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DRIVERS OF STYLE

Isabella Rose Taylor shows wisdom beyond her teenage years

THE D R E S S COL L EC TO R

Nikki Joza Hickman opens her closet

N O. 193 | S T Y L E

Eight Austinites on top of their game

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CO N T E N T S | F E AT U R E S

SEPT. STYLE WEEK #14 It’s here!

P. 42 DRIVERS OF STYLE Eight Austinites on top of their game

P. 44 THE DRESS COLLECTOR Nikki Joza Hickman opens her closet

P. 58 AUSTIN’S FASHION PRODIGY Isabella Rose Taylor shows wisdom beyond her teenage years

P. 64 FALLING FOR CASUAL ELEGANCE The looks we love this season

ON THE COVER: Fall fashion captured by Kate Zimmerman and styled by Britt Towns at Mattie’s

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y K AT E Z I M M E R M A N

P. 70


FIRST LOOK AT FALL CINQ À SEPT

AUSTIN THE DOMAIN, MOPAC AT BRAKER 512.719.1200


CO N T E N T S | DE PA RT M E N TS

Life + Style

Social Hour p. 20

BEHIND THE SCENES AT OUR

“Drivers of Style” Shoot

S TR EE T S T Y LE p. 86

S T Y LE PRO FI LE p. 88

Community + Culture

Director and cinematographer

LOC A L LOV E p. 94

Kyle Osburn shot a behind-the-scenes video at our “Drivers of Style” photo shoot

PROFILE p. 26

with Wynn Myers at SHDW Studios.

KRISTIN ’S COLUMN p. 29

Head to tribeza.com to see our eight style

TRIBEZ A TALK p. 32

icons pose for the camera and explain what style means, who they look to for style tips, and how they define their own style.

86 Food + Thought K AREN ’S PICK p. 98

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INSPIR ATION BOARD p. 100 DINING GUIDE p. 104

Arts + Happenings

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDARS p. 36 MUSIC PICK p. 37 ART PICK p. 38 EVENT PICK p. 40

98 @ TRIBEZ A

40 14 SEPTEMBER 2017 |

A Look Behind !…! p. 108 tribeza.com


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EDITOR'S LETTER

S

TYLE IS A DIFFICULT THING TO DEFINE. EVEN DEFINING ONE’S OWN STYLE CAN

be tricky. It’s the way we choose to express ourselves, but that means something somewhat different to each of us and, as we change, so too do our ideas about style. Growing up, there was a time when I wanted to be a lawyer, in part because I wanted to be able to wear a sharp-looking skirt suit and heels to work every day. At the time, this outfit seemed integral to the image I had of my confident, future professional self. Never mind that I had no idea what lawyers actually spent their time doing. Today I own one skirt suit, which I got from United Colors of Benetton more than a decade ago, when I was getting ready for college interviews. I’ve taken it with me from San Diego to Los Angeles, D.C., Reykjavik, and now Austin. It still fits, and I love it, but I can count on one hand the number of times I’ve worn it. I certainly didn’t go to law school, I’ve yet to work in an office that requires me to wear anything remotely formal, and I’m grateful that that’s the case. I can’t even begin to imagine wearing a suit to work every day. To me, that kind of uniform now seems like a solution to a repressive dress code more than anything else, but I can still get behind the idea that certain clothes allow us to feel confident in our personal or professional lives. In other words, choosing what we wear—and consequently, how we express ourselves—can make us feel more comfortable in our own skin or like our best self. But of course, what we wear is never going to hide what’s on the inside. “There is no outfit that makes inner ugliness pretty,” as Kristin Armstrong has so eloquently noted in a past column. “There is no lingerie that can make selfish look sexy. There is no surgery that can uplift a sagging spirit. There is no makeup to cover a heart that has grown bitter or cold. There is no jewelry that can make a judgmental woman sparkle. There is no accessory worth as much as a genuine smile.” Our style is merely an extension of who we are and how we carry ourselves. On that note, with this issue, we once again tackle the subject of style. We cast light on eight people who we consider drivers of style, a diverse group that embodies this difficult-to-define concept from the inside out. We chat with Nikki Joza Hickman, an avid dress collector whose collection of 60 pieces includes a 1953 Dior and several iconic Chanels. We profile Isabella Rose Taylor, the youngest person to participate in New York Fashion Week and have a clothing line at Nordstrom, both of which she accomplished before she was old enough to drive a car. And, we bring you a fall fashion shoot with a few ideas to inspire your own sense of style. Whatever your style may be, we hope you enjoy the issue and we’d love to see you later this month at Tribeza’s 14th annual Style Week, featuring all kinds of creatives displaying what style means to them at this moment in time.

anna@tribeza.com

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LOEWY LAW FIRM


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

16 YEARS

S E P T E M B E R 2 017

N O. 1 9 3

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Anna Andersen

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Staley Moore COLUMNISTS

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Errica Williams Holly Kuhn INTERNS

Caroline Miesch Lauren Schulze PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Eli John Emy Cies M.M. Adjarian Nicole Beckley Parker Yamasaki Tobin Levy PHOTOGR APHERS

Bailey Toksoz Dagny Piasecki Danielle Chloe Jessica Pages Holly Cowart Marshall Tidrick Mica McCook Miguel Angel Rudy Arocha Wynn Myers Kate Zimmerman ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


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SOCIAL HOUR 2 “NOTWORKING” FOR CHARITY Twisted X Brewing and 512ATX.com teamed up for the “Notworking” for Charity event, held at The Vaughn Austin on July 27. Guests enjoyed drinks from Tito’s Handmade Vodka, a live DJ, a celebrity guest bartender panel and an incredible silent auction with 100 percent of the proceeds benefitting Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas.

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ZIN COLLECTION LAUNCH PARTY

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PAY IT FORWARD WITH DANIEL CURTIS On August 3, the seventh annual Pay It Forward with Daniel Curtis event took place at the AT&T Hotel and Conference Center. In addition to raising awareness about spinal cord injuries, proceeds went to the Lone Star Paralysis Foundation and Easter Seals of Central Texas. The event featured some of Austin’s top culinary talent from numerous outstanding restaurants with cocktails curated by The Tipsy Texan. “NOTWORKING” FOR CHARITY: 1. Angie & Andy Aushing 2. Sara Osburn, Mark Garza, & Catherine Cody 3. Ellen Bellis & Victoria Gonzalez ZIN COLLECTION LAUNCH PARTY: 4. Anne Rutt-Enriquez & Edson Enriquez 5. Philip Nelson & Claire Zinnecker 6. Ashley Green & Britt Towns 7. Emily Leach, Lauren Cunningham & Erica Rae 8. Emily Teachout & Sarah Pendley PAY IT FORWARD WITH DANIEL CURTIS: 9. Daniel Curtis 10. Adrienne & Garrett Garman 11. Tiffany Heyse & Janelle Reynolds

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B A I L E Y TO K S OZ , M I G U E L A N G E L , A N D M A R S H A L L T I D R I C K

On Thursday, July 27, Limbo Jewelry and Claire Zinnecker celebrated the launch of their new collaboration, the Zin Collection. Co-hosted by Jen Pinkston, guests sipped on summer cocktails while enjoying bites, swag bags and fun giveaways. Each piece in the new collection of necklaces, earrings, and rings, is made-toorder in Limbo’s East Austin studio.


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SOCIAL HOUR

WHITE LINEN NIGHT 2nd Street District held its annual White Linen Night on August 5, promoting the Austin Food & Wine Alliance, a nonprofit organization dedicated to innovation in the Central Texas culinary community through grants, educational programming and events. Guests, dressed in their best white linen, enjoyed bites from over a dozen local eateries while delighting in sumptuous wine and beer pairings.

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NEIMAN MARCUS’ THE SO CRAZY GOOD EVENT

TRIBEZA’S AUGUST ISSUE RELEASE PARTY The August Issue Release Party took place on August 9, where Tribeza and friends celebrated the launch of the latest Makers Issue. Guests indulged in gorgeous bites from VOX Table and Spread & Co., and local spirits were provided by Mighty Swell Cocktails, Ben Milam Whiskey and Guns & Oil Brewing Co. DJ ulovei curated the beats that had guests swaying.

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10 WHITE LINEN NIGHT: 1. Campbell McCrea & Marti Grizzle 2. Ali Bills & Erin Colagin 3. Zack & Lucretia Jones NEIMAN MARCUS’ THE SO CRAZY GOOD EVENT: 4. Jill Selman & Laura Hutchinson 5. Michele Vanostran & Jennifer Gressett 6. Sheree Ross & Miramar Dichoso 7. Chris Hendel & Jennifer Carnes 8. Sonya Evans & Michelle Washington TRIBEZA’S AUGUST ISSUE RELEASE PARTY: 9. Emily Treadgold & Jessica Ferreira 10. Kelly Ernst, Joseph Rodrigo & Radhika Patnana 11. Rachel & Joshua Prewitt 12. Matt Heyens & Cari Wainwright

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T A N D B A I L E Y TO K S OZ

On August 9, Neiman Marcus held The So Crazy Good Event at the Domain NORTHSIDE. Before the fall trends runway presentation showcasing some of the chicest fall styles, guests grooved to live music by DJ Robert Michael and enjoyed sips and sweet bites by Fluff Meringues, along with free graphic glam beauty tips and touch-ups.


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Presented By

Hosted By


COMMUNITY + CULTURE CULTURAL DISPATCHES FROM AUSTIN’S CREATIVE COMMUNITY

Jewelry designer Sheila HawkinsBucklew PHOTOGRAPH BY DANIELLE CHLOE

PROFILE

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K R I S T I N ’ S CO L U M N

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T R I B E Z A TA L K

32

tribeza.com

| SEPTEMBER 2017

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Made Connections JEWELRY DESIGNER SHEIL A HAWKINS-BUCKLEW TE AMS UP WITH NIGERIAN FASHION DESIGNER HAUWA LIMAN TO EMPOWER WOMEN IN L AGOS By Parker Yamasaki Photographs by Danielle Chloe

I  

T S TA R T E D S OM E W H E R E O U T S I D E O F

Pittsburgh. Sheila Hawkins-Bucklew was different. She was the only colored girl at school, she had a pointy nose; the girls asked about her hair, the boys threw footballs at her head. Rather than take in all the negativity, she remembers, she used the attention to embrace her own style. At the same time, she remembers thinking: “We are more alike than we are different. We all look for ways to identify, with our peers, with our communities. We all seek that experience in some way.” Since then, Hawkins-Bucklew has found ways to both emphasize the individual and connect to the community. In 2014 she launched Hawkins Bucklew Handcrafted Jewelry Designs during Austin Fashion Week. Her custom pieces are built on what she calls the “three pillars” of her company: individual style, self-discovery, and empowerment. Last year she and her daughter, Chelsea, used the company as a platform to initiate the Creative Entrepreneurship Bootcamp in

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Lagos, Nigeria. With the help of Nigerian fashion designer Hauwa Liman, Sheila and Chelsea led a group of women through a weeklong series of workshops in jewelry design, creative thinking, and entrepreneurial development. She hopes to bring the Bootcamp to Austin and is in the process of looking for sponsors. In the meantime, Hawkins-Bucklew continues to create opportunities for herself and others by making jewelry and stringing together the beads of a global community. Before starting Hawkins Bucklew Jewelry, you worked in retail for fifteen years. What was the transition like from retail employee to business owner? In between my retail career and the start of owning a business, I became a mother. Being a mother elevated my perspective, it ignited a tenacity for multitasking and overachievement. I became all things to all people. I was the chauffeur, event planner, travel agent, chef, and gardener. Being a mother prepared me for being a business owner. Of course, as a business owner you assume risk. However, you gain the freedom to create a work culture that best fits your needs as a professional and family-oriented woman. What do you think are some of the challenges for women entrepreneurs, particularly for those entering a creative trade? Securing financing, having their professional skills and expertise questioned, embracing risk, balancing assertiveness, and breaking through male-dominated industries. What are the most important practices for women to overcome those challenges? Women need to acquire a team of raving fans and

mentors; those people in your network who support you, challenge you, and hold you accountable to your goals and stated aspirations. Tell me about your “team.” Starting a business always starts with an idea in your own mind. So the first thing I will say is: Be careful who you share your dreams with. There is really a lot of room for self-doubt in the beginning, so you need people around who will encourage you to keep going. That is what I mean when I say a “team of raving fans.” For me, I shared the beginning of my jewelry company with a group of colleagues and childhood friends. People who I could bounce ideas off of, who I could tell my dreams to and then ask whether they liked my logo this way or that way. Do you think your daughter has been raised to embrace these ideals? I dressed my daughter the way that I wanted to when she was young. Lots of matching outfits and coordination, because I came from the world of fashion and retail. When we moved to Texas she started dressing like the girls around her—blue jeans and ponytails, and I was like, what happened to my fashionable little girl? But as she’s grown she’s come into her own and does

IT IS ESPECI A LLY IMPORTA N T FOR YOU NG GIR LS BU T I SEE OLDER WOMEN TOO, ST ILL T RY ING TO FIGU R E T HEMSELV ES OU T, LIK E GET T ING BU T T INJ ECT IONS A N D ST U FF. W H AT IS U P W IT H T H AT ? W HER E DID T H AT COME FROM?

her own thing. I think that it is so important to build a foundation in who you are. That’s one of our pillars: self-discovery. Get to know who you are and you are less likely to be affected by the negativity from other people. It is especially important for young girls but I see older women too, still trying to figure themselves out, like getting butt injections and stuff. What is up with that? Where did that come from? What has it been like working with Chelsea, and how has having your own daughter involved shaped or enhanced your motivation for the business? As a mother, I’ve always wanted my daughter exposed to women whose lives were different from ours. The chance to hear the stories of the women who participated in our Creative Entrepreneurship Boot Camp in Lagos was invaluable. Although our goal was to empower creative women entrepreneurs while we were there, the connection we felt with these ladies was an enriching experience for all of us. Women of different cultures, religions, and perspectives coming together for a shared experience rooted in the entrepreneurial spirit; what a fortifying exchange.         I’ve always been self-motivated, however a lot of what I do is done for the betterment of not only my daughter but all women. It would be sublime if we lived in a world which provided equal pay and equal opportunities for women; an environment where workplace sexual harassment did not exist, and women no longer were objectified. I hope these situations for women change sooner than later, and I look forward to working toward a future that holds this type of reality for all women. tribeza.com

| SEPTEMBER 2017

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Real STYLE By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

W

HEN I WAS IN MY TWENTIES,

broke and inexperienced, trying to look like I knew what I was doing in my corporate job, I thought style meant “expensive.” I coveted anything with a brand name or a pricey price tag, because to me it meant that I was going places. I was somebody. Respect me, dammit. Do you know how much this handbag costs? I have a memory of myself from that time, driving through traffic (or what we thought was traffic back then—ha!) to get to the ACC Pinnacle campus to give a big marketing pretribeza.com

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

I WORE A JEWEL-TONED ANN TAYLOR SUIT WITH SHOULDER PADS. I WORE NUDE-TONED sentation for work. I worked for a videoconferencing company at the time and gave sales pitches over video. I still drove my first car, a red Jeep Wrangler. It felt a lot better to have a car with no windows or doors back at Miami of Ohio than it did in Austin in August. I wore a jewel-toned Ann Taylor suit with shoulder pads. I wore nude-toned panty hose and sensible pumps. My car was overheating and the clutch was making weird noises, and I was sweating my young ass off in my hose sitting on black leather seats. I kept having to pull over and let the car rest, with the late afternoon sun beating down on me and sweat trickling down my back. I was running late and getting nervous. My car finally sputtered and died just as I turned into ACC, which you may know is at the bottom of a giant hill. I looked at my watch. I had no cell phone, because I’m old and no one had cell phones yet. I think the Internet was just being unveiled as a mysterious thing. I had no choice but to make a run for it. I wasn’t even a runner at the time; I did occasional step aerobics in white Reebok high-tops with a Velcro strap, but running was out of the question. Nonetheless, I took

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PANTY HOSE AND SENSIBLE PUMPS. MY CAR WAS OVERHEATING AND THE CLUTCH WAS MAKING WEIRD NOISES, AND I WAS SWEATING MY YOUNG ASS OFF IN MY HOSE SITTING ON BLACK LEATHER SEATS.

off my sensible pumps and ran up that hill in my royal blue Ann Taylor suit with my Coach briefcase (that I didn’t really need, but thought made me look professional) banging against my hip. I showed up with minutes to spare as my salesperson was making small talk and killing time, waiting on me. “Where the hell have you been?” he hissed at me. Then he did a double take, eyes widening. I must have been a sight. Shoes in my hand, toes sticking out my ripped, snagged nude pantyhose, drenched in sweat, tomato-red face, pit circles on my blazer, wet hair sticking to my cheeks, panting. My usual young self would have been apologetic, embarrassed by the wreckage of my appearance, and utterly terrified of being fired. Looking back, I guess I was too hot, too tired, and too pissed off to play small. “I’ll tell you where I’ve been. Busting my ass to get here for you, that’s where. Now give me a second to pull it together and I’m on,” I growled. I made a run for the nearest bathroom, splashed cold water on my face, tried to dry my pits under the hand dryer, pulled my wet hair into a ponytail, threw my ripped hose into the sanitary napkin trashcan in the bathroom stall, stepped into my pumps, and strutted out. The room was ominously quiet and my salesperson looked nervous. I straightened my 22-year-old shoulder-padded shoulders and did

what my Dad always told me to do when I was nervous about a speech—pause, breathe, smile, and start with a joke. I stepped up, looked around the room of executives, took a deep breath, smiled, and told the story about my car troubles and afternoon hill sprint before I launched into one of the best presentations of my high-tech career. That was the day I learned about real style. Style isn’t about what you put on—it’s what shines through. It isn’t what kind of bag you are carrying—it’s the way you carry yourself. It isn’t the gorgeous outfit that makes you confident. It’s the confidence that makes the outfit gorgeous. It isn’t how much everything costs. It’s how much you know you are worth.


MORELAND PROPERTIES Austin’s leading real estate firm for luxury downtown sales, globally affiliated with:

MOR E L U X U R Y Welcome to the wine room of one of the highest and most luxuriously-outfitted residences in downtown Austin, Texas - The Austonian’s - 50T. While every residence at this signature high-rise address is remarkable, this particular custom build is embellished with world-class design. Coupled with exclusive residential amenities, we are confident this is a tower not even Rapunzel would want to leave. MORE at 200CongressAve.com/50T LISTED BY ERIC MORELAND AND TREY PHILLIPS | DOWNTOWN@MORELAND.COM | 512.623.3633 MORELAND P RO P E RTIE S | M O RE L A N D. C O M | AUST I N 5 1 2 . 4 8 0 . 0 8 4 8 | L AKE WAY 5 1 2 . 2 6 3 . 3 2 8 2


T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Guys in SHIRTS

When Hobson Brown and Billy Nachman launched Criquet Shirts in 2010, they wanted to revitalize the retro-cool style of classic collared Polo-type shirts. Seven years later the brand has grown to include Texas-made button-down shirts and seasonal items, and expanded from online-only to 150 stores throughout the US. “I think the vintage style speaks to guys that maybe don’t wear collared shirts every day but they love the throwback style of our shirts,” Brown explains. One guy in particular who loves the style is actor Luke Wilson. “We kept seeing him in our shirts showing up on various TV programs for interviews,” Brown says. Last year Wilson came on board as a partner in the brand. In October Criquet is debuting its first jacket offering. “It’s kind of our take on the classic Patagonia fleece jacket that every guy has and loves,” Brown says, “[It’s] not super heavy, so made more with Texas in mind than Alaska.” CRIQUETSHIRTS.COM

GET GHOSTED

SEEN & BE SEEN New downtown hotspots are popping up left and right. In the newly opened Aloft hotel on Congress Ave. at Seventh, Caroline is serving up New American food all day, with Upstairs at Caroline slinging cocktails and hosting live music on the second floor patio. If all-day brunch is more your style, make a bee-line for Holy Roller, off West Sixth in the former Wahoo’s space. Led by Callie Speer (formerly of Geraldine’s and Swift’s Attic), the punk rock vibe plays out in creative combinations like pancakes with fried chicken and migas kolaches. HOLYROLLERAUSTIN.COM & ALOFTAUSTINDOWNTOWN.COM/CAROLINE-RESTAURANT

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Add a little “boo!” to your ‘do with haircare brand Verb’s Ghost line. This month Verb releases four new items, including Ghost Shampoo and Conditioner, Ghost Dry Oil, and Ghost Prep, a hair primer meant to be applied pre-styling. Don’t be scared of these ghosts – the products are paraben and sulfate-free, and use moringa seed oil to combat frizz and natural ingredients like sunflower seed and quinoa protein to help protect hair. VERBPRODUCTS.COM


BENEFICIAL BEAUTY In 2011, while traveling in Namibia, Emily Joyce Bolf happened upon Kigelia Africana extract from southern Africa’s native Sausage Trees. Lauded as an ingredient to clarify skin and treat eczema and dark spots, Bolf was inspired to formulate a skin care line built around the extract. This May Bolf launched Kelia Skincare, a luxury green beauty brand that works to target sun damage. “Kigelia Africana is really pretty much unknown, so it’s exciting to be able to bring this new ingredient to people,” Bolf says. The line is already receiving praise from folks with skin sensitivity. “It’s so thrilling and gratifying to hear that it’s working for people,” Bolf says. A serum, moisturizer and night cream are available now and a part of the proceeds go back to the African farmers that help produce the key ingredient.

One Stop SHOPPING

Looking for a spot to get artisan-created jewelry, home goods, and ceramics under one roof? Thanks to Fail Collective, Christine Fail’s handcrafted modern jewelry line, and EA/ST Co. you can find handwoven scarves, hanging planters, hammered bronze earrings and forged brass bangles all at their newly opened East Cesar Chavez outpost, which held its grand opening in July. SHOPEAST.CO AND FAILJEWELRY.COM

KELIASKINCARE.COM

Shop to the MUSIC

The ever-expanding Domain NORTHSIDE celebrated two new shop openings in July, with the addition of cutting-edge denim outfitter Paige, and sustainable leather goods brand R.M. Williams. This month Domain NORTHSIDE celebrates its 1-year anniversary and launches NORTHSIDE Amplified, a three-night music series, with a performance from The Nightowls on September 30. DOMAINNORTHSIDE.COM

Wearable ART “Really the products that we carry, they’re like little works of art,” says Jen Lewis, founder of Purse & Clutch. Since starting the brand in 2011, Lewis has worked with artisans in Guatemala and Ethiopia to produce fair-trade handbags, and this spring launched their first independently designed collection. They also opened their first retail space, on South Lamar, hosting a grand opening in August. The space allows people to admire the hand-spun cotton and botanically dyed colors. This fall look for their new zippered cross-body leather bag from Ethiopia and small batch-made cotton-silk blended scarves from Guatemala. PURSEANDCLUTCH.COM

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ARTS + HAPPENINGS WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO The genredefying Kaki King performs at the Long Center on September 16 PHOTOGRAPH BY SIMONE CECCHETTI

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MUSIC PICK

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ARTS PICK

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C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC

BLEACHERS September 19 Emo’s Austin

DONALD FAGEN September 2 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

TWO DOOR CINEMA CLUB September 19 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

UNCLE BILLY’S GOSPEL BRUNCH SUNDAYS September 3–24 Uncle Billy’s Brewery

SHE FACTORY WITH KATHY VALENTINE September 19 The Townsend

ERIC CHURCH WITH ELLE KING September 7 Austin360 Amphitheater

TENACIOUS D September 20 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater DEPECHE MODE September 20 Austin360 Amphitheater

GREEN DAY September 8 Austin360 Amphitheater PHILLIP PHILLIPS September 8 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

LUKE BRYAN September 21 Austin360 Amphitheater JON BELLION September 21 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

MOZART IN PARIS September 8 & 9 Long Center STURGILL SIMPSON September 9 Austin360 Amphitheater MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA September 9 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

ENRIQUE IGLESIAS & PITBULL September 24 Frank Erwin Center AN EVENING WITH DRACO ROSA September 24 Paramount Theatre

JANET JACKSON September 10 Frank Erwin Center

2 CHAINZ September 25 Emo’s Austin

HANSON September 13 Emo’s Austin

ARCADE FIRE September 27 Frank Erwin Center

SHAKEY GRAVES September 15 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

CHRIS ISA AK September 27 Paramount Theatre

KGSR’S END OF SUMMER SPLASH WITH BEN FOLDS September 15 Stubb’s Outdoors

FATHER JOHN MISTY September 29 Bass Concert Hall

KAKI KING September 16 Rollins Studio Theatre ZAC BROWN BAND September 17 Austin360 Amphitheater

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MS. LAURYN HILL & NAS September 30 Austin360 Amphitheater NORTHSIDE AMPLIFIED WITH THE NIGHTOWLS September 30 NORTHSIDE Lawn

FILM SUMMER CLASSIC FILM SERIES September 1 & 2 Paramount Theatre FAMILY FILM FESTIVAL: KING KONG September 3 Paramount Theatre AUSTIN GAY & LESBIAN INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL September 7–10 Various Locations AUSTIN MUSIC VIDEO FESTIVAL September 12–16 Various Locations MOVIES IN THE PARK: WAYNE’S WORLD September 14 Pease Park FRIDA FEAST & FILM September 16 North Austin Sanctuary FANTASTIC FEST September 21–28 Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas HARRY POTTER FILM CONCERT SERIES September 23 & 24 Bass Concert Hall TEXAS FOCUS: WHAT WAS OURS September 28 Bullock Texas State History Museum TERRENCE MALICK’S THE TREE OF LIFE September 30 Dell Hall

THEATER BUILDING THE WALL September 1–10 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

LION, WITCH, & WARDROBE September 9 – December 16 ZACH Theatre SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN September 27 – October 29 ZACH Theatre ABRAHAM.IN.MOTION September 29 McCullough Theatre MANUAL CINEMA: LULA DEL RAY September 13 & 14 Rollins Studio Theatre BELONGING, PART 1 September 21 – October 1 Seaholm District Plaza THE WOLVES September 21 – October 21 Hyde Park Theatre

COMEDY OUT OF BOUNDS COMEDY FESTIVAL Through September 4 Various Locations COMEDY NIGHT September 5 Radio Coffee & Beer SKLAR BROTHERS September 13–16 Cap City Comedy Club CHRIS TUCKER September 16 Bass Concert Hall TAI NGUYEN September 19 Stateside at the Paramount BRENT MORIN September 21–23 Cap City Comedy Club

THIS RANDOM WORLD September 1–24 Austin Playhouse

CAMERON ESPOSITO & RHEA BUTCHER: BACK TO BACK September 29 Stateside at the Paramount

OCEAN Through September 4 The VORTEX

RITA RUDNER September 29 & 30 Cap City Comedy Club


CHILDREN MOTHER EARTH DAY FESTIVAL & BACK TO SCHOOL NATURE BASH September 15 Barton Springs

HA AM BENEFIT DAY September 12 Various Locations

FIT KIDS FEST September 16 Long Center

WAR ON THE CATWALK September 14 Paramount Theatre

ROBINSON FAMILY PUMPKIN PATCH September 23 & 24, 30 Robinson Family Farm

CREATIVES MEET BUSINESS EXPERIENCE September 14–16 Various Locations

THUMBELINA September 30 EmilyAnn Theatre & Gardens PUBLIC SAFETY DAY September 30 Allen R. Baca Center STORYTIME LIVE WITH CURIOUS GEORGE September 30 Kiddie Academy of Round Rock

OTHER

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M A R L A A U F M U T H

ZILKER RELAYS September 8 Zilker Park

LONE STAR LE MANS September 15 & 16 Circuit of the Americas WHISKIES OF THE WORLD September 16 JW Marriott Austin AUSTIN MUSEUM DAY September 17 Various Locations THINKERY’S IMAGINARIUM 2017 September 22 JW Marriott Austin

THE FINE GOODS MARKET September 1 The Paper + Craft Pantry

FALL PECAN STREET FESTIVAL September 23 & 24 Sixth Street Austin

WORLD BEARD & MOUSTACHE CHAMPIONSHIPS September 1–3 Long Center

TEXAS CRAFT BREWERS FESTIVAL September 30 Fiesta Gardens

PIRELLI WORLD CHALLENGE September 2 & 3 Circuit of the Americas FREE DAY OF YOGA September 4 Various Locations THE ABGB 4TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY September 4 The Austin Beer Garden Brewing Co.

