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FARMHOUSE MODERN

From lumber to luxe, the story behind Austin’s best-kept secret club

THE M ODU L A R MOD E

Instead of predicting the future, Kasita is manufacturing it

N O. 194 | A R C H I T EC T U R E

The details are not the details

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Co-Chairs Elizabeth Caples Rogers, George Elliman

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2422 WOOLDRIDGE Laura Gottesman, Broker | Gottesman Residential Real Estate 512.451.2422 | gottesmanresidential.com | 2422wooldridge.com


CO N T E N T S | F E AT U R E S

OCT. BUILT FOR MODERN LIFE Exploring the comforts of a modern home in Rollingwood

P. 54 FUTURE RETRO The legacy of Mid-Century Modern architecture in Austin

P. 62 DETAILS ARE NOT THE DETAILS Building interconnectedness into The Woodlawn Residence

P. 66 BOHEMIAN LUXURY From lumber to luxe, the story behind Austin’s best-kept secret club

P. 74 DARK AND STORMY A Cothron’s Safe and Lock becomes a popular, upscale hostel

THE MODULAR MODE Instead of predicting the future, Kasita is manufacturing it

P. 88

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

P. 84


4429 4429Mirador MiradorDrive Drive

3907 3907Prentice PrenticeLane Lane

9108 9108Brookhurst BrookhurstCove Cove

114 114Bella BellaStrada StradaCove Cove

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CO N T E N T S | DE PA RT M E N TS

F I N D M O R E AT

TRIBEZA.COM

Life + Style

Social Hour p. 28

LOC A L LOV E p. 98

S T Y LE PRO FI LE p. 102

Community + Culture

S T Y LE PICK p. 106

INSTAGR A M PICK OF THE MONTH

PROFILE p. 36

Head over to Instagram to catch our favorite spots to enjoy everything from happy hour to healthy bites.

KRISTIN ’S COLUMN p. 39 TRIBEZ A TALK p. 42

106 Food + Thought K AREN ’S PICK p. 110

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NEW IN TOWN p. 112 DINING GUIDE p. 114

DO YOU SMELL TH AT?

Arts + Happenings

There are a lot of details to consider when it comes to creating the perfect home.

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDARS p. 46

One of the more elusive details, invisible to the eye but noticeable to the nose, is the scent of a home. As it turns out, there is a whole industry dedicated to “scent marketing.” You’ll find site-specific scents floating all around Austin, from the car-dealership (Lincoln uses a custom green tea, jasmine, and tonka mix “to encourage a sense of upscale well-being”) to the hotel lobby (think South Congress Hotel’s “crushed mint leaves and silver moss”).

MUSIC PICK p. 47 ART PICK p. 48 EVENT PICK p. 50

Didn’t know that scent was such a thing? Neither did we. We just figured that it was something in the air…and as it turns out, it is.

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@ TRIBEZ A

48 22 OCTOBER 2017 |

Head to Tribeza.com to learn more.

A Look Behind !…! p. 120 tribeza.com


EDITOR'S LETTER

T

HIS MONTH, FOR OUR ANNUAL ARCHITECTURE ISSUE,

we take a look at a variety of spaces, including a modern home in Rollingwood; a farmhouse in Enfield; a new boutique hostel in East Austin; a members-only social club, also in East Austin; and a modular home manufactured in town, ready to ship out to anywhere in the world. In our cover story featuring the Rollingwood home

designed by Alterstudio, architect Kevin Alter talked about the strength of contrast. “Contrast is a powerful tool we often employ in our work,” he said. “For example, juxtaposing something vast with something intimate invites an appreciation of the special qualities of each condition.” Alter was talking about specific spaces and details in this home, but his

On the Cover Our cover image, shot by Casey Dunn, features a modern home in Rollingwood designed by Alterstudio Architecture. The house is centered around the private landscape of the backyard. The master suite overlooking it offers an unexpected sense of view and vista. Above the suite, a deck is embedded into the rooftop, its stairs visible from behind a screen.

notion about contrast resonated with me as I thought about my relation-

A Pard Morrison sculpture sits

ships to the places I’ve lived over the years.

on the patio’s Egyptian Desert Sand

Living abroad in my twenties, I took pride in the fact that I didn’t really own anything. I was unburdened by possessions, and I liked to think that I could pack all of my stuff into a couple of suitcases and take off with a moment’s notice. Now, after a year and a half in Austin, I am weighed down by things for the first time, but I feel differently about it. I’m realizing the benefits of truly investing in your surroundings and creating a space that’s your own, whether it’s temporary or not. This issue, I loved learning how the different people we spoke to decided to design their homes or places of gathering, in the case of Native Hostel and The Pershing. Although the processes and outcomes are vastly different, a lot of thought went into fine tuning each of these home bases. And more and more, I can understand why.

anna@tribeza.com

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limestone, which extends from the pool’s surroundings into the house. See more on page 54.


LOEWY LAW FIRM


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

16 YEARS

O C T O B E R 2 017

N O. 1 9 4

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Anna Andersen

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Staley Moore COLUMNISTS

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Errica Williams Holly Kuhn INTERNS

Caroline Miesch Lauren Schulze PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Brittani Sonnenberg Eli John Emy Cies Joleen Jernigan M. M. Adjarian Nicole Beckley Parker Yamasaki Tobin Levy PHOTOGR APHERS

Bailey Toksoz Breezy Ritter Casey Dunn Chase Daniel Courtney Pierce Holly Cowart Joe Layton Leah Muse Leonid Furmansky Mica McCook Miguel Angel Warren Chang ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


SOCIAL HOUR 2 PAIGE OPENING PAIGE Austin celebrated its grand opening at Domain NORTHSIDE on August 17 by throwing a party hosted by Camille Styles. A number of lucky guests were treated to delicious bites from Sway while getting a first look at the latest trends.

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ICE BALL GALA 2017 On August 26, the 13th annual Big Brothers Big Sisters of Central Texas Ice Ball Gala drew a crowd of 800 people to the JW Marriott for an elegant, black tie event that brought in more than $650,000 to help create life-changing friendships between at-risk youth and caring adult mentors.

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PAIGE OPENING: 1. Sylvia Vaquera, Deanna Rivers & Jonie Howard 2. Caroline Pinkston, Camille Styles & Allie Geller 3. Alix Mire, Paige Adams Gellar & Carolyne Black ICE BALL GALA 2017: 4. Leslie Manzano & Troy Marcus 5. Kiani Dober, Jesse White & Kailey Perez 6. Bill & Connie Nelson 7. Lindsay Nahoum, Lauren Petrowski, Ashley Behara & Keri Walling 8. Kirida McDaniels & Theresa Riggens 9. Blake and Christine Absher, Cassie LaMere 10. Raman Sandhu & Ho Jang

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SOCIAL HOUR

POP UP ZÓCALO The Harry Ransom Center held a members-only celebration on August 8 for their latest exhibition, Mexico Modern: Art, Commerce, and Cultural Exchange, 1920–1945. While enjoying live music and signature cocktails courtesy of Tequila Don Julio, guests got the first after-hours look at the exhibit and a chance to win an exhibition-themed prize package.

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THE BIG GIVE I Live Here I Give Here’s annual fundraiser, The BIG Give, took place on September 8 at Hotel Van Zandt. The organization celebrated 2017 BIG Giver Brittany Morrison of Hospice Austin, raising a record-setting $133,500 for their community programming. The 400+ attendees enjoyed Tito’s cocktails, foodtruck inspired plates, and a performance by local band Keeper.

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LITTLE BLACK DRESS SOIRÉE

POP UP ZÓCALO: 1. Molly Beth Malcolm & Bruce Malcolm 2. Steve Enniss & Jennifer Poteat 3. Lois Kim & Claire Burrows THE BIG GIVE: 4. Jonathan Criscoe & Tim Shannon 5. Brittany Morrison & Sarah Woods 6. Emily Treadgold & Elsa Mai 7. Erin Slade & Ty Cobb LITTLE BLACK DRESS SOIRÉE: 8. Cara McCarty and Scott Gallup 9. Tricia Tumlinson & Murphy Larson 10. Shayla & Dino Maglaris

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y, M I G U E L A N G E L A N D J O E L AY TO N

It was a packed house at the Phillips Event Center on September 9 for the Little Black Dress Soirée: All That Glitters, benefiting Dress for Success Austin. The Old Hollywood-themed party featured Bruce Smith Band, gourmet bites from Chef ATX, a silent auction, and more.


FRIENDSHIP FIESTA S U N D AY, N O V E M B E R 5 t h , 4 - 8 P M AT M A N U E L S G R E AT H I L L S

Join us for a festive evening of wine, Margaritas, delicious food, live music and entertainment benefiting Finding-Freedom-through-Friendship.org

FOR TICKETS GO TO MANUELS.COM

with Special Guest

MARIO LOPEZ


SOCIAL HOUR

LOOT FINER GOODS LAUNCH PARTY On September 13, Loot Finer Goods threw an exclusive launch party at their Loot Rentals Showroom for their first-ever small batch home goods collection featuring a range of both handmade and refurbished goods. Guests were treated to delicious bites from Peached Tortilla and Good Pop, and drinks from Champagne Supply Co. and Argus Cidery.

FILIGREE THEATRE INAUGURAL GALA FUNDRAISER

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On September 14, the new female-driven Filigree Theatre held its Gala Fundraiser at Springdale Station. Guests enjoyed live music, small bites, drinks, and a silent auction while getting to mix and mingle with Filigree co-founders Elizabeth V. Newman and Stephanie Moore and the cast of the upcoming production of “Betrayal.”

RED DOT ART SPREE

LOOT FINER GOODS LAUNCH PARTY: 1. Ana Silva & Gabrielle Cline 2. Tyler Crelia & John Kolar 3. Sloan Kurak & Sophie Hunt 4. Anna Crelia & Rhoda Brimberry FILIGREE THEATRE INAUGURAL GALA FUNDRAISER: 5. Chad & Keli Pollarine 6. Renee Barnett & Elizabeth V Newman 7. Ali Marszalowski, Lauren Stevenson & Amanda Beck RED DOT ART SPREE: 8. Peggy & Ron Weiss 9. Karen Hawkins, Rick Hawkins & Ann Clark 10. Camille Jobe & Tobin Levy

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T, B A I L E Y TO K S OZ A N D J O E L AY TO N

Women & Their Work held their 22nd annual Red Dot Art Spree on September 14 featuring more than 150 works from incredible local and global artists. Guests took part in a silent auction offering an assortment of exceptional prizes while delighting in sips and bites provided by El Locavore and Tito’s Handmade Vodka. All proceeds went toward the gallery’s extensive arts educations programs, exhibitions, and more.


furrowstudio LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

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COMMUNITY + CULTURE CULTURAL DISPATCHES FROM AUSTIN’S CREATIVE COMMUNITY

Curators Alyssa Taylor Wendt and Sean Gaulager explore the transformative experience of grief in their conceptual art installation “Good Mourning Tis of Thee.” PHOTOGRAPH BY LEAH MUSE

PROFILE

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K R I S T I N ’ S CO L U M N

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T R I B E Z A TA L K

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Mourning is Magic ALYSSA TAYLOR WENDT OFFERS AUSTIN A STARTLING NEW GLIMPSE OF GRIEF AND ARCHITECTURE By Brittani Sonnenberg Photographs by Leah Muse

W  

E ALL WANT TO SKIP OVER

grief when it shows up like a dreaded relative. We look away from the bereaved, mumble apologies and f lee funeral parlors. But when we do so, grief goes underground, a silent river, waiting for us to build a well. And, indeed, drawing up buckets of that grief, when we are ready for it, is the only way to get well. We forget that mourning is magic; that if we allow it in, it can carve out a space of breathtaking beauty in us, bestow us with new vision. “Good Mourning Tis of Thee,” a conceptual art installation written, curated and directed by Alyssa Taylor Wendt, along with Co-Lab’s Sean Gaulager, seizes upon grieving rituals as sites of profound transformation. And in an act of radical curatorial insight, Wendt has chosen to add architecture and development to the exhibition’s heady brew of loss and recovery. Co-Lab’s DEMO Gallery, housed in a downtown building scheduled for demolition, provides a poignantly “purgatorial” setting for the show. Our wide-ranging conversation with Wendt leapt from Detroit to Austin to her outspoken decision to sit shiva for a beloved pet. We rarely see grief and architecture explored in tandem. How did you land on this pairing?

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My work has long explored the cycles of ruin and monument. We disregard figures and structures only to venerate them at different moments of social change. Four years ago, after making a film in Detroit, I bought a historical home in the city’s tax auction. Spending time in Detroit, as well as watching the unfathomable development in Austin, has had a large influence on these constructs and ideas around destruction, transformation and the animism of objects and places. A home or a specific place is a vessel for life, just as our bodies are, and they often record and contain the energy of the activity therein. Is there a time in your life where steeping yourself in the rites of mourning has helped you? Or do you feel that you, like many others, were raised without the tools of mourning and ritual? How have you let go of houses or other beloved structures you’ve left behind? I became interested in the concept of ritual early on in my art career and have explored this as a tool for art-making as well as healing. Our society has a serious denial about death and could benefit greatly from other cultures and their approaches. I recently lost my beloved dog Prince and was at a loss on how to move on without his life energy. Despite protests from my friends and family, I decided to sit with his corpse for a day, a sort

of shiva, anointing him with oil, talking to him and photographing him surrounded by flowers and his toys. This process helped me immensely; I was transformed immediately and filled with an acceptance of his sudden passing and peace. I do think that leaving homes can have a similar significance, as a loved place that has been witness to one’s life, full of memories, hopes and emotions. Just think of the grief in the city of Houston and in many places in the Caribbean right now. Very apropos. How can we apply the lessons of “death as a positive agent of change” in architectural arenas where such change negatively impacts previous inhabitants? This question will be addressed by a panel discussion I have scheduled for October 15th featuring an architect, a mortician, a developer, an artist and others. Healthy mourning is about feeling

A HOME OR A SPECIFIC PL ACE IS A V ESSEL FOR LIFE , J UST A S OU R BODIES A R E , A N D T HE Y OFT EN R ECOR D A N D CON TA IN T HE EN ERGY OF T HE ACT I V IT Y T HER EIN.


and expressing your true emotions to the full extent and then letting them go with an acceptance of change as a positive agent. A simple acknowledgement of how important place is would be a healthy place to start, as well as the recognition of the history of a building or structure, rather than the disregard and emphasis on new development. A symbiotic balance can be achieved when humanity is considered before capital. Do you believe that it’s possible for buildings, like humans, to die of “natural causes”? Is the razing of a healthy building a kind of execution? What responsibility do we have to the shelters/institutions we create, in how we maintain and how we destroy them? Old age and time will weather any vessel, the duration of which depends on its innate strength and longevity. Seeing all the amazing buildings in various states throughout the Midwest and in Detroit in my recent travels reminds me of the history that precedes me. Perhaps buildings should dictate their own timeline and not be “resurrected.” It’s hard to say, but I do believe that razing of buildings especially for purposes of commercial gain should be seriously questioned. Preserving history through its physical and architectural manifestations promotes a sense of respect and a greater understanding of our cultural lineage. What works in the exhibition are you most excited about? All of the artists are contributing work from deep in their spirit and I am honored to have them all in the show. I am excited to bring installations and performances from artists who have never done anything in Austin, including Scott Hocking, Frank Haines, Jon Brumit, and Chris Carlone as well as returning favorites like Joseph Keckler, one of my muses. tribeza.com

| OCTOBER 2017

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

A Romance Remodel By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

I

HAVE REMODELED ENOUGH HOUSES TO

know that it’s far wiser and more comfortable to relocate to a temporary residence while most of the messy, noisy work is being done. However, when we go through more personal types of remodels—inner “remodels” related to identity or relationships—we simply do not have the luxury of moving out. But damn, I wish I could. Instead I have to sit with myself in the midst of this demolition and dust. What I’m presently referring to is a relationship remodel—my beloved boyfriend of almost two and a half years and I are “taking a break to figure things out.” I am not sure what this means exactly. The older tribeza.com

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

BY SCR A PING A PR E V IOUS

DW ELLING , YOU C A N M A K E CERTA IN T H AT T HE FOU N DAT ION

IS LE V EL A N D SOLID A N D T HE A RCHIT ECT U R A L PL A NS

R EFLECT T HE N EW GROW T H A N D

DIR ECT ION. YOU C A N T E A R DOW N OLD WA LLS A N D LOW CEILINGS

A N D DESIGN BR IGH T, OPEN SPACES FOR E V ERYON E TO ENJOY.

I get the less I find I have figured anything out, but I do know this—I love this man more than I’ve ever loved any man and I want to live life and grow old together. This time apart is moving heavy and slow, pressing down on me like I’m strapped in a wrecked car, flipped upside down. Love gone awry is like being caught in a wave, when you can’t tell which way is up for air, the tide churning and grinding you helplessly into the sand, then tugging you back out to sea. My brother, Jon, who has served as my unpaid therapist since we were kids and now is actually a real therapist, keeps telling me to hang in there. He tells me that every great love story has to have this part, the part where the couple has to pause and decide. In a romance novel, it’s called the conflict. It’s where the reader agonizes over the misunderstandings and misperceptions that are frustratingly easy to see with an omniscient viewpoint. The reader burns through the pages, staying up late to finally get to the part where the lovers are back in each other’s arms and the world is set right once again. In a rom-com movie it’s the montage scene, where the girl does yoga and

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cries to her girlfriends and the guy stays in his dark apartment accumulating empty beer bottles and pizza boxes. Everyone is miserable but tries to hold it together, until they realize that they can’t hold it together apart any more. The scene that follows is why we watch these movies in the first place. Because it’s a fact of being human that a life story without a love story isn’t much of a story at all. Jon also tells me that while remodels are hard, they also create the place you really want to live. He says things have to get messier before they transform. By scraping a previous dwelling, you can make certain that the foundation is level and solid and the architectural plans reflect the new growth and direction. You can tear down old walls and low ceilings and design bright, open spaces for everyone to enjoy. You can clear out old junk you’ve been holding onto and create room for new memories. You can add more doors and windows, inviting the natural light, exposing the beautiful view, and allowing for more freedom to come and go. The best thing about a remodel, he says, is that you end up with a home you design together, a fresh start from a place of shared vision. I hope my true love realizes that he can’t hold it together apart any more. Or if he can, it isn’t nearly as much fun as holding it together together. I hope we get the chance to work on a remodel, to scrape what doesn’t suit us anymore and build the relationship of our dreams. I hope we can be stronger, more authentic, more compassionate, more accepting, more devoted, and more courageous than we ever imagined. I hope we get a second chance to put each other first, and maybe one day show our precious brood of six what it feels like to live in the house that Love built.


T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

SWEET THINGS

PRESERVING AUSTIN

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN

Since 1960, Preservation Austin has acknowledged projects that honor and preserve the city’s most historic places. This year the nonprofit selected nine Merit Award winners, including the Darnall House, Downs Field, and the revitalized Green Pastures. The projects were selected for their commitment to revitalization and craftsmanship. The awardees will be honored at a celebration at the Driskill Hotel on November 3.

By Nicole Beckley

STEP Forward Earlier this year Kacey Samiee and Aaron Lindsey opened A Modern Step, a Hyde Park showroom for upscale flooring. “We tried to make it a place for designers and shoppers to come and be in a space that promotes design and inspires you,” Samiee says. “It looks a little bit more like an art gallery or a museum.” Wanting to make more unique flooring options available, and focusing on sustainable materials, they source reclaimed wood and customized engineered hardwood, as well as designer rugs and carpet. “There’s some great beautiful and weird stuff out there,” Samiee says. AMODERNSTEP.COM

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YUMMIJOY.COM

PRESERVATIONAUSTIN.ORG

DA R N A L L H O U S E P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

TRIBEZ A

If stepping into Toy Joy wasn’t enough to rekindle the sweet nostalgia of childhood, surely walking into Yummi Joy can summon the nostalgia of childhood sweets. A new candy shop from the folks behind Toy Joy, Yummi Joy promises dairy-free Sweet Ritual ice cream, specialty coffee, and shelves and shelves of colorful sugary treats. The vibrant Second Street storefront includes glass candies hanging from a chandelier and a mural of a sweet tooth-laden squid, its tentacles wrapped around an ice cream cone, ringpop and other goodies.


FRESH FLAMES

P L AY B OY M A R I A P H OTO G R A P H B Y K AT H L E E N S H A F E R F R O M M A R FA : T H E T R A N S F O R M AT I O N O F A W E S T T E X A S TO W N © 2 01 7, U N I V E R S I T Y O F T E X A S P R E S S

Blanket Statements

When Hiller Dry Goods originally opened in Detroit in 1904, they specialized in textiles and men’s clothing. As the name and concept have passed down through the family, the store’s been re-created as an outpost for home goods, southwestern furniture, and now as an ecommerce shop for woven blankets. “Every generation who’s had the store has had their own interpretation of what it could be and what they’re interested in,” Nick Hiller says. After relocating to Austin seven years ago, Hiller hadn’t intended to take on the family business, until he came across a bank note from Hong Kong while cleaning out a drawer. Inspired by the design, Hiller decided to apply the pattern to a blanket. “The fact that textiles were used as currencies for thousands of years just made for an interesting connection and concept,” Hiller says. In July he launched the online shop, with nine different blanket styles, carrying on the family tradition. HILLERDRYGOODS.COM

“When I first saw the space, it had been a realtor’s office and it was very vintage, with bright colors and just not our style,” says Michelle Simmons, founder and owner of Slow North. “I was like, immediately, everything needs to be white, cause there’s amazing natural light; the whole front of it is glass,” Simmons says, explaining her want to create a shop that would feel cozy and modern. Simmons and her team, including her husband, Jon, fellow founder and owner, moved Slow North from their backyard studio to a space on Anderson Lane, officially opening the shop in August. For the last two years Slow North has specialized in

creating beautiful all-natural candles, and the new space offers shoppers a peek behind the scenes at the production. This fall catch them pouring two brand new candle scents: Coffee + Spice and Sandalwood + Amber. SLOWNORTH.COM

MARFA Style The go-to getaway for hipster tourists and art lovers from Texas and beyond, Marfa might never have morphed from small town to artist mecca if not for the migration of Donald Judd. A new book by Kathleen Shafer, “Marfa: The Transformation of a West Texas Town,” examines Judd’s influence after he departed the 1970s NYC art scene for rural Texas. The book also explores what’s next, as Marfa continues to evolve. UTPRESS.UTEXAS.EDU/BOOKS/SHAFER-MARFA

Playboy Marfa, 2013 tribeza.com

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architecture & interiors

THE WORLD WE LIVE IN IS THE ONE WE CREATE northarrowstudio.com


ARTS + HAPPENINGS WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO The Timberline Pass home built by Tim Brown Architecture is one of thirteen homes that visitors are welcome to walk through during AIA Austin’s 31st Annual Homes Tour. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEONID FURMANSKY

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ARTS PICK

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C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC SZA October 1 Emo’s Austin ANDREW W.K. October 3 Mohawk LILA DOWNS & LISA MORALES October 4 Paramount Theatre AUSTIN CITY LIMITS MUSIC FESTIVAL October 4–6, 13–15 Zilker Park CHELSEA WOLFE October 6 Paramount Theatre RUN THE JEWELS October 6 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater PORTUGAL. THE MAN October 7 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater HARRY STYLES October 11 ACL Live at the Moody Theater CRYSTAL CASTLES October 11 Emo’s Austin FOSTER THE PEOPLE October 12 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater TOVE LO October 12 Emo’s Austin THE ROBERT CRAY BAND October 19 Paramount Theatre

