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ARTIST STUDIOS

Get the scoop on the can’t miss events

COLLEC TO R S

A peak inside art-filled homes

N O. 195 | A R T S

Inspiring spaces built for creating

AUSTIN ART MONTH

16 YEARS


“Hurricane Lamp” in bright chrome and glass by famed Danish artist and designer, Bjørn Wiinblad. Made in Denmark for Rosendahl Design Group and available locally at Copenhagen.

Large 23.5”

$199

Medium 19.5”

$189

Small 15.5”

$169

Austin 2236 West Braker Lane 512.451.1233 San Antonio 18603 Blanco Road 210.545.4366

www.CopenhagenLiving.com

contemporary furniture & accessories


GOTTESMAN RESIDENTIAL

2 4 2 2 Wo o l d r i d g e

1 6 0 9 We s t o v e r

1301 Meriden Lane

gottesmanresidential.com

|

512.451.2422

707 Norwalk

2403 Hatley Drive


300 Summit Loop

3 4 0 9 F o o t h i l l Te r r a c e

4 5 0 1 We s t l a k e D r i v e # 2 0

2206 Bonita

3907 Prentice Lane

R E A L E S TAT E


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I ’ M L IK E AUSTIN W E ATHER .

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theGardenRoom

1601 W. 38th Street at Kerbey Lane Austin, Texas ~ 512-458-5407 Monday through Saturday 10:00am -

5:30pm

gardenroomboutique.com

follow us on instagram @gardenroomatx


Come Visit Us. Shop our showroom tucked away just one mile east of South Congress at 2090 Woodward Street. Or visit us online to see what’s new, find inspiration and browse our digital catalog. Exclusively in Austin. FOURHANDSHOME.COM


“Iris”

Debuting at the Smithsonian Natural History Museum - Early 2018

© 2017 Patent #6594901 | zoltandavid.com | 512•372•8888 | Austin, Texas


M O T O R I Z A T I O N

&

A U T O M A T I O N

S P E C I A L I S T S

interior motorized solar screens

SOLAR SCREENS

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AW N I N G S

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ROLLING SHUTTERS

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INTERIOR SHADES

tel.

512.402.0990

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INSECT SCREENS

11813 Bee Caves Rd.

www.txsunandshade.com Showroom Hours: 10-5 M-F & 10-2 Sat.


GIVE THE

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Cannot be combined with other offers or specials. Based on availability. Valid Sunday through Friday (excludes Saturdays) through December 31, 2017.

RELAX ATION.

Make it a holiday season to remember with special offers on two treatments at Omni Barton Creek Resort & Spa’s Three Springs Spa. Renew your senses with a Peppermint Pedicure complete with peppermint essential oils and a lower leg sugar scrub, or enjoy the Texas Two Step which features an exfoliating dry scrub followed by a rejuvenating massage.

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CO N T E N T S | F E AT U R E S

NOVEMBER

A SPACE TO CREATE A look inside the studios of four creatives we love

P. 48 ART DEALERS A glimpse inside the business of art

P. 54 THE COLLECTORS Find out what four tastemakers with great style are collecting now

P. 62

Musician and collector Dan Dyer at home in his Cedar Creek studio; Photography by Dagny Piasecki

ON THE COVER Artist, Avalon McKenzie, in her Hyde Park studio. Photography by Wynn Myers

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CO N T E N T S | DE PA RT M E N TS

Social Hour p. 20 Tribeza Style Week Recