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SOLID FOUNDATIONS

MID-MODERN LIFE

A Roland Roessner home sets the stage for creativity and community

WALKING THE LINE

A look into the new Line hotel

N O. 206 | A R C H I T E C T U R E

A group of young architects is shaping what Austin will look like in the years to come

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YEARS


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OCTOBER 14, 2018 – JANUARY 6, 2019

Friday, October 26 | 6 - 10 p.m.

blantonmuseum.org/afrobeats

This exhibition is organized by the Vitra Design Museum and the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao and funded by the German Federal Cultural Foundation and Art Mentor Foundation Lucerne. Generous funding for this exhibition at the Blanton is provided by Suzanne Deal Booth and Jeanne and Michael Klein, with additional support from Ellen and David Berman. Image: Cyrus Kabiru, Caribbean Sun (detail), 2012, from the series C-Stunners, digital print © Carl de Souza AFP/Getty Images

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GERMAN FEDERAL CULTURAL FOUNDATION

The University of Texas at Austin / MLK at Congress, Austin, TX 78712 / 512.471.7324 blantonmuseum.org @blantonmuseum #MakingAfrica


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CONTENTS

OCTOBER / ARCHITECTURE

The Sugarshack house, photographed by Casey Dunn, was designed by Alterstudio and named for the street on which it resides.

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DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 26 Kristin’s Column p. 36 Community Profile p. 40 Tribeza Talk p. 44 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 48 Music Pick p. 49 Art Pick p. 50 Event Pick p. 52 The Design Guide p. 96 Style Profile p. 104 Style Pick p. 110 Travel Pick p. 112 Karen’s Pick p. 118 Dining Guide p. 122 A Look Behind p. 128 FEATURES

Walking the Line p. 60 Mid-Modern Life p. 68 Solid Foundations p. 78 The Art of Living p. 88 ON THE COVER The Austin skyline, then and now, photographed by Chase Daniel. Photograph PICA09467 courtesy of The Austin History Center, Austin Public Library.

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CUSTOMIZE WITH THE CHARMS COLLEC TION

C O M E V I S I T U S ! South Congress | Lamar Central | The Domain


EDITOR'S LETTER

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QUICK GLANCE AT OUR CITY’S SKYLINE REMINDS ONE OF THE VERTICAL AND horizontal expansion happening all around us. Hotels, apartments, restaurants, and possibly even sports facilities abound and are (re)shaping our daily lives, commutes, and horizon. Certainly it’s not all good, but I am eternally optimistic about Austin’s growth and quite frankly have seen the alternative and it is not something I wish for our city. So, yes, these buildings, and the people who design and create them, have real power: the power to engage and include, form new patterns, and possibly even reanimate old traditions. This is what we choose to highlight in our annual architecture issue. The Line hotel is a perfect example of such an opportunity. Opened in the ’60s as the Crest Inn and more recently as The Radisson, the beautiful mid-century building has been given new life thanks to Michael Hsu and his team. Years of poor design decisions had led to what was a fairly average, if ever-present, structure standing tall at Cesar Chavez and Congress Avenue. Thanks to writer Nicole Beckley, photographer Chase Daniel, and the Austin History Center we were able to tell the story of this hotel (“Walking the Line”), which stands as a testament to Austin’s past, present, and future. Of course, you don’t need to have the name recognition of a Michael Hsu or a major hotel chain as a client in order to be making an impact architecturally. Camille Jobe and Ada Corral are cleverly and beautifully solving problems for their clients — one of which is now the City of Austin and The Trail Foundation. The business partners, who, unbelievably, first met as neighbors in the Delwood pocket of Austin (“Community First”), approach each new space with an eye for preservation. And throughout all this design innovation no man or woman is an island, which the group highlighted in Brittani Sonnenberg’s “Solid Foundations” has proved time and again over the past 10-plus years. The group of friends, who first met in their undergrad days at The University of Texas, continue to work together and support one another in big and small ways. Whether it’s showing up for a toddler’s backyard birthday party or collaborating on new designs, these friends and up-and-coming architects and designers are certainly ones to keep an eye on. The following pages are most definitely the result of a team effort. And I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the crew it took to capture the stunning Roland Roessner home featured in Anne Bruno’s “Mid-Modern Life.” The original owner, Suzy Lindeman Snyder, who worked side by side with Roessner to design the space, and her daughter Anne Wheat, gave us access to not only their memories but dozens of family photos. The photos reveal the home’s thoughtful design and how beautifully the current owner, horticulturalist Laurie Humphreys, has adapted the space for modern living. The three women have become friends, and Humphreys carries on the neighborhood ice-cream socials that Snyder and her family once hosted. Somehow Leonid Furmansky captured all of these equally important strands, allowing us to share both the space itself and the meaning it has held for its residents and neighbors since first built in 1960. Margaret Williams margaret@tribeza.com

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1214 West 6th St Austin,TX 78703 www.juliangold.com (512) 473-2493


TRIBEZ A

17

YEARS

AUSTIN CUR ATED

O C T O B E R 2 01 8

N O. 2 0 6

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Photograph © Jake Holt

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Claire Schaper

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Shaleena Keefer Errica Williams PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

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WRITERS

Neal Baker Nicole Beckley Dorothy Guerrero Hannah Morrow Brittani Sonnenberg PHOTOGR APHERS

Miguel Angel Warren Chang Holly Cowart Chase Daniel Kady Dunlap Casey Dunn Leonid Furmansky Jonathan Garza David Brendan Hall Taylor Prinsen Bill Sallans Kate Zimmerman Turpin ILLUSTR ATORS

Thanks to our Title Sponsor, Urbanspace For more information please call AIA Austin, 512.452.4332

Kristin Moore Madison Weakley

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

www.aiaaustinhomestour.com


SOCIAL HOUR

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COVERT CADILLAC LAUNCH PARTY On August 16, Covert Cadillac held an exclusive VIP unveiling of the Cadillac XT4. While enjoying complimentary bites and beverages, guests had the opportunity to get behind the wheel through an immersive virtual-reality experience where they built and customized their very own XT4.

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FUNBOX POP-UP PARTY

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TEXAS 4000 FOR CANCER TRIBUTE GALA On August 24, the annual Texas 4000 Tribute Gala shared the story of the University of Texas’ 2018 cycling team and honored their accomplishments upon returning to Austin after the team’s bike ride to Anchorage. The night featured a seated dinner, silent and live auctions, moving feature videos, dancing, and more, with proceeds going toward cancer research. COVERT CADILLAC LAUNCH PARTY: 1. Joe Joseph III, Brad Elliott, Joe Joseph Jr. & Courtney Elliott 2. Viola & Thomas Rogers 3. Kay Rester FUNBOX POP-UP PARTY: 4. Emily Young & Jill Dewey 5. Maggie Rosenbohm, Christiana Goldman & Amy Young 6. Tiffany Craven, Keith Kreeger & Robyn Malloy TEXAS 4000 FOR CANCER TRIBUTE GALA: 7. Rachel Boaz & Samantha Finkenstaedt 8. Kent Shearer & Madeline Orr 9. Jessica & Laurie Brubaker 10. Kayla Shapiro, Drew Curran & Erika Rodrigues 11. Wes & Allyie Carberry

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y DAV I D B R E N DA N H A L L , J O N AT H A N G A R Z A A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

FUNBOX by Craven + Co. organized a pop-up party at Keith Kreeger Studios on August 18 to commemorate the launch of its latest line of event products. While Keith Kreeger’s porcelain and House of Margot Blair florals provided eye candy for the night, guests sampled delightful appetizers from Loro, swayed to beats by Vinylmnky, snapped shots in the GIF booth, and took home fun gift boxes.


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SOCIAL HOUR

SUNSET SOUNDS Fairmont Austin hosted Sunset Sounds on August 25, an exciting concert benefiting the nonprofit Kids in a New Groove, which provides Central Texas foster kids with mentoring and music lessons. Special guests were treated to a VIP mixer and meet-and-greet with local favorites The Bright Light Social Hour, who closed out the night with an incredible set.

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BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS ICE BALL GALA 2018 Big Brothers Big Sisters held the 2018 Ice Ball Gala at Fairmont Austin on August 25. With ice sculptures, live auctions, silent auctions, dinner, and dancing, the lively event made a big impact for children in Austin. Big Brothers Big Sisters serves nearly 1,000 children each year, ensuring that they get matched with the mentors they need and deserve.

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STUDIO 54KLIFT 2018

SUNSET SOUNDS: 1. David Adams & Nanett Mock 2. Sara Osburn, Laura Wood, Brad Booker & Alex Franco 3. Sarah Gaut & Andrea Boidman BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS ICE BALL GALA 2018: 4. Natalie Thigpen, Ashley Yarborough & Ali Ryan 5. Sarah Saxon, Kristie Gonzales & Quita Culpepper 6. Greg Russell & Lena Mathes STUDIO 54KLIFT 2018: 7. Daniel & Trasi Judd 8. Hannah Roberts & Jenna Carrens 9. Karen & Damon Borich

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y TAY LO R P R I N S E N , WA R R E N C H A N G A N D R E G A N M O R TO N

On August 25, Forklift Danceworks threw its annual fundraising party at the Texas Federation of Women’s Clubs Mansion. Donning their best disco attire, partygoers grooved to music by DJ Mahealani, snacked on bites from Il Brutto, and celebrated Forklift’s mission to activate communities through collaborative creative processes, raising more than $32,000 for the night.


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SOCIAL HOUR

RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE ANNUAL RED SHOE LUNCHEON Ronald McDonald House Charities of Central Texas put on its annual Red Shoe Luncheon on September 5 to support Central Texas families with critically ill or injured children who need help during a pediatric crisis. Guests gathered at Brazos Hall sporting red shoes for a night of incredible food and philanthropy.

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THE BIG GIVE 2018 On September 7, nonprofit I Live Here I Give Here held its annual fundraising event The BIG Give at the Hotel Van Zandt. While guests were treated to local food, cocktails, music, and an exciting silent auction, the organization named the 2018 Patsy Woods Martin Big Giver, an award that recognizes an inspiring individual making a big impact in our community.

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The Harry Ransom Center celebrated the opening of its newest exhibition, “Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance,” by throwing an exclusive bash on September 7. Art lovers got after-hours access to the exhibition, delicious sips and snacks, and an opportunity to win an exhibition-themed prize package. The exhibition will remain on display until January 2019.

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9 RONALD MCDONALD HOUSE ANNUAL RED SHOE LUNCHEON: 1. Katie Owen & Susie Soderquist 2. Hannah Floyd, Tala Matchett, Katie Comer, Mary Barton & Tam Hawkins THE BIG GIVE 2018: 3. Terri Broussard Williams & Lemuel Williams 4. Kelsey Kuehn, Noel Bridges, Christina Allen & Haley Thompson 5. Chikage Windler & Trevor Scott 6. Catherine Lucchesi & Marisa Secco “ED RUSCHA: ARCHAEOLOGY AND ROMANCE” OPENING: 7. Kathryn Millan & Greg Curtis 8. Michael Fracasso & Leslie Ernst 9. Michael & Kathy Hoinski 10. Jean Kilberry & Drew Johnson 11. Efrain Miranda & Sue Sellstrom

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y A N T H O N Y J O H N S O N , T R E N T M A X W E L L A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

“ED RUSCHA: ARCHAEOLOGY AND ROMANCE” OPENING


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SOCIAL HOUR

KIKI SMITH “BOUNTY” OPENING RECEPTION On September 13, Loot Finer Goods threw an exclusive launch party at their Loot Rentals Showroom for their first-ever small batch home goods collection featuring a range of both handmade and refurbished goods. Guests were treated to delicious bites from Peached Tortilla and Good Pop, and drinks from Champagne Supply Co. and Argus Cidery.

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HUNT SLONEM EXHIBITION OPENING On September 14, the new female-driven Filigree Theatre held its Gala Fundraiser at Springdale Station. Guests enjoyed live music, small bites, drinks, and a silent auction while getting to mix and mingle with Filigree co-founders Elizabeth V. Newman and Stephanie Moore and the cast of the upcoming production of “Betrayal.”

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THE 2018 TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL: AUTHOR REVEAL PARTY

KIKI SMITH “BOUNTY” OPENING RECEPTION: 1. Andrew Riefenstahl & Liana Putrino 2. Lydia Gee & Cat Diederich 3. Holly Rymer & Meagan Shepherd 4. Amy Sawtelle, Mia Carameros & Emily Seeds FILIGREE HUNT SLONEM EXHIBITION OPENING: 5. Chelsey Moore & Eric Garcia 6. Tricia Bucklen & Grace Williamson 7. Anita & Oscar Rios THE 2018 TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL: AUTHOR REVEAL PARTY: 8. Maya Payne Smart & Heidi Marquez Smith 9. Claire Burrows, Lisa Lucero & Lois Kim

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I G U E L A N G E L A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

The Texas Book Festival’s author reveal party took place on August 29 at the home of John Little and Heather Stallings, where the full lineup for the upcoming festival weekend on October 27 and 28 was shared. This year’s impressive group of over 280 authors includes Susan Orlean, John Scalzi, Phoebe Robinson, Scott Kelly and more.