DEL MCCOURY BAND October 20 Paramount Theatre

MEAN GIRLS PUB RUN + SCREENING October 3 Stateside at the Paramount

SELECTED SHORTS October 21 Paramount Theatre

HAL KETCHUM W/ TRAVIS LINVILLE October 21 Stateside at the Paramount

WILD TEXAS FILM TOUR October 10 ZACH Theatre

THE WOLVES Through October 21 Hyde Park Theatre

ELVIS COSTELLO: SOLO October 22 Paramount Theatre STEVIE WONDER AT FORMULA 1 October 22 Circuit of the Americas BOB SEGER October 24 Frank Erwin Center POST MALONE October 25 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater CHRIS STAPLETON ALL-AMERICAN ROAD SHOW October 26 Austin360 Amphitheater HALSEY October 27 Frank Erwin Center JUDAH & THE LION October 27 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater NORTHSIDE AMPLIFIED W/ CHARLIE MARS October 28 NORTHSIDE Lawn ECHOSMITH October 29 Emo’s Austin RINGO STARR & HIS ALL-STARR BAND October 31 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

JOAN OSBORNE October 19 One World Theatre

LCD SOUNDSYSTEM October 31 Austin360 Amphitheater

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WOMAN IN BLACK October 13–30 Austin Scottish Rite Theater

JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE AT FORMULA 1 October 21 Circuit of the Americas

MACKLEMORE October 19 Emo’s Austin

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FILM

STAR WARS: A NEW HOPE SCREENING + LIVE SCORE October 11 & 12 Dell Hall MOVIES IN THE PARK: DEATH BECOMES HER October 19 Pan Am Park

NOT AFRAID OF THE DARK THE SHOW THAT GLOWS October 21 & 22, 28 & 29 Ballet Austin Studio Theater SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN Through October 30 ZACH Theatre

COMEDY

TEXAS FILMMAKERS: THROUGH THE REPELLENT FENCE October 22 & 24 AFS Cinema

THE HODGETWINS October 7 The North Door

AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL October 26 – November 2 Paramount Theatre & Various Locations

DYLAN MORAN October 9 & 10 Stateside at the Paramount

THEATER ANON(YMOUS) October 4–15 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre THE MOUSETRAP October 6–29 City Theatre A MOON OF MY OWN Through October 8 Rollins Studio Theatre BETRAYAL October 8 The Santa Cruz Theatre JUST TAP! October 12–22 Rollins Studio Theatre RENT October 13–15 Bass Concert Hall

STUFF YOU SHOULD KNOW October 10 Paramount Theatre JOHN MULANEY October 12 & 13 Bass Concert Hall & ACL Live at the Moody Theater BERT KREISCHER October 12–14 Cap City Comedy Club WHITNEY CUMMINGS October 16 Paramount Theatre SINBAD October 19 ACL Live at the Moody Theater DONNELL RAWLINGS October 19–21 Cap City Comedy Club RHETT & LINK’S TOUR OF MYTHICALITY October 20 Emo’s Austin


BILL BURR October 20 & 21 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

TEXAS TEEN BOOK FESTIVAL October 7 St. Edward’s University

JEN KIRKMAN October 22 The North Door

OKTOBERFEST October 14 German Free School

KEVIN NEALON October 27 & 28 Cap City Comedy Club

RUPAUL’S DRAG RACE October 18 Paramount Theatre

CHILDREN LITTLE TEXANS: MY FAVORITE THINGS October 12 Bullock Texas State History Museum THE KIDZ BOP KIDS October 13 H-E-B Center SHOPKINS LIVE! SHOP IT UP! October 21 Dell Hall FAMILY NIGHT: HALLOWEEN HOOTENANNY October 27 Thinkery PAW PATROL LIVE October 28 & 29 Long Center ROSITA Y CONCHITA: A DIA DE LOS MUERTOS PLAY Through October 29 Austin Scottish Rite Theater

OTHER AUSTIN FLEA October 1–29 Various Locations TOGETHER TOUR 2017 October 3 Bass Concert Hall BUBBLE RUN October 7 Travis County Fairgrounds

SPIRITS OF MEXICO October 19 Fair Market FALL COCKTAIL WORKSHOP October 20 Revelry Kitchen + Bar FORMULA 1 UNITED STATES GRAND PRIX October 20–22 Circuit of the Americas ZOMBIE CHARGE 5K MUD RUN October 21 Mylo Obstacle Fitness SPOOKTACULAR October 27 Bullock Texas State History Museum AIA AUSTIN HOMES TOUR October 28 & 29 Various Locations IRONMAN 70.3 AUSTIN October 29 Various Locations HEY SUGAR! AUSTIN DESSERT FEST October 29 Peached Social House UNCLE BILLY’S GOSPEL BRUNCH Through October 29 Uncle Billy’s Brewery TEXAS FIREWORK DIA DE LOS MUERTOS CELEBRATION October 31 Kreig Baseball Field

MUSIC PICK

WAIFS & STRAYS: FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE MUSICIAN TREATMENT FOUNDATION By Eli John

Paramount Theatre OCTOBER 22

Elvis Costello comes to town for a benefit solo concert at the Paramount Theatre this month. The legend, who has churned out more than two dozen albums since the ‘70s, will hold a one-off concert to kick-start fundraising for The Musician Treatment Foundation, a new Austin-based nonprofit dedicated to the medical needs of professional musicians. For the gig, whimsically titled “Hits & Headlines / Waifs & Strays,” Costello promises to showcase some of his best-known songs alongside newer and deeper cuts. A portrait of thoughtfulness, Costello is hesitant to take his hits for granted, but would rather “earn the right to sing them again” in new contexts. Costello’s appearance at the engagement is more than incidental: both he and his wife, jazz musician Diana Krall, sit on the board of The Musician Treatment Foundation. The Foundation’s goals broadly target the medical ailments associated with the musical profession. In addition to helping musicians—regardless of their insurance status—gain access to orthopedic care, the Foundation aims to fund research on medical issues which specifically afflict musicians. It’s easy for us laypeople to forget that shreddin’ on guitar too much can rip your muscles to shreds! tribeza.com

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A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts BRAD & SUNDIE RUPPERT October 7 – November 5 Yard Dog Art Gallery

ON THE BRIGHT SIDE Through October 23 OLA Gallery

TEXAS BIRD PROJECT Through October 7 Flatbed Press & Gallery

READ MY PINS: THE MADELEINE ALBRIGHT COLLECTION October 28 – January 21 LBJ Presidential Library

YOU I I I EVERYTHING ELSE October 7 – December 16 de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART ELLEN HECK: SOLO SHOW October 8–28 Wally Workman Gallery

ART PICK

PAUL MEYER OPENING AT OLA GALLERY By Parker Yamasaki

Office for Local Architecture, 201 E 5th St #104 OCTOBER 27, 6–9 P.M.

Hattie Lindsley sees art in the world everywhere she goes. Usually it’s because she put it there. Lindsley works for the Office for Local Architecture in downtown Austin but her influence on the Austin architecture scene doesn’t stop at the drywall. She’s an artist and a curator herself, so it stands to reason that Lindsley’s own workspace would be a little bit remarkable in its own right. The Office for Local Architecture—OLA—is a small collaborative of architects and designers that focus on sustainability. At the start of August the group opened OLA Gallery at the front of their offices, built out of reclaimed hardwood floors from an early 1900s Austin house and coated with a sustainable hardwood finish that really “brightened up the office,” Lindsley says. Around the same time as the OLA Gallery opened, Lindsley came across the work of Paul Meyer, a Houston-based artist who also lays heavy emphasis on the materials that he uses, and re-uses, and re-re-uses. Meyer, who says he works between 2D and 3D realms, calls it relief painting. “I was drawn to the texture of his work. It demands a closer look, but also has a calming effect,” Lindsley explains. “I like how the cement can feel like a desert landscape, an urban landscape, or an emotional landscape. Additionally, one of our gallery walls consists of historic Butler Brick which is a very prevalent material downtown. I think layering historic materials with Paul’s textural, but atmospheric work will create a subtle visual narrative of the history of building materials in Texas.” The already blurry line between art and architecture is smudged into near oblivion at the OLA Gallery. Paul Meyer’s exhibit opens on October 27, with a reception from 6 to 9 p.m., and will be on display until mid-January.

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CHRISTOPHER ST. LEGER: APPROACH Through October 28 Gallery Shoal Creek BELIEVE ME Through October 29 grayDUCK Gallery

MIKE EGAN: NEW PAINTINGS Through October 8 Yard Dog Art Gallery

DENISE PRINCE: OBJECT LESSONS Through November 10 Women & Their Work

WILLIAM T. CARSON: UNEARTH Through October 14 CAMIBAart Gallery

2017 TEXAS BIENNIAL Through November 11 211 E Alpine Rd

ART @ THE DOMAIN October 14 & 15 The Domain

UMLAUF PRIZE 2017 Through November 26 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

THE AFTERLIFE OF ARTIFACTS October 14 – November 25 Davis Gallery AMERICAN DREAM Through October 20 Visual Arts Center KIND OF ABOUT MICHIGAN Through October 20 Visual Arts Center THE ROCK THAT OWNS ITSELF Through October 21 Not Gallery


E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

31ST ANNUAL AIA AUSTIN HOMES TOUR By Parker Yamasaki

Various locations OCTOBER 28 & 29

Have you ever caught yourself glancing at the newest home on the block and ending up staring straight across someone else’s dinner table, invading a “how was your day, honey” from the other side of the window pane? We’ve all become the unacknowledged third person at the table, especially since the introduction of floor-to-ceiling windows. Who is responsible for your unintended intrusion? Is it your fault for stopping to stare at the modernist marvel or the fault of the homeowners for having it in the first place? Well there’s another force at work: the architect. The fine mind that sketched and cut and placed the glass window that you’re staring through now, and the walls beside it, and the fence you’re standing at. Please, stay off the lawn. They also created, for all of our convenience, a front door. And on October 28 and 29, you’re invited to step through it, into the 31st annual American Institute of Architects (AIA) Homes Tour. This year’s tour spotlights the collaboration between the homeowner and the architect and features homes from thirteen local firms, including this year’s Design Award winners, A Parallel Architecture and Tim Cuppett Architects. The homes themselves serve up a wide range of styles, from townhouse to farmhouse, classic craftsman to modernist marvel. As the saying goes, two’s company and three’s a crowd, while four is a party. And who doesn’t like a good party? So stop gazing from beyond that perfectly placed picket fence and come on in. The door is wide open, make yourself at home. Advance tickets are on sale now for $35, day-of tickets will be available for $40.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-Fri 10-4, Sa-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

MUSEUMS


717 WEST ANNIE co mi ng w i nter 2017

Th e per fect bal an ce of s i m pl e i n ti m a t e ro o m s w i th s pati al i ty an d re f i n e d m a te r i a l s .

4 Be d ro o m s 3 . 5 Ba t h ro o m s

2 L i v i n g Areas O ff i c e / St udy

2 , 7 9 7 SF ( b u i l de r )

Mason Quintana, REALTORÂŽ, GRI 512.740.8008 | mason@gottesmanresidential.com gottesmanresidential.com


E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S. Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By Appt. Only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd. Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org

DE STIJL | PODIUM FOR ART 1006 W. 31st St. (512) 354 0868 Hours: Tu-Thu, Sa 1-5 destijlaustin.com

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG AGAVE GALLERY 208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY 209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE 230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK 425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com


E l l e n H e ck

WWG

Wa lly Wor km a n Ga l l ery

1 2 0 2 West Si x t h St reet A u st i n , Tex as 78703 wa l l y wo r k manga l l er y.co m 5 1 2.472.7428 Image: Girl Wearing a Mobius Strip as a Hat (detail), woodcut and drypoint on paper, 31 x 23 inches


As the last property on a dead-end street, the Rollingwood home injects modernity into an otherwise traditional neighborhood.

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Built for Modern Life Exploring the comforts of a modern home in Rollingwood BY ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY CASEY DUNN

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One of the defining features of modern homes is their powerful connection to the outdoors. Here, that means a private landscape and pool which the home is centered around.


A VAST ARRAY OF NEW HOMES AROUND AUSTIN FEATURE FLAT ROOFS,

unadorned square and rectangular structures, and walls of glass. Beautiful from the street but, really, how comfortable is a modern home? Don’t all those hard, white surfaces feel cold? How do people live in such giant, open rooms, anyway? And where is that cozy spot, the one for a quiet chat or reading, craved by human beings since the world began? Spend time with the friendly folks at Alterstudio Architecture in their open, but warm office space and you might come away with a new view on modern. “I think modern is o"en misunderstood,” says Kevin Alter. There’s a fundamental difference between style and content, he explains: “From the street you might see modern style, but that doesn’t equal modern content.” In talking about the two-story, five-bedroom home Alterstudio designed in 2016 for a family in Rollingwood with a keen appreciation for materials

Walnut cabinets in the kitchen surround a generously sized Calacutta quartzite island. tribeza.com

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A fireplace of Venetian plaster and waxed steel provides a strong focal point in the sunken living room. The inset davenport sits in front of one of the home’s Walnut screens, the kitchen’s acid-etched glass backsplash can be seen glowing from behind it.

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Alter holds a strong conviction that architecture should change your life. The arrangement of living spaces should allow you to experience the world in anew way.

and fine cra"smanship, it’s clear that Alter is well aware of the preconceived notions people o"en have about modern houses. Along with his partners, Ernesto Cragnolino and Tim Whitehill, and project architect for the Rollingwood House senior associate Matt Slusarek, Alter holds a strong conviction that architecture should change your life. The arrangement of living spaces should allow you to experience the world in a new way. “It’s not about how a house looks; it’s about how it makes you feel,” he says. To illustrate his point, Alter shares a memory of a very brief conversation that took place at an AIA homes tour in 2002. Alter was showcasing the firm’s Hardouin House (featured on our October 2004 cover), when an older, conservatively dressed woman said to him, “I hate modern, but I love this house.” “She said that because of the way the home made her feel, not because of its looks,” Alter says. A common misconception people hold about modern design is that it’s all about clean, wide open spaces that might be great for a party, but don’t provide the right scale for everyday family living or an intimate conversation between two people. Addressing that notion, Alter explains that the concept of multiplicity is key in modernism. For example, spaces can be both expansive as well as cozy; they can have the ability to be discreet as well as enormous. tribeza.com

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The kitchen’s cushioned banquette surrounds a live-edge wood table. Behind the informal dining space, another of the home’s finely detailed walnut screens can be folded into the wall.

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Such is the case with the Rollingwood House’s generously sized kitchen. A 15-foot island of richly grained walnut cabinets topped by a slab of predominantly white Calacatta quartzite anchors the space and is balanced by an inviting cushioned corner banquette. The comfy dining spot features a set-in-place live-edge wood table, just right for family meals, homework and everyday conversation. In the sunken living room, a custom inset davenport holds its own adjacent to a large, floating Venetian plaster and waxed steel fireplace. Via a shared wall, the space is animated by shadows coming through the kitchen’s acid-etched glass backsplash and a walnut screen behind the davenport. The finely detailed screen is one of several throughout the house, starting at the exterior entry area where the wood of the screen stands in contrast to walls of glass and white stucco. Shadows and contrast play a large role in the home’s design. “Contrast is a powerful tool we o"en employ in our work,” Alter explains. “For example, juxtaposing something vast with something intimate invites an appreciation of the special qualities of each condition.” Alter also notes the importance of taking into account the building process when designing a home in the modernist tradition. A look at the unusually large number of detailed construction drawings for the Rollingwood House attests to his point. “So much of the important work in a modern home is behind the scenes,” Alter says. “The uninterrupted soffits and floor-to-ceiling walls of glass, for instance, create a powerful connection to the out of doors, but to make that special condition, the house is constructed in a different way than a traditional house.” While many details of the Rollingwood House are behind the scenes, their impact is not: together, they add up to a comfortably livable home that sparks the imagination.

Top: Alter believes that multiplicity is key in modernism. The Rollingwood home features both a formal dining room, and an informal dining space attached to the kitchen. Bottom: A wall of glass separates the shower room, which overlooks a micro-courtyard, from the rest of the master bath. Different forms of Silverthorn travertine cover the floor and walls, while Calacatta Lincoln marble tops the counters. tribeza.com

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Right: The Robert Mueller Airport terminal and control tower, for which Fehr and Granger won the Progressive Architecture Design Award in 1959. Below: Arthur Fehr (far left) and Charles Granger (leaning on table) review a model of the Robert Mueller Airport with members of their staff.

Future Retro

THE LEGACY OF MID-CENTURY MODERN ARCHITECTURE IN AUSTIN BY ANNE BRUNO

PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEONID FURMANSKY

HISTORIC PHOTOS COURTESY OF AUSTIN HISTORY CENTER, AUSTIN PUBLIC LIBRARY

IT’S HARD TO PINPOINT THE REASONS, BUT THERE’S NO DENYING THE

allure and current popularity of Mid-Century Modern architectural design. On the residential side, Austin homes that have managed to maintain their original modern elements command a high price in today’s market. The interest in careful renovation and updating of such homes has never been higher. Mid-Century Modern commercial buildings are also seeing their share of attention, something local architectural historians and enthusiasts have been advocating for a long time now. One of the most important office renovations in recent years is that of downtown’s 1954 Starr Building, originally designed to house American National Bank. This iconic jewel endured years of neglect (even landing a spot on Preservation Texas’ list of the Most Endangered Places) before it was thoughtfully renovated to serve as the offices of ad agency McGarrah Jessee. Be it residential, commercial, educational, or ecclesiastical, our city’s rich legacy of Mid-Century Modern architecture wouldn’t exist without the creative interplay between the pioneering architects, who realized a"er World War II that they were in the right place at the right time to usher in new ideas,

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and the clients, who were not only willing, but interested in straying from the architectural norm of the day. According to Ingrid Spencer, executive director at AIA Austin, the time was right for a “third-wave” of modernist architects: the Americans who had traveled, gaining exposure to influences around the world, and studied under the European modernists who’d moved to the U.S. to work and teach. Among Austin’s most prominent and prolific architects of the time were Arthur Fehr and Charles Granger. Though ten years apart, both men graduated from the University of Texas. They first met in the 1930s while they were working in Bastrop for the National Park Service, but it wasn’t until 1946 that they became partners. “A"er World War II, the way people lived was very different and architecture had to address that,” says Spencer. Austin was full of opportunity and the population grew by large numbers. “The city was booming, as was the demand for housing. So, the time was right for architects like Fehr and Granger to introduce new ideas.”


Top Left: One of several homes designed by Roland Roessner in the Balcones neighborhood. Top Right: The Westwood Country Club by Fehr and Granger added multiple facilities and flexibility within the structure to a historic mansion on the site. Bottom: The McGarrah Jessee building is one of downtown’s many Mid-Century Modern gems, restored to its former glory by McKinney York Architects in 2008.

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ON DISPLAY

For more on Mid-Century Modern, check out these two exhibits now showing in central Austin and online:

“Fehr & Granger, Architects — Austin Modernists” August 15 – November 15 Austin Center for Architecture at 801 W. 12th St. Open Mondays – Thursdays 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. and Fridays 8:30 a.m. – noon, barring any scheduled meetings of AIA Austin (call or check the online calendar before going) 512-452-4332 aiaaustin.org “Mid-Century Austin: Photographs by Dewey Mears” August 29 – January 14 Austin History Center at 810 Guadalupe Street Open on Sundays from noon – 6 p.m. and Tuesdays - Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. (closed on Mondays) or visit the exhibit online at library.austintexas.gov/ahc/ online-exhibits 512-974-7480 library.austintexas.gov/ahc/visit-us

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Top Left: The Fannie Davis Town Lake Gazebo, designed by Sterry Nill, Jr., marks the physical beginning of Austin’s beautification project of the Town Lake area during the late 1960s and early 1970s. Top Right: The airport tower at the Robert Mueller Airport was designed by Fehr and Granger and completed in 1961.Right: The Phillips house was commissioned in 1964 by Delta Phillips and built by John S. Chase, the first African American to graduate from the UT School of Architecture. It sits above East Martin Luther King Blvd., in a neighborhood lined mostly with ranch-style homes and bungalows.


Instead of homes with lots of small rooms and parlors for formal entertaining, living spaces were opened up and designed more for family gathering; a greater connection between rooms was established to accommodate the informal way people were increasingly wanting to live. Women’s changing roles, in particular, initiated some of the biggest design differences. The kitchen, which had previously been cut off from the rest of the house, now occupied a more central space with greater flow into other rooms. Along with other Austin architects working in the modern style, such as A.D. Stenger, Roland Roessner, and John S. Chase, Fehr and Granger were sensitive to the environment and climate in which they worked. And, authenticity was key. They made great use of the region’s abundant natural materials, such as limestone, and they had a preference for showing the rock in its raw state and working with local cra"smen. Consistent with the tenets of modern architecture in other places, the new generation of Austin architects placed an emphasis on connecting a structure’s interior to the natural surroundings of its exterior. This was achieved by taking advantage of the latest technology allowing for larger windows, which not only brought in more natural light but also created a bigger view to the out-of-doors.

As for the clients, a number of Austin’s first modern structures were the homes of the architects themselves, says Lindsey Derrington, president of Mid Tex Mod, a volunteer organization dedicated to raising awareness of modern architectural design in Central Texas. Such first dra"s served as powerful tools of persuasion to help clients understand the new style and see what living in a modern house might be like. Over time, modern designs grew in acceptance and commissions for modern homes, schools, and churches began coming regularly. For some architects, however, getting the work was harder than it was for others. Derrington explains, “One reason we see John S. Chase’s work primarily in East Austin is that he couldn’t get work in other parts of the city. Chase was the first African-American architect licensed by the State of Texas.” In fact, he was also the first African-American to earn an advanced degree in architecture at the University of Texas. Despite his qualifications, Chase couldn’t find a firm that would hire him, so he moved to Houston to teach at Texas Southern University and started his own firm. He would subsequently design dozens of notable buildings across Texas, including two Mid-Century hallmarks in Austin: the Phillips House and the David Chapel Missionary Baptist Church. Mid-Century Modern design is sometimes described as inherently optimistic. Its clean lines, contrasting materials and respect for nature seem to give it a sense of stability and integrity, while piquing one’s curiosity about what lies around the next corner, behind the translucent screen or the stone wall. Whether those things account for its upsurge in popularity, or there’s another indefinable attractant at work doesn’t really matter. In Austin, it’s an architectural heritage worth celebrating. Evidence of Fehr and Granger’s influence is present throughout the Austin cityscape, from public spaces to private office buildings, to schools, churches, and residences.

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DETAILS ARE NOT THE DETAILS

Building interconnectedness into The Woodlawn Residence BY PARKER YAMASAKI PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEONID FURMANSKY


Old Enfield requires its residences to be set 40 feet back from the street. To maximize their usable space, and still keep room for a backyard and pool area, Coel arranged the home at an angle to the street. It took a couple of meetings with the historical commission, but they were eventually approved for the innovative design.

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Coel, Gonzalez, and Jenny Bachler had “lighting meetings” where they would spend hours talking about light fixtures; “tile meetings” where they would just sit together and design tiles, and so forth. One of Coel’s favorite aspects of the house is the staircase that leads to a guest room and Craig’s office above the carport. It took special engineering to get them to “float” up to the second story, and the perforated metal they are made of keeps the view from the side-yard to the front relatively unobstructed.

J

ENNY BACHLER IS THE TYPE OF PERSON WHO

walks into a visually complex place like South Congress Hotel and notices its scent. A"er some emails, phone calls, and internet digging, she tracked down the company that makes South Congress Hotel smell like South Congress Hotel. Now it’s one of the first things you notice when you walk into her home in Old Enfield—“mint leaf, smoky vetiver, silver moss,” as the company’s website describes it—but it certainly isn’t the only thing you notice. Jenny and Craig Bachler moved to Austin in August 2014. As Jenny and Craig tell the story, the idea to relocate was born on a walk. Five years earlier the couple had moved their kids from the crowded San Francisco Bay Area to the open air of Tucson, Arizona. Moving had been a big project, and they were just getting ready to renovate the kitchen of the second home they had purchased in Arizona. For some reason on that night, on that walk, in the open air that they had sought from Tucson, the couple confided in each other: they didn’t like living in Tucson. They decided to visit Austin when the kids—12 and 10 at the time—were out of school for summer vacation. They found an AirBnb just west of downtown and knew within a couple of days that they wanted to stay. tribeza.com

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The home faces true west, providing the homeowners an optimized summer breeze flow and creating some interesting quadrilateral pockets into which Coel cleverly tucked a bamboo-rimmed pool and outdoor seating area.