AUSTOBERFEST September 30 Scholz Garten

MUSIC PICK

KAKI KING: THE NECK IS A BRIDGE TO THE BODY By Eli John

The Long Center SEPTEMBER 16, 8 P.M.

For the past 13 years, composer and guitarist Kaki King has been churning out albums, scoring films, and collaborating with iconic acts as disparate as The Mountain Goats and Timbaland, but she’s not what you’d call a household name. Using far more than just the strings on her guitar and layering virtuosic riffs with a loop pedal, she creates music that Rolling Stone hails as constituting a genre unto itself. Tapping her Ovation Adamas guitar, she punctuates slick, emotive strains with DIY percussion, producing melodies that grow into lush worlds and move with a steady, but controlled momentum. This month, King is bringing her most recent project, “The Neck Is A Bridge To The Body” to Austin’s Long Center. Although sharing a title with her most recent album, King conceives of the performance as the thing itself. Continuing to explore the possibilities of the guitar as a physical object, King transforms her instrument into a literal projection screen: throughout the performance, an onstage projector casts an evocative, visual story upon her guitar, which has been custom-designed for this piece. The subjects of this story? Nothing less lofty than creation and death. The result is an immersive, multimedia cosmogenic meditation which is certain to make you forget that you’re watching a lone guitarist on a mostly empty stage. tribeza.com

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A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts CHROME TO CANVAS September 1 – October 1 Link & Pin Gallery MICKY HOOGENDIJK Through September 7 Women & Their Work WILLIAM GEISLER + JOHN PERALTA September 9–30 Wally Workman Gallery MIKE EGAN: NEW PAINTINGS September 9 – October 8 Yard Dog Art Gallery MEXICO MODERN: ART, COMMERCE, AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE, 1920–1945 September 11 – January 1 Harry Ransom Center

ART PICK

COMMUNITY ALTARS: LOVE TO DEATH By Parker Yamasaki

Mexic-Arte Museum SEPTEMBER 15 – NOVEMBER 26

In 1984 the Mexic-Arte Museum in downtown Austin threw itself onto the scene with a wild opening season party. Everyone was invited. Mexican and Latino, Anglo and otherwise, dead or alive. It was their first Day of the Dead Festival, and they’ve been throwing it every year since. While the annual festival and parade don’t happen until late October (in connection to the Day of the Dead celebrations in Mexico), the Mexic-Arte Museum begins its celebration early with the exhibition “Community Altars: Love to Death” in the main gallery north and annex hall. Beginning September 15 the museum will present Dia de Los Muertos-style altars created by artists, community groups, and individuals to commemorate the lives of influential figures, pop culture icons, and loved ones who have passed. Since its inception in ’84, the Mexic-Arte Museum has stood proud and bright as one of the nation’s few Mexican art museums. And as one of the few cities in the nation that has crossed the majority-minority threshold (the non-Hispanic white population dropped below 50% over a decade ago, and the Latino population accounts for over one-third of residents today), Austin is the perfect place to celebrate the diverse lives that have made Austin Austin. The exhibition runs from September 15 through November 26, and everyone is welcome. No matter your race, class, or sentient status.

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UMLAUF PRIZE 2017 September 14 – November 26 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum DIEGO Y FRIDA: A SMILE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WAY September 15 – November 26 Mexic-Arte Museum COMMUNITY ALTARS: LOVE TO DEATH September 15 – November 26 Mexic-Arte Museum JOHN BOCK: DEAD + JUICY September 23 – January 14 The Contemporary Austin WANGECHI MUTU September 23 – January 14 The Contemporary Austin 50 OVER 50 Through September 30 South Austin Popular Culture Center

ABOUT US: SHEA LITTLE Through September 30 Dimension Gallery KAREN HAWKINS & KOICHI YAMAMOTO Through September 30 Gallery Shoal Creek EPIC TALES FROM ANCIENT INDIA Through October 1 Blanton Museum of Art THE BIRDS Through October 1 Art.Science.Gallery. ELEMENTS Through October 7 Davis Gallery


E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES MUSEUMS THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

PECAN STREET FESTIVAL By Parker Yamasaki

East 6th Street SEPTEMBER 23 & 24

Hey, hey, no need to push. We know, sometimes it feels like the whole country is trying to cram their way into Austin. Our dear city is a regular on the “Top Ten Cities to Live In If You [fill in the blank].” If you like music. If you like art. If you’re nice. If you have a dog. If you have a mother. (Literally, despite complaints of a “yuppie” influx Austin remains one of the most generationally diverse cities in the United States). Last year Forbes ranked Austin as the third fastest growing city in the nation. IN THE NATION, putting us ahead of, well, a lot of cities. The flip side of the growth-and-change coin is the push to preserve, protect and respect. OGs and historical societies can breathe easy thanks to Austin’s Pecan Street Association, which began in the early ‘70s as a group of volunteers who wanted to invest in their city’s small downtown area. In 1977, they threw the first Pecan Street Festival, gathering local food and art vendors to sell their stuff and raise funds for the restoration and renovation of the Sixth Street (historically known as Pecan Street) district. Since 1977 the Pecan Street Festival, like the city it supports, has expanded in size and popularity. It is now a bi-annual weekend-long festival of art, music and food that lands on many of those aforementioned internet listicles. The festival is, and always has been, free and open to the public, and all the money raised during the weekend goes toward projects in the Sixth Street and downtown areas. So whether you’re wanting to support emerging or preserving, or if you’re just looking for a good weekend outing, the Pecan Street Festival is here to prove that there’s room for everyone. In with the old, in with the new.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-Fri 10-4, Sa-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T | M U S E U M S & G A L L E R I E S

GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S. Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By Appt. Only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd. Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org

DE STIJL | PODIUM FOR ART 1006 W. 31st St. (512) 354 0868 Hours: Tu-Thu, Sa 1-5 destijlaustin.com

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG AGAVE GALLERY 208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY 209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE 230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK 425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

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TRIBEZ A

ST YL E WEEK14 IS HERE! #

PRE S E N T E D BY

Tribeza Style Week returns for the fourteenth year to celebrate Austin’s unique style with a series of events encompassing food, design, film, and fashion—all culminating in what’s become the city’s premier runway show of the year. With this year’s presenting sponsor, Lexus, Tribeza is also proud to recognize eight standout Austinites as this year’s Drivers of Style.

THE TRIBEZA FASHION SHOW 2016 PHOTOGRAPH BY BREEZY RITTER


STYLE WEEK KICK- OFF PARTY

MOVIE NIGHT AT THE STATE THEATRE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 7–10 P.M. 800 CONGRESS TICKETS: $20

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 STATESIDE THEATRE, 719 CONGRESS AVE. VIP TICKETS: $20, GA: $10

Tribeza Style Week #14 kicks off at 800 Congress. The evening is sponsored by Tru-Skin Dermatology, which will be offering a one-of-akind pop-up lip bar. After you get all glammed up, hop into the MOODxMOSS photo yurt and get your aura captured by Polaroid. There will be specialty bites and drinks from some of the best restaurants around town.

Head downtown to the Stateside Theatre for a special screening of “The First Monday in May,” a film offering a behind-the-scenes look at two of New York’s premier cultural events, hosted by Neiman Marcus. Chic movie bites and drinks will be provided for a one-of-a-kind movie watching experience.

DINNER X DESIGN SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 7-10 P.M. FAIR MARKET, 1100 E. 5TH ST. TICKETS: $180 The popular Dinner x Design event is back for its second year, featuring Austin’s dynamic group of interior designers, makers, and chefs. This year we’re welcoming Robin Colton, Ann Edgerton, McCray & Co., Allison Jaffe, and Christine Turknett to create stunning tablescapes that will be paired with the culinary stylings of some of Austin’s top chefs to create a truly spectacular dinner party. London Grey will be hosting this event and giving the space a homey touch with their unique collection of rugs.

TRIBEZA FASHION SHOW #14 THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, VIP: 6–7 P.M., GA: 7 P.M., FASHION SHOW: 8 P.M. FAIR MARKET, 1100 E. 5TH ST. Rounding out the week, join Tribeza for its marquee event, the Tribeza Fashion Show. Sponsored by Robin Colton Studio, this year’s runway show, featuring stunning models dressed in high-fashion looks from Austin’s top boutiques and designers with hair and makeup styled by Jose Luis Salon, is guaranteed to be better than ever. Arrive early for an intimate VIP gathering sponsored by SWBC Mortgage and Tru-Skin Dermatology with specialty appetizers and cocktails from Deep Eddy Vodka, Ben Milam Whiskey, and Stella Artois, and stay late to enjoy an unforgettable evening celebrating the best fashion Austin has to offer.

SPONSORS

LONDON GREY RUGS


DRIVERS of STYLE

IN COLLABORATION WITH LEXUS, WE RECOGNIZE EIGHT UNIQUE AUSTINITES WHOSE DIVERSE STYLES WE ADMIRE BY TOBIN LEVY PHOTOGRAPHS BY WYNN MYERS

Style is a defining characteristic that’s nearly impossible to define. To be a style driver is to be without a synonym. “Fashionista” is reductive, “maven” too obscure. The eight Austinites featured here are unequivocal embodiments of style, each has a unique take on what, exactly, that means, and, though flattered, a few remain baffled by the designation. Professionally and sartorially these men and women are a motley crew, and their collective answers to what constitutes style is a colorful swirl of personal and professional philosophies and designer favorites. They are some of Austin’s best dressed. However, in terms of exemplifying Austin style, the common thread has as much to do with an appreciation for clothing as it does ethos, intellect, eccentricity and relationship to the city they all call home. 44 SEPTEMBER 2017 |

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JENNIFER ROSE SMITH WRITER, CREATIVE DIRECTOR, CAMILLESTYLES.COM

Talking to Jennifer Rose Smith is a merry-go-round of imagery and cultural references: a blue magician’s cape, Patrick Swayze, “The Blue Lagoon,” Rosie O’Donnell, glittery bling, a scraggly man in a three-piece suit, a white horse, and a tragic cashmere crop top. She refers to all of these within the timespan of an hour and in a conversation about style that is far less bizarre than it sounds. “Style can mean so many different things to so many people and, to me, Austin is a style town but not really a fashion town, and I love that,” Smith says. “I think designer names don’t mean that much here. Creativity is the currency. It’s more about who has the most unique item with the best story behind it.” For Smith, great style is also about self-expression and a host of spirited adjectives such as “playful,” “theatrical,” and “spontaneous.” Today it means an easy, understated white dress and a confident wide-brimmed hat. “I grew up studying theater and dance, and think that dancewear has really inspired my style,” Smith explains. “I like things that I can move in and that show my form.” She has a low tolerance for clothes that aren’t comfortable and a penchant for bold accessories, such as hats, cuffs, and, less expected, a bowtie. “My relationship to accessories is very spur of the moment,” she says. “It’s about wearing something for fun, kind of like pulling something out of a costume trunk.” She is the picture of insouciance and, when it comes to style, a fan of laid back paired with something that suggests otherwise. “I think people with great style know how to create tension,” she says. “Like a girl with a satin dress and no makeup or a scraggly man with long hair in a beautiful suit.” For her it’s

about contrast, the unexpected. As a creative director at camillestyles.com and a prolific contributor to the site, Smith is admittedly more comfortable being the one asking the questions than she is answering them. Smith is far less interested in being the center of attention than she is, for example, watching “Road House” and “Dirty Dancing.” She recently hosted the double feature at her house and remains buoyed by the line, “nobody puts baby in a corner.” Her love for Patrick Swayze certainly qualifies as less than predictable, her style icons only slightly less so. In that category she lists Brooke Shields in the “The Blue Lagoon,” Lauren Hutton, and Bianca Jagger á la Studio 54. “The thing they have in common is something a little bit wild and natural,” Smith explains. “That contrast of very natural hair and makeup, unexpected outfits, and confidence. Especially that moment with Bianca on the white horse. I mean, she just created that and it was perfect!” Smith is endlessly entertaining when it comes to the things she deems quintessential. The perfect destination wedding outerwear: a velvet, cobalt blue magician’s cape from the 1920s, which she found on Etsy. The epitome of a fashion mistake: a bright blue cashmere, dry-clean-only sweater set complete with a beaded crop top, which she treasured in college. And the perfect party theme: Smith threw a Halloween fete based on the movie “A League of Their Own,” in which everyone had to create their own Rockford Peaches uniform. For those less schooled on the 1992 classic, it’s about an all-American girls’ professional baseball league called the Rockford Peaches, starring none other than Rosie O’Donnell. tribeza.com

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DRIVERS OF STYLE 2017

ADRIENE MISHLER

ACTRESS, YOGA TEACHER, ENTREPRENEUR, CO-FOUNDER OF FIND WHAT FEELS GOOD

At first, Adriene Mishler seems like a conundrum. It’s not only because she’s an actor who isn’t starving, has never lived in LA, and hasn’t done serious time waiting tables, but also because while working in an industry known for competition, cattiness, and instability she has built a business, Yoga with Adriene, and a lifestyle brand, Find What Feels Good, that promotes balance and tranquility. However, for Mishler, both personally and stylistically, yoga and acting are synergistic. And being from Austin and staying in Austin makes them even more so. “Style is about so much more than a wardrobe. It’s very personal. I want it to reflect the way I’m feeling or the way I want to feel,” Mishler says. For her, this means “either understated outfits or charming, a bit fancy, maybe even a little weird.” The artist in her celebrates fiction, costumes, and playful, temporary transformation. As a yogi, she embraces comfort, things easy to move in that don’t distract from personal truths, whether profound or profoundly human. Fashion-wise, the latter means stretchy pants and Adidas. The former, more o#en than not, means something from Kick Pleat, owned by Wendi Koletar, whose style and business acumen Mishler deeply respects. Mishler credits Koletar for changing where and how she shops. “I pretty much exclusively go there,” Mishler says. “It’s not just about wearing the perfect outfit, it’s about the relationship with the people who work there and staying local. Mishler views Kick Pleat like she does her own business. They are examples of “taking responsibility for the things you love.” While yoga pants are a staple Mishler’s life she by no means lives in them. The joy is in embrac-

ing the yin and yang, of oscillating between two disparate looks, each paired with the signature Austin approachability that makes people want to move here and the reason Austinites who know Mishler are grateful to have her represent. “I embrace Austin as part of my storyline,” says Mishler, for whom down to earth is a natural state of being. It’s an integral part of her hard-earned success story, as is her childhood, which was spent rummaging through the costume room at St. Edward’s University, where, for years, her mother was the artistic director in the theater department. She spent much of her teenage years wearing theater shirts and, thanks to her mother’s own spiritual inclinations, becoming one with Rumi. “At the time, my mom’s obsession with me learning positive affirmations and conscious imaging drove me insane,” says Mishler, admitting that now those affirmations and positive thinking remain invaluable to her work in both fields. Mishler maintains a schedule and list of obligations that seem counterintuitive to calm. There are the yoga classes she teaches in Austin and the ones she posts on her Yoga with Adriene YouTube channel for her 2 million subscribers. Then there’s programming for Find What Feels Good’s video subscription website; a new weekly podcast; and the annual fall “Roadshow,” where Mishler takes her yoga classes cross country. When she returns, she’ll be adding an acting job to her list. She’s looking forward to the stylistic possibilities. Sharing her story is a large part of her job as a yoga instructor, and, a#er taking a hiatus from acting to focus on her business, she’s “craving fiction,” she laughs. “I’m craving having my costume back for a bit. I can’t be Yoga with Adriene all the time.” tribeza.com

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DRIVERS OF STYLE 2017

MICHAEL DICKSON PARTNER, NATIVE HOSTEL

When Michael Dickson was approached about appearing in the Tribeza Style issue, it took him a few seconds to put two and two together. “I actually thought I was being interviewed for this,” he laughs, pointing to the warm hues, rich fabrics, and textured walls at Native Hostel and Bar & Kitchen. That’s not to say that Dickson, who’s co-owner of the venue, is apathetic when it comes to the fashion components of style. He’s a super fan of Billy Reid and alert to what other people are wearing. “I wish I could be the guy who wears bright red pants and crazy shoes,” says Dickson, without even a hint of sarcasm. He’s referencing Taylor Jarrett of SHDW Studios, another Driver of Style, who he met at the photoshoot. “I couldn’t do that, but I appreciate the hell out of it.” In fact, the idea for Native came out of his appreciation of stylistic differences, sartorial and otherwise. “If I could wear one thing every single day it would be a plain white t-shirt, blue jeans and these shoes,” says Dickson, pointing down to a handsomely innocuous pair of white sneakers. In terms of clothing, he is geared toward casual and comfortable, and defines good style in those terms. But for him, clothes and style are two different conversations. The latter is far more about the experience of a space than it is about a shirt’s fabric and fit. “I love the style of this place because you can come in, relax and sit here for hours,” he says of Native Hostel. Of course, he is proud of the design elements, but, for him, the beauty is equally reli-

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ant upon the laissez-faire feel and lack of pretension. Great style is in the fact that there are young well-heeled businesswomen conducting a meeting on one couch, a scruffy college student playing with his phone on another, and, on a third, a guy whose general mien screams gun rack. This is exactly the vibe Dickson was going for. Though an Austin native who “remembers when,” his nostalgia generally settles on things like Hypercolor shirts and a guy who used to spray paint galaxies on downtown sidewalks. Native was his solution to the one thing from “old Austin” that he bemoaned: “My friends and I all used to hang out at the same place,” he says. “It didn’t matter if you were a football player or a singer-songwriter. Now there’s a certain type of person who goes to Rainey Street, a certain type of person who hangs out in East Austin and another type who goes to West Sixth.” Though the comparison goes unspoken, Dickson wanted to revitalize a famously Austin ethos, one memorialized in country songs about friendships between rednecks and hippies. The business plan caters to an eclectic demographic. The modish lodging appeals largely to out of towners, usually twenty-somethings with a limited budget who are looking forward to food trucks, will spend their days exploring the city and don’t mind sharing a room. The food and bar attracts a local crowd. Business plan aside, Dickson attributes the success to style. Even awash in color, like a white t-shirt, the décor is comfortable, malleable, democratic, and easily transformed into something everyone can love.


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DRIVERS OF STYLE 2017

TAYLOR JARRETT & DAGNY PIASECKI CO-FOUNDERS, SHDW STUDIOS

Taylor Jarrett and Dagny Piasecki are a picture of stylistic symbiosis. A former model, Jarrett, 24, has a featured column at camillestyles.com, is a creative director, a fashion stylist and image consultant. Piasecki, 32, is a photographer and muse. You will rarely hear one name without the other. Though both are from Texas, they are otherworldly in visage with beguiling exotic cultural histories. Piasecki’s father is from Poland and her mother from El Salvador. Jarrett’s family is Panamanian and French. Together, Jarrett and Piasecki founded SHDW Studios, a photo studio and gallery in East Austin. They are quintessential fashion enthusiasts and savvy creatives with a shared and successful business endeavor — and deeply, madly in love. They are unmistakably one of Austin’s best dressed couples and, as they will tell you with enthusiasm, they are rarely apart. What does style mean to you? TJ: I think of it as self-expression and first impressions. DP: I’m on the same page of style being self-expression and art at one of its highest forms. Ultimately, it’s a way to express confidence.    How would you describe your style? DP: My personal style is constantly evolving, but if I had to describe it I say I go for either minimal or I completely embrace color and go crazy with a pattern, a print, or accessories. TJ: I’m like Dagny, going either minimal or all out but in a refined way. I’m also finding myself progressing to suits and elevated menswear, and exploring colors and fabrics that way. Even though a lot of Dagny’s clothing is minimal, she takes it to the next level. And, you know, it’s been so beautiful seeing her style evolve over the time we’ve

been together. Now she’s exploring not only name designers and up-and-comers and really embracing the high-low trend of wearing luxury brands with, for example, a pair of Adidas or Stan Smiths. Rumor has it you like to pick out each other’s clothes...  DP: Oh yeah, it’s mostly Taylor dressing me. We’ve really nerded out on clothes and style. It’s a language we both speak and a topic we love to discuss. It’s led to us to convert a bedroom in our home into an entire closet. It’s become kind of our dressing room space where we can really have fun dressing each other, and have an influence on each other’s day. TJ: When we’re together we’re always looking for style feedback.    Was there anything you begged each other to excise from your closet? TJ: There was definitely a wardrobe clean-out on both ends. Before I moved in Dagny asked me to come and help her clean out her wardrobe like I do with my style clients. So, by the time I really moved in we already had a head start… DP: There was one pair of shoes of yours that I was like get rid of those! They were the Alexander McQueen ones that looked like dinosaurs!  TJ: Yeah, they were an old Puma collaboration sneaker.  DP: They were green and had these weird dinosaur spikes on them. I’m sure that at one time they were super cool and coveted, but I was like what are these! TJ: Dagny had a lot of old boho dresses.  DP: He had a lot of work to do on my closet, I will say that.

What is your most beloved piece of clothing? DP: My kimonos are like my little babies, but I would say a pair of Gucci shoes. They are wild with pearls on the heels and I’m absolutely obsessed with them. They’re one of those things I keep in a very safe place at all times. TJ: For me it’s definitely my ascots. Years ago, my father was co-owner of a clothing store, and the day I graduated from high school he gave me two massive boxes filled with vintage ties and ascots. I don’t wear the ties much because they are very flamboyant, ‘90s Italian man, but the ascots have been a consistent inspiration.  Were you interested in style as a kid? TJ: Definitely. DP: His dad has told me many stories, like when he introduced Taylor to designer clothing on Taylor’s first trip to New York. A#er that, he was like, that’s all I want from here on out. TJ: I grew up in College Station, so up to that point the only clothes like that that I’d seen were in music videos.      How old were you? TJ: Eight. I remember my first day at school a#er that trip. My style had elevated, and I looked differently, and was considered differently, and people approached me differently, and I’ve always reflected on that and tried to make my impressions on people grander through my wardrobe. Are their any couples you consider style icons? TJ: Rick Owens and Michele Lamy, and not just because she is older than he is. They are truly influential on each other’s style; I know the brand is his but there wouldn’t be Rick Owens without her. tribeza.com

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DRIVERS OF STYLE 2017

KRISTIE GONZALES PRESIDENT & GENERAL MANAGER KVUE-TV

Last year, Kristie Gonzales made headlines when, at 35, she was hired as the general manager at KVUE-TV. Statistically, she is an anomaly within her industry: Only 16.5% of all television general managers are women, 7.6% are minorities, and less than 4% are Hispanic at English-language TV stations. “We have a lot of room to grow when it comes to diversity in my line of work, especially in the higher ranks,” she says. “So, it’s funny, when people ask me about style icons, I say mine are the women running the businesses. It’s about the style and grace that you bring when you are able to penetrate those glass ceilings.” Despite the state of the world, the enormity of her achievements, and the fact that Gonzales’s male counterparts are rarely, if ever, questioned about style, Gonzales has no qualms when it comes talking about fashion, and she is unabashed about there being a Rubicon, a before she worked in the television industry and a#er. “I used to wear some crazy stuff,” she laughs. “In high school I remember having silver satin pants that I thought were the coolest thing in the world. I would wear them with a neon Scuba Polo Shirt.” In college, she majored in painting and embraced the artists’ anything goes aesthetic, which, for

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her meant an affinity for petticoats, a nose ring, a lip ring, and an unfortunate pixie cut — the only style decision she’s ever truly regretted. Her wardrobe now consists solely of clothes that continue to reflect her definition of style. In that regard, the only real difference between her before and a#er clothes is that the latter make sense in a corporate world. “My style expresses how I feel about myself,” she says. “It confirms my confidence. And the colors represent my personality.” She’s wearing a red dress and heels, and accessories that are classic and original. She looks professional but my no means priggish. “Red is a very powerful color,” she says. “It says let’s engage, let’s have a conversation.” It also makes her stand out, which she likes. Gonzales has worked unbelievably hard to get where she is today. “I’ve been working since I was fi#een, and I’ve never stopped. I’ve never taken time off between jobs,” she says, noting the ways fashion has been unexpectedly life affirming. “I remember the first time I bought a pair of expensive shoes,” she says. “It was a big day for me. I never thought that coming from my background that I would ever be able to afford something like that. It was a symbol of how hard I’ve worked

and of the sacrifices I’ve made along the way.” Gonzales grew up in Albuquerque. Her father is Mexican-American. Her mother was orphaned at seventeen. “They came from humble beginnings.” Last year, Gonzales was honored with the 2016 Latino Trendsetter Award. “It felt great to be recognized, but the value of that award for me was knowing that it’s not an award given to you because of your exterior it’s an award given because you’re doing things for your community and setting an example,” she says. “My motto is ‘as you climb, li#,’ and I needed to do that in my career.” Gonzales volunteers with the SAFE Alliance and the Make-A-Wish Foundation and helps mentor young Hispanic women so that they, too, can reach their full potential. This includes discussions about style. “I just read a book about female CEOs and there’s a whole chapter devoted to how you dress,” she explains. “Because we live in a male dominated world, it’s something we have to talk about even if we don’t want to. But I like to celebrate the positive. So, yeah, if you’re female and trying to become a CEO there are going to be chapters on how to dress. But let’s not spend time on the negative. Master it and move on and do the real work of running a business.”


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ZANE WILEMON

CO-FOUNDER, UBUNTU FOUNDATION AND UBUNTU MADE, ORDAINED EPISCOPAL PRIEST

Zane Wilemon arrived to the Tribeza photo shoot straight from the airport, after twenty-eight hours of travel. “I feel  great,” he laughs. Wilemon was in Kenya, visiting the small town  of Maai Mahiu  outside of Nairobi where, in 2003, he co-founded the Ubuntu Foundation and, later, Ubuntu Made. The foundation’s mission is to empower the 60,000-person community through job opportunities and programs that allow people to pull themselves out of poverty. Ubuntu Made is a product line that includes exuberant hats, bandanas, bags, and jewelry — all inspired by the local ethnic Maasai culture and made by Kenyan women whom their company employs full time, providing benefits such as healthcare for them and their families. It is a self-sustaining model with revenue also helping fund the foundation’s special education programs and healthcare endeavors. Wilemon, his Ubuntu colleagues, and their friends in Kenya affectionately refer to the women who make the Ubuntu Made products as “mums.” (Kenyans, like the English, pronounce and spell mom “mum.”) Their products are now sold online and globally, in the U.K., Canada, and the U.S. and

distributors include Whole Foods Market, Allegro Coffee, ByGeorge, South Congress Hotel, Sunroom, and Zazzle. They are currently working on a partnership with celebrity stylist Anita Patrickson. To Wilemon, the Maasai women epitomize style. “If you look at the precision and complexity of the patterns and bead work in everything they wear, it’s remarkable,” Wilemon says. “It’s like, wait, you live in a mud hut, you sleep on an animal skin rug, and every day you spend six hours fetching dirty water, but you look fabulous! It’s who they are. It reflects their confidence, spirit, and vibrant personalities.” When it comes to Wilemon’s own style, he says it’s about having a uniform sense of self if not an actual uniform. One of his favorite sayings is “choose a uniform; wear it o#en; know when to change.” It’s about far more than a wardrobe staple, though he does, in fact, have one: a pair of work boots he’s had for twenty years and resoled four times. “They go with everything,” he explains. “I can wear them out to a nice dinner or to Africa or Montana,” where he and his wife, Amal, spend time in the summers. Wilemon points to his boots’ durability as another facet of style, or at least good style.