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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

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VECTORS By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Kristin Moore

No one would ever attempt to build a house or a building by just showing up, dumping some concrete on the ground, and hammering some boards together. No way. Months, sometimes even years, are spent in the planning phase, looking at the topography of the land, drafting architectural plans and renderings, considering the foundation, the beams, the framing, the safety of the structure, the view, the light, the design, and the materials. It takes vision and patience to create something safe, beautiful, and lasting. Yet how often do we show up in our own lives without a plan? I have an old priest friend, and I remember when he spoke about vectors. He said that if we don’t know where we are going, it’s quite certain we will never get there. He compared it to the way a pilot needs a f light plan and said we humans need to chart our life course as well. The thing about vectors is that if we are just a few degrees off course, we will land far from our intended destination. Small degrees yield a widely different arc. I actually really liked geometry, so this image and the metaphorical meaning it applies to life registered in my brain and I never forgot it.

I like the idea of knowing where I ultimately want to go and stopping periodically to check my vectors. My spiritual mentors talk about meditation and how important it is to visualize the life we want, and specifically sit with those thoughts and desires and emotionally charge them with our feelings. Especially powerful charges are things like excitement, hope, love, gratitude, and a yearning to serve others. Desire is fully manifested when we link our attention to our intention. This is like the builder who has a plan. With a vision of what we ultimately want to build, it’s much easier to bring that dream to fulfillment. So the time we spend in our workroom (our hearts and minds) is everything. Today life is fast, life is full, and life is noisy. Everywhere we look, something is demanding and distracting our attention. Watch the way you respond when your phone beeps, buzzes, or rings. We drool and wag like Pavlov’s dogs. We run down the rabbit trail of urgency rather than pursue the path of importance. It’s hard to pause long enough to make time for dreaming, visualizing, or checking our vectors. But this is absolutely essential. It is also essential to understand that reali-

zation depends upon giving away the thing we want the most. This is so counterintuitive that I fought it for over a decade. If we want financial freedom and abundance, we have to be generous. If we want empathy and connection, we have to show up for other people in their pain. If we want success in our careers, we have to mentor others and share our gifts. If we want advancement, we must contribute to and celebrate the achievements of another. If we want a promotion, we have to credit our team. If we want forgiveness and mercy, we have to first press through our resentment and extend it to someone else. If we want to feel beautiful, we have to honor the beauty in nature, art, and in other people. If we want to feel valuable, we have to value others. If we want patience, we must endure suffering and waiting. If we want courage, we must be willing to be vulnerable. If we want victory, we must try hard enough to risk failure. If we want to love, we must be willing to suffer loss. If we want faith, we have to relinquish control and trust in something bigger than ourselves. If we want joy, we have to be joyful. If we want freedom, we must grant it to others and slowly, mindfully, learn to let go.

“IF WE WANT VICTORY, WE MUST TRY HARD ENOUGH TO RISK FAILURE.”

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LIVE AUSTIN

MARGARET PARMA GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISOR c. 512.632.9519 margaret.parma@sothebysrealty.com austinluxuryresidential.com

38 OCTOBER 2018 |

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

COMMUNITY FIRST THESE ARCHITECTS SHARE A BUSINESS, A STREET, AND A DESIGN SENSIBILIT Y THAT ADAPTS TO THEIR CLIENTS’ NEEDS By Margaret Williams Photographs by Holly Cowart and Casey Woods

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Ada Corral and Camille Job, shown with their families, in front of Ada’s home. The owners of Jobe Corral Architects live just down the street from one another.

DA CO R R A L A N D C A M I L L E J O B E , P R I N C I PA L S A N D

co-founders of Jobe Corral Architects, describe their neighboring homes as the Twin Houses. The two homes do in fact have quite a lot in common: Set just a few houses apart on the same street, both are low-slung one-story concrete block homes that have natural light streaming through their original casement windows. So, yes, there are similarities, but as with any space the details reveal a fuller picture. Jobe, a Corpus Christi native who has been a practicing architect for 20 years, is an avid cook whose kitchen is not only the centerpiece of the house but also the bridge that connects the home’s original footprint to its later addition. Corral, a graduate from the University of Texas’ architecture program and the mother of three young children (two of them twins), has created a home that skillfully surprises. Upon first entering Corral’s home, the 1940s outline seems unchanged, but a turn past the kitchen and din-


ing room reveals an entirely new space centered around a play space for her children and a master suite for her and her husband. In fact both homes were so thoughtfully adapted that the Twin Houses recently received a Preservation Austin addition award. It makes sense that these homes, set in the Delwood neighborhood, speak volumes about the type of architects Jobe and Corral are, since they are also the way they met and became friends and, eventually, business partners. “A lot of people can’t see what they can do with these little houses,” Corral explains. Jobe follows, saying, “Our houses can be an example of how to do it … you don’t have to demolish them.” The AIA-certified architects, whose work ranges from an entirely new and modern build in South Austin, to an inventive and playful treehouse, to the upcoming and most recent Lady Bird Lake restroom project, want to offer their clients solutions for the way they really live, whatever that means. We sat down with the architects and friends to find out how exactly they met, what their relationship means for both their work and their families, and what projects the women have on their horizon. When and how did you two meet? Were you really neighbors first? CORR AL: We met in the neighborhood after a colleague told me about this other architect that lived down the street. Later Patton [Jobe’s youngest son] and Orlando [Corral’s oldest child] were in preschool together. I reached out to Camille in 2012, soon after starting my business, because I needed help with the business side of things. Camille had wanted someone to discuss ideas with also. We had both found it difficult to work in isolation, so we started having coffee and helping each other out. That eventually led to

finding office space together and more collaboration that later turned into officially merging our businesses five years ago. JOBE: That pretty much covers it!

We are the organizers of the team, the coordinators of the work, and the grease that keeps the wheels turning. It means a better product in the end. CORR AL: Early on we discovered that we had How did you decide to start a business togethvery similar design sensibilities but very different er? Pros and cons to living next door to your skill sets. Discussing projects, running ideas by each other, and combining our different areas of expertise made all our projects The Jobe Corral designed Elm Street Solarium stronger. It was also easier to start hiring people and growing our business by sharing the expenses and responsibilities. In fact our first employee, Sarah Haf ley, who is still working with us, worked for both of our separate companies before we were officially Jobe Corral Architects. But since we are neighbors we try to strike a balance between the personal and the professional. We spend a lot of time together but also are respectful of each other’s own time. Our kids have sleepovers, Halloween is at Camille’s house, and New Year’s Eve is at mine. And we can just walk down the street if we need a quick after-hours meeting.

friend and business partner. JOBE: We are both very pro-collaboration. We have a list of ideas that we wrote up soon after deciding to join forces, and one thing stuck out: “Collaboration is not about gluing together existing egos. It’s about the ideas that never existed until everyone entered the room.”

What drew you to your home and the Delwood neighborhood? CORR AL: We loved our neighborhood as soon as we first drove in. There are huge trees framing the entrance, and the houses are very simple. A clean canvas is an architect’s dream. I grew up in Puerto Rico, where most construction is made out of concrete blocks, so finding a concrete block house felt like home. JOBE: Simple, clean lines — the steel windows and lack of trim details were very appealing. The location was also a big selling point, since I spend a lot of time at the Waller Creek Boathouse and I needed to be close. Almost all of the homes in the neighborhood are one-story concrete block houses, usually around 1,000 square feet, with stucco on the interior, the exterior, and the ceilings. tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

How have you adapted your home through the years? CORR AL: Our house was great for Matthew [Corral’s husband] and I before we had kids, and even with one kid, but the two bedrooms and one bathroom quickly became too small after the twins came along. First we renovated the original part of the home, which included uncovering and restoring the original parquet floors, resurfacing the fireplace, and remodeling the kitchen and bathroom. Once we could no longer handle one bathroom for five people, we finalized our plans for an addition that had been in progress for a decade. Ten years after we purchased the house, in 2005, we broke ground. We love that we were able to maintain the character of the old house, with a modest addition that fits our needs, that is in keeping with the character of the neighborhood. JOBE: The houses were all built in the 1940s. People lived very differently back then. Our house didn’t originally have a dining area outside of the kitchen, the kitchen was very small, and there wasn’t a connection to the

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This Modern Barn, situated in Blanco, is organized around a breezeway that serves as a functional workspace. The exterior is comprised of limestone, vertical grain cedar and steel.


EARLY ON WE DISCOVERED THAT WE HAD VERY SIMILAR DESIGN SENSIBILITIES BUT VERY DIFFERENT SKILL SETS ... COMBINING OUR DIFFERENT AREAS OF EXPERTISE MADE ALL OUR PROJECTS STRONGER .

backyard from the living spaces. The only back door went through the garage. When we did our addition, it was all about making the house livable for a modern family without destroying the character of the house and the neighborhood. How does the way you live inform your design for clients’ homes? CORR AL: Having gone through the process of adding to and renovating our own homes allows us to better speak to our clients about the process, the things that worked and even the things we regret or wished we had done differently. In terms of design, we really want the way our clients live, rather than the way we live, to inform the design of their home. We want to offer the solution for the way they want to live. JOBE: Because we are always working on the homes and workplaces of others, we are always observing, critiquing, and analyzing. We are always looking for better ways to design for the way our clients want to live. My husband and I, and our whole family, love to cook and entertain. Those experiences inform my design. What projects are you working on currently? Anything especially exciting or challenging you can share? JOBE: We are very excited to be working on a restroom project along the Butler Trail on Lady Bird Lake. Our clients are The Trail Foundation and The Parks and Recreation Department. It is the fourth restroom on the series, but the first one on the East Side, and the first by a women-owned firm.

FAR LEFT: Camille’s home, along with Ada’s, was part of a recent Preservation Austin award. ABOVE: Camille’s modern patio addition served as the perfect backdrop for a conversation between the two architects.

These are all unique and sculptural projects and on a very beautiful site. Ours will be on Festival Beach. The schematic design was just revealed to the public, and construction should start in early 2019. CORR AL: We are reinterpreting the materials of an existing old restroom on the site that the neighbors are fond of, and we will have a colorful, undulating glazed-tile roof, which allows for wind and light to move through the building. It is both exciting and a challenge to have basically all of Austin as our potential end user. We get to design something that will be used by the Austin community and contribute to our city. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Training

GROUNDS

TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Honor Roll

Concluding their series of roundtables for the year, Women in Architecture, a committee of AIA Austin, will host the Honor Awards in November. The group works to create opportunities for connection and development for women excelling in the architecture and design fields, and the awards highlight firms and individuals for their significant contributions to the profession. AIAAUSTIN.ORG

Press PRINT One of the buzziest brands at this year’s SXSW festival wasn’t an app or device. It was a 3D-printed home from Icon. That particular home served as a sample of what Icon is working to iterate, a one-story, 600- to 800-square-foot space that can be printed in under 24 hours with a price tag around $4,000. The future just may be a tiny home you print yourself. ICONBUILD.COM

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“Branding and architecture and personality and work atmosphere, all those things have to merge properly together,” explains Mark Odom. As the founding principal of Mark Odom Studio, he’s recently tackled work spaces like the Bumble headquarters and dining spaces like Rosewood. With the opening of the Seaholm district’s Generator Athlete Lab, the challenge was to figure out how to let the building’s existing industrial components mix with a modern atmosphere. “It’s such a beautiful space, the power plant,” Odom says. “And so anytime you mix old with new, how do you do that appropriately?” Working with limitations — a partnership between developers and the city of Austin called for public viewing space of the power plant — Odom worked with Generator’s founders, Jessica Tranchina and Delfin Ward, to realize a clean space for the lab’s training and treatment facility. “This is their first shop, of many I hope,” Odom says. GENERATORATHLETELAB.COM AND MARKODOMSTUDIO.COM


TAMIE GLASS

for engagnment than onstructed of a single teractions, se, or chal-

PROMPT

s a curated timely and lations and l principles n to impact

TAMIE GLASS

PROMPT SOCIALLY ENGAGING OBJECTS AND ENVIRONMENTS

SOCIALLY ENGAGING OBJECTS AND ENVIRONMENTS

Tamie Glass is an associate professor and director of the Interior Design Program at The University of Texas at Austin. She is an advocate for human-centered design education across campus and contributes to university-wide initiatives focused on bridging disciplines through design thinking. Within the School of Architecture, she teaches a wide range of design studios and lecture courses. Tamie Glass holds a Master of Interior Architecture from the University of Oregon and a Bachelor of Environmental Design from Texas A&M University. She began her career in Germany where she worked with Daimler’s Corporate Identity Design team, followed by practice in London with internationally renowned design firms Virgile and Stone and Conran and Partners. In addition to her academic role, she maintains an award-winning design consultancy in Austin, Texas. As a practitioner and educator, Tamie Glass aims to expand the role and enhance the perception of interior design through her research, which focuses on designing for human behavior and experience. She explores the methods used by designers to instill intangible qualities into the built environment with an emphasis on the positive impact of carefully considered spatial conditions. She is the recipient of the 2018 ASID Nancy Vincent McClelland Award which recognizes lasting and significant contributions to the body of knowledge that supports the interior design profession.