By the end of that summer the Bachlers were renting a house in Pemberton Heights and had begun looking for a place to call home. On a walk one night (they take a lot of walks), Jenny and Craig saw a “For Sale” sign on a thin, empty rectangle of land in the Old Enfield neighborhood. It’s a historic neighborhood, with hundred-year-old trees, over a hundred year old mansions, and some city building codes that date back to its conception in the early 1900s. To find an empty lot in this neighborhood was almost unthinkable, but there it was. This is where Carina Coel, of Restructure Studio, enters the scene. The Bachlers were familiar with Coel’s work because of the remodel-that-never-was in their Tucson house. In preparation for that project they had bookmarked as inspiration one of Coel’s properties in Austin—the Bouldin Creek Residence, owned by Kelly and Carlos Gonzalez. They called Coel and asked her to be their architect. Coel agreed and called interior designer Kelly Gonzalez (and the owner of the Bouldin Creek residence) and a contractor, Koch Construction.

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The Bachlers discovered the work of multimedia artist Dolan Geiman through their interior designer, Kelly Gonzalez. Four of his pieces hang in their home (including “Father Nature� shown here).

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The tile found in the kitchen, bathrooms, and breezeway were made by Popham tiles, a Moroccan company that Jenny found online. Every set was custom designed and handmade.

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“One of the most fun things about working with the Bechlers is that they were entirely open to my design ideas,” Coel says. “I’d be like, ‘hey, how about when you walk in you enter a giant, three story open space?’ A lot of people would have wanted a second floor there. The Bachlers would just be like, ‘totally!’”

The first step was to put a shape on the 8,778 square-foot lot. Because of the historic district’s restrictions, the house had to be set back 40 feet from the street. Rather than feel boxed in by the constraints, Coel got creative and rotated the 3,237 square-foot floor plan so that it cuts diagonally across the lot. The home faces true west, providing the homeowners an optimized summer breeze flow and creating some interesting quadrilateral pockets into which Coel cleverly tucked a bamboo-rimmed pool and outdoor seating area. To view this home is not just to view this home. It is to see through perforated stairs that “float” out from the side of the carport (“I really had to push the engineers to get these,” Coel confides. “They’re one of my favorite aspects of the house now.”) To walk through this home is to tread on tiles designed by

Coel, Jenny Bachler, and Gonzalez and handcra"ed in Morocco. To be invited into the kitchen is to lean on their custom 39-inch kitchen counter, designed to accommodate Craig’s height. It is to look through windows that were five months in the making and travelled 4,942 miles to be installed. Charles Eames’s philosophy resonates throughout the house: “The details are not the details,” he once said, “They make the design.” Despite their acute attention to the details, when you join the Bachlers in the story of how they built their home, it feels nothing like a story of tedium and endurance that many homeowners and first-time builders will tell. They tell it with the ease of an evening stroll, on which you are encouraged to stop and smell the roses. tribeza.com

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BOHEMIAN From lumber to luxe, the story behind The Pershing, Austin’s best-kept secret club BY TOBIN LEVY

Founder Kip McClanahan repurposed an acre lot formerly home to the Austin Lumber Company to create The Pershing, which he calls Austin’s “only contemporary members-only club.”

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PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEONID FURMANSKY & NICK SIMONITE


LUXURY

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The gallery event space can be rearranged to host a variety of events for up to 400 people.

like New York, Los Angeles and London. Still, in 2013, when Austinites started hearing whispers about plans for Pershing, an exclusive social club on East 5th Street, some panicked, as though a social club was a White Walker preying on the Austin ethos rather than mankind. It should be noted that Pershing is not Austin’s first private social club. The Headliners Club, on the 21st floor of the Chase Tower, has been around for more than sixty years. Only members and their guests can enjoy the stunning bird’s-eye views and the spectacularly patrician sensibility. At the Headliners Club, as with Pershing, dues are required in exchange for the luxuries of convenience and met expectations. Pershing offers the first contemporary alternative. Pershing founder Kip McClanahan, who moved to Austin 34 years ago, sought to address Austin’s relaxed spirit and growth through this passion project. He repurposed a one-acre property on the East Side rather than seek out a shiny new downtown high rise for the club. His goal was to provide a unique gathering place for Austin’s creative class, whether their medium was food, music, media, tech, or the visual arts.

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

P

RIVATE CLUBS ARE UBIQUITOUS IN METROPOLISES


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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

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One of the original walls from the Austin Lumber Company partitions off sections of the outdoor lounge.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y

It seemed more amenable to becoming a parking lot rather than the verdant urban oasis it is today. The lot was formerly home to the Austin Lumber Company. The site came with an old mill; an expansive lumber shed full of unused lumber; a rail spur; the shell of a courtyard; a 1930s two-story bungalow; and, courtesy of the cement company that used to be across the street, an ungodly expanse of concrete. It seemed more amenable to becoming a parking lot rather than the verdant urban oasis it is today. Now native trees and plants in steel planters surround the buildings and imbue the courtyard with an upscale backyard feel, replete with a hanging wicker swing. “The amount of green that is here now is magnitudes greater than what originally existed,” says Sky Currie, the project manager. Pershing is a collaboration between McClanahan, Currie, who is with Clayton & Little Architects, dwg. landscape architect Cassie Bergstrom Gowan, and interior designer Rachel Horn. They created a space that reflects Austin’s famous affinity for the outdoors and some of its history. Across from the lot, where there now stand a series of condos, there used to be a sign that read: “Welcome to Pershing, Texas.” Just as the space essentially named itself, the existing buildings and materials that were already there informed the design. The fluidity of the space relies on the seamless integration between exterior and interior, industrial and organic. To incorporate the bones and connect disparate pre-existing elements, “the landscaping component wasn’t the traditional linear process where the architecture comes first,” explains Currie. They happened simultaneously. tribeza.com

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Pershing has a variety of spaces for everything from holding board meetings to watching the Mayweather vs. McGregor fight.

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“We also tried to design a certain nimbleness to the space,” says Gowan. The former lumber shed was transformed into an event space that can be opened up for a party of 400 or, with scrims, turned into a venue as intimate as the adjoining courtyard, which features an outdoor bar and cooking area, a canopied, open air grassy lounge, and a long dining table with overhanging bistro lights for the perfect outdoor dinner party. It offers a pathway to the renovated bungalow. Throughout both spaces there are nooks and crannies that allow members to indulge in luxe privacy or enjoy a more social experience. Members come for an alternate work space, cocktail hours, dinner parties and late-night fetes. The interior of the bungalow has a kind of sexy vibe, with velvety fabrics, faux-furry pillows, deep blues, and animal-skin rugs. The first floor includes an expansive bar, the second a sleek kitchen, an exquisite dining room, and a panoply of oriental rugs, brass ornate mirrors, and elegant sitting areas, including one with a brown leather couch and opaque golden drapery that creates a harem effect when closed. tribeza.com

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L E F T: P H OTO G R A P H B Y DAG N Y P I A S E C K I

“Grown-up bohemian luxury was the thread of what this was supposed to feel like,” says Horn. “It’s Texan, European, and a little bit rock and roll.” It is a surprisingly cohesive aesthetic, one that reflects Austin’s growing diversity and warrants playful exploration. Its members are generally between the ages of 30 and 45 and, by regularly bringing in guest chefs, the club reflects a restaurant culture that didn’t exist fi"een years ago. Though the creative team eschewed a roo"op pool (a common private club amenity) for a more down to earth presence, over time, they plan on adding infrastructure and more amenities, such as a spa. Pershing captures some of the spirit of Austin rather than a ghost of the past. The closest they get to being a White Walker is the headstone they found on the property. “We still have it, but there wasn’t a dead person,” McClanahan promises. “Everyone looked, but nothing was buried here.” Pershing is very much alive and, for those initially worried about any cultural ramifications, it is a sigh of relief. To inquire about membership, email info@thePershing.com or visit their website thepershing.com.


Pershing has a full commercial kitchen in its gallery event space. tribeza.com

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Dark and Stormy

THE CREATIVE TEAM BEHIND NATIVE EXPLAINS HOW THEY TURNED A COTHRON’S SAFE AND LOCK INTO A POPULAR, UPSCALE HOSTEL BY TOBIN LEVY PHOTOGRAPHS BY CHASE DANIEL

WHEN TALKING ABOUT URBAN DEVELOPMENT, DUTCH ARCHITECT,

theorist and provocateur Rem Koolhaas noted that, “Change tends to fill people with this incredible fear. We are surrounded by crisis mongers who see the city in terms of decline.” But Koolhaas was speaking as an artist up for a challenge. “I try to find ways in which change can be mobilized to strengthen the original identity,” he explained. “It’s a weird combination of having faith and having no faith.” The team behind Native Experiential Hostel Bar & Kitchen exhibits a similar creative duality. In this “upscale hostel” the interiors are simultaneously, successfully polished and roughhewn, intimate and cavernous, broody and upbeat. “‘Dark and stormy’ was our design mantra,” says Michael Dickson, co-owner of Native along with Antonio Madrid and Will Steakley. Yet their general mien is anything but dark and stormy. Dickson and Madrid are man-

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aging partners of Icon Design + Build and worked on Native with interior designer Joel Mozersky, Jared Haas at collaborative design firm un.box studio, and Christian Helms from Helms Workshop. From the beginning, it was agreed upon that the approach to building “would be more about deconstruction rather than actual construction,” says Haas, who was initially presented with the existing brick and mortar (most recently Cothron’s Safe and Lock), the dark and stormy theme, and a vague idea for an eclectic community-oriented destination, possibly a boutique hotel. “Antonio and Michael are from Austin, hence the name, and they wanted Native to have a social component, to be for locals as well as travelers,” Haas says. They also wanted it to preserve Austin’s inclusive culture. Native consists of a two-story, 19th century limestone edifice and connecting mid-century brick warehouse, which have been transformed into a 12-


Tramp Artdetailing on the woodwork of Native Kitchen & Bar pays homage to the building’s 19th and early 20th century history.

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Fine communal and at home dining possibilities for those so inclined.

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MOZERSKY, TOO, WAS CAREFUL TO HIGHLIGHT THE GEMS THEY UNEARTHED IN THE RENOVATION PROCESS. IT’S WHAT HE REFERS TO AS HIS “DO NO HARM” APPROACH.

room hostel with a 4,000-square-foot communal space and adjacent bar and kitchen. An additional 14,000 square feet is being developed as a music and event venue. Further research into the building’s history proved serendipitous. The older portion originally housed travelers who’d come to Austin to work on the railroad. They’d work all day then sleep upstairs on makeshi" cots. Upstairs is now home to a “romper room” with plush sofas, ten beds and three bathrooms. The first floor of the space, which originally functioned as both a saloon and mercantile, now features the bar, restaurant, and a pop-up market where local artisans sell jewelry, clothes, and art. The history is integral to the design. Original plaster and ceilings remain exposed and confident. Haas celebrates this kind of authenticity and age-dependent beauty while incorporating modern elements. Mozersky, too, was careful to highlight the gems they unearthed in the renovation process. It’s what he refers to as his “do no harm” approach. Mozersky paid homage to the building’s history with Tramp Art detailing

on the woodwork. Tramp Art is a movement from the late 19th to the mid 20th century where shapes were whittled out of wood from discarded cigar boxes or palettes. In another ode to the vagabond, artist Adele Hauser created a map of Austin, dotting landmarks with Hobo Codes – simple graphics, drawn on houses or posts, once used by migrant train riders to communicate with the itinerants in their wake. For example, the outline of a cat means a compassion lady lives here. The name “Joe” with an arrow below it means someone named Joe went whichever way the arrow is pointing. Each thoughtful nod to what was is strengthened by something new and unexpected—be it a piece of art, an introduction, or a drove of B-boys doing their thing on a makeshi" dance floor. “Antonio put it best when he said this isn’t a club or bar or restaurant,” Dickson says. “It feels like you’re lounging in your buddy’s house all day and then a"er a few cocktails the music gets a little louder and eventually you start partying and the next morning you wake up and you’re still there.” It’s not that they want people to stay indefinitely, Dickson asserts. Though breakfast tacos are an option… tribeza.com

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THE

MODULAR MODE

The Kasita’s clever features and layout prove that creating space is more a matter of design than it is of square footage.

Instead of predicting the future, Kasita is manufacturing it BY PARKER YAMASAKI PHOTOGRAPHS BY WARREN CHANG AND LEONID FURMANSKY


Tom Asuquo is Kasita’s in-house civil engineer. He helps ensure that every Kasita arrives permitted at the state level.

F

IVE MONTHS AGO TOM ASUQUO VISITED AUSTIN

during SXSW and interviewed for a job with a modular home company called Kasita. He sat on the couch-cum-bed in the 352-square foot unit with Jeff Wilson, the company CEO and co-founder, and thought: “This is the future.” Asuquo got the position and moved to Austin. As a civil engineer he deals with building permits and municipal codes. He knows how many Kasitas can be stacked on top of one another, how much it costs to install an elevator, and how many parking spots per Kasita a city requires. He knows about handicap accessibility laws, soil foundations, energy restrictions, and who to rent a crane from to li" a Kasita over your house and into your backyard. So even though he’s not from Austin, he knows how to live in Austin. Visiting the Kasita showroom on East 4th Street the first thing one notices about “the future” is that it is small (though the company avoids using terminology associated with the popular “tiny” homes trend). It’s sleek, almost slippery. It’s got high ceilings, white finishes, and glass walls. The future has a woman’s voice and she responds to commands like “date night” and “cinema” by dimming the lights appropriately and revealing a hidden flat-screen TV from beneath the cabinetry in the living room. Amazon’s Echo comes standard in the Kasita. But what Asuquo really means when he says that “modular homes are the future” is that they are part of a widespread dream of urban planners, designers, architects, and engineers to shi" from construction to manufacturing. The Kasita is built at the company’s manufacturing headquarters in East Austin while people like Asuquo work on site planning and permitting, saving significant building times. The pieces are all there, the instructions come with the building, you just supply the lot. It’s like the difference between Lincoln Logs and Legos. tribeza.com

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The future is sleek, almost slippery. It’s got high ceilings, white finishes, and glass walls.

Every kitchen comes equipped with a two-burner electric stove, microwave, garbage disposal and refrigerator/freezer. They say the kitchen is the heart of the home, the Kasita kitchen is no exception.

Dason Whitsett, the principal architect at Kasita, agrees. “As an architect, we all have this dream of coming up with some scheme to manufacture buildings,” he says. “I became interested in Kasita specifically because they were not just thinking about manufactured homes as a design challenge. They were thinking of the challenge as extending into the supply chain, into the government organizations, into zoning laws, and financial planning. There are all of these entrenched assumptions in each field. They saw the vertical integration of that and hired experts in every field.” Whitsett’s point of entry into Kasita was through the insulation system. He was originally pulled into the project about a year and a half ago when Wilson asked him and his business partner to come check out some thermal factors of his new design. Whitsett and his partner figured out what needed to be done, and then started coming up with other ways to maximize efficiency, blend designs, and comply with city coding. For Whitsett, making tweaks here and there is an ongoing process. It presents one of the biggest internal challenges for the company, the one that propels them forward and also sets them back. They are trailblazers, but they seem unsure of where they are headed. The popular sentiment around the Kasita warehouse is also a perfectionist maxim: “It can be better.” “We’re never satisfied,” Asuquo says. “I thought I was smart; I got a master’s in civil engineering before I started working at Kasita, but I’m trying to prove myself every day here.” Whitsett mirrors this attitude. “The first bed we built was so problematic sometimes we would just describe how it worked to our viewers so we wouldn’t look like we were struggling to open it,” he laughs. Their current bed practically floats into the living room. Yet, Whitsett looks down at the table and says, “It can be better.” So far they have permitted five different designs, but the only ones that have made it past the manufacturing doors are the two that sit on the showroom lot at East 4th Street: the “Alpha,” the first model put into production, and the “Beta,” which is open for public viewing on Thursday mornings.

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Dason Whitsett, the principal architect at Kasita, has big dreams for modular structures.


The sofa slides out into the living room and becomes a queen-size bed.

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Every appliance has been carefully considered for the Kasita. The chrome shower head, for example, is the Vero by Delta, chosen for its superior quality and not just for its space-age look.

The lifted glass front of the Kasita is called “the Cube.” The company describes it as “a workspace, lounge area, or a place to fit in a little morning yoga.”

Nonetheless, the company already has 134 orders from individual buyers and 124 orders from developers—people interested in building hotels, office buildings, even suburbs—that range from 20 to 300 units per order. A developer in San Diego, for example, just signed a contract for a fi"een-story Kasita hotel. A single unit (ADU, as they refer to them around the office) costs $139,000; multiple units come at a discounted $100,000 each. With so many orders placed and not a single model out in the world, it might seem like the company is getting ahead of itself. “It’s all hands on deck right now,” Asuquo confirms, shi"ing his attention from our conversation in the Kasita kitchen to a woman looking for ways to use her “large lot,” to a group of four curious Austin police officers who have just entered the Kasita. He spins gracefully from interview to showman, and from answering e-mails on his iPad to quieting an incoming call from his mother. (“I’m not that guy,” he says, “but I just talked to her this morning.”) It’s not the role you would imagine the archetypal engineer to jump all over, but he hardly seems out of his element. Whitsett says a new model in the back of their warehouse, “Charlie,” should be ready in a couple of weeks. “We can’t help it,” Asuquo says about their continuous efforts to improve the Kasita before diving into a list of international orders. “Australia e-mailed me yesterday,” he says. “There’s a wait and they know it, but most want to get the ball rolling anyways.” So yes, the customers are eager. The developers are dreaming big. And little Kasita, in East Austin, is gearing up for its big debut. tribeza.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

HUGH JEFFERSON RANDOLPH ARCHITECTS Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects believes that each and every project should tell a story. The story of the client. The story of the place. The story of collaboration. An award-winning, full service firm with an eclectic range of work, we take great pride in creating special places.

LA RUE ARCHITECTS

Embracing the notion that a building is an extension of its surroundings and reflects the character of its occupants, LaRue Architects creates custom residences in sync with the progressive spirit of Austin. Our diverse team members work collaboratively with our clients on a design process that is practical, yet highly creative.

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ARCHITECT AND BUILDER GUIDE There are a lot of questions that go into building a home. Where should this go? What does this do? What happens when I press‌? Some answers are best left to the experts. Here we have a selection of award-winning architects and designers who have built trust and innovation into the structures of their own companies. These are the experts who can answer all of your home-building questions, even ones you didn’t know you had.


LAKE I FLATO

Since its founding in 1984, Lake|Flato has designed buildings that respond to the culture and climate of each unique place. We believe in creating environments that enrich communities and nurture life through our work. We collaborate with our clients to create buildings that are tactile and modern, environmentally responsible and authentic, artful and crafted.

BARLEY|PFEIFFER ARCHITECTURE

At Barley|Pfeiffer Architecture we practice green by design. Our buildings are site-specific and emphasize systems integration, because we believe that 90% of effective high-performance building decisions happen in the first 10% of the design process. We advocate living well while living green!

MICHAEL HSU OFFICE OF ARCHITECTURE

Michael Hsu Office of Architecture is a nationwide, award-winning architecture and interior design firm that calls Austin home. A proud recipient of the 2016 AIA Austin Firm of the Year Award, our diverse portfolio ranges from design-driven residences to urban-scale developments. We continually strive to create an emotional connection between the space and the user.

TREEHOUSE

TreeHouse knows remodeling your home is intimidating, which is why we offer our free design services. Yup. It’s free. Our designers walk with you through your remodel, from idea to install, so you can focus on the fun parts. Stop by TreeHouse or visit us online to get started. tribeza.com

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TWIST TOURS Central Texas Real Estate Marketing

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A Christmas Affair

The Palmer Events Center | November 15-19, 2017 SHOPPING & EXCITING EVENTS TO KICK OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON: PREVIEW PARTY & SHOPPING | NOVEMBER 15 BRUNCH | NOVEMBER 16 SANTA PARTIES | NOVEMBER 17-19 EARLY SHOPPING & CHAMPAGNE | NOVEMBER 18 TEEN & TWEEN FASHION SHOW | NOVEMBER 18

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LIFE + STYLE HOW WE LIVE RIGHT NOW

Through their “experience” company, DSN X MFG, Brian Simpson and Scott Starr get to combine their interest in digital technology with a love for working with their hands. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEAH MUSE

LO C A L LOV E

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LOC AL LOVE | LIFE + ST YLE

LOCAL LOVE SOMETIMES BUILDING SOMETHING NEW REQUIRES A LIT TLE OUT OF THE BOX THINKING. WE ASKED SOME LOCAL ARCHITECTS TO SHARE SOME OF THE MORE UNIQUE FE ATURES THEY’ VE DESIGNED.

FEATURE:

HANGING BED THE STORY: The homeowners asked for a lounging spot on their master screen porch, so we created this hanging bed. Designed as a steel-supported wooden cradle, it is large enough for sleeping or sitting up with a book. To hang it from the sloped structure, we created a steel bracket attached to the rafters allowing all suspension points of the bed to be in the same plane. The hanging bed is one of the homeowners’ favorite features in the house. ARCHITECT: FURMAN + KEIL ARCHITECTS

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H A N G I N G B E D P H OTO G R A P H B Y PA U L B A R DAG J Y

Compiled By Nicole Beckley and Holly Cowart


FEATURE:

INDOOR SLIDE THE STORY: This

slide is a multipurpose addition to the house. It serves as a fun way for the kids to get to the first floor and is a convenient laundry chute. The slide access also provides a light well to the utility room below. The piece was a custom order from a company located in Indiana and was site finished.

FEATURE:

BATHING PORCH THE STORY: Before

moving to Texas, my wife dreamed of an outdoor shower to complete her times in the garden and hot sun. Without a convenient place for an outdoor shower, we converted our 1916 bungalow’s sleeping porch, just off our bedroom, into her “bathing porch.” Opening narrow windows on each end of a symmetrical projecting bay window brings in nature’s delight.