The materials for Ubuntu Made products are sourced locally in Kenya, further stimulating the Kenyan economy. “We’re trying to make fewer but nicer pieces that people will keep because they are  simple and beautiful and come with a story and a name. Ubuntu means ‘I am  because  we are.’” The translation appears on the product labels and each artisan fills in the statement on the pieces they make, signing their name, offering a potent descriptive of a personal attribute they hope to share. It is an introduction, one that personalizes product origin, and highlights human connectivity.  “An example would be ‘I am Miriam, and we are powerful,’” says Amal, who offers additional insight into the company and her husband. Together they exhibit an unassuming glamor and adoring rapport, although their relationship has not been without its complications. Amal is from a traditional Islamic background. He remains an Episcopal priest. “I’ve got my collar in the closet,” Wilemon says. “You’re chatting with a Muslim woman and Christian priest about fashion in Africa.” If they’re proselytizing, they are advocating for a way of life that stresses the importance of community. tribeza.com

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LOIS KIM

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, THE TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL

Whether talking about books, family life or Fair Isle sweaters, Lois Kim is the epitome of eloquence. There is a reflexive thoughtfulness to the words she chooses and a confidence in the way she speaks. They are skills she must need in overseeing the literary  nonprofit organization that runs the annual Texas Book Festival, which brings 300 authors and 50,000 book lovers to the State Capitol each year. Ironically, when asked how she defines style, she’s, at least temporarily, at a loss for words. “I think it’s difficult to articulate something so personal,” she says. However, when asked about fictional fashion icons Kim is quick with an unlikely response. “As a child, I was totally obsessed with Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the ‘Little House on the Prairie’ series, which was set in the 1870s, and with the narrator/protagonist Laura’s calico dress. It was the description of pioneer life, the way they had so little that you would really focus on how precious it was to have a dress made from fabric that they could only buy once a year. In earlier fiction, external worlds were really described in detail, and social class was written on the body in clothing,” she explains. “In today’s novels, it’s more about psychological truths. Everyone’s concerned with what’s happening inside the characters’ heads, so you don’t have that beautiful detail of

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Laura’s brown calico dress with the red flowers…” Our conversation winds its way through Shakespeare, Edith Wharton, Fitzgerald, then back to the 21st century and Kim’s fashion choices. She somehow simultaneously manages erudite (Kim has a PhD in literature), earnest, and approachable. There is a notable parallel between Kim’s relaxed persona and her stylistic sensibility. “I’m such a fan of this town’s lack of pretension around so many things, including fashion,” she says. “You can either participate in the fashion vibe or not, and no one is going to judge you either way. If you do participate, if you are invested in your personal style, it’s because it makes you feel good. And I definitely feel better when I’m making a conscious choice about what I’m wearing.” Having had time to mull it over, Kim concludes that “style is about figuring out what your body type is, what your overall look is, and determining what looks good with who you are.” Kim is a self-described minimalist with a tendency toward understated pieces that reflect the comfort that she feels in her own skin as well as her allegiance to physical comfort. “I won’t suffer for fashion,” she laughs. Kim prefers unstructured shapes (No belts. Ever.) and four-inch heels. Her preference for the latter is a relatively new development. “I’m owning my height,” she says, “a#er spending most

of my life trying to shave it off by telling people I’m five nine and a half when I’m really 5’10”.” Embracing a 6’2” vantage point is not about a need to stand out, but rather a lack of concern when it comes to fitting in. She’s quick to admit that this wasn’t always the case. As a child and even as a young adult she eschewed personal style for a more chameleon existence, save for a burgundy, full three-piece suit her mother made for her when Kim was in the fi#h grade. (“It was the ‘70s, and had a kind of John Travolta effect.”) Other than that, she says, “it was a lot of mimicry, depending on the environment I was in.” Kim spent her childhood in Buffalo, New York. Lisa Birnbach’s “Official Preppy Handbook” was Kim’s bible. “You would actually call your friends and coordinate outfits, which always consisted of a turtleneck, two button downs, an Izod, and a Fair Isle sweater—usually in Kelly Greens and blues—with a matching Pappagallo purse,” she says. “I mean, the epicenter of prep was my coming of age…” Her closet still features traces of preppy—an updated button  up, a modified chino. “I think I am always going to have a little bit of that—it’s part of my childhood, part of my immigrant longing to fit in then,” she says. “Maybe that’s also something about style, it’s part of your history, so it’s always going to follow you.”


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The

Dress Collector

Nikki Joza Hickman opens her closet to reveal vintage treasures and the best of emerging designers BY ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY DAGNY PIASECKI HAIR & MAKEUP BY MEESH RIOS

“LOOK AT THE DETAILED CONSTRUCTION INSIDE, WHERE YOU CAN SEE EXACTLY HOW IT WAS

stitched together,” Nikki Joza Hickman says, delicately fingering the hand-sewn and expertly notched seams inside a 1953 Christian Dior bengaline dress, still surprisingly white a#er 64 years. Made of textured cotton and silk with a large bow of the same fabric placed midway to the ballerina-length hem, the dress’s impossibly tiny waist, deep V-neck, and full skirt create an ultra-feminine silhouette. It’s a style and shape immediately reminiscent of Hollywood’s heyday of black and white films showcasing the talents (acting and otherwise) of young starlets like Elizabeth Taylor, Grace Kelly and Audrey Hepburn or the ads created by the early Mad Men of the late 1940s and ‘50s. The dress is clearly special. But, despite its nostalgic appeal, would anyone really spend a significant amount of money on a dress she knows from the start she’ll never wear because it’s not her size? Most women would not say yes to this dress. But for a collector like Hickman, the answer is a resounding, “Absolutely, this is an incredible find!” “This Dior is one I really wanted to own, not because I could ever get into it,” Hickman says laughing, “but because it played such an important role in fashion history.” The typically not-so-serious Hickman explains with convincing authority: “When Dior created this style for his own label, it became known as the New Look and it was a huge deal. Everything changed a#er that.” Hickman knows her stuff: in fact, Dior’s New Look stands as one of fashion’s game-changing moments. A#er the Second World War, women’s fashion took a drastic turn as Christian Dior decided it was time to bring femininity back to the fore. Using yards of previously rationed fabric, the house of Dior created full and flowing dresses with delicately sloped shoulders, and adorned the new creations with pretty details like the bow on Hickman’s perfect example of the period. Dior set the course for lasting change that other designers would quickly follow. For Hickman, as with most collectors bewitched by a passion — be it art, stamps or another personal fancy involving living large in a space beyond logic and reason — the story behind a prized piece o#en

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Nikki Joza Hickman in a Johanna Ortiz gown surrounded by new and vintage treasures from her collection.

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Clockwise from left: Hickman in a beaded tulle Elie Saab gown; the handstitched interior corset of a vintage Jeanne Lanvin; silk chiffon-covered buttons on the back of an Emilio Pucci cocktail dress.

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Above: the ruffled edge of an off-the-shoulder Johanna Ortiz gown. Below: Hickman’s closet, filled with canvas garment bags and archival boxes.

represents its first, and almost magically strong, allure. That’s the case with both the vintage pieces in her collection and the ones by the new, emerging designers Hickman likes to discover before their names and work become regulars in the pages of Vogue and Women’s Wear Daily. She knows the relative value of what she buys, and her personal history of spending money very carefully has proven useful. Born in South Africa, Hickman, her parents and her younger brother immigrated to the United States to start a new life one week before Hickman’s ninth birthday. (She became a U.S. citizen shortly a#er graduating college.) She has vivid memories of being a young girl and her mother taking her to stores like J. C. Penney or the Gap to buy a new outfit. “It didn’t happen very o#en because my parents were working so hard to get us settled here and build their small business. So when we got to go shopping, it was special,” she says. “I always loved trying things on and getting to pick out something new.” Hickman put herself through UT Austin working full-time on a semiconductor processing assembly line, graduating with a business degree in 1999. When she wasn’t donning her white cleanroom suit at Motorola, in class, or studying, she’d window shop on the Drag, lingering in front of ByGeorge. There wasn’t much there she could buy at the time, but her plan was for that to change. Several years out of college she was looking online for something unusual to wear to a big event. “I bought something on eBay by Zac Posen and I was blown away by how gorgeous and well-made it was,” she says. “That’s when I really started appreciating what’s behind a dress like that, the influences, the individuals who contribute to the finished product, everything that goes into a garment that’s not mass-produced. That’s how the whole thing started.” Knowing that someone else’s hands took time and care to create what she’s wearing adds another layer of meaning and is one reason Hickman is so attracted to dresses that are one-of-a-kind. “Choosing to wear a dress covered in hand-painted feathers or a piece of vintage jewelry, I feel like I’m honoring that place in time and whoever touched it before it got to me. These pieces meant something to someone else; the person who made it and, if it’s vintage, whoever wore and cherished it,” Hickman says. In addition to the ‘53 Dior, Hickman’s closet boasts a deep wine-colored micro-pleated linen dress of the same era from legendary Irish designer Sybil Connolly, best known for dressing Jackie Kennedy; from the 1960s, an oh-so-mod short Paco Rabanne dress covered in hand-sewn shiny plastic and wood discs, and a Jeanne Lanvin couture cocktail dress of white brocade with a structured interior corset. Several beauties represent the ‘70s, including an elegantly simple black hammered silk Halston sheath and two Chanels, one featured in the iconic brand’s 1978 advertising campaign. Collecting is about being inspired and motivated to do more than just shop. While a shopaholic might spend hours at the mall filling shopping bags with the latest trends, a collector like Hickman peruses eBay, 1stdibs and online auction houses hunting for a coveted vintage piece of a certain era or designer. For emerging designers, she reviews look books on Moda Operandi, keeps up with insider new-arrival emails from shops like Sunroom, and attends trunk shows at ByGeorge (still a favorite). According to Hickman, collecting involves patience and discernment. Before a purchase, Hickman asks herself, what makes sense for me? What will I be happy with for a long time? What will hold its literal and figurative shape? “For vintage pieces,” she explains, “I have a wish list and those are things I might look for over a period of years. That’s the only time I invest in something I know I won’t ever wear. For new things, when you tribeza.com

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Details matter. Right: layered metal discs cover every inch of a Burberry Prorsum mini, creating an eight-pound dress. Below: the dramatic ruffle of a Louis Vuitton cocktail dress worn by Uma Thurman in the brand’s 2005 ad campaign.

see it, you know it. I love going through look books, but it’s only every once in a while you see something that really jumps off the page and speaks to you ... when you know it’s the one. My rule is I really have to fall in love with something to buy it. Otherwise, I know it’ll be heading to the consignment store.” Stepping into a well-made dress, Hickman says, zipping it up and feeling it around you, is transformational. “It makes you feel not so much like a different person, but like your most wonderful self. You hold yourself differently and it’s like you can feel all that’s gone into that dress from everyone who’s worked on it and then it comes out in you. It’s a hard sensation to describe, but it’s very real.” Her collection of about 60 pieces, acquired over the last 15 years, is neatly arranged in a modestly sized but well organized closet. Balenciaga, Chloé, Chanel, Lanvin, Nina Ricci, Halston, Monique Lhuillier, Dolce & Gabbana, Oscar de la Renta, Prada, Zuhair Murad, Yves Saint Laurent, Valentino, Emilio Pucci, Madame Gres, Elie Saab, Brock Collection, Rosie Assoulin: all share the same space, none the exact same story. Walking through the closet, Hickman carefully unzips a canvas garment bag here and li#s the cover of a tissue-lined archival box there to reveal irresistible details like the handwork of a finely scalloped hem or the cloisonné buttons on a Chanel. Pulling out a full-length Johanna Ortiz dress, Hickman says, “I love how the colors and bold floral print show you who she is and where she came from [Colombia].” Sometimes, the provenance of a piece illustrates the career of a favorite actress such as the gray silk Nina Ricci gown that Marion Cotillard wore during awards season the year she won an Oscar. (Traces of the star’s de rigueur body bronzer still show along the top edges). Or, a designer’s inspiring backstory may be what seals a particular deal. With several Balenciagas in her collection, Hickman has always admired the Spanish couturier, a seamstress’ son who grew up in a fishing village. Cristóbal Balenciaga began apprenticing for a local tailor at age 12 and subsequently became the exceptional designer who could skillfully use a pair of scissors to do his own cutting. While a straight line between Hickman’s career of 20 years in human resources (she’s currently a leader in Facebook’s Austin office) and her passion for fashion might not be obvious, what she enjoys most about her work mirrors what she likes about discovering up-and-coming creators of style. “I genuinely enjoy supporting people in their development and growth efforts,” she says. “Whether it’s an emerging designer who’s creating a brand and trying to figure out what resonates with customers, or a colleague at work building new skills and experiences on their career journey – it’s the same. And, for people I haven’t met in person, I’ve always been inspired learning how someone became who they are today.” Hickman says most of her friends know about her love of collecting uniquely stylish pieces, but confesses to having been reluctant to name designer names, afraid it might come across the wrong way. “It used to be that when someone asked me about what I was wearing at a special occasion, I felt kind of shy talking about it. But I’ve gotten more comfortable with it,” she says. “I realize people are genuinely curious and it’s my chance to help spread the word. The emerging designers I’ve met are so appreciative of that kind of support.” Highlighting the talent of someone she believes in is, “incredibly gratifying,” Hickman says. “It makes wearing a beautiful dress that much more special!”

While a shopaholic might spend hours at the mall filling shopping bags with the latest trends, a collector like Hickman peruses eBay, 1stdibs and online auction houses hunting for a coveted vintage piece of a certain era or designer.

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On her first trip to Paris, Hickman brought along this vintage Chanel silk and wool tuxedo dress.

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Isabella Rose Taylor at her studio in Austin.

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AUSTIN’S

TEEN FASHION SENSATION ISABELLA ROSE TAYLOR TALKS GRADUATING FROM PARSONS, HER RECENT POTTERY BARN TEEN COLLABORATION, AND UPCYCLING ‘90S FASHION

BY EMY CIES PHOTOGRAPHS BY JESSICA PAGES

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These rose gold canisters were designed with organization in mind for Taylor’s PBteen collection.

F

OR MOST OF US, THE EVOLUTION OF PERSONAL

style is a battle fraught with awkward photo documentation and cringeworthy teenage years. For Isabella Rose Taylor, who turned 16 in March, style is the outcome of an inherent desire to create. The Austin native started painting at age three. Her first sewing class at eight sparked an interest in fashion design. By 12, she’d launched her first collection online, graduated high school, and become the youngest designer to send a collection down the runway at Austin Fashion Week. A#er taking two years of art and design classes at Austin Community College, Taylor transferred to Parsons School of Design in New York, where she earned her associate’s degree in fashion marketing. At 13 she became the youngest person ever to have a clothing line at Nordstrom and show a collection at New York Fashion Week. This year, she’s graduating from Parsons and is celebrating her freshly launched collaboration of home décor with Pottery Barn Teen. Taylor has never seen her age as a disadvantage or an excuse to be taken less seriously. “I was definitely younger, but I never really got any reactions,” she says. “I feel like most people didn’t really notice or pay attention; I just blended in.”