A NEW BLUEPRINT

Birkhäuser Basel

In 2016, Tim Brown Architecture launched Perch Plans, a way to deliver customized home design through accessible house plans. Those looking to build a house can choose one of their styles, like the smaller-scale Brune, a take on a countryside home, or the Senepol, a version of a large modern farmhouse with a three-car garage, among others, and use it as the blueprint to building a uniquely tailored residence. The plans provide a jumping-off point to working with their architectural team to modify the designs for additional customization. PERCHPL ANS.COM 21.05.18 20:50

GREAT SPACES G E N E R ATO R AT H L E T E L A B P H OTO B Y C H R I S O L F E R S H O N O R R O L L P H OTO B Y PAT R I C K W O N G

While in architecture school, Tamie Glass realized she was most interested in buildings’ internal architecture. “I found that it was the spaces inside that were most compelling to me because that’s the part of the building architecture that we actually engage with the most and where we spend such a significant amount of our time,” Gla ss says. After earning degrees from Texas A&M and the University of Oregon, and working in identity design for Daimler in Germany, Glass came to teach interior design at UT Austin. In her new book, “Prompt: Socially Engaging Objects and Environments,” she examines 36 projects and how those spaces shape people’s behaviors and interactions. Glass wants to look at what spaces actually do for us, “how they help facilitate the time we spend in them, the activities, the interactions, how they support relationships with other people or personal growth … I think we sometimes don’t talk enough about that, and so the book is dedicated to just that.” TAMIEGLASS.COM

BUILDING Blocks “I instinctively think about problems spatially. Architecture is about synthesizing a lot of disparate things into one beautiful functional object,” architect René Graham says. When it came to creating Renzoe Box, a modular makeup carrying case, applying a space-driven solution to the typical messy makeup bag made perfect sense. “To me, it is architecture,” Graham says. Launched in a crowdfunding campaign in August, the compact box accommodates multiple “pods” for eyeshadows and blush, storage for brushes, and an area for longer tubes of items like mascara or eyeliner. RENZOEBOX.COM

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Amber Vickery Photography

CELEBRATE THE HOLIDAYS AT FAIR MARKET A unique Eastside neighborhood event space, perfect for social gatherings and corporate festivities of all kinds. 1100 E. 5th Street, Austin, Texas 78702 fairmarketaustin.com events@fairmarketaustin.com


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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC ROBERT PLANT & THE SENSATIONAL SPACE SHIFTERS

October 1 ACL Live at The Moody Theater KEVIN GATES

October 2 ACL Live at The Moody Theater PHOENIX W/ THE VOIDS

October 3 & 4 Stubb’s BBQ

October 7 Manuel’s

BISHOP BRIGGS W/ DONNA MISSAL

October 9 Emo’s Austin

DAVID BYRNE W/ TOPAZ JONES

October 10 Bass Concert Hall

RESIDENTE W/ TROOKO

ALL TIME LOW & DASHBOARD CONFESSIONAL

October 4 ACL Live at The Moody Theater INDIGO GIRLS

October 10 Emo’s Austin

THE NATIONAL

October 11 Stubb’s BBQ

SYLVAN ESSO

October 4 Paramount Theatre

October 12 Stubb’s BBQ

ST. VINCENT

MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA W/ BEN KWELLER

October 5 Stubb’s BBQ

THE WOMBATS W/ YUNGBLUD

October 5 Emo’s Austin

YEKWON SUNWOO

October 5 Bass Concert Hall

AUSTIN CITY LIMITS MUSIC FESTIVAL

October 5 – 7 & 12 – 14 Zilker Park BROCKHAMPTON

October 6 Stubb’s BBQ

October 13 Emo’s Austin

ASO PRESENTS: OZ WITH ORCHESTRA

MOVIES IN THE PARK: PRACTICAL MAGIC

TOO MANY ZOOZ

AUSTIN AREA JAZZ FESTIVAL

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL

October 19 Austin360 Amphitheater October 19 Antone’s Nightclub

ASO PRESENTS: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, LENNY

October 19 & 20 Long Center

MARY CHAPIN CARPENTER

October 20 Paramount Theatre MOLLY BURCH

October 20 Barracuda TOADIES

October 20 Stubb’s BBQ VICENTE AMIGO

October 21 Long Center

COMEBACK KID

October 23 Barracuda

BOZ SCAGGS

CURTIS HARDING W/ JACKIE VENSON

LIL DICKY

October 13 Stubb’s BBQ

October 14 Antone’s Nightclub PAPA ROACH

October 16 ACL Live at The Moody Theater October 19 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

October 6 Long Center

BRUNO MARS & BRITNEY SPEARS

ODESZA

88RISING

JOSHUA BELL

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KENNY WILLIAMS & ART CARVAJAL LIVE FOR SUNDAY BRUNCH

October 24 Paramount Theatre October 24 Frank Erwin Center A PERFECT CIRCLE

October 24 Austin360 Amphitheater GHOSTLAND OBSERVATORY

October 25 Stubb’s BBQ CHERUB

October 26 Stubb’s BBQ tribeza.com

October 27 Long Center

October 27 Rosewood Park

CLIFFORD ANTONE’S BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION

October 27 Antone’s Nightclub

COURTNEY BARNETT

October 27 Stubb’s BBQ

FILM CLOSE-UP: OTHER FORMS OF LIFE FILM SERIES

October 3 – 29 AFS Cinema

BEETTLEJUICE

October 27 Domain NORTHSIDE THE FILMS OF ED RUSCHA

October 11 Harry Ransom Center

TEXAS FOCUS: TENDER MERCIES

October 25 Palm Park

October 25 – November 1 Paramount Theatre & Various Locations

THEATER TOC TOC

Through October 12 Austin Scottish Rite Theater ONCE

Through October 28 ZACH Theatre BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE MÉXICO DE AMALIA HERNÁNDEZ

October 4 Long Center

MISS JULIE

October 4 – 20 Mastrogeorge Theatre DOUBT

October 12 – November 4 The City Theatre RAGAMALA DANCE COMPANY

October 11 Bullock Texas State History Museum

October 18 Bass Concert Hall

THAT’S MY FACE FREE SCREENING

TAPESTRY DANCE COMPANY PRESENTS: SOUND & SILENCE

October 12 George Washington Carver Museum

AUSTIN UNDER THE STARS FILM FESTIVAL

October 20 Lone Star Court

October 18 – 21 Long Center

THE PLAY THAT GOES WRONG

October 23 – 28 Bass Concert Hall


COMEDY LA VIDA DE LOS MUERTOS

Through November 1 The Hideout Theatre DOV DAVIDOFF

October 3 – 6 Cap City Comedy Club STEVE MARTIN & MARTIN SHORT

October 4 & 5 Bass Concert Hall

JOE ZIMMERMAN

October 10 – 13 Cap City Comedy Club AL SIDDIQ

October 17 – 20 Cap City Comedy Club NEAL BRENNAN

October 18 & 21 Paramount Theatre

STORYTIME: HALLOWEEN

October 25 Bullock Texas State History Museum ASO PRESENTS: HALLOWEEN CHILDREN’S CONCERT

October 28 Long Center

OTHER ART OF ICE CREAM POP-UP

October 1 – 31 1500 E. 4th St.

BARKTOBERFEST

October 6 Yard Bar

TEXAS TEEN BOOK FESTIVAL

October 6 St. Edward’s University

WALLER CREEK CONSERVANCY BENEFIT

October 10 Stubb’s BBQ

CHILDREN BEWITCHED

October 3 Domain NORTHSIDE THE MYSTERY OF THE GREEN TEETH GHOST

October 6 & 7 Long Center

ROSITA Y CONCHITA

October 6 – November 2 Austin Scottish Rite Theater FAMILY DAY AT THE VAC

October 20 Visual Arts Center

SEXUAL HEALTH & DATING AFTER 40 Join Planned Parenthood for two events where our healthcare experts will create a relaxed, fun and welcoming atmosphere for a discussion on sexual health. Back On The Dating Scene, October 11 and Reproductive Healthcare After 40, October 26. ppgreatertx.org/lets-talk

MUSIC PICK

Too Many Zooz By Neal Baker

ANTONE’S NIGHTCLUB, OCTOBER 19

The bigger the ruckus, the bigger the tip. Or so it has worked out for New York City trio Too Many Zooz. Getting their start as buskers in the subway system, the band’s sound is the product of a couple of horns and a pretty big drum. Playing a dirty mash of dance and funk that they like to call “brass house,” Too Many Zooz exist to remind us that you don’t need a big band to make a heck of a lot of noise. It’s their personalities as much as their music that make them remarkable, with David Parks’ unbreakable focus on his stuck-together drums, Matt Muirhead’s contrasting cool demeanor and brash trumpet sounds, and saxophonist Leo Pellegrino’s hyperactive footwork and constantly evolving hair colors. Their early underground performances were recorded by strangers, amassing millions of views on their own and giving them an unexpected break. By now, Too Many Zooz is one of New York City’s worst-kept secrets, and they’ve left Union Square to tour behind two studio records. On October 19 they land at Antone’s Nightclub. Even though their music is crafted for the train platform (they’re clearly still sticking to this judging by the title of their more recent album, “Subway Gawdz”), their presence under concert lights is unthinkably funky and electric. When you go, just be sure to tip the guitarist on the sidewalk outside—maybe he’ll be the next to make it big.

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts ANN WOOD: QUICK AND QUIET

ERWIN MEYER: EUROPEAN WORK

EDWARD LANE MCCARTNEY: HOLDING PATTERNS

HISTORY LAB: RE-INVENTING IMPRESSIONISM

Through October 8 Big Medium Gallery

Through October 13 CAMIBAart Gallery

HARRY UNDERWOOD

DE/CONSTRUCTION

DAMEON LESTER: SERENE DISTURBANCE

TITO’S PRIZE EXHIBITION: STEVE PARKER

(IM)POSSIBILITIES: A RETROSPECTIVE OF DYSFUNCTION

JON LANGFORD ART

Through October 20 Davis Gallery

Through October 29 grayDUCK Gallery

Steve Parker By Neal Baker BIG MEDIUM GALLERY, OCTOBER 19 - NOVEMBER 18

Focusing on multifaceted projects, installations, and performances, Steve Parker’s work ranges from zany to mysterious to quietly thoughtful. He works in a diverse array of crafts, having spliced together brass instruments, written a quartet for choreographed speaker drones, and engineered an interactive digital auditory landscape mapped to the city of Austin. While his compositions and auditory creations are sometimes performed by hired talent, it’s just as likely that the viewer or passerby will become part of the ensemble. His diversity of creation is rooted in a diversity of inspiration, as can be seen in one of his handdrawn programs or collected on his Instagram feed. He has displayed an affinity for World War II-era listening devices with his interactive “Tubascopes”; he has speculated about the result of a collaboration between Marcel Duchamp, John Cage, and Frank Zappa with his “Lo-Fi Cycle”; and he has done his best to learn from Austin wildlife in “Grackle Call” and “Bat//Man.” Now, after having put together one unique project after another, Parker is being recognized by Big Medium in its second annual granting of the Tito’s Prize, which comes along with a $15,000 award and solo exhibition at Big Medium. Parker will be adapting his eclectic style of creation for a more traditional exhibition space, and his show will open in Big Medium’s gallery on October 19, where it will stay through the East Austin Studio Tour.

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October 14 Neill-Cochran House Museum MAKING AFRICA: A CONTINENT OF CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

Through October 15 Yard Dog Art Gallery

ART PICK

October 5 – 14 5930 Bold Ruler Way

Through November 3 Flatbed Press

UMLAUF PRIZE 2018

Through November 5 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden STORIED & POP JAPAN

October 4 – December 14 Asian American Resource Center

October 14 – January 6 Blanton Museum of Art

October 19 – November 18 Big Medium Gallery

October 26 – November 25 Yard Dog Art Gallery WHITNEY TURETZKY: FEMININE GRANDEUR

Through November 25 Elisabet Ney Museum


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

Texas Book Festival By Avery Tanner VARIOUS LOC ATIONS IN AND AROUND THE C APITOL , OCTOBER 27 & 28

There’s nothing quite like holding a book in your hands, flipping through the pages, and being taken on a literary journey. Though we live in a constant state of hustle and bustle, reading remains a window into the greater world around us. The Texas Book Festival takes over the Capitol and its surrounding environs on October 27 and 28 to celebrate the written word, bringing notable authors from both near and far to Austin. This year’s lineup includes former White House photographer Pete Souza and former president of Planned Parenthood Cecile Richards, as well as local favorites like Helen Thompson and Casey Dunn. The two-day festival also includes a number of signings, cooking demonstrations, and activities for children. Most events are free, with proceeds from books sold during the festival benefitting the Reading Rock Stars program and the Library Grants initiative. The mission of the Texas Book Festival is to promote a love of reading with people of all ages. With its long-standing status as one of the most prestigious book festivals in the country, the fest highlights local authors while celebrating some of the best-known writers of our time. The perfect place for Austin book lovers to unite!

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y J U L I A K E I M

MUSEUMS


ELEGANT AND UNDERSTATED. THOUGHTFUL AND REFINED. The Elisha is a collection of four, one-level, luxury residences ranging from 1,940 to 2,699 SF. Buyers can choose between two interior design palettes that offer custom materials and stately finishes. Inquire today to learn more.

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The right is reserved to make modifications and changes to the information contained herein. Renderings, photos and sketches are representational only, and may not be totally accurate. Dimensions, sizes, specifications, layouts, views and materials are approximate only and subject to change without notice.


Fairmont Austin Ballroom 101 Red River Street, Austin, Texas 78701 SATURDAY, OCTOBER 13, 2018 COCKTAILS 5:30PM | DINNER & PROGRAM 6:30PM INDIVIDUAL TICKETS $350 bit.ly/catrinaball

Honorary Chairs Alina Flores Gonzalez & Consul General of México Carlos Gonzalez Gutierrez

Co-Chairs Elizabeth Caples Rogers & Michael Torres

Lifetime Achievement in the Visual Arts Award Honoree Rina Lazo

Patron of the Arts Award Honoree Manuel Zuniga

Keynote Speaker Carlos Tortolero

Runway Presentation by Midi Solis

The Official Mexican & Mexican American Fine Arts Museum of Texas Teresa Miller & Mike Taylor

Innovator® Framing System

Jane & Manuel Zuniga

Elizabeth Rogers

Ana Ruelas & Friends

Tom Gilliland

Sponsorships available. For more information call 512-200-7276 or visit bit.ly/sponsorcatrina |2017 Catrina Ball Runway Presentation by Midi Solis. Photo by Chris Caselli


elihalpin.com

Grand Opening Party 1023 Springdale Rd 10A

Oct 27 2018

Austin Tx

6-10 pm

Complimentary Cocktails Tiny Petting Zoo 7-9pm Halloween Attire Encouraged Ribbon Cutting Ceremony at 6pm Sponsored by Sweet Charli Girl BakeryÂ

WWG

Wal ly W or k m a n Ga l l e ry

Hol ly Wilson

1 2 0 2 W. 6 t h St . A u st i n, T X 7 8 7 0 3 wa l l y wor k man.com 5 1 2 . 4 7 2 . 7 4 2 8

Mia Carameros


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: S 12–5 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa & Su 11-4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa & Su 12-5 massgallery.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12-6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F 10-6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 1600 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu-F 10-5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com


EST. 1989 EST. 1989

EST. 2015

EST. 2015

presents presents

benefiting

benefiting

Champagne, Lunch, Bubbles & Bling, Legendary Silent Auction and of course, BINGO! OCTOBER 20, 2018 | 10:00AM - 1:30PM | JW MARRIOTT AUSTIN O N

S T O N E L A K E

THE SM

Amanda Van Hoozer Northside Domain

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19 – 21 October Circuit of the Americas, Austin, Texas

20 October BRUNO MARS

Tickets: TheCircuit.com

21 October BRITNEY SPEARS tribeza.com

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Walking

THE LINE A look behind the palette and paradoxes of downtown’s Line hotel BY NICOLE BECKLEY PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHASE DANIEL

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The newly designed lobby of the Line Hotel. The planters intentionally reference the shape of a bullet. The design “is inspired by a nod at what Texas used to be, which is a frontier space, and it’s a way to twist that around and turn it into something different, something that plants grow in instead.” — Michael Hsu tribeza.com | OCTOBER 2018 61


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V I N TAG E LO B B Y P H OTO TA K E N B Y AV E B O N A R , P H OTO G R A P H A R .19 9 1.113 CO U R T E S Y O F T H E A U S T I N H I S TO R Y C E N T E R , A U S T I N P U B L I C L I B R A RY.

alk into the Line hotel on a given Friday afternoon and just beyond the concrete columns, beneath the rough, textured ceilings and hanging planters, excited travelers and their friends gather, those who know something of Austin or who want to visit the Austin they’ve heard about. Rolling suitcases prowl the extended lobby, navigating the various seating areas that offer an eclectic mix of patterns, an intentional nod to Austin’s eclectic history. If there’s a feeling of coolness to being in this prime downtown spot, with its pale-pink walls, dark floors, and tranquil lake views, it’s by design. When the building first opened, on the corner of Congress Avenue and what was then First Street, now Cesar Chavez, its grand opening on January 23, 1966, was announced with 12 pages in the Austin American-Statesman. Opened as Wilbur Clark’s Crest Hotel, the structure was an efficient example of the modernist architecture of the time, with a

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This is not what I’'d call a one-note hotel.

Far left: The hotel’s check in desk then and now — a moment captured from the early 1990s and today. Top: Blue pendant lights hang above diners in Kristen Kish’s Arlo Grey. Left: The inviting poolside lounge area.

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V I N TAG E P H OTO O F “ W I L B U R C L A R K ’ S C R E S T H OT E L” P H OTO G R A P H P I C A0 9 4 6 6 CO U R T E S Y O F T H E A U S T I N H I S TO R Y C E N T E R , A U S T I N P U B L I C L I B R A R Y.

Left: Then and now — a photo of the hotel in the mid-1960s, and today. Above: Architect Michael Hsu near one of the hotel’s three fireplaces.

few signature features. Texas architect A. Carroll Brodnax, designed a 12-story, 310-room structure, which included three indoor pool suites (“the Crest Hotel chain’s trademark”) and the building’s exterior window arches, meant to block the sun and provide shade. Inside, the hotel boasted an Old World Spanish influence, with terrazzo floors, dark wood, Spanish oil paintings, and a gold-leaf ceiling. Burnt-orange and gold colors accented the hotel’s corridors. Heavy paneled double doors opened into the Seville dining room, seating 90, and an auditorium that could accommodate 500. But the real highlight was the hotel’s location on the edge of Town Lake, with Congress Avenue and the Capitol in clear view. Fast-forward half a century. Purchased from

Radisson in 2016, the hotel recently reopened as a Sydell Group property, in an extension of the Line brand, whose other outposts include spots in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C., after undergoing a thorough renovation, which, in a way, helped return the building to its roots. “Its location here in Austin was really underappreciated,” architect Michael Hsu explains. “It was a huge deal, and then it sort of fell out of favor, became a building people sort of looked past or, even worse, didn’t really like at all.” Michael Hsu Office of Architecture (MHOA), along with L.A.-based Knibb Design, made plans to maximize the hotel’s location and its foundational structure. “The current building codes wouldn’t allow you to actually modify the building a lot,” Hsu says. “So a lot of it was about stripping away layers of additions and remodels that the building had seen.” The design team went back to basics and focused on natural elements. “We talked a lot about being on the city edge, the lake, and drawing a lot from some of the natural forms and textures and colors,” says Maija Kreishman, a partner at MHOA. They looked to features of Austin for their color palette, finding inspiration in the greenery of Hamilton Pool, the blues of Barton Springs, geological pinks, the black darkness of caves, Hill Country oak trees, and, being on Congress Avenue, the bats. And they worked to visually reconnect the hotel to the lake. “In the old hotel, [when] you walked in, you didn’t even see the lake at all. There was no connection whatsoever,” Hsu says. They cleared the sightlines and opened up the hotel’s pool more to the lake as well, outlining the poolside space with rough slatted wood and adding a pop of color with orange plaid umbrellas. Inside, with the textured natural-colored curtains pulled back, diners in the Arlo Grey restaurant have views of both spaces. While sitting at gray marble tabletops or lounging on tufted couches in Top Chef winner Kristen Kish’s restaurant, patrons can look out at paddleboarders or turn their attention to their drinks, mixed behind a large black wood bar. The sleek central bar was built by Wimberley-based furniture maker Michael Wilson.

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” “Even though it’s a large place, I think it still has the vibe you might get when you go to someone’s house,” Hsu says. “It feels very personal. You can connect with people. That’s why you see a lot of the layering of furniture, layering of styles, colors. This is not what I’d call a one-note hotel.” There was also a desire to use the lobby areas to communicate a sense of history. Just past the main entrance, a large circular ottoman and various patterned chairs give a nod to the 1960s. “[It’s] sort of playing off lobby history, formality, Lady Bird — the very stately icon — and then the building itself, which is born of that particular time,” designer Sean Knibb says. Closer to the check-in desk, a concrete, stairstepped fireplace takes its cues from Italian contemporary brutalist architect Carlo Scarpa. Notes of brutalism play out throughout the hotel in found concrete moments, echoing those of the Line’s L.A. hotel. “We didn’t bring it in [to the Austin hotel], to be honest. It was already there. We just didn’t cover it up,” Knibb says. The overall effect of the design elements is a subtle complexity — the dark and the light, the rugged textures offset by an abundance of hanging brass and copper planters and strategically placed

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fiddle-leaf fig trees. “Part of the paradox of Austin that we love, having lived here, is that there are contradictory things — we love refinement, but we also love roughness. We love grit and we love sophistication. We love beauty, but we’re also quite happy looking at landscapes that are in a way brutal and maybe a little hard,” Hsu says. “Contradictory things, paradoxical things — that’s what makes the city thrive and interesting.” That ethos extends to the hotel’s 428 guest rooms as well. Graded blue hallway carpet and dark-blue walls carry the natural feeling of flowing water to the rooms’ entrances. Sandblasted plywood headboards support soft, low beds. Large windows to the south give open views of kayakers traversing the lake and, to the north, pedestrians — tourists and businesspeople — navigating toward Congress Avenue. “One of the things I love about Austin and people who want to visit here is they come and feel like they really want an authentic experience of what Austin is,” Hsu says. “I think it’s our job to really figure out what the future of the city looks like through these types of projects, taking old things and really reinterpreting and reintroducing them to a completely different audience.”


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Mid-Modern

LIFE A Roland Roessner home sets the stage for creativity and community BY ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEONID FURMANSKY

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PREVIOUS SPREAD: Anne Wheat with her grandfather, astronomer Donald H. Menzel, in the early 1960s. RIGHT: A painting by Jack Roth hangs in Humphreys’ art filled home.

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ruise Balcones Drive and the surrounding neighborhood and it doesn’t take an architectural historian to pick out the mid-century modern beauties holding their own amid all the new-home construction. What you can see driving past — large expanses of glass with cantilevered covered porches and natural elements of limestone and wood — are hallmarks of the style, making these homes feel somehow vintage, modern, and timeless all at once. But it’s the unseen elements that tell the story of how these structures came to be and the people who love them, the primary reason many of Roessner’s houses still survive and shine. In 1959 Suzy Lindeman Snyder and her late husband, Jim Lindeman, contracted with architect Roland G. Roessner to build a home for their family on a cul-de-sac in the new Balcones Park neighborhood near Mount Bonnell. Roessner, like many of his contemporaries, was a World War II veteran and the art and architecture he’d seen in other parts of the world influenced his work. He had been recruited to teach at the University of Texas in 1948, when the architecture program was still part of the College of Engineering. Over the next 30 years at UT, he became one of the School of Architecture’s most notable professors, being one of the few to meld his academic career with a vibrant private practice, to the benefit of students and clients alike. Along the way, his work earned numerous professional awards as well as public recognition. In 1955, a Roessner-designed home on Balcones (one that is, sadly, no longer standing) was

named Newsweek magazine’s House of the Year. Almost 55 years after the house was built, when Laurie Humphreys purchased it, the same details the Lindemans loved about the home’s design spoke to Humphreys’ own aesthetic. A UT graduate of art history and an accomplished landscape architect with a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania, Humphreys says, “The first time I drove up and saw it — before I even got out of the car — I said, ‘This is it.’”

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Many of the home’s original architectural features, like the stone and steel fireplace, remain untouched.

Roessner was particularly adept at connecting the inside of a house to its outside surroundings. The home’s layout and abundance of windows invite natural light in, while protecting the privacy of its occupants. The first steps inside reveal an unobstructed view to a porch running the length of the back of the house and a sloping yard below. Here, Humphreys’ horticultural talents come to life with a lush forest of potted plants on the porch and a tranquil, meadow-like feel to the backyard. At the time the home was built, Roessner’s design was neither flashy nor trendy, but it was definitely forward-thinking. For Suzy and Jim Lindeman, a very creative pair, the house reflected their own progressive ideals. Over the course of five decades, the home not only served as the headquarters for a very busy family of five, but also played host to meetings for a number of civic organizations like Austin Community Nursery Schools and the Women’s Symphony League. Here, adults and children alike were treated to stimulating conversation as well as music, art, and games. “I grew up always wanting to learn and do new

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things, and things that help people,” says Lindeman Snyder, now in her early nineties and a well-known presence at Westminster Manor. “At the time I studied early childhood education at Skidmore College, it was a very new field. Early in my teaching career I even got chided for letting the nursery school children play too much! Can you imagine? Of course,” she adds, “eventually everyone understood just how important play is to a child’s development.” As Lindeman Snyder’s own children got older, nearly every inch of the home’s interior, including the first-level basement, as well as the driveway, front yard, backyard, and cul-de-sac, was put to use for all manner of gathering like Girl Scout meetings, puppet-making and puppet shows (on no less than a full-size stage built by Suzy and Jim), and annual Christmas caroling parties. International students and businesspeople visiting Austin were also regulars; Lindeman Snyder’s penchant for bringing people together was publicly recognized in 1963 by the Austin American-Statesman, when she was named Austin Hostess of the Year.

I really believe the world would be a better place if we had more ice-cream socials.


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Humphreys walking into her Balcones Park Neighborhood home. The home was designed and built in 1959. 74 OCTOBER 2018 | tribeza.com


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Original owner, Suzy Lindeman Snyder, shares photos and memories with current owner, Laurie Humphreys.

While every event hosted by the Lindemans (and later by Suzy and Bryan Snyder, whom Suzy married after Jim passed away) made people smile, one that Humphreys has carried on is the ice-cream social. According to Humphreys, it was practically inevitable that she revive the tradition, which some of the neighbors still remember. “It’s one of the things my neighbors on the block told me about when I moved in,” says Humphreys, a Waco native who returned to Texas from Pennsylvania after more than 20 years away. “Like Suzy, I love the idea of making sure everybody knows each other — just taking time to visit outside for a while,” she says. “I think it’s so important.” Since moving into the house in 2014, Humphreys has hosted several ice-cream socials in her front yard, bringing in Amy’s Ice Creams trucks for an updated twist on the original. As Lindeman Snyder tells it, the near-legendary ice-cream socials started when her son Jim had a paper route. “Since Jimmy was out delivering pa-

pers anyway, it seemed the easiest way to spread the word was to just have him deliver invitations to everyone on the paper route. Back then,” she adds, “everybody took the paper. So that’s how we did it, and anyone who wanted to come was always welcome. The parents came, the children came — just about everyone in the neighborhood or anyone who was walking nearby!” Not surprisingly, it was an event held at the house that brought original and current owner together. Unbeknownst to Humphreys, one of the attendees at a board meeting she hosted in her home is a friend of Lindeman Snyder’s youngest daughter, Anne Wheat. Wheat tells the story of how all the pieces came together: “My friend, who happens to be an architectural historian, was telling me about a beautiful house he’d been to and how it was a wonderful example of mid-century modern architecture. As he described the details, tears came to my eyes when I realized he was talking about the house I grew up in.”

Since the connection was made, Lindeman Snyder and Humphreys have developed a friendship and discovered even further common bonds. Last month, Humphreys hosted a luncheon for Lindeman Snyder. Among the guests were Lindeman Snyder’s daughters and former Balcones Park neighbors, many of whom also live at Westminster Manor. “I love having Suzy come over and tell me stories about what the neighborhood was like when they first built this house,” Humphreys says. “I hope I have half the energy she does when I’m her age!” Today, the neighborhood is one of Austin’s most beautiful, the mature trees that were young saplings when the Lindemans built their home now shading the winding streets and graceful lawns. As far as the ice-cream socials go, there’s no plan to stop anytime soon. Says Lindeman Snyder, “I really believe the world would be a better place if we had more ice-cream socials.” Laurie Humphreys couldn’t agree more. tribeza.com

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Nick Hunt and Claire Zinnecker discuss The Common, a creative co-working space set to open in the North Loop neighborhood in 2019. The architect and designer are collaborating on the project.

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Foundations S O L I D

A group of young visionary architects and designers are shaping what Austin will look like in the years to come — over beers and laughter in their backyards By Brittani Sonnenberg Photographs by Kady Dunlap

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The group of long time friends and collaborators gather in the Brykerwoods backyard of Nick and Brittany Hunt.

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eople love the myth of the lone genius, but a peek behind the curtain suggests that most geniuses lean heavily on their support networks. Sherlock had Watson. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg (aka the Notorious RBG) had her late husband, Marty. James Beard had Julia Child, and Julia Child had James Beard. Successful creative relationships demand that you sometimes play the sidekick and sometimes the superhero. For a group of eight rising architects and designers in Austin, switching roles — from superhero to sidekick, from welder to project manager, from professor to architect to parent — is just part of the job. And if that juggling ever starts to feel overwhelming, there’s chilled white wine and laughter and friendships that began in UT architecture classes 10 years ago, connections that remain as inspiring and foundational as any designs sketched since. Architects Brittany and Nick Hunt hosted the latest group hang and invited Tribeza to sit in on the action. On a lovely weathered back porch in Bryker Woods, where a hammock swung lazily between two cedar elm trees, two toddlers chased each other, and two dogs eyed the charcuterie plate, a group of old friends reconnected as we listened and asked a few questions of our own. What follows are snippets from an evening’s musings on architecture, design, and the nature of creative collaboration.

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NICK HUNT

Hunt Architecture (Architect and Co-founder) There’s something about the studio atmosphere in college architecture classes that fosters amazing friendships. I’m a relative latecomer to the group, which began at UT with my wife, Brittany, and her friends. Brittany and I met at an architecture firm in New York, and when we had Cooper [now 18 months old], we decided to move back to Austin. This group has been incredible for me. When I moved here, I lost my entire New York network, and knowing these guys has meant that I have access to vital local connections, from millworkers to contractors. In Austin, it’s not about competing with each other: Everyone does their own thing, and we all help each other out. I just started working on a project with Claire, and it’s a privilege to collaborate with friends whose work you deeply respect. We visit each other’s building sites and give feedback; we’re all doing wildly different things.

BRITTANY HUNT

Nick Hunt’s projects are often based in both Austin and New York City, like this renovation for a young couple living on Madison Avenue.

This fall will be my first semester teaching at UT. It feels like coming full circle to me. I’m the first of our group to go back to the classroom. The architecture profession doesn’t support mothers very well, and that kicks a lot of people out. I’m in a unique position because I can do my architecture work from home. At school, there were more women than men in our department, but in the workforce it flips back to an overwhelmingly male ratio. You have to be really committed to your career. I’ve been in love with the profession from an early age. It’s tough and time-consuming and requires a really thick skin. I was lucky to marry an architect who gets it, who’s my number one fan and a big part of my support system and an equal parent. As a woman, you have to ask for what you want in this field. I was upfront with my boss about needing more maternity leave. You learn to advocate for yourself in a profession where nobody else will. We don’t really discuss gender roles in this group; we’ve all been equally successful at different things. Will taught Meegan and me how to weld; nobody ever told us we couldn’t do something because of our gender. We offer each other feedback all the time and talk about our struggles. Dan has been so helpful in guiding Nick, and we all ask advice from each other all the time. This group is a big reason Nick and I moved back to Austin. After nine years in New York, with a kid and hungry to set up a practice in a supportive community, it was a no-brainer.

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P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F S H E N G N I N G Z H A N G

Hunt Architecture (Architect and Co-founder) UT School of Architecture faculty


JOHNNY ALGOOD Pollen Architecture & Design (Project Manager)

I met Brittany and Meegan on a welding project in 2008, when they showed up to help us do steelwork. The site was right next to the river, and after work we would kick back and drink beers by the water. I studied architecture and design, but I spent summers doing carpentry, and I think that tectonic background makes the rest of my work better. When you graduate in the middle of the recession, it serves you well to have options. It’s afforded me a lot of opportunities, from design to construction. I work better collaboratively: showing other people what I’m working on. I like to pull in friends to help on projects outside of my own expertise, and I’m helping Dan do carpentry work. We’re all trying to buy our own places and renovate them with each other’s help.

DAN FIELDS FKF Studio (Co-founder) 

I’ve called Austin home for 18 years now. When most of my friends were moving to New York or Europe or grad school, I stayed in Austin because the city was growing in a way that I knew would work for a particular type of residential architecture. I wanted a chance to be a part of the creation and not just the maintenance of a great city. If I had to trace my friendship with [the] group to one person or event, I would give credit to our mutual friend Nick Rivard. Nick’s family own a gorgeous Lake Flato house on the Llano River in Mason. Nick would have these multiday parties that were like salons.  Through these get-togethers at the ranch I’ve made some of the best friends of my life. We would talk, swim, potluck, fish, hike, drink, and just all around get a little weird.   My firm, FKF Studio, is a partnership with Alex Finnell and Devin Keyes.  I’ve known my partners both for about 16 years.  We’re a design-build firm, meaning we are also contractors for our projects. We’re a “horse-first” firm.  When we first started our practice four years ago, we would joke about people with fancy websites and no build work as cart-before-the-horse. We design everything from scratch, using a first-principals methodology.  Architects Fields and Algood shown working together on Fields’ own home. tribeza.com

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BEN DIMMITT Chioco Design (Project Architect) 

The Perry Residence was designed by Zinnecker, in collaboration with Alterstudio Architecture.

CLAIRE ZINNECKER Claire Zinnecker Design (Designer and Founder)

My uncle is an architect and I always wanted to grow up to do the same. After seeing my passion for making, drawing, etc., he suggested I opt for interior design instead. I’m currently working on The Common (a creative co-working space) with Nick. My favorite aspect of the project is the team! I’ve collaborated with Petrified Design, Lauren Cunningham (the client) and the construction company before and love them all. I love Nick as a person and so admire his work. So many good friends and great talent. Also it’s in my neighborhood – North Loop! The building has been empty since I moved in back in 2007. I can’t wait to see how it all comes together.

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P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F M O L LY C U LV E R

I think going to school together cemented a certain sensibility for us. Our generation has different priorities, different ideas about design and sustainability that came from a focus on affordable housing and social responsibility at UT. You find those ideals in a university setting — architecture’s role in the public sphere— before they take hold in the industry itself. I’m excited now about a project I’m working on for HOPE Outdoor Gallery’s new space, at Carson Creek Ranch. It’s a moment to address civic engagement and what design can do to build community in a city.


WILL FOX

Outdoor Voices (Director of Retail Design)

P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F E R I C L E V I N O F E L E V I N S T U D I O S

I learned a ton studying architecture in undergrad; especially the pragmatic, functional influences of the field. After graduating, I spent some time just making things: doing welding and constructing, which was great for the rest of my work. Grad school at Yale was very eye opening, and offered me an even wider pool of influences, plus the chance to work with architects like Frank Gehry and Greg Lynn. I worked with Frank Gehry for three years, and slowly began to find ways to have more fun with architecture, to be less strict with myself. Of course it’s crucial that everything functions the right way, but it doesn’t have to fit a single aesthetic, and you can allow for wider influences. I began to let myself be led by fine art, sculpture, installations. Lots of things that weren’t architecture, per se—at least not what you’d see in a magazine. I increasingly found myself moved by the vernacular. Things that were designed, but not by architects. Little Cape Cod shacks on the water, dinky homes. Now it’s about finding a balance between sculpture, art, emotion and architecture. I’m drawn towards artists like Cy Twombly, Mark Rothko, Sol Dewitt, and Ellsworth Kelly. They each embrace a simple minimalism but aren’t afraid to take risks with color and emotion, and have a little fun.

Outdoor Voices’ Boston store.