ARCHITECT: TIM BROWN ARCHITECTURE

N I C K D E AV E R B AT H I N G P O R C H P H OTO G R A P H B Y W H I T P R E S TO N ; F LOAT I N G S E CO N D F LO O R P H OTO G R A P H B Y C H A R L E S DAV I S S M I T H ; I N D O O R S L I D E P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

ARCHITECT: NICK DEAVER

FEATURE:

FLOATING SECOND FLOOR, DOUBLING AS A CARPORT THE STORY: Our

clients are both race car drivers, which is how they met. They wanted to build a house that allowed them to celebrate their shared passion, the thing that connected them in the first place. Our challenge was to design a compact urban living space that doesn’t feel small and also connects to the car level. We created a floating second floor volume that can be shifted forward to allow for double-height views into the garage space at the back, while acting as an everyday carport beneath the hovering bed chamber in the front. The living space feels light and airy by being visually expansive to the adjacent exterior roof deck, as well as to the sky above. ARCHITECT: MATT FAJKUS ARCHITECTURE

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LOC AL LOVE | LIFE + ST YLE

FEATURE:

CUSTOM STEEL AND WOOD LED LIGHTED GLASS ART DISPLAY CASE THE STORY: The

home owner is a collector of modern glass art; the goal was to create a display case that would allow the viewer to experience the art three-dimensionally. The real challenge was to create a “floating” steel display case that would support the glass art, and also light each piece of art in a desirable way, without obtrusive electrical wires. We collaborated with a custom steel fabricator to design a unique display case — a piece of art in and of itself. ARCHITECT: CDK ARCHITECTS

THE STORY: A

client came to us wanting a tennis court, but their backyard was too narrow. I suggested that we spin the court 90 degrees and hang it off the side of the cliff. The result makes for a more exhilarating game of tennis than usual. The only downside is that balls hit over the fence are gone for good. ARCHITECT: WINN WITTMAN OF WINN WITTMAN ARCHITECTURE

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C U S TO M S T E E L A N D W O O D L E D L I G H T E D G L A S S A R T D I S P L AY C A S E P H OTO G R A P H B Y J O N B O L D E N ; T E N N I S CO U R T P H OTO G R A P H B Y S E A N B R E C H T

FEATURE:

TENNIS COURT HANGING OFF THE SIDE OF A CLIFF


FEATURE:

SOLID TWO-FOOT WIDE LIMESTONE WALLS THE STORY: The

use of solid stacked limestone walls was a primary feature of a house we designed and built. The main challenge was building the massive walls into the sloped site and then weaving the interior spaces of the house between and through them. ARCHITECT: BERCY CHEN STUDIO

FEATURE:

THE TRANSFORMER

S O L I D T W O - F O OT W I D E L I M E S TO N E WA L L S P H OTO G R A P H B Y J O S H U A M AC K L E Y ; T H E T R A N S F O R M E R P H OTO G R A P H B Y M J N E A L

THE STORY: The

client’s request was to turn the single car garage into a new playroom and “open it up” as much as possible, incorporating the side yard into usable area that has a direct relationship with the house. The front wall and corner pivot to open, the side wall folds down to become a deck, and the small pivot window becomes a child’s door and window seat. The folding deck also becomes the “front porch,” providing the possibility for interaction with one’s neighbors as they pass by. ARCHITECT: MJ NEAL ARCHITECTS

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

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Creators of COOL HOW DSN X MFG BUILDS E XPERIENCES

By Nicole Beckley Photographs by Leah Muse

M

AYBE YOU POSTED A PIC ON INSTAGR AM IN FRONT

Brian Simpson and Scott Starr of DSN x MFG. It’s part idea hub, part design house, and part fabrication shop.

of the Hollywood sign-inspired ACL logo during the 2016 Austin City Limits festival. Or selfied at this year’s SXSW before catching a catnap at the Casper mattress experience. If you did, you’re already aware of some of the work of DSN x MFG, the group behind these made-for-social-media experiences. “At the core of who we are, we’re an experience company, but it manifests itself in a lot of different ways,” explains Brian Simpson, DSN x MFG’s CEO. Social sharing is just one piece. Started by Simpson in 2014, DSN x MFG is something of an idea hub, design house, and fabrication shop rolled into one. With a background in digital technology, Simpson wanted to create a company capable of generating ideas and bringing them to life – whether it be physically building a pop-up shop or doing the research and design work to maximize the space inside a Kasita, the sub-400 square foot home. “There’s such a visual component to what we do, social media just lends a natural fit for us,” Simpson explains. “And that’s the main reason most of our clients come to us too, because they’re looking for social media content as well.” In a less photo-focused, technologically connected age, DSN x MFG’s work might have only been known behind the scenes. In today’s era, a lot of people find them through Instagram—including Facebook, which contracted them to build a “tiny office” in their Austin space, complete with small chairs, a white board, and classic white ceiling tiles. “There’s an employee at Facebook Austin who had been following us on Instagram; we found this out while we were installing it,” Simpson says, “They reached out to us, per her recommendation, and the next thing you know we’re building a tiny office for Facebook.” Part of DSN x MFG’s visual allure is their retro, get-your-hands-dirty style. “I think everyone who works with us, and I think this is indicative of anyone who does anything with their hands, has an old soul; I know I do,” Simpson says. He points to his team’s fascination with classic cars—matribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

With normal architecture, you may work on the design, or on the logistics of the piece or the budget, and then it gets handed off to someone else and you don’t get to have that satisfaction of seeing the whole process through,” Starr says, “I love the whole process, the end to end of it.”

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The DSN x MFG team sees projects through, from idea to implementation, from their multifunctional facility on South Congress.

chines that can be taken apart, fixed, put back together. Parked outside their 10,000-square foot facility off South Congress is their iconic dark grey ’58 Ford pickup truck, emblazoned with their simple white logo, and inside one of their large bays is a cream ’74 Volvo. “We have an appreciation for things that are built with your hands,” Simpson says, noting his preferred ride, a ’72 Scout. Their offices are part design space—with the requisite computers and meeting room, part show room, and part creation space—with a laser cutter, CNC machine, and metal and wood shop areas. In the shop music pumps and a pallet jack roams the floor below a hanging Texas flag. While their core team is six full-time employees, this spring they joined a collective with four digitally-focused firms to expand their capabilities. “Blending the digital-physical is our wheelhouse; that’s really what we want to be focused on,” says Scott Starr, DSN x MFG’s general manager. Starr came to the team with experience as an architect and fabricator, attracted to the quick pace of production and the ability to work on each part of a project’s creation. “With normal architecture, you may work on the design, or on the logistics of the piece or the budget, and then it gets

handed off to someone else and you don’t get to have that satisfaction of seeing the whole process through,” Starr says, “I love the whole process, the end to end of it.” Projects like the tiny Facebook office or the Tiny Texas Embassy mobile retail space, built for No. Four St. James, prove especially gratifying. “There’s such a novelty to just changing the scale of something, even though it’s a very traditional design,” Starr says. “Just by making this very boring corporate-looking office tiny, it makes it fun and interesting and silly and people want to take pictures of it and crawl inside of it.” As for what’s coming next, DSN x MFG is pushing the frontier of physical spaces, integrating interactive games, virtual reality and digital projections. This way their constructions can be more fully immersive experiences. “This company [DSN x MFG] is a culmination of me kind of finding my own self,” Simpson says. “I went through the digital technology side of things and always had a yearning to do something with my hands. All the knowledge I had learned through working with brands in a digital format, I’ve been able to apply that to physical spaces to kind of complete the loop of a holistic experience.” tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK | LIFE + STYLE

10,000 and Counting AUSTIN-MADE BUNTING COWHIDE RUGS ARE MAKING THEIR MARK By M. M. Adjarian

A

USTIN RUG DESIGNER KYLE

Bunting’s father loved to work with his hands. In his Dallas garage, Jim Bunting experimented with different ways of putting together pieces of cowhide without stitching. By the late ‘70s, he had created the first seamless cowhide rug. Word of his singularly beautiful work spread. Soon the elder Bunting received commissions to create one-of-a-kind rugs, tabletops, wall hangings and other home décor pieces, all made from cowhide. Twenty-five years later, his entrepreneur son Kyle asked Jim for his tools so he could take over the business. “I’d caught the design bug and was doing a lot of interior design and decorative work in real estate,” Kyle explains. “Then one night, I woke with an idea to take what Dad had done and do things a little differently.” Sixteen years later Kyle Bunting has completely transformed the pastime that, according to family legend, put him and his brother through The University of Texas. Bunting rugs are now at the heart of a global brand whose adherents include Kim Kardashian, Kris Jenner and Vogue. Yet Kyle has remained adamant that his company remain local. “Any other company that makes hide rugs might put the pieces together in Argentina or Italy,” he says. “We do it here in Austin.”

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Part of the company’s international appeal stems from Bunting’s commitment to collaborating with designers and artists from around the world. This year, the company has worked with such luminaries as Nigerian-born multi-media artist Abidemi, New York-based interior designer Amy Lau and L.A. street artist Spencer Mar Guilburt. Three collections have emerged from these collaborations. Element, created with Abidemi, expresses the theme of unity in chaos. Prisma, created with Lau, hearkens back to the Op Art movement of the 1960s. A third in-progress collection, This Means Mar, highlights Guilburt’s bold color schemes and exuberant curves. The rugs themselves are all made from imported, premium quality hair-on-leather cowhides. The colors range from naturally occurring browns, whites and blacks to specially dyed versions prepared by master tanners in Italy. To date Kyle Bunting and his team of artisans have created more than 10,000 opulently bespoke rugs. Yet despite the high volume of production, Kyle still sees his company as a studio that seeks to honor Jim Bunting’s original vision. “Custom work is about introducing something new and unique that the world has never seen before,” he says, the pride in his voice as Texan as his blue jean shirt.

Kyle Bunting’s rugs have drawn celebrity attention and international collaboration, but the heart and soul of his company remains happily at home in Austin.

T HE RUGS T HEMSELV ES A R E A LL M A DE FROM IMPORT ED, PR EMI UM QUA LIT Y H A IR-

ON-LE AT HER COW HIDES .

T HE COLOR S R A NGE FROM

NAT U R A LLY OCCU R R ING BROW NS , W HIT ES A N D BL ACK S TO SPECI A LLY DY ED V ER SIONS PR EPA R ED BY M A ST ER TA N N ER S IN ITA LY.


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www.eswealth.com | 512.250.2277 Jenny Fleming, CPA

SOMETHING FOR

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Shop our cutting-edge apparel, unique accessories and gifts, as well as, our fabulous jewels!

6317 Bee Cave Road #210 Austin, TX 78746

luxroxboutique.com

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FOOD + THOUGHT A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON OUR LOCAL DINING SCENE

The vintage decor, creative cocktail list, and Italian-style apertivos will make you forget that you’re sitting in an old parking garage, which is exactly where the aptly named Garage Bar is located. PHOTOGRAPH BY MICA MCCOOK

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

The bar was designed by Mickie Spencer and is adorned by creations from head chef, Tim Lane, and lead bartender, Jayson Black.

“W

HERE ARE YOU TAKING ME?” MY HUSBAND GROUSED,

Garage Cocktail Bar PARK YOURSELF AT THIS COVERT SPE AKE ASY FOR KILLER DRINKS AND FOOD By Karen Spezia Photographs by Mica McCook

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as we haplessly scoured a downtown block for our destination. I’d been justly warned that Garage Cocktail Bar was hard to find, but just as we’d lost hope, a discreet neon sign beckoned from the bowels of a high-rise parking garage. We entered frustrated and weary, but hours later, departed delighted and thankful that we’d persevered in discovering one of Austin’s coolest covert bars. In a city rife with trendy cocktail bars, Garage has trumped them all with true Austin weirdness: it’s in a parking garage. Seriously, it’s tucked beneath a downtown office building in an old parking attendant office. The snug space has been transformed into a stylish speakeasy that’s both cozy and airy, creating a delightful oasis of superior craft cocktails and outstanding Italian-inspired nibbles. It ain’t just any old garage: the office tower above it is historic and iconic. When it opened in 1954, the American National Bank Building was a modernist marvel. Its Mid-Century Modern lobby was designed by famed archi-


Black has ensured that there is something for everyone behind the bar, whether you’re out to try something new or settling in for a good, old-fashioned whiskey.