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To her classmates’ credit, Taylor radiates calm and wisdom beyond her years. Her poise and easy confidence are opposite to the typically awkward teenager. Perhaps it’s the self-assuredness that comes with making a name for yourself in the fashion world before you can drive a car. But being a teen designer has some serious advantages. Mainly, being the same age as your targeted demographic. Her collaboration with PB Teen dropped earlier this year and the final round of samples have just been escorted out of her studio and back to headquarters. The collection is inspired by her sketches and paintings: a black and white color palette with abstract faces, dramatic brushstrokes, and accents of dreamy pinks and rose gold. “I’ve always been really interested in interior design and textiles, plus I was kind of designing for my peers,” she smiles. “It was a fun way to bring them into my world of art.” This was Taylor’s first foray into home décor. It included a signature bedroom and art studio, both inspired by her personal bedroom and studio in Austin. “In a studio I look for multifunctional pieces, that’s a big thing I was able to do with Pottery Barn, like a really awesome art cart,” she explains. “I really wanted to create more versatile pieces that can grow with you.” Taylor describes her path into design as an organic process that started as a fun hobby and snowballed into a full-time business. A#er taking sewing classes, she started making clothes for herself and friends, then progressed


NYFW 2015 Taylor’s whimsical NYFW collection featured baby doll dresses, crochet sweaters, and interactive graphic patterns in a neutral palette of gray and pink.


Her designs are inspired by her paintings; she’s referred to fashion as “art with legs” from a young age.

Her IRT x Redux collection featured playful twists on classic ‘90s brands like Gap, Reebok, and Kappa for a clever take on the athleisure trend.

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HER POISE AND EASY CONFIDENCE ARE OPPOSITE TO THE TYPICALLY AWKWARD TEENAGER. PERHAPS IT’S THE SELF-ASSUREDNESS THAT COMES WITH MAKING A NAME FOR YOURSELF IN THE FASHION WORLD BEFORE YOU CAN DRIVE A CAR.

into selling online and landing massive retailers like Nordstrom. While reinvention is always key to developing your personal style, it is never more true and important than during tumultuous teenage years. Growing up with a brand allows for plenty of experimentation, it’s just that most teenagers don’t have a catalogue of their fashion choices marching down the runway. Taylor sees it as a natural progression and has stayed true to her own brand of self-expression. “A lot of the values of my brand have stayed consistent but the style has evolved a little bit as I’ve matured,” she says. “I’ve always been drawn to more classic pieces and simpler silhouettes that can be reinvented.” Her personal style is a mix of urban and glamorous aesthetics. Think sporty caps with waist-length blonde hair, tracksuits and Chanel backpacks. “I like a street and sportswear-inspired influence,” she says. “I love looking at old designers, like vintage Calvin Klein.” Keep in mind that if you were born in 2001, Calvin Klein is an old designer. “Everyone has a pretty specific personal style, whether they think they do or not,” she says. “Every decision you make, from a piece of clothing you pick out to how you decorate your living space and what you like on social media.” Her latest collection, IRT Redux, took vintage and classic brands and “upcycled” them with political and female-positive messaging. “It kind of brings to life my personal style of reinventing classics,” Taylor explains. “I wanted

to make fun statement pieces with a twist.” For example, the classic ‘90s Gap hoodie, bespoke with the message: “Close the Gender GAP.” Whether planning a runway show or designing an art studio, Taylor likes to be as involved as possible, curating every aspect to create a world for her clothes and designs. “I love creating the concept: mood boards, figuring out color schemes. Creative direction is always very fun,” she says. “I think also first round of samples is very exciting because it’s the first kind of physical thing that you have.” In 2014, she achieved something most designers never will: making it to New York Fashion Week. Taylor feels Austin had a big part in preparing her for such a pinnacle moment. She debuted at Austin Fashion Week in 2012 and was honored as a rising star. “I feel really grateful; that opportunity helped shape me,” Taylor says. “Austin is such a creative city and there’s so much support that comes from within the fashion community.” Her whimsical collection wowed at New York, where she became one of the youngest to ever present. Taylor says being 13 wasn’t an issue, and she was more than ready for the challenge. “Because I had done Austin Fashion Week I kind of understood what goes into putting a show on,” she explains. “So when it came to a larger scale I felt more prepared, but it was so surreal and very emotional.” “It was always a dream of mine — I think it’s every designer’s dream, I never expected it to happen,” she smiles and then adds, “Not this soon.” tribeza.com

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On him: SIMON MILLER shirt, $265, ByGeorge. AG pants, $178, Nordstrom at the Domain. KAPITAL jacket, $450, ByGeorge. HELM shoes. ASPEN HATTER hat. On her: ISABEL MARANT dress, $1,090, ByGeorge. CALVIN KLEIN jacket, $1,895, ByGeorge. RAG & BONE shoes, $475, Nordstrom at the Domain. THE DOWRY jewelry, ByGeorge. Opposite: TALITHA dress, $1,190, Neiman Marcus. THE DOWRY jewelry, ByGeorge.

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FALLING FOR CASUAL ELEGANCE

THE LOOKS WE LOVE THIS SEASON

PHOTOGRAPHS BY KATE ZIMMERMAN

STYLED BY BRITT TOWNS

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BARENA VENEZIA shirt, $250, ByGeorge. AG pants, $178, Nordstrom at the Domain. BELSTAFF jacket, $950, ByGeorge. KAPITAL scarf, $89, ByGeorge. Opposite: RACHEL COMEY jumpsuit, $415, Kick Pleat. CALVIN KLEIN coat, $4,995, ByGeorge. JEFFREY CAMPBELL shoes, $109.95, Nordstrom at the Domain. THE DOWRY jewelry, ByGeorge.

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ROSIE ASSOULIN top, $1,895, ByGeorge. THE ROW pants, $2,390, ByGeorge. DRIES VAN NOTEN shoes, $728, ByGeorge. THE DOWRY jewelry, ByGeorge. Opposite, on her: VERONICA BEARD dress, $495, Neiman Marcus. ISABEL MARANT shoes, $775, Neiman Marcus. COACH purse, $450, Neiman Marcus. THE DOWRY jewelry, ByGeorge. On him: BILLY REID shirt, $225, Nordstrom at the Domain. ACNE pants, $280, ByGeorge. COMMON PROJECTS shoes, $536, ByGeorge. GARRETT LEIGHT glasses with clip-on sun lenses, $435, ByGeorge. ASPEN HATTER hat.

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SIMON MILLER shirt, $150, ByGeorge. AG pants, $178, Nordstrom at the Domain. ELDER STATESMAN sweatshirt, $252, ByGeorge. COMMON PROJECTS shoes, $536, ByGeorge. GARRETT LEIGHT glasses, $285, ByGeorge. Opposite: SAINT LAURENT top, $2,490, ByGeorge. ROSIE ASSOULIN skirt, $1,950, ByGeorge. DRIES VAN NOTEN shoes, $728, ByGeorge. THE DOWRY jewelry, ByGeorge. Hair and Makeup: MICHELLE MCMILLAN. Models: BECKAH BOYKIN (Wallflower Management), LUKE TURPIN. Shot on Location at MATTIE’S.

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BEAUTY GUIDE With an abundance of options, Austin’s beauty scene encompasses everything from hair, makeup and nails to the latest esthetic treatments for health and wellness. Browse our up-to-the-minute beauty guide for the best of the best, then treat yourself to an experience that will make you feel beautiful, inside and out.

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Tru-Skin Dermatology’s mission is to prevent, detect and treat skin cancer. To that end, Dr. Ladd and his team have provided hundreds of free skin cancer screenings and perform a nonsurgical skin cancer treatment using the revolutionary SRT-100 Vision. Tru-Skin Dermatology specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of all types of skin diseases and provides a full-service cosmetic practice, with an emphasis on anti-aging and skin rejuvenation products, procedures, injections and laser treatments. In addition, a portion of every service, patient visit and product purchase at Tru-Skin Dermatology is donated to support the important work of The Shade Project, a nonprofit skin cancer prevention initiative. Tru-Skin Dermatology has eight convenient locations including one in Central Austin.

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SKIN BY RACHEL

Skin by Rachel offers facials, makeup and airbrush tanning, lash and brow extensions, sugaring and waxing treatments in a little beauty shop off East 6th street in downtown Austin. Rachel started out as a makeup artist for theatre, film and television and discovered her passion for all things esthetic related. SKIN BY RACHEL

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THE WORLD WE LIVE IN IS THE ONE WE CREATE northarrowstudio.com

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image (left): William Geisler, Aquamarine, encaustic collage on panel, 60 x 60 in. image (right): John Peralta, Valentine, Olivetti Valentine Portable Typewriter (C.A. 1969) Wood/Latex/Flourocarbon Mono liment/Led Lighting, 36.5 x 48 x 12 in.


LIFE + STYLE HOW WE LIVE RIGHT NOW

As an image consultant, Raquel Greer Gordian is an expert at color analysis. PHOTOGRAPH BY DANIELLE CHLOE

STREET ST YLE

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ST YLE PROFILE

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LO C A L LOV E

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STREET STYLE | LIFE + STYLE

East Austin Street Style WE WANDERED AROUND E AST AUSTIN ON A MONDAY AF TERNOON TO CAPTURE THE AUSTINITES WHO LIVE, WORK, AND SPEND TIME IN ONE OF THE CIT Y’S MORE CRE ATIVE CORNERS. WHETHER THEY’RE SPORTING SOME QUALIT Y THRIF T FINDS, ON THEIR THIRD PAIR OF TRIED-AND-TRUE DENIM JE ANS, OR ROCKING SOME HANDMADE ACCESSORIES, THESE LOCALS SHARE A LOVE FOR E XPRESSING THEIR SENSE OF ST YLE. By Lauren Schulze Photographs by Rudy Arocha

LAINE BERGERON, 23

LAUREN THESING, 27

TREVOR RATHBONE, 35

ELLEN SIGANDER, 24

He’s on his fourth pair of his favorite shoes, DC Trases.

She describes her style as “eclectic comfortable.”

He wears rings all day, every day.

Comfort and functionality are her top priorities when it comes to style.

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ALLIE LONG, 23

AMANDA MCMICREN, 26

RYAN LAMENT, 34

LAUREN SCHULZE, 20

“I always wear this watch. It was my grandma’s and the notch she used fits perfectly on me.”

She sports some thrift finds, a Madewell tee & some DIY accessories.

He mixes a cowboy button down with Vans shoes & Etnies jeans.

“I hate being hot, but I don’t like shorts. It’s an unlucky mix.”

HANNAH LOVE, 29

MICHAEL BUSH, 35

MICHELLE POWELL, 25

NIC VASCOW, 32

Dr. Marten Airwaves are her everyday shoe.

Rockin’ a COS shirt, Topman jeans and shoes, and ASOS sunnies.

She describes her style as “funky & pink.”

“I wear a lot of denim, I wear a lot of hats, and I can’t see, so I wear glasses.” tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

From the Inside Out R AQUEL GREER GORDIAN HELPS WOMEN MAKE FASHION STATEMENTS FROM THE CORE By M. M. Adjarian Photographs by Danielle Chloe

R

AQUEL GREER GORDIAN’S CLOSET

is organized with a capital “O.” Eye-catching clothes in a multitude of textures, colors, and patterns hang in neat rows. On the racks above them, shoes line the walls according to color. Big, bold necklaces drip from a rack at the back of the closet, which also holds a collection of stylish bags and sweaters. A black felt hat and one made of straw rest on two hooks. Everything is in its right and proper place, including the poster of a pinkmasked gorilla hanging near the hats. It’s Saturday, but the fresh-faced Austin native is up early, carefully surveying her closet for the outfit she will wear to visit clients at their homes. Her work, which involves revamping women’s wardrobes and creating new looks from already owned and/or new clothes, is her passion and it shows. Gordian is very clear that what she does involves more than just helping clients look fashionable. “I focus on creating style from the inside out,” she explains. “My goal is to help women enhance their self-awareness and confidence by building a wardrobe that ref lects their inner core.” Attired in a simple dress aswirl in black-andwhite flower-like designs, Gordian disappears into her closet, her soulful-eyed Pekingese/pug mix, Norma, trailing at her heels. All her movements are swift and fluid; she exhibits no hesitation in her choices, which she says are dictated by three things: mood, weather, and the kind of client she will visit. And while she has styled women

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Gordian’s dog Norma looks less than thrilled to be spending a sunny Saturday morning inside a closet.

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

as young as 13 and as old as 85, this morning the 30-year-old dresses for her more typical clients: 30- to 40-something urban professionals. She finds a gray shift decorated with tiny cream-colored diamonds laid out in horizontal stripes and takes down a hanging black-beaded necklace purchased from a New Orleans street vendor. After changing into her outfit, she pulls out a ring set with a long dark rectangular stone from a hanging jewelry bag. She puts on a set of wood, metal and Bakelite bangles and slips into a pair of beige-gray python print pumps. The effect — edgy yet elegant — is unexpectedly stunning. “There’s an angular diamond shape that gets repeated in both pieces,” she says, describing how she matches patterns. “But the diamond shape in the python print is much bigger. Then the gray of the dress plays into the gray in the shoes. The black beads tie everything together.” She pauses to put on her hat. “You can’t have an outfit without accessories. Not only do they show the complexity of the outfit, they show the complexity of who you are.” Looking poised and in control, Gordian projects the image of the confident woman she inspires in her clients, including professionals, homemakers and expecting mothers, breast cancer survivors and bariatric surgery patients, retirees and more. She emphasizes that style involves a process of self-analysis that goes beyond evaluating what a woman has in her closet. “It’s easy to make excuses about your wardrobe,” she says. “But if you learn tricks like pattern and color matching, proportion and balance, you can apply them in seconds. Then style becomes routine, not this big scary thing you don’t have.” Now sitting in the living room of her quiet South Lamar Street apartment, Gordian gazes thoughtfully at 10-year-old Norma, a rescue from the Manhattan ASPCA, who lounges nearby. The two have come a long way together. Gordian adopted Norma just as she was be-

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ginning her post-college life — and the search for a career — in New York City. With a history degree, she could teach or go into research; but neither appealed as career choices. Fashion was something she loved and could see herself involved with in some way. So Gordian began working in a Manhattan clothing boutique, where she found out about an image consulting program at the Fashion Institute of Technology. After she earned her certificate, she took an in-

ternship with Dominique Isbecque, founder of the Image Resource Center of New York and an industry leader in color analysis. “Her eye is incredible,” Gordian raves. “Dominique really taught me how to understand what works best based on what you’re seeing in a person’s complexion and the palette that goes with it. That’s a big part of what separates a stylist from an image consultant.” Stroking the top of Norma’s grizzled head,


“If you learn tricks like pattern and color matching, proportion and balance, you can apply them in seconds. Then style becomes routine, not this big scary thing you don’t have.”