MEEGAN BEDDOE

Andersson-Wise Architects (Project Architect) My range of work with Andersson-Wise is expansive, which has afforded me the opportunity to work on all scales of projects and typologies, from religious buildings that address issues of campus and community to residential projects where I can explore conditions of comfort and respite. Place defines a lot of our initial design process; taking advantage of prevailing breezes, framing views, and creating spaces with deep overhangs and shade to protect from the hot Texas sun are all driving forces behind our designs. For me, seeing a building go from drawings on a page to fully realized in the built environment is one of the most exciting and rewarding aspects of architecture. Guiding clients and contractors through the construction phase is not always easy, but the collaborative nature of making a space that shapes people’s lives is incredibly rewarding. tribeza.com

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ABOVE: Brittany Hunt with her son Cooper. ABOVE RIGHT: Architect Johnny Algood catches up with friends.

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THE WHOLE CREW (FROM LEFT): Claire Zinnecker with her pup Emma, Ben Dimmitt, Johnny Algood, Alice and Will Fox with their young daughter Margot, Dan Fields, Meegan Beddoe and Brittany and Nick Hunt with their young son Cooper.

As the sun sinks, Coop and Margot move inside to the playroom and launch what may grow into a lifelong interior-design collaboration, carefully moving chairs and toy blocks around without hitting each other or screaming. Like their parents, they play nice. Over by the picnic table out back, Johnny tells Dan about Hendrix Wall, a dry stack wall in Florence, Alabama, that one man built with all the limestone he could find in a five-mile radius (in addition to stones from more than 120 countries) as a memorial to the Trail of Tears that his grandmother had walked. “Can you imagine being that guy’s neighbor?” Dan jokes. “God damn it, I was about to build a patio, and you took all the limestone.” “Sorry, man, didn’t know you needed it,” Johnny, in character, quips back. Alice (Will’s wife and a designer herself ), Claire, Meegan, and Brittany confer briefly about next season’s jeans, then join the rest of the group in a debate on (architectural) design. From the road, the laughter ringing out from the back porch sounded like any other summer gathering. But who knows what ideas for tile in the master bath are slowly cohering, what creative collaborations are gelling, and what aesthetic innovations are emerging, soft and suggestive as the early evening’s late-August breeze.

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The dining area is nestled into the angled home. Alter says the Henrys didn’t need a formal dining room but still desired something special within the large open-concept kitchen and living space. “We have this plush banquette inside the wall,” says Alter of the built-in bench. “It was a clever solution to make a space but still allow it to be handsome.”

I

t came as no surprise to learn that Kevin Alter, of architectural firm Alterstudio, has dabbled in ceramics. “I’ve had a former life as a potter, in college. I love when you take a piece off the wheel and your hand prints on it or you put it in the kiln and it shows flashes from the flames,” says Alter. “The goal isn’t perfection. The goal is a controlled serendipity.” The Sugar Shack home, named for the street on which the Westlake lot sits, is a flawless example of such a process. The building fits like a puzzle piece — slipping between trees and perching on stilts among the shifting elevation. It lies on the left side of the jagged property, its back end angled to cantilever over a large drop-off. Alter refers to these potential complications, like large live oaks and a full-blown cliff, as opportunities. “With our work, we begin by wondering what’s good about it and how do you make it better and how to suppress what could be problematic,” says Alter. “This little motion of cranking the plan keeps it with the contour of the land, and it also gives you a beautiful condition that when you’re upstairs, you’re either looking into the courtyard, which is a lovely little world, or into the tree canopy.” “We love the thoughtful way the house was designed with the lot’s topography,” says Katie Henry, who hired the firm with her husband, Stanton. “We knew we loved their aesthetic, so we just gave them some basic parameters and let them go to town on the design. I’d describe it as modern, with a slight nod to midcentury. It’s understated and unfussy, but when you get up close, you notice all the little design details that make it special.”

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The master sits at the back of the house. In total, the home features four bedrooms and three bathrooms.

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The front door leads into the living space, which is furnished with a mix of new and vintage pieces. Katie says they wanted the style to be “sleek, but bright, warm, and comfortable, not sterile.” The ’60s-era sofa, which sat in the living room of Stanton’s grandmother, was reupholstered in a navy velvet geometric print. “I like a clean, neutral base, but sometimes that feels too cold in a modern design, so we warmed it up with color, texture, and pattern with the finishes and furnishings,” says Katie. “All of the natural sunlight also adds warmth and depth.” The full-length glass windows slide open to the courtyard.

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Alter recognizes the necessary correlation between clean (i.e. uncluttered) living and storage space; with that in mind, much of the home’s storage is ample but subtle. This large piece of black steel in the living room disguises a closet. “[The metal] is not finished. It’s the way it came out of the factory. We just waxed it,” says Alter. There’s a raw power, he says, of using natural, often industrial-leaning materials in an unmanipulated state. “It’s about the engagement of mistakes,” says Alter. “It’s not striving for perfection but for a balance of happenstance and nature. I can’t do anything quite as beautiful as that, but I like to show it.”

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Like a finely tailored suit, the simplicity of the home has everything to gain in the way it hangs just right on the Henry family. Though the building is modern, with clean lines of steel, cement, and fumed oak, its abstract qualities allow for the appreciation of patterns and pleasures of floor-to-ceiling windows and open-concept living. “The home is something special that came out of the partnership rather than us using them as a vehicle to make our art,” says Alter, who designed the project with the firm’s partners, Tim Whitehill and Ernesto Cragnolino, and project manager Daniel Shumaker. “We’re trying to build something that has a life of its own.”

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The polished kitchen, which boasts a glass backsplash and a tucked-away pantry hidden on the right, has organizational features that Alter likes to include on the firm’s projects. The backsplash has a lower band that catches plugs. Similarly, a vertical steel stripe on the left wall holds all light switches, and a panel on the ceiling gathers all lighting. “We don’t want to sit a big, ugly faceplate on this beautiful wood wall,” says Alter.

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

There is much to consider when creating a space and nothing is more important than who you partner with for the building and design of your home. Before budget and timeline are discussed and layout and decor are debated, let us help make sure you have a strong team in your corner. The following experts in design, architecture and construction can be called upon as trusted and established voices in what can, at times, be a stressful process. Just tell them Tribeza sent you.

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y TA N I A L E E G O N Z A L E Z

THE DESIGN GUIDE


As Austin’s original fine linen boutique, Feather Your Nest has evolved over the last 30 years to include a thoughtfully curated selection of both classic and modern dÊcor, bath accessories, furniture and gifts, while also staying true to its luxury bedding beginnings. With a selection that is always high-quality and unique, Feather Your Nest offers bespoke bedding from lines such as Bella Notte, Matouk, Sferra, Peacock Alley, Yves Delorme and Scandia Down (exclusively available in Austin at Feather Your Nest). The goal is to provide every customer with a personalized shopping experience, from expert design service to inspired gift ideas, making Feather Your Nest your go-to resource for every room and occasion. featheryournesthome.com | 3500 Jefferson Street, Suite 120 | 512-206-3555 tribeza.com

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Mark Odom Studio is a full-service architecture and interior design firm in Austin and San Antonio. Comprised of creative problem solvers, they approach each project with attention to the unique aspects of the program that meets their client’s goals and results in experience related architecture. They believe collaboration with owners and consultants is a key ingredient to a successful project. The Studio’s work interprets context by referencing the vernacular, landscape and urban setting while finding familiarity with the client’s past. They approach their projects with wellness and health in mind and aim to foster community, whether it’s through co-working spaces, multifamily housing, health optimization facilities and more. Their team of architects and designers work to orchestrate the way in which one experiences a project while maintaining the integrity and intention the space is meant for. Their dedicated team is known for a commitment to clients and a highly personal level of service. markodomstudio.com

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Building the future. Restoring the past. Practicing proven Green Building Science Technologies. edward-gordon.com

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Remarkable experiences result from a thorough response to sensory details beyond a building. Clayton & Little is an interdisciplinary design firm known for creating layered, coherent experiences by filtering context and intent to summon the richness of place. Though projects are diverse in style, type, and geography, an independent yet ever-gracious spirit animates them all. This intangible hallmark — Clayton & Little’s signature — reflects the firm’s values and its deep Texas roots. claytonandlittle.com

PH OTO BY CASEY DUNN

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“So many of our dreams at first seem impossible, then they seem improbable, and then, when we summon the will and have the right guide, they soon become inevitable.” - Winn Wittman, AIA

Winn Wittman’s projects are habitable sculpture, and the firm’s passion is helping rule-breakers and changemakers navigate the often-daunting process of translating their vibe and values into a contemporary home that is as iconic as they are. Working with a select group of clients on homes starting at $1million, the first consultation is complimentary. Visit their site to fill out your Vision Blueprint today. winnwittman.com

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At Butter Lutz Interiors, Amy Lutz and her team of designers are known for their ability to execute the vision of their clients; creating contemporary and sophisticated spaces, where style meets function. Their design philosophy is rooted in the idea that good design should be attainable to everyone. The Butter Lutz team brings a uniquely collaborative approach to each project; this enables them to tailor their designs to fit each clients’ needs, maximizing the impact of their budget while maintaining the design’s beauty and functionality. butterlutz.com

Michael Hsu Office of Architecture is a nationwide, award-winning architecture and interior design firm that calls Austin home. A proud finalist for the 2018 James Beard Restaurant Design Award, their diverse portfolio ranges from design-driven residences to urban-scale developments. They continually strive to create an emotional connection between the space and the user. hsuoffice.com

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SARAH BULLOCK MCINTYRE ARCHITECT

FREEDOM SOLAR POWER

For every project, large and small, Sarah Bullock McIntyre, AIA strives to create a home that is timeless, beautiful and thoughtfully designed regardless of size or budget. She feels that a successful project is the direct result of a strong working relationship between the architect, client and builder. bullockmcintyre.com

Freedom Solar is the #1 residential solar installer in Texas. With a reputation for craftsmanship and personal attention to detail since 2007, they are trusted by thousands of customers including Whole Foods and The University of Texas. They offer SunPower’s worldleading solar technology backed by the industry’s best warranty. freedomsolarpower.com

MEREDITH ELLIS DESIGN

DELINEATE STUDIO

MEREDITH ELLIS DESIGN is a nationally recognized design firm with over 20 years of experience. Ellis creates homes where life is lived and memories are made. With her exceptional attention to detail, Ellis expertly layers pattern, texture and color, creating spaces rooted in tradition but with a modern sensibility for today’s lifestyle. meredithellisdesign.com

Delineate Studio provides insightful design solutions for a variety of project types from restaurants to creative offices to lakefront homes. Regardless of the project, they are consistent in collaborating with clients for thoughtful building design solutions. Delineate Studio values an innovative approach, uniqueness of place and actualizing their client’s vision. delineatestudio.com tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE

Architects Ryan and Stephanie Lemmo situated this steel structure on a Hill Country precipice allowing owners, David and Kathy Clem, striking views.

By Dorothy Guerrero Portrait by Bill Sallans

I

N THEIR NEWEST BOOK, “TEX A S MADE/TEX A S MODERN: THE

House and the Land,” author Helen Thompson and photographer Casey Dunn capture the pioneering spirit of architects who combine 20th-century principles with the rugged practicality of sprawling ranch design. The book is the follow-up to “Marfa Modern,” where the duo went out to West Texas to discover the minimalist structures dotting that beautiful expanse of nothing. After that book became a fixture on good-looking coffee tables everywhere, the pair, who are old family friends from Austin, were eager to collaborate again. On a recent evening, we sat in Dunn’s newly built home in East Austin to discuss the evolution of “Texas modern” style and their quest to find the perfect corner of the world.

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C A S E Y D U N N , P H OTO G R A P H E R . CO U R T E S Y O F T H E M O N AC E L L I P R E S S .

Pioneering Spirit


LEFT: Michael Morrow, of Kinneymorrow Architecture, placed lightboxes on the roof of this Marfa home to ensure natural light during the day and sky views at night. RIGHT: Thompson and Dunn pictured in the kitchen of Dunn’s East Austin home.

