes reproductions of never-before-published works from collections in Europe and Australia. David Mabberley will be giving a keynote presentation at the BGANZ 2017 Congress

www. n ews ou t h b oo k s .co m. au

Simply Science / Education, Ferguson Room October 25, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM


List of Presentations

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1. Living collections: Bridging research, education, conservation, and aesthetics’ Dr Peter Boyce1, Associate Professor Sin Yeng Wong2 1 Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich, Germany, 2University of Malaysia, Sarawak, Malaysia

13. The living classroom: Create an outdoor learning space to establish a lifelong connection with plants Michael Connor1 1 Botanic Gardens , Wollongong, Australia

2. Experiences from the advancement programme of the National Botanic Gardens Lae Papua New Guinea Michael Lovave

14. Cultural and commercial events: Panel session Nadia Parker1, Thomas Finnerty2, Kris Charlton1, Phil Rankine4 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, 2Botanic Gardens & Centennial Parklands, Sydney, Australia, 4Space Events, Adelaide, Australia

3. Botanic gardens: the opposition and the opportunity Professor David Mabberley1,2,3 1 Wadham College, University of Oxford, United Kingdom, 2Universiteit Leiden & Naturalis Biodiversity Center, , The Netherlands, 3Macquarie University and National Herbarium of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia 4. Living collection verification, a case study of Diospyros. Dr Nicola Fidler1 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia 5. More than volunteers Mr John Bentley1 1 Friends Of The Melton Botanic Garden, Melton South, Australia 6. Scholarship success - A journey from the USA to a garden blog. Mr Steven Halliday1 1 Sydney Living Museums, Sydney, Australia 7. Social climber – building an engaged presence with social media Dr Dale Dixon1 1 Botanic Gardens& Centennial Parklands, Sydney, Australia 8. Achieving financial sustainability through cultural tourism Mr Simon Spellicy1, Mr Andy Lown1 1 Sandwalk Partners Pty Ltd, Paddington, Australia 9. Innovation in conservatory design Mr Peter Byron1 1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia 10. Inspiring Chinese visitors to come to our garden Mr Stephen Speer1 1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia 11. Who are your visitors? Understanding what motivates (or doesn’t motivate) visitors to your garden. Mr Stephen Speer1 1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia 12. Plants plus: The role of botanic gardens nurseries beyond the curated collections Ms Mandy Thomson1 1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria Cranbourne Gardens, Cranbourne, Australia 64 BGANZ 8th Congress

15. Look both ways Mr Jimmy Turner1 1 Botanic Gardens & Centennial Parklands, Sydney, Australia 16. Botanical ageism - Large old trees & botanic gardens in the anthropocene Mr James Shugg1 1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Melbourne, Australia 17. The Calyx: Connecting with plants through art and technology Ms Christina Mcghee1 1 Royal Botanic Garden Sydney, Sydney, Australia 18. Oliveiating the problem: Weeding out the olives Mr John Siemon1 1 Australian Botanic Garden, Mount Annan, Australia 19. Care for the rare: Exploring the feasibility of establishing a multi-site conservation collection in Victoria Mr John Arnott1 1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria Cranbourne Gardens , Cranbourne, Australia 20. From backyards to biolinks: the role of RBG Victoria in urban greening Mr Chris Russell1 1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Cranbourne, Australia 21. The SENSW bioregion working group, botanic gardens and land management agencies achieving plant conservation success Mr Paul Tracey1, Mr David Taylor2 1 Wollongong City Council, Keiraville, Australia, 2 Australian National Botanic Garden , Canberra, Australia 22. Are Australia’s ex-situ plant collections conservation ready ? Dr Judy West1, Mr David Taylor1, Mr Martin Henery1, Dr Zoe Knapp2 1 Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia, 2Australian Biological Resources Study, Canberra, Australia 23. Learning about the threatened plants of South Australia Dr Jenny Guerin1 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia 24. Seeds of South Australia Mr Dan Duval1, Mr Thai Te2, Mr Rex Croft1 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia, 2Nature Glenelg Trust, Mt Gambier, Australia


25. NZ botanic gardens and threatened plant conservation Mr Jack Hobbs1 1 Auckland Botanic Gardens, Auckland , New Zealand 26. Eye on nature, making the ordinary extraordinary Ms Micheline Newton1 1 Auckland Botanic Gardens, Auckland, New Zealand 27. Carnivorous plants - The most important plant group in your living collection Mr Greg Bourke1 1 Blue Mountains Botanic Garden, Mount Tomah, Australia 28. Adapting a world-renowned botanical landscape to climate change: Landscape succession strategy, Melbourne Gardens Mr Michael McNabb1 1 Royal Botanic Gardens Victoria, Melbourne, Australia 29. Ex-situ seed conservation and research planning: priorities and progress for threatened and significant plants. Dr Caroline Chong1,2, Tom North1, Dr Lydia Guja1,2 1 National Seed Bank, Australian National Botanic Gardens, Acton, Australia, 2Centre for Australian National Biodiversity Research, CSIRO National Research Collections Australia, Acton, Australia 30. Making Aboriginal cultural connections happen Mr John Bentley1, Mr Damien Loizou2, Ms Joanne Layton3 1 Friends Of The Melton Botanic Garden, Melton South, Australia, 2Djerriwarrh Health Services, Melton, Australia, 3Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency, Melbourne, Australia

37. ‘Gotta find them all’ – how jumping on the social phenomena bandwagon can bring about effective botanical education Ms Ngaire Gilligan1 1 Brisbane Botanic Gardens Mt Coot-tha, Brisbane, Australia 38. Interpretation undressed – it’s in the bag! Ms Jacqui Kennedy1 1 Botanic Gardens & Parks Authority, Perth, Australia 39. BGANZ’s potential role in the International Plant Sentinel Network Greg Fraser1 1 Plant Health Australia, Canberra, Australia 40. Promoting our relevance: The importance of embracing the Botanic Gardens Australia and New Zealand Open Day Mr Peter Byron1,3, Mr Paul Tracey1,2 1 BGANZ Council, 2Wollongong Botanic Garden, Wollongong, Australia, 3Australian National Botanic Gardens, Canberra, Australia 41. With a little help from our friends Mr John Zwar2,3, Cherie Gerlach1 1 The City of Port Augusta, Port Augusta, Australia, 2 The Friends of The Australian Arid Lands Botanic Garden, 3Port Augusta City Council’s Reference (advisory) Committee 42. Encouraging botanic gardens to do more plant conservation: tools and approaches Dr Paul Smith1 1 Botanic Gardens Conservation International (BGCI)

31. Rediscovering our own Rhododendron (with a little help from our friends) Mr Robert Hatcher1 1 Botanic Gardens of South Australia, Crafers, Australia 32. Seed images - highlighting a vital part of botanic gardens’ living collections and research Dr Brook Clinton1, Dr Lydia Guja1 1 The National Seed Bank, Australian National Botanic Gardens; CSIRO, Canberra, Australia 33. democracyCo Emma Lawson, Emily Jenke1 1 democracyCo 34. Wildlife gardening: strengthening community connections through caring for nature and place Ms Laura Mumaw1 1 Gardens for Wildlife Victoria, Melbourne, Australia 35. Whip bird walk redevelopment Mr Robert King1 1 Sunshine Coast Regional Council, Sunshine Coast, Australia 36. Practical solutions to the challenges of ex-situ conservation Mr Steg Pedersen1, David Taylor2 1 Booderee Botanic Gardens, 2Australian National Botanic Garden

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BGANZ 2017 Handbook  
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