RAQUEL GREER GORDIAN’S FALL FASHION TIPS 1 Get a little sporty at work this fall by pairing your tailored ankle pant with slipon sneakers. Try crushed velvet for a ‘90s spin or quilted leather for an edgier accent.

Gordian reaches for a dress in her impeccably organized closet.

2 Transition your favorite sundress from summer to fall with the Austin staple: cowboy boots. My favorite brand to rock right now is Austin-based Tecovas. 3 Mellow your look for the cooler weather by accentuating warm neutrals with cool ones. Pair a blush satin top with slate grey jeans. Finish with pink mules and a charcoal moto jacket. 4 Bombers are still on trend, so invest in a fun one. Try an embroidered piece for a more romantic style or a letterman bomber jacket for a playful, downtown look. 5 Don’t get caught up in the rules of fashion. Instead, embrace what you love. Wear white all year long by pairing it with vibrant accents like a midnight blue pullover sweater and hot pink pumps. 6 Drop earrings are the perfect party piece this season, but make sure to pair with tops that won’t bump into them. Choose an offthe-shoulder top on warmer nights. Finish with a leather mini skirt and strappy heels. 7 Velvet is the star the season, so make sure it doesn’t have to compete with other elements of your outfit. Pair this rich fabric with black-on-black separates or a t-shirt and jeans to relax the look.

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

“I focus on creating style from the inside out. My goal is to help women enhance their self-awareness and confidence by building a wardrobe that reflects their inner core.”

Gordian explains the differences between the two professions. “To be an image consultant, you need certification,” she says. “You need to become an expert at color analysis, which is the ability to determine undertones and overtones in a client’s skin and determine a person’s natural color palette. You also need training in how to determine a client’s body type and how to best dress for it. Then you can help a client develop a wardrobe for work, weekend activities, and date night that reflects her personality.” In 2014 and after five years in Manhattan, Gordian returned to Austin to begin Greer Image Consulting. Three short years later, she has established herself as an award-winning figure in the world of Austin women’s style. Between her many weekly style consultations and shopping trips for clients, Gordian also makes guest appearances

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on KXAN’s Studio512 and KEYE’s We Are Austin and writes a column on professional women and style for the Austin Business Journal. The fierce work ethic behind her success is similar to that of fellow 30-something Sophia Amoruso, vintage style titan and author of the 2014 bestselling book, “#GIRLBOSS.” “[Amoruso’s] book is inspiring and shows that the possibilities for women entrepreneurs are endless,” Gordian says. “The fact she grew her business into a multimillion-dollar company just shows you what can come of working hard and believing in what you’re doing.” Part of what drew Gordian away from Manhattan was the desire to work in a city she remembered as fun, eccentric and accepting. “Old Austin was a very funky do-your-own-thing place,” she says. “But people coming from LA,

New York and Portland are switching up style. Now Austin’s signature hippie look is colliding and merging with a fresh, cosmopolitan one, and it’s making for an eclectic fashion culture.” As for how Austin fashion will evolve, Gordian believes that the next trend will be toward minimalism. “People are getting sick of all the fast fashion that’s been pumped out,” she says. “So now they want fewer, quality pieces that they can understand how best to use and in as many different ways as possible.” Gordian is cosmopolitan in her vision, but very much the hometown girl who loves cowboy boots and turquoise jewelry. Her approach to style is trend-aware, fresh and playful, just like the city she loves. But it’s also personal. “Style is your daily dose of self-expression,” she quips, grinning.


Gordian emphasizes that the right colors and accessories are essential to personal style success.

GREERIMAGECONSULTING.COM INSTAGRAM: @RAQUELGREERGORDIAN

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LOC AL LOVE | LIFE + ST YLE

JESSI AFSHIN

THEDARLINGDETAIL.COM / @JESSI_ AFSHIN ITEM:

Lightweight vintage Burberry scarf

OBTAINED: MOSS

When it comes to fall outfitting in Texas, layering with lightweight pieces is an effortless way to transition your wardrobe. A quintessential and neutral accessory like a lightweight scarf is a wardrobe staple that you can repurpose yearover-year and from season-to-season. MOSS is my favorite stop for getting my hands on darling and designer thrifts—each piece having a special story behind them. ABOUT IT:

LOCAL LOVE

WANT TO ADD SOME FL AIR TO YOUR FALL WARDROBE? WE ASKED SOME LOCAL FASHIONISTAS TO OPEN THEIR CLOSETS AND SHARE SOME OF THEIR FAVORITE FALL ITEMS Compiled By Nicole Beckley

APRIL ONEBANE

PIECEOLOGYVINTAGE.COM / @PIECEOLOGYVTG

Vintage Distressed Levi’s 501 Jeans Vintage ABOUT IT: My absolute favorite jeans from the best source for vintage denim, Passport Vintage. I wear them with almost everything and they are the most comfortable pair of bottoms I own. You can never go wrong with a classic pair of vintage Levi’s 501s! ITEM:

OBTAINED: Passport

Everyday Dress, Oversized, Cotton in Indigo OBTAINED: Miranda Bennett Studio ABOUT IT: This dress is so versatile and can be worn during any season. I wear it around the house in my bare feet, to business meetings with sandals, or out to nice dinners with heels. It’s also extremely flattering for being oversized and the draping falls along my figure in all the right places. ITEM:

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KIMBERLY BURKE LITTLEBITTYINTHECITY.COM / @LITTLEBITTYINTHECITY

Everly Floral Print Romper Pom Fashion ABOUT IT: I love that here in Austin we can easily transition our summer wardrobe to fall by simply switching up a few key accessories and adding light layers. Case in point: this darling green floral romper from Pom Pom Fashion. The floral print is perfect for summer, but the bold colors are also fitting for fall. I have already worn this romper for a date night and out for brunch with the girls, and plan on wearing it with tan booties and a cozy cardigan as the temperatures start to drop. ITEM:

OBTAINED: Pom

ITEM:

Madewell Fleet Jacket

OBTAINED: Nordstrom

This Madewell utility jacket is one of the most versatile pieces in my closet and is a constant go-to. The olive color can easily be paired with various outfits and adds a chic ABOUT IT:

finishing touch to a casual one. It is the perfect layering piece for your transitional wardrobe as the seasons change. I take it with me to the office, to a movie at the Drafthouse, on the plane, and on the occasional chilly mornings and evenings. It’s totally worth the investment!

HALEY BERRY

THECHICBURROW.COM / @THECHICBURROW ITEM:

Stuart Weitzman booties

OBTAINED: Nordstrom

DANI AUSTIN THEDANIAUSTIN.COM / @DANIAUSTIN

BLANK NYC Suede Moto Jacket OBTAINED: Nordstrom ABOUT IT: Smooth and oh so stylish! This moto jacket is perfect to pair with your favorite denims or throw over a sundress for a more edgy look. ITEM:

FRAME Le Oversized Cuffed Jeans OBTAINED: FRAME ABOUT IT: The loose fit is still incredibly sleek. I love these with a tucked in button-up top. Add some height with super high heels. ITEM:

ABOUT IT:I

love a classic bootie for fall, especially suede ones! These booties are what I most recently added to my closet for fall. They are perfect for work due to the short block heel—can wear them all day! They are also great for with jeans for date night or weekends. Vince chunky knit sweater Neiman Marcus ABOUT IT: This sweater is perfect for throwing on as an extra layer with jeans or styling with short suede skirts. I love items that can be worn with a variety of outfits—and keep you warm in the fall! ITEM:

OBTAINED:

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OPENS SEPTEMBER 11 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu FREE ADMISSION

SOMETHING FOR

EVERYONE

Shop our cutting-edge apparel, unique accessories and gifts, as well as, our fabulous jewels!

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luxroxboutique.com


FOOD + THOUGHT A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON OUR LOCAL DINING SCENE

It’s round-theclock deliciousness at June’s All Day. PHOTOGRAPH BY MICA MCCOOK

K AREN’S PICK

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DINING GUIDE

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

LOC AT ED ON A BR EEZ Y COR N ER OF SOU T H CONGR ESS , T HE SU NDA PPLED C A FÉ FE AT U R ES CL A SSIC ELEMEN TS LIK E BR A SS BIST RO TA BLES , LE AT HER BA NQU ET T ES ,

June’s All Day

CHECK ER BOA R D T ILE FLOOR ING , GLOBE L A MPS , A N D A W R A PA ROU N D M A R BLE BA R .

WINE-FOCUSED SOCO NEWCOMER HAS STAYING POWER By Karen Spezia Photographs by Mica McCook

I

MAGINE IT’S THE YEAR 2025. AUSTIN’S POPULATION HAS DOUBLED,

Mopac’s construction is finally complete, the Longhorns are back in contention for a national title, and June’s All Day is still thriving. It’s a world that’s hard to imagine, especially considering that Austin’s new restaurants rarely stick around for a decade. But I assure you, June’s will. This delightful new café is in it for the long haul. June’s pedigree helps ensure its imminent longevity. Opened last year, it’s the newest addition to McGuire Moorman Hospitality’s impressive portfolio that includes Jeffrey’s, Josephine House, Clark’s, Elizabeth Street Cafe, Perla’s, and Lamberts. The restaurant’s namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—one of less than 10 in Texas—who serves as the group’s beverage director, overseeing the drink programs for all its properties. But June’s is her baby. Along with her MMH partners, Rodil created a wine-focused restaurant complemented by serious cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas, and urban wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing, and lingering. Its offerings are sophisticated without being ponderous, upscale but still playful. As the name implies, you’ll wanna hang there all day. And you can, as June’s serves breakfast, lunch, and dinner. The wine list is worth special consideration given Rodil’s credentials. She rotates selections monthly in hopes of exposing her customers and staff to

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a variety of styles and regions. But don’t expect an intimidating, pontifical list. Instead, by-the-glass options are scribbled on an overhead mirror and the 120-bottle reserve list is presented in a whimsical hand-drawn booklet, or zine, which reads like a grown-up fairy tale. June’s food matches its bar’s high standards. Breakfast is serene, with a smattering of locals on laptops, business tête-à-têtes, and neighbors grabbing a bite to go. Everything’s delicious, from the authentic buckwheat crepe to the pillowy cruller doughnut. Gratefully, there’s nary a breakfast taco in sight. The all-day menu encompasses lunch and dinner. The Matzo Ball Caldo is a delicious marriage of Jewish and Mexican flavors: fluffy matzo balls, tender poached chicken, vegetables, avocados, and jalapenos in a sublime broth. Other tempting starters include fried baby eggplant, snapper carpaccio, and an asparagus and string bean salad embellished with foie gras.


The fried chicken sandwich is one of the best I’ve had. Succulent whitemeat chicken is coated in crunchy, feather-light batter and dressed with zingy slaw, jalapeños, and a drizzle of hot sauce. Other winners include the smoked salmon nicoise salad, the bone marrow bolognaise with homemade pasta, and the roasted fresh fish on a bed of braised leeks. Desserts and pastries are outstanding, so save room—or take one home for later. The signature Monster Cookie is chock full of chocolate chips, M&Ms, pretzels, and peanuts, creating a sweet and salty treat. The marshmallow fluff brownie is an ooey, gooey work of art.

The signature Monster Cookie is chock full of chocolate chips, M&Ms, pretzels, and peanuts, creating a sweet and salty treat.

Be sure to visit June’s for one of its ongoing specials, such as its generous nightly happy hour and its popular Sunday Pub Night, with spot-on Indian bar eats, discounted English beer, and select wines. As with all McGuire Moorman restaurants, June’s oozes understated style and panache. Located on a breezy corner of South Congress, the sun-dappled café features classic elements like brass bistro tables, leather banquettes, checkerboard tile flooring, globe lamps, and a wraparound marble bar. For entertainment, a vintage Wurlitzer jukebox plays an eclectic mix of tunes and a corner TV airs favorite sporting events. On the sidewalk, a cozy patio provides al fresco dining and exceptional people watching. Being at June’s is truly a joy. But don’t just take my word: Bon Appétit and Food & Wine magazines both included June’s on their national 2017 “Best New Restaurants” lists. Its terrific food, drinks, and laid-back sophistication make it a timeless addition to Austin’s dining scene. See ya there next week – and next decade. JUNE’S ALL DAY 1722 SOUTH CONGRESS AVENUE (512) 416-1722 | JUNESALLDAY.COM

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I N S P I R AT I O N B OA R D | F O O D + T H O U G H T

The Zine-Making Sommeliers JUNE RODIL AND EMILY BL ACKMAN ILLUSTR ATE AN APPROACHABLE WINE LIST AT JUNE’S ALL DAY By Anna Andersen Photographs by Danielle Chloe

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“A

WOMAN CAME UP TO ME AT A PARTY NOT TOO LONG AGO

and said, ‘Oh, you wrote a wine book!’ And I was like, ‘No, I didn’t!’” recounts sommelier Emily Blackman, chuckling at the idea. What the woman was referring to is actually the wine list at June’s All Day, and she can probably be forgiven for mistaking it for a book. After all, it’s not every day the server at a restaurant hands you a wine list in the form of a zine, one that has a colorful centerfold illustration featuring, for instance, a naked couple in the middle of a jungle embracing wines au naturel. To Blackman, who started making zines as an art school student about 14 years ago, the form is obvious, and she likes the fact that, unlike a book, it’s not precious. But that’s not to say it’s thrown together in haste. Blackman and Master Sommelier June Rodil put a fair amount of work into making a new volume each month, a process that involves coming up with a theme, selecting and ordering wines, writing interesting tidbits, illustrating, drawing, cutting, pasting, and finally, Xeroxing a bunch of copies and stapling them together. When we dropped by their offices on a Friday afternoon in early August, Blackman and Rodil were on the last step, stapling together Zine Vol. VIII, featuring island wines with a centerfold illustration of a woman in an orange bikini floating in the ocean. “It’s really hot and people want to be on vacation, so it’s perfect for this time of year,” Rodil explains of their theme. “It’s also a great way to get people to try wines with indigenous grapes that they might not be able to pronounce. People aren’t like, ‘Oh look, it’s Hatzidakis, Santorini, I’ll have a bottle of that one,’ but when people associate an esoteric wine with going on vacation to a beautiful island, they’re more inclined to try it.”

Pictured here, Blackman and Rodil wrap up their August zine. If you head to June’s in September, you’ll see a new zine featuring Alpine wines, or wines influenced by the Alps.

Rodil opens to the centerfold of an old zine, one featuring natural wines.

For Rodil, the most time-consuming part of the process is choosing the wines, compiling them into lists, and making sure they come in on time. “Getting special wines flown in and delivered can be difficult, and I’ll often have to tell Emily that we need to change out a wine—and of course she’ll have already made this wonderful illustration around it.” The illustrations typically work themselves out, but as Rodil tries to secure a particular vintage, which goes from being available, to being unavailable, to being available again at the last minute, there winds up being a lot of literal cutting and pasting for Blackman. But they say their process has improved with each new volume, and they’ve certainly come a long way since their first one, which was entirely handwritten. “It was really lo-fi and awesome,” Rodil says, f lipping through it. “The problem is, I have grandma handwriting that is barely legible, and people were like, ‘What is that?’ So we decided, okay, we’re going to have to type and print out the wine names to make them more legible, but I still write little notes in each volume that people can choose to read or not read.” With their notes and accompanying illustrations, which range from a jukebox full of Dolly Parton songs to a primer on how rosé is made or what champagne dosage levels mean, Rodil and Blackman aim to educate and entertain. It’s also evident that they’re having a lot of fun themselves, sometimes working into the early morning hours and laughing hysterically over their clever 3 a.m. ideas. Although a zine might not immediately seem like the most appropriate home for the high quality wines that Rodil sources, Blackman says the form makes sense. “Like June’s, the zines are super approachable, but have a lot of interior quality,” she explains. “It’s just pages that we’ve Xeroxed on a machine, but the wines we have in here are so good. I feel like June’s is the same way; we’re right in the middle of South Congress, you can go buy cowboy boots, yet you can also come in here and have amazing burgundy or rad champagne.” “The zines also give the restaurant vibrancy,” adds Rodil, who also happens to do the coloring. “I want June’s to have this a casual, neighborhood feel to it, but without missing the quality.” tribeza.com

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I N S P I R AT I O N B OA R D | F O O D + T H O U G H T 4

2

Inspiration Board:

8

BL ACKMAN AND RODIL SHARE THEIR ARSENAL OF TOOLS 9

7

6

1

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5

3

10

1. BOTTLES OF WINE

4. ARTWORK BY KELTI SMITH

7. BRISTOL PAPER

11. JOHN PORCELLINO’S KING-CAT

“The wines on my desk are some of the ones that

“Our creative director’s wife, Kelti Smith, made

“It’s what I draw on.” - Blackman

COMICS (not pictured)

we need to taste to see if they’re going to work

this for a tasting we did at Josephine House. It’s

8. CORAVIN

“Shout out to my favorite zine artist, John

out.” - Rodil

actually of me and all of my Master Sommelier

“It’s pretty rad. The needle displaces wine with

Porcellino, who makes King-Cat Comics. I

2. LE PEN PENS

friends in Texas. So that’s me playing badminton…

argon gas. I love it for training.” - Rodil

always joke, having gone to art school, I’m

“I have every color of Le Pen pens because I love

They’re my family, my friends.” - Rodil

9. LONG-REACH STAPLER

the worst artist, I mean my people are a step

them. They’re my favorite pens to write with.

5. PRISMACOLOR PENCILS

“Our long-reach stapler is probably the most

above stick people–but here’s an artist who

Nobody else in the office buys them, so if I see

“We use these old-school Prismacolor pencils

important thing on the planet. It’s a very

has a really simple style of drawing. He still

one around here, I know somebody stole it from

for coloring—old school Prismacolor and Le Pen

important tool. It’s the best. I love this thing.

puts out a quarterly that he prints out and you

me. We use the red one to cross out the wines in

pens.” - Rodil

The end of our process involves folding and

can subscribe and he’ll mail it to you. He’s my

the zine when we run out.” - Rodil

6. EMILY’S ART BOX

stapling.” - Blackman

inspiration.” - Blackman

3. ILLUSTRATION FROM ZINE VOL. 1

“This is my art box from college. It’s coming

10. NOBLE ROT MAGAZINE

“This illustration is from Zine Vol. 1. We couldn’t

up on 14 years. It has my ink nibs, my micron

“This is awesome. It’s my favorite publication.

figure out how to label our Cabernet list, and it

pens, and my favorite tool—my non-photo-

It’s British and it comes out every four months.

was a 3 a.m. idea to put Henry the VIII in a cab

reproducing blue pencils. I use these pencils to

It’s very current, but not too hip. I also really love

and call it King Cabs. I laughed for forever. I was

do all my initial sketches. They’re my favorite

matte periodicals in the wine world. Whenever

delirious. So we kept it.” - Rodil

thing.” - Blackman

it does come out I get really excited.” - Rodil tribeza.com

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ALCOMAR 1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161 Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner or weekend brunch, and start your visit with blood orange margarita and the crab and guacamole.

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR 319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884 Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting; perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas, incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino) and locally-sourced, seasonally inspired

34TH STREET CATERING

chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails,

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000 | 34thstreetcafe.com

local beers on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

One of the best and most creative full service catering companies in Austin. Acclaimed Chef Paul Petersen brings his culinary experience

ASTI TRATTORIA

and high standards to the catering company

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

and to your event! Call them to save the date

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential

and they'll start planning any occasion. We’re

Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them

coming to the party.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

with. Finish off your meal with the honey and goat

Nothing compliments the bold flavors of traditional Interior Mexican cuisine like a superb Premium Tequila or Mezcal. Special care is taken not only with making the selections, but they’re also served to you in a vessel most appropriate for your ultimate exerience of that spirit.

BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE & BEER GARDEN

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

24 DINER 600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400 Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

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cheese panna cotta.

79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656 Banger’s brings the German biergarten tradition to Rainey Street with an array of artisan sausages and more than 100 beers on tap. To get the full Banger’s experience, go for their weekend brunch and indulge in the Banger’s Benny, the beer garden’s take on eggs Benedict.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

3663 Bee Caves Rd. West Lake Hills, TX 78746

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch and

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for their happy hour to share

the f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy

a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

BRIBERY BAKERY

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous

2013 Wells Branch Pkwy. #109 | (512) 531 9832 1900 Simond Ave. #300 | (512) 297 2720 Pastry Chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confections. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine and coffee.

dessert, alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029 Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamon serrano. The white-brick patio invites you

LAS PALOMAS

to sip on some sangria and enjoy the bites.

3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

CAFÉ JOSIE

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experi-

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed

ence” menu every night at Cafe Josie, which offers

setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh

guests a prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience.

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas!

The a la carte menu is also available, featuring

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally-sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

CAFÉ NO SÉ

classics such as smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

2nd Street: 238 W 2nd St | 512.472.9463 Domain: 11410 Century Oaks | 512.339.9463 CRUaWINEbar.com

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place for weekend brunching. Their spin on the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

CRU’s wildly popular Ahi Tartare is the perfect

BAR CHI SUSHI

compliment to any of over 300 selections, 80

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

premium wines by the glass or 15 wine f lights.

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town,

A state-of-the-art wine preservation system and

this sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the

temperature control ensure optimal taste and

weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake

appreciation. Toast to Summer at CRU.

bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

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CENTRAL STANDARD

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 0823

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

Between their full dinner menu, impressive raw bar and craft

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides mod-

cocktail offerings, Central Standard at the South Congress

eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and sweet

ern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mortadella

Hotel is the perfect place to spend a night on the town.

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry thyme cocktail.

CHEZ NOUS

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

HOPFIELDS

510 Neches St. | (512) 473 2413

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Now an iconic Austin staple, Chez Nous creates authentic

EPICERIE

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful

French cuisine just a few yards away from bustling 6th

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail

Street. Genuine, simple and delectable, it is hard not to leave

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibili-

options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restau-

this bistro feeling completely satisfied.

ties by Thomas Keller-trained Chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of

rant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays!

JEFFREY’S

315 Congress Ave, Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

FIXE

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

Belly up to the counter at this 25-seat space for an intimate

500 W. 5th St. | (512) 888 9133

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

dining experience that’s modern yet approachable. This

Southern charm meets delicious f lavors in this downtown

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

unique eatery gives three, five and seven-course tasting

eatery. Run by the team who founded Eddie V’s, Fixe serves

the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but welcoming

menus in an immersive setting.

modern Louisiana cuisine with a dash of Dixie.

atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

COUNTER CAFÉ

FOODHEADS

JUNIPER

626 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 708 8800

616 W. 34th St. | (512) 420 8400

2400 E. Cesar Chavez St. Ste. 304 | (512) 220 9421

1914 E. 6th St. | (512) 351 9961

Fresh and inspired sandwiches, soups and salads in a charm-

Uchi alum Nicholas Yanes cooks up northern Italian fair

It’s nothing fancy, but this tiny shotgun-style diner has some

ing refashioned cottage and porch. This local sandwich shop

on the east side. Juniper’s minimalistic menu reinvents the

of the city’s best breakfast offerings. This cafe fuses Ameri-

on 34th Street is the perfect date spot for you and your book.

Italian classics.

can diner food with a global touch. Make sure to order their

Don’t forget to check out the daily soup specials!

famous pancakes and burgers!

FREEDMEN’S

DAI DUE

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional French

2406 Manor Rd. | (512) 524 0688

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

and Southern cuisine. Think late night Parisian-style

Whether you’re in the mood for fresh market ingredients or

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to

burgers with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for

a succulent dining out experience, Dai Due has it all. Their

the desserts and even their cocktail offerings. Pitmaster

Sunday brunch.

products are regionally sourced and seasonal, including the

and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue

eclectic drink list.

on a charming outdoor patio.

LUCY’S FRIED CHICKEN

EASY TIGER

GERALDINE’S

2218 College Ave. | (512) 297 2423

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

2900 Ranch Rd. 620 N

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s

Straight-up Southern goodness, from moon pies to fried

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative

green tomatoes and the house specialty: fried chicken. Chef

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local

cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady Bird Lake.

James Holmes puts a fun take on our Southern favorites

brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with

Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy Chef Ste-

and serves them up with inventive cocktails, like the peach

beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

phen Bonin dishes and cocktails from bar manager Jen Keyser.

cobbler martini.

106 SEPTEMBER 2017 |

tribeza.com

L’ESTELLE HOUSE 88 1/2 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588

5408 Burnet Rd. | (512) 514 0664 &


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

ODD DUCK

PARKSIDE

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 215 8972

1201 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 433 6521

301 E. 6th St. | (512) 474 9898

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensibil-

Famed food trailer turned brick-and-mortar, Odd Duck was

Chef Shawn Cirkiel’s f lagship restaurant, featuring a happy

ity to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitchen

the first venture from acclaimed chef Bryce Gilmore. Expect

hour with half-price oysters and tasty cocktails, is a local

and at the counter.

seasonal fare and drinks with a Texas inf luence at this

favorite. Don’t overlook the dessert menu, with delectable

NAU’S ENFIELD DRUG

South Lamar oasis.

items such as a brioche beignet and chocolate mousse.

1115 West Lynn St. | (512) 476 1221

OLIVE & JUNE

SALTY SOW

An Austin institution since 1951, this all-American soda

3411 Glenview Ave. | (512) 467 9898

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

fountain within an antiquated drug store gives guests an

Celebrated Austin chef Shawn Cirkiel created this southern

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including

unmatched experience founded on tradition. The food is

Italian-style restaurant with a menu that highlights local,

a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu,

simple and classic, rivaled only by the scrumptious shakes

seasonal ingredients with dishes like saffron ricotta ravioli

heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-

and hand mixed old-fashioned sodas.

and pork meatballs.

night noshing.


A L O O K B E H I N D 7…7

A Kimono with a Backstory By Anna Andersen Photograph by Wynn Myers P H OTO G R A P H E R W Y N N M Y E R S WA S I N

Tucson, Arizona, shooting for Tiny Atlas Quarterly when she decided to pop into Desert Vintage and wound up snapping this photo of Roberto Cowan, who she describes as “the sweetest shop owner.” When Dagny Piasecki saw that photo of Roberto on Myers’ website, she fell in love with the green kimono hanging behind him. “I called Roberto and told him that I had to have the kimono. Unfortunately, he told me it had just been purchased,” Piasecki recounts. “But then, a week later, I got a call from Roberto and he said that it had been returned. When it finally arrived in the mail, I almost teared up. It was hand embroidered in the 1920s, and it’s probably the most beautiful piece in my collection.”

108 SEPTEMBER 2017 |

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Upon finding found out that Myers would be photographing her as part of the Drivers of Style shoot, Piasecki decided to show up in the green kimono that she had discovered in Myers’ photo. “I thought it would be fun to come full circle,” she says. Talk about a small world, huh?


LONDON GREY RUGS

3001 PALM WAY STE. B | AUSTIN, TEXAS 78758 | DOMAIN NORTHSIDE 512-839-8999 | LONDONGREYRUGS.COM


TRIBEZA September 2017  

The Style Issue No. 193