BU T J UST BEN E AT H T HE PA R K ING R A MP R EM A IN ED A DINGY VAC A N T VA LET OFFICE CONSIDER ED NON-R EN TA BLE . T H AT IS , U N T IL A T R IO OF IN V ESTOR S C A ME A LONG W HO FOU N D INSPIR AT ION A N D POT EN T I A L IN T HE U N USUA L SPACE , A N D GA R AGE COCK TA IL BA R WA S BOR N.

tect, furniture designer, and Mies van der Rohe protégé Florence Knoll. It featured Austin’s first escalators and a large-scale mural by artist Seymour Fogel, a disciple of Diego Rivera. It boasted Austin’s first motor bank and an innovative double helix-shaped parking ramp—a nod to the DNA molecule—that housed the cars and the valet parking office. In 2008, it was renamed the McGarrah Jessee Building and restored to its original glory by McKinney York Architects, garnering a Best American Architecture Award. But just beneath the parking ramp remained a dingy vacant valet office considered non-rentable. That is, until a trio of investors came along who found inspiration and potential in the unusual space, and Garage Cocktail Bar was born. The space maintains much of its industrial character with high, exposed ceilings and gray concrete walls. Local legend Mickie Spencer (Eberly, East Side Show Room, et al.) embellished the space with dazzling custom-made decor. She created a centerpiece circular bar that mimics the curves of the spiral parking ramp, its marble countertop under lit from below and bathed in soft light from the transom windows above. Behind the bar, a dark and sultry lounge area is illuminated by flickering votives and intricate light fixtures handmade by Spencer. Buttery-soft leather banquettes hug the walls, accented by sleek ottomans and marble tables. Vintage green subway tiles line the entrance and bar. And a vintage Rega RP3 turntable sets the mood by spinning soul-funk vinyl throughout the night. But all this cool vintage history and modern style means little if the drinks and food aren’t good. But they are. They are very, very good. The folks behind Garage’s bar and stove are just as passionate about their artistry as its architects and designers. Lead bartender Jayson Black is a storyteller, creating original libations — like the Paintbrush, the Coachwhip, and my favorite, the Evangelist — whose ingredients all seem to have a history. He also mixes perfect classics, like Daiquiris, Old Fashioneds, and a riff on the Sazarac called a Junior Junior. And his whiskey list will blow your mind. Chef Tim Lane’s food is a revelation. His small menu of shared snacks is modeled after the Italian apertivo, the classic evening ritual of drinks and nibbles. Lane knows Italian food: he cooked in Italy for over a decade, including Rome’s Michelin starred Glass Hostaria, and also spent time at New York’s highly acclaimed wd~50 and Austin’s own Asti Trattoria. His clever menu features regional Italian flavors and changes with the seasons. Recently, we swooned over tender hand-pulled mozzarella with tomatoes; gobbled up crispy rice suppli croquettes with savory stuffing; and fought over the last crunchy cube of eggplant, dressed with a spectacular arabiata sauce. From its quirky location to its chic décor and knockout drinks and snacks, Garage will surprise and delight you. Everyone involved is zealously dedicated to their craft, which puts Garage a notch above – or in this case, below – everyone else in town. GARAGE 503 COLORADO ST. (512) 369-3490 | GARAGETX.COM

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NEW IN TOWN | FOOD + THOUGHT

A Gateway to Downtown FAREGROUND AT ONE ELEVEN OFFERS A GLIMPSE INTO AUSTIN’S FUTURE

A functional piece of art called the Nimbus provides essential shade to the tables below.

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A L L P H OTO G R A P H S CO U R T E S Y O F D W G

By Joleen Jernigan


F

OR YEARS, THE MANTRA OF THE DOWNTOWN AUSTIN ALLIANCE

has been “as downtown goes, so goes the rest of the city.” Daniel Woodroffe, the president and founder of landscape architecture firm dwg., has taken this mantra to heart. In collaboration with Cousins Properties, the Michael Hsu Office of Architecture and the ELM Restaurant Group, Woodroffe and his team have been working hard to convert the One Eleven building and its sunken smoking patio into one of Austin’s most forward-thinking, sustainable, and delightful spaces. With its unique stair-stepped shape, the One Eleven building on Congress Avenue has been a prominent fixture of downtown’s skyline since it was built in 1987. However, Woodroffe, Hsu, and co. saw a building with far greater potential and set forth to create the indoor-outdoor food hall and gathering place that opens this month. Their idea was to not just update, but transform One Eleven in line with Austin’s master plan of repositioning Congress as a modern-day Main THE FAREGROUND FOOD HALL: Street. “Projects on Congress Ave. have, I believe, COMING SOON! a moral obligation to be really exceptional. It’s the The ELM Restaurant Group is positioning Fareground at One Eleven postcard image of Austin,” Woodroffe says. “We to be an unparalleled food mecca in the heart of the city with six see Fareground at One Eleven as the new gatediverse vendors to open this fall: Easy Tiger, one of their own ventures; way to downtown, bringing food, art, culture, and Antonelli’s Cheese Shop; Contigo Fareground; Dai Due Taquería, 100% ADA accessibility to this previously hidden emphasizing wild game and fish tacos in homemade tortillas; Henbit jewel in our city.” & Honeybit, the brainchild of the Emmer & Rye team; and Ni-Kome, The immediate visual appeal of the plaza and combining the strengths of Kome Sushi Kitchen and Daruma Ramen. grounds, adorned with thoughtfully designed gardens, beckons natives and tourists alike to explore and lounge comfortably. A fountain called Cloudscape stands tall above the plaza, emitting an actual cloud created with condensation collected from the air conditioning units inside One Eleven. Tables in the plaza receive essential shade from another piece of functional art called Nimbus, a nod to the concepts of hydrology that the designers studied during Cloudscape’s creation. To further their goals of being environmentally astute, their sprawling lawn is made of synthetic grass that requires no water and stays green year-round. Woodroffe says we are experiencing a renaissance in landscape architecture, as we return to a time when great cities were built from the ground up and people clamored around a vibrant plaza, meeting for a casual chat or to make a business deal. “People want to hang out and conduct meetings outside despite our summer heat of the sun,” Woodroffe says. “They want that outdoor experience. That’s what we stand for, what I founded my firm on. We are passionate about the urban architectural landscape and believe that design excellence can be an engine for change.” Fareground is the latest of a series of downtown projects that Woodroffe and dwg. have worked on together. Other projects include the Royal Blue pocket park, the Yeti patio, and the rooftop terrace at 816 Congress. “We are building a reputation of not settling for just okay,” Woodroffe explains. “Downtown is a direct reflection of what the rest of the city needs to do, and it’s starting to happen.”

Daniel Woodroffe is the president and founder of dwg.

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

3663 Bee Caves Rd. West Lake Hills, TX 78746

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch and

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for their happy hour to share

burgers, all-day breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

BRIBERY BAKERY

ALCOMAR 1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161 Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner or weekend brunch, and start your visit with blood orange margarita and the crab

2013 Wells Branch Pkwy. #109 | (512) 531 9832 1900 Simond Ave. #300 | (512) 297 2720 Pastry Chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confections. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine and coffee.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

and guacamole.

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR 319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting;

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas,

perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino) and locally-sourced, seasonally inspired

ASTI TRATTORIA

chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails,

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

local beers on tap and boutique wines from around

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

the world.

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey and goat cheese panna cotta.

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

BARLEY SWINE

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the f lavors of her

sharing with small plates made from locally-sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

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FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

Nothing compliments the bold flavors of traditional Interior Mexican cuisine like a superb Premium Tequila or Mezcal. Special care is taken not only with making the selections, but they’re also served to you in a vessel most appropriate for your ultimate exerience of that spirit.

culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce! Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert, alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029 Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamon serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some sangria and enjoy the bites.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

EASY TIGER

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and sweet

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

EL ALMA

EPICERIE

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin

sensibilities by Thomas Keller-trained Chef Sarah

dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoy-

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

ing delicious specialized drinks outside for their everyday

here for a bite on Sundays!

3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

LAS PALOMAS

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 101

3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

Small, neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior

locally-sourced food with an international twist at reason-

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for dollar oysters.

setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh FREEDMEN’S

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas!

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953 Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

CAFÉ JOSIE 1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226 Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Cafe Josie, which offers guests a prix fixe allyou-can-eat dining experience. The a la carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061 South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place for weekend brunching. Their spin on the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

the desserts and even their cocktail offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue

2nd Street: 238 W 2nd St | 512.472.9463 Domain: 11410 Century Oaks | 512.339.9463

on a charming outdoor patio.

CRUaWINEbar.com

GERALDINE’S

CRU’s wildly popular Ahi Tartare is the perfect compliment to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine preservation system and temperature control ensure optimal taste and appreciation. Toast to Summer at CRU.

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755 Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy Executive Chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar manager Jen Keyser. tribeza.com

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GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

OLAMAIE

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides mod-

Rustic, continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and

Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek

ern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mortadella

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with

egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry thyme cocktail.

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary con-

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on their patio

cepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

trendy goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

favor and order the biscuits (they’re worth every delectable

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

LA BARBECUE

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the east side.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbe-

PIEOUS

whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

cue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trail-

12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041

er, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up

Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer,

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combi-

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

L’ESTELLE HOUSE 88 1/2 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588 This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional French and Southern cuisine. Think late night Parisian-style burgers with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for Sunday brunch.

L’OCA D’ORO

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876 Located in the Mueller development, Chef Fiore Tedesco delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy impressive cocktails, wine and a great craft beer selection.

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 215 8972

bite).

nation of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket pizza is a crowd favorite and a must-try.

REBEL PIZZA BAR 7858 Shoal Creek Blvd. | (512) 457 5757 Along with its unique street art interiors, Rebel Pizza Bar delivers updated takes on bar classics including hot wings and waff le fries. But the pizza is the real star of this cozy restaurant, like the Get Up Stand Up pie that packs a powerhouse of flavors that will leave you jostling for the last slice.

SALTY SOW 1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensibili-

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

ty to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitchen and

a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu,

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

at the counter.

heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for

from Pastry Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

late-night noshing.

NAU’S ENFIELD DRUG

JEFFREY’S

1115 West Lynn St. | (512) 476 1221

SNOOZE

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

An Austin institution since 1951, this all-American soda

3800 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 428 8444

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

fountain within an antiquated drug store gives guests an

This Denver original serves up brunch classics with a

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

unmatched experience founded on tradition. The food is

creative twist seven days a week, with two locations on either

the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but welcom-

simple and classic, rivaled only by the scrumptious shakes

end of Lamar. With friendly service in an updated

ing atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

and hand mixed old-fashioned sodas.

diner atmosphere, Snooze is sure to start your day off right.

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“ clothes V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

mean nothing until someone

lives in them.”

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options. VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town.

Along with an inviting ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold and most importantly

~MA RC JACO B S

delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

WINEBELLY 6705 Hwy 290 # 503 | (512) 584 808 3016 Guadalupe St. Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193 Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro maintains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors.

9 LOCATIONS AROUND AUSTIN NOW AT DOMAIN NORTHSIDE


Dick Clark

1944 – 2017 A modern classic that will be missed.

Austin 115 W. 8th St. 512.480.0436 Dallas 1617 Hi Line Dr. Ste. 100 214.748.9838 scottcooner.com


A L O O K B E H I N D 5…5

Remembering Legendary Austin Architect Dick Clark By Emy Cies

A

DICK CLARK HOME IS INSTANTLY RECOGNIZABLE FOR ITS

warmth and introspection, emphasis on natural beauty and timeless design. Clark, who passed away on August 8 at 72, is remembered as a visionary: an incredible architect, friend, and mentor who shaped the look of Austin and planted the seeds for the culture of design and creative professionalism the city is renowned for today. The father of the Austin’s modern architecture movement left behind a huge legacy of remarkable homes and award-winning restaurants and landmark local bars. Dick Clark + Associates was founded in 1979 and is responsible for numerous influential projects that transformed the Warehouse District and Hill Country neighborhoods. Hangar Lounge, Rain on 4th, Key Bar, Lonesome Dove, and the South Congress Hotel are among many other accomplishments that are now integral to the city fabric. “Dick was always a visionary,” says Sherry Matthews, Clark’s companion and partner of 35 years. “He was very involved in the person he was designing for, always thinking of the little things that would fit their personality.” Known as the life of the party, Clark loved designing social spaces, sketching ideas on cocktail napkins with a laugh that roared across the room. His restaurants and homes across the city are an extension of who he was as a person: contemporary, magnetic, and genuine. “He didn’t intend to change Austin,” said Larry Speck, long-time friend, professor and former dean of the School of Architecture at the University of Texas. “But there was a tenor to what he did, capturing the spirit of this laid-back city and creating a contagious vibe that took over.” Clark became known for investing his talents in people, a huge part of his legacy relied on mentoring young architects. His office has served as a launching pad for other notable Austin architects — Michael Hsu, Matt Garcia, Jamie Chioco — who have carved their own paths but carry that “Clark quality” in their work. “Dick had an undeniable influence but he let you spread your wings and gave you the opportunity to be your own architect,” said Mark Vornberg, protégé and now CEO of Dick Clark + Associates. “His hand in the evolution of Austin made it a better place by leading by example and we’ll keep pushing his legacy forward.”

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LONDON GREY RUGS

3001 PALM WAY STE. B | AUSTIN, TEXAS 78758 | DOMAIN NORTHSIDE 512-839-8999 | LONDONGREYRUGS.COM


TRIBEZA October 2017  

The Architecture Issue No. 194