DOROTHY GUERRERO: So how did you two start working together in the first place? HELEN THOMPSON: I’d been working for a lot of magazines. And then suddenly it was Casey Dunn photographing it all. I had another book I had proposed, and I wanted Casey to shoot it, but I realized it involved too much traveling around. So we were sitting there and we said, “Well, where would we like to go? What would we really like to do?” And that’s when we decided — let’s do Marfa. CASEY DUNN: In the beginning we didn’t know if there was enough out there, but the fur-

ther it went along, it was like, there’s too much out here. DG: How did this second book come about? When did you realize Texas modern would be the next subject to tackle? HT: “Marfa Modern” actually was a much narrower narrative of modernism, modernism that fits into a place. So we realized that there was a larger story to be told about modernism that’s specific to Texas. We were looking at pictures Casey had taken and realized there was something bigger we could talk about. DG: In the acknowledgments you talk about

“Texan-ness” as a concept. What does that mean to you? HT: Well, modernism has been around for a hundred years. It made its way to Texas somewhat later, maybe in the ’20s and ’30s. And there were some Texas architects who felt that what we built here should be more specific, not that universal glass-box look that you see that is typically modern. Their views coincided with a renaissance of awareness about the state, and there was an artistic movement. The Dallas Nine [a group of artists working in Dallas in the 1930s and 1940s who were inspired by the Southwest landscape] were doing modern artwork, and something was also happening with architecture. They felt that we should be using our resources here, we should be doing modernism that fit with the climate. So what evolved can really be traced from O’Neil Ford in the early ’30s to the architects who are now emerging from Lake Flato. Not everybody is in the book, but it’s all directly from that one lineage. DG: Is there a common trait among the people who live in these homes? HT: They all like living gently on the land. This is all about sustainable architecture. It’s all about catching the breezes and not using materials that don’t really belong here or building houses that don’t really fit in the setting. CD: I’m always surprised by the range of people who own modern houses, and it’s the same in this book. Everyone was very — it wasn’t a similar type of person, but they all seemed to be inspired by Texas. HT: They like being outside. CD: And the landscape of Texas. DG: Did you all have a hard time narrowing the houses down? How did the selection process go? CD: I think we went through a couple rounds of revision in the beginning. It started with looking through stuff that I’d shot, and then Helen kind of came back with an idea that was like, This is the beginning of something. And then from that point we started to search out other homes. tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE

HT: Which wasn’t hard to do. Casey sent me a lot of what he’d shot. We were originally going to do something about ranch houses. And then I started looking at those things, and I realized they were kind of emerging from O’Neil Ford’s brain from 1930, this whole look that we were liking. It had an aura to it. DG: On the flip side, is there such a thing as Texas modern gone wrong? CD: Let’s just put them on blast right here. HT: I don’t think — can you go wrong with Texas modern? I guess some lunatic could. CD: Yeah, if you let the landscape inform it and the site inform it, those are just good places to start. HT: I think the people who want these houses are thinking of the land, they’re thinking of the environment.They’re not thinking, I’m gonna make this the splashiest Texas modern house ever. DG: What are some of your favorite houses in the book? HT: That’s tough.

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C A S E Y D U N N , P H OTO G R A P H E R . CO U R T E S Y O F T H E M O N AC E L L I P R E S S .

BELOW: San Antonio’s O’Neil Ford House. The doors are original to the home and were carved by Ford’s brother Lynn.


A former boarding house, this Marfa home references ranch utility buildings.

‘‘

W E R E A LIZED T H AT T HER E WA S A L A RGER STORY TO BE TOLD A BOU T MODER N ISM T H AT ’S SPECIFIC TO T EX A S .

CD: You’re asking us to pick our favorite children! HT: I’ve always loved the Paul Lamb house. It’s very romantic. This is in Austin, and if you took all these materials away and did it in glass, it would be completely traditionally modern. But then he’s put reclaimed wood and fieldstone and suddenly it’s warm. All right, Casey. CD: Well, I have a few. I love the Hazelbaker Rush house, which is in El Paso, overlooking Juárez. To me, it was so unexpected. It’s so set into the landscape, and the rocks and the landscaping were beautifully integrated in the back. HT: I feel like it’s on the edge of the world, this house. CD: Yeah. The muhly grass was turning when we were there, and it looked unreal. When I was editing these, I had to pull back on the vibrancy because it was like, people will think this is fake. It’s all the things that Helen said. It’s just very visually compelling. DG: Is there a particular room featured in the book that you’d love to spend more time in? A special little nook?

CD: The Max Levy project in Dallas; I love Max Levy. His sensibility for designing with natural light is unmatched. His spaces are luminous. There is a room I love with wood slats in the book. In the morning there’s already soft and beautiful light, but at the point when the sun gets high in the sky, the light bounces around and comes through in a way that’s still soft. So, all day, the light has a quality that is either interesting or soft and quiet. It was really fun to photograph, and it would definitely be one of the places I’d like to spend more time in. HT: The Lake Flato house in Mill Spring — that’s got a nice nook. This whole house really was a riff off of an old dam that was already there on the property. DG: So will you guys do another book after this? HT: We’re working on one right now. DG: What’s it about? CD: It’s about a place called … HT: Santa Fe! Santa Fe modern. DG: Do you two, being so aesthetically inclined, obsess about the look and feel of these books? Do

you go back and forth about size, fonts, and paper style? HT: Well, this whole book, it’s like we’re three parts, equal parts. CD: That’s true. Our designer, Cody Haltom, is amazing. This was meant to be a companion to “Marfa Modern.” They’re the same size, shape. Some of that was already kind of informed by that first book. HT: The landscape in Texas is very hefty and rugged and “Marfa Modern” was more horizontal and finely textured. These books are very textural. I’ve been surprised at how many people mention that. I was thrilled that people noticed. DG: These things matter! HT: They do. DG: Casey, you recently went through a home build and design. What new perspective do you have now that you’re shooting other people’s homes? CD: I appreciate it 100 percent more. The level of problem-solving is so much more three-dimensional. Whereas I’m used to solving problems in a tribeza.com

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The Hazelbaker Rush house, located in El Paso.

two-dimensional space. It’s also this mix between budget and aesthetics and the way you actually live. All these things are constantly at play, and at any given point you have to ask, What’s the higher priority? DG: Is your personal aesthetic pretty modern, Helen? In your home? HT: Comfortable. Just comfortable, I think. The house I live in now is pretty serene. It’s quiet. CD: Mmm hmm. Also, I think that if you’re building a house, the goal shouldn’t be to make something that’s on trend because hopefully you’re going to keep the thing for a long time. Good design principles and good, honest materials are the best route. HT: To me, this kind of architecture is full of joy. These guys were just realizing that Texas was cool. They were out here in the middle of nowhere, and people, I guess, thought we were hicks, or something. But they were discovering and were thrilled with what they were doing in literature and art and architecture. Houses that look like they belong where they are will always be in style. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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A historic city. A modern real estate firm. We’re proud to call Austin our newest home. compass.com

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STYLE PICK

This Side Up HOW ONE ROLLINGWOOD FAMILY’S BACK YARD IS THE PERFECT HOME FOR A SCULPTUR AL PL AYSCAPE

T

By Margaret Williams Photographs by Leonid Furmansky HE IDEA BEGAN WITH A QUICK DRAWING - LEGS POKING

out from under a packing box. But when the person charged with bringing that sketch to life is Dave Kilpatrick, partner at Tim Cuppett Architects, the results are anything but slapdash. As Kilpatrick and his team were wrapping up the newly built, modern, art-filled home designed for Ricardo and Isabel Del Blanco, the homeowners asked for one last element: something in the backyard for the couple’s four kids and their friends. Kilpatrick, riffing off the couple’s tactile art collection, thought, “Man, that’s an opportunity to make a sculpture in the yard.” Tasked with the request and the couple’s one requirement — the structure had to also serve as a toy garage — Kilpatrick decided, “We ought to make a giant cardboard box. It’s the idea of the quintessential kids’ fort. It’s an upside-down box.”

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‘‘

“ M Y FAVOR IT E PA RT IS BEING U P HIGH .” — BENJA MIN, AGE 5 1/2

Kilpatrick knew he wanted to make the two-story fort out of cedar, since the material would eventually “silver out and become the color of a box,” but it took him a bit longer to come up with the fort’s other signature component, a large red stamp that reads “Hecho en Mexico.” Kilpatrick explains, “We started playing with how to reinforce the idea that it’s a box. At one point I had ‘Fragile’ spray-painted, and then we tried the international ‘This Side Up’ paired with a big arrow.” But Kilpatrick wanted something more personal, and since the couple is from Mexico and the phrase “Hecho en Mexico” is ever-present in their home country, he decided to stamp the symbol upside down, “reinforcing the idea that the box is flipped upside down.” Kilpatrick and the homeowners are all equally pleased with the final fort design (built by Risher Martin Fine Homes), which the architect describes as more object than building. But we were most curious about the fort’s smallest critics. What did Ricardo and Isabel’s oldest kids, five-and-a-half-yearold twins Benjamin and Santiago, have to say about their newest backyard staple? We quizzed the boys about the fort as their younger brother, Pablo and neighborhood friends madly dashed up and down and in and out of the inventive space. “My favorite part is being up high.” proclaimed Benjamin. tribeza.com

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T R AV E L P I C K

Marrakech DUE E AST’S MOLLIE BROWN TAKES US INTO THE HE ART OF MOROCCO

By Hannah Morrow Photographs by Holly Cowart and Kate Zimmerman Turpin Marrakech is a place of tactile exploration. Narrow passageways weave like veins through the dreamy city, seated in western Morocco, connecting its mosques, palaces, gardens, and souks — the picturesque marketplaces that act like arteries of artisanal tradition. In these souks, thumbing through textiles and handwoven rugs, you’ll find Mollie Brown, founder of Austin’s own Due East. The Texas native first came to Marrakech in 2016 with her husband to visit friends. Brown fell fast for the culture, the people, and the markets that brimmed with local craftsmanship. “There is so much magic in Marrakech, and the heart of it is in the medina, which dates to the 10th century,” says Brown. “The contagious energy, the vibrant colors, and the artistry steeped into every corner are inspiring to even the most well-traveled.” Brown founded Due East, an ethical importer that brings authentic Moroccan designs and goods to Texas buyers, last year. The business’ name is inspired by the fact that Morocco lies at the same latitude as our state. “I’ve made a business out of sourcing beautiful things in and out of the souks and have created wonderful relationships in Morocco that are the foundation of Due East,” says Brown. “The people of Morocco are continuously welcoming. They are gracious hosts, and so many of them are invested in nurturing the traditions and artistry of their ancestors.” Here, we’ve invited Brown, who was in Morocco last month on a sourcing trip for Due East’s fall/ winter collection, to share her picks from the former imperial city.

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Brown started Due East after a trip to Morroco in 2016. She now visits a few times a year to source textiles, leather goods and home accessories.


TO STAY TO STAY “I call El Fenn the Hotel Saint Cecilia of Marrakech. This once dilapidated riad was refurbished into one of the most iconic hotels in Africa. The exquisite interiors are a modern and fresh take on traditional Moroccan decor and architecture. Each room is impeccably decorated to leave every guest feeling inspired and energized. Don’t miss watching the sunset on the roof.”

ABOVE: Marrakech’s El Fenn hotel, a favorite of Brown’s.

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T R AV E L P I C K

TO SEE

The best advice I ever received was that on your first venture into the souks, don’t buy anything! It’s easy to get overwhelmed and intrigued, but to really be smart in shopping, you should get a feel for what the souks have to offer first and then go back the next day. Don’t be afraid to barter, and never pay more than you’re comfortable with, because it’s most likely overpriced! 114 OCTOBER 2018 |

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“Have lunch at La Famile or Nomad. Both restaurants have a casual and alfresco atmosphere; fresh, locally inspired food, plus small shops to peruse if there is a wait — or even if there isn’t.”

ABOVE: A scene from one of Marrakech’s many souks.

ABOVE: Shtatto restaurant. BELOW: A coffee break at Nomad.

“After scouring the souks for rugs and goodies, take a break at Shtatto for a juice or coffee on the roof while you take in the view of the Atlas Mountains over the rooftops of the medina. Be sure to stop at each floor on your way up, which include local shops and even a quirky retro barbershop.”


TO RESTORE

You can’t leave Morocco without treating yourself to a hammam. Rooted in Islamic cleansing rituals, frequent visits to the local hammam is a part of almost every Moroccan’s life. At Les Bains de Marrakech, you’ll experience three of the main elements of the hammam treatment: cleansing, exfoliating, and the washing. Some hammams are still heated by hand. In the picture you can see this man throwing sawdust and paper onto the fire to heat the water for his local hammam. 116 OCTOBER 2018 |

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KAREN'S PICK

Cookbook Bar & Cafe By Karen Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

O

NE OF THIS YEAR’S MOST SURPRISING AND DELIGHTFUL

new restaurants is in a library. You heard me right: Cookbook Bar & Cafe sits on the first f loor of downtown’s gleaming new central branch. And if the architecturally stunning space isn’t reason enough to check out the library’s new digs, Cookbook Cafe offers another great excuse to hustle over. There’s a lot to love about Cookbook. First of all, it looks great. The restaurant is surrounded by soaring glass windows that frame downtown’s evolving cityscape: shiny new skyscrapers, beautifully landscaped Shoal Creek and dramatic works of public art. The airy interior, designed by VeroKolt in partnership with architect Lake Flato, offers table dining plus bar seating and communal tables. There’s also an expansive covered terrace that captures the gentle breezes off the creek. Lining the cafe shelves are its namesake cookbooks, hundreds of them, donated by beloved Austin food wirter Virginia B.Wood, who bequeathed her treasured collection upon her recent death. Ranging from 1950s vintage editions to contemporary celebrity chef tomes, Wood’s collection has been lovingly displayed for diners to admire and peruse.

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Cookbook Bar and Cafe is housed within the Lake Flato designed Austin Central Library. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner Spezia fell for dishes like this white chocolate coconut cake.

But Cookbook doesn’t just rest on its good looks and prime location: Its food is terrific. Led by chef Drew Curren of the Elm Restaurant Group (24 Diner, Italic, Irene’s), the kitchen turns out sophisticated flavors and presentations that belie its fast-casual counter service and modest price point. Every item on the menu has been inspired by the published recipes of revered chefs and cookbook authors. Serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner, plus a full bar, Cookbook offers something for everyone. In the mornings, there are hearty choices like huevos rancheros driven by renowned NYC chef Gabrielle Hamilton’s book “Prune.” Or there’s PB&J French toast from the infamous “Betty Crocker’s New Cookbook,” plus grab-and-go treats like orange-scented rye muffins. At lunch and dinner, starters include a refreshing salad of watercress, arugula, pears, walnuts, and Parmesan from Jamie Oliver’s “The Naked Chef Takes Off.” There’s also creamy fresh lemon ricotta topped with mushrooms, garlic, and shallots inspired by chef Yotam Ottolenghi’s “Plenty More.” But the winner might be the addictively light and crispy artichoke fritters with lemon aioli by New Orleans chef Alon Shaya. Sandwiches like the turkey Waldorf inspired by Emeril Lagasse and the shrimp BLT by Jonathan Waxman are elegant and satisfying. But the chicken potpie à la Thomas Keller is a comfort-food home run with its flaky crust and soulful fillings. Even side dishes are given careful thought like the grilled potato salad with bacon from San Francisco’s beloved Tartine. Kids get hungry, too, and Cookbook’s child-friendly offerings have pedigrees from superstar chefs like Alain Ducasse’s chicken-and-vegetable kebabs. And don’t forget dessert. Pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren gives a loving nod to the late Anthony Bourdain with a “Les Halles Cookbook”-inspired chocolate-hazelnut tart.

COOKBOOK BAR & CAFE 710 W. CESAR CHAVEZ ST. COOKBOOKATX.COM

Did I mention there’s a full bar in the library at Cookbook? (Where was this when I was in college?!) Not only are there very nice wine and beer lists, there are also sophisticated cocktails that are both delicious and clever, like the raspberry-steeped Adventures of Huckleberry Gin, the chilled mocha Murder on the Orient Espresso, and my personal favorite, Tequila Mockingbird, with jalapeño-infused tequila, watermelon, and lime. Sophisticated food doesn’t need to be stuffy, and Cookbook is the kind of place where you can nibble over your laptop or luxuriate over a dinner date. It’s also one of the few new restaurants where you can have a conversion without shouting over an earsplitting din. Oh, there’s still great energy and a cool urban vibe, but it is a library after all.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

THE BREWER’S TABLE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

With an emphasis on quality and community, this

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

East Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone at the

up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

brewer’s table. Local ranchers and farmers source the

breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

ingredients, which are utilized in both the kitchen and

charcuterie board.

the brewery to eliminate food waste. The seasonally

34TH STREET CAFE

changing menu is unique, but provides options for even

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

the pickiest of eaters (ask for the kids menu).

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups, salads, pizzas, and pastas — but don’t miss the

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000 Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the

ANNIE’S CAFÉ AND BAR

f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy

319 Congress Ave | (512) 472 1884

empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting;

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert,

perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is executed

BAR CHI SUSHI

by their Stefano Ferrara wood-burning ovens which run

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the week-

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

at more than 900 degrees. Lactose intolerants beware, there is no shortage of cheese on this menu!

ends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com

a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

Angels On Horseback! Fresh, jumbo shrimp wrapped

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

in bacon and perfectly grilled, served on a bed of our

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

house-made escabeche (pickled vegetables) that brings

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

the right balance of herbs and acid.

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

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CAFÉ JOSIE

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CAFÉ NO SÉ

THE FAREGROUND

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

111 Congress Ave.

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic

The Fareground has a little something for everyone

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides

décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place

— with six Austin food vendors and a central bar in

modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried-mor-

for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the classic

this unique downtown food hall. You can enjoy meals

tadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry-thyme

avocado toast is a must-try.

ranging from wild boar tacos at Dai Due Taqueria to

cocktail.

EASY TIGER 709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972 Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

EL ALMA 1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923 This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

made-to-order ramen at Ni-Komé. Remember to grab a monster cookie from Henbit on your way out to cap off

GRIZZELDA’S

your culinary experience!

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908 This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes, each fused

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

with a range of f lavors and styles. The attention to detail in

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

each dish shines, from dark mole served over chicken brined

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the

FREEDMEN’S

Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

pizzas, and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues

caramel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally

the f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s  — from

inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

the barbecue to the desserts and even the cocktail

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnam-

plates some of the city’s best barbecue on a charming

ese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and sweet

outdoor patio.

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap, and boutique wines from around the world.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168 Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

GERALDINE’S

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

East Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt,

specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

EPICERIE

Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

combining creative cocktails, shareable plates, and

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

scenic views of Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

night of the week as you enjoy executive chef Stephen

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar manager Caitlyn

here for a bite on Sundays.

Jackson.

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the

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HOME SLICE PIZZA

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home

Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local,

Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your

and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies

Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and

like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and

indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

RAMEN TATSU-YA

LA BARBECUE

8557 Research Blvd. #126

Pecorino Romano.

HOPFIELDS

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beau-

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

tiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE 3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808 Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience, Jacoby’s Restaurant & Mercantile transports you from East Austin to a rustic Southern home nestled in the countryside. The menu features the best dishes Southern cooking has to offer, including beef from Adam Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin.

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

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1234 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 893 5561 Executive chefs and co-owners Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya “Tako” Matsumoto have perfected the art of ramen, what they call “the soul food of Japan.” The restaurant serves savory broths with a variety of toppings and your choice of flavor, ranging from buttery to spicy. The authentic dish is vastly different from your college ramen.

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

RED ASH ITALIA

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between

comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique,

high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in

seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine

downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steak-

garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-

house is led by an all-star team, including executive chef

producing regions in the world.

John Carver. Sit back, relax, and enjoy an exceptional evening.

MANUEL'S 310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555

TINY BOXWOOD’S

10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

1503 W 35 St. (512) 220 0698

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-quality

This Houston-based brand now serves it’s simple and deli-

regional Mexican food, fresh-pressed cocktails, margaritas, and tequilas. Try the Chile Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf shrimp, day boat scallops, and jumbo lump blue crab, or Manuel’s famous mole. Located downtown at the corner of 3rd and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on

JEFFREY’S

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LENOIR

THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

cious food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood. Favorites include house-ground burgers and salmon provencal salad. Stop by for breakfast, lunch, or dinner, but don’t leave without one of their signature chocolate chip cookies!

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

UCHIKO

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE

4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

609 W. 6 St. (512) 542 3380

The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of

Owned by actress and Austin resident Sandra Bullock, Wal-

Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and

ton’s is a dreamy brick-walled bakery, deli, and floral shop.

Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

Take some pastries home after indulging in gourmet sandwich-

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

es and fresh salads for lunch, or stay for the rotating dinner

VINAIGRETTE

menu. Most importantly, make it before 2 p.m. to order the legendary biscuit sandwich served only during breakfast!

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the

WINEBELLY

prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambiance, the

519 W. Oltorf S. | (512) 487 1569

salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly deli-

Named one of the top-20 wine bars in America by Wine

cious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates.The bistro maintains a local feel with its comfortable, laid-back interiors.

Join us as we welcome the collaboration of world-renowned Chef & Restaurateur Richard Sandoval and Chef James Flowers at Four Seasons Hotel Austin. 98 San Jacinto Boulevard | Austin, TX 78701 | 512.685.8300

WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.


Thank you, Austin, for showing HAAM generous love on HAAM Day With the support of the Central Texas community, the Health Alliance for Austin Musicians’ (HAAM) HAAM Day held on Sept. 11, 2018 was a major success! Thank you to the generous supporters, businesses, volunteers, musicians and everyone who came out to one of the over 200 shows. The funds raised will go towards providing access to affordable health care for Austin’s low-income, working musicians.

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1. Mayor Steve Adler, HAAMbassador volunteers, HAAM staff, and HAAM board members kick off HAAM Day 2018 at Whole Foods Market bright and early 2. Brendon Anthony with the Texas Music Office presents the official HAAM Day proclamation from the State of Texas to HAAM Day chair Matt Long and HAAM Executive Director Reenie Collins 3. Board member Keith Carmichael and musician Sydney Wright celebrate HAAM Day—both are from the same hometown of Snyder, TX 4. Congressman Lloyd Doggett, musician Akina Adderley, and musician Ryan Young 5. HAAMbassadors collect donations at Whole Foods Market 6. AJ Vallejo with friends of HAAM, Lourdes Lucas and Sally Allen 7. HAAMBassadors Laura Acklen and Aaron Von Flatern collect donations at Seton Medical Center 8. Supporters of HAAM at the RECA Showcase at Antone’s 9. Becky Heston of Endeaver with Guy and Jessica Forsyth at the IBC Bank showcase—Endeaver was a sponsor 10. Musician Nakia belts it out at the RECA Showcase at Antone’s 11. Our littlest HAAMster volunteer starting out early in supporting local musicians 12. Austin City Limits Radio afternoon host Andy Langer enjoys HAAM Day 13. Musician Cody Jasper collects donations at Threadgill’s 14. Gigi and Rick Cikowski, Terry and Deborah Stewart, committee member Chip Rives of Texas Crew Productions, and Marie Vargas 15. Longtime HAAM supporter Roggie Baer enjoys the music 16. Musician Derrick Davis performs at Guero’s 17. Musician Scrappy Jud Newcomb, HAAM Executive Director Reenie Collins, and musician Johnny Gouddie at Whole Foods Market downtown—Newcomb has performed in the 7:00 a.m. slot since the inception of HAAM Day *Photography by Ben Porter, Andrew Bennett, Brenda Ladd, Todd Wolfson and HAAM staff


THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2018

ACL LIVE at the MOODY THEATER MUSIC AL

PRESENTS

FE AT UR IN G S PE C IAL G UE S T

DELBERT MC CLINTON

GUEST

JIMMIE VAUGHAN TRIO MIKE FLANIGIN, GEORGE RAINS a THE TEXAS HORNS + JAI MALANO & SOUL MAN SAM

50 2 5 - $O M $ E S.C ABL AIL ELPKID V A ETS RDH T I C KC L I F F O T R CE ELP C O N W W. H W

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A LOOK BEHIND

Feliz Cumpleaños, Manuel’s THE CONGRESS AVENUE STAPLE TURNS 35 THIS MONTH By Abby Moore Illustration by Madison Weakley

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ES S TH A N H A LF A MILE FROM TH E Mexic-Arte Museum resides another celebration of Mexican culture, Manuel’s. Located on Congress Avenue, the restaurant is a downtown staple, known for its traditional Mexican cuisine and its compassion for the community. The Manuel’s menu does not echo the myriad TexMex eateries populating the city. Instead founder Greg Koury wanted to introduce Austinites to the authentic

dishes of interior and coastal Mexico. Koury’s vision has been a success, proved by the restaurant’s upcoming 35th birthday. Explains Koury, “For the first four years Manuel’s was open, we did everything, including cooking, cleaning and waiting on most of the customers. When a car would pull up in front we would stop what we were doing and eagerly run to the door. After serving close to three million customers, we still have that attitude.” Within those 35 years, Manuel’s has opened a second location, partnered with more than 20 organizations on community and financial support, and has continued to honor its heritage through cooking. To the restaurant that brings Austin mole and margaritas, Sunday jazz brunches, and a rich cultural perspective, thanks for giving us another excuse to attend happy hour. Happy birthday!

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LONDON GREY RUGS


LIVE ATX We all have passion. And passion springs from inspiration, which begins with your surroundings. That’s what home is. Family. Friends. A sense of place. An amazing view. It’s what makes a space a home – because your home is where you truly LIVE.

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5 Austin-Area Locations See More at KuperRealty.com Property: The Austonian, #35E

TRIBEZA October 2018  

The Architecture Issue No. 206

TRIBEZA October 2018  

The Architecture Issue No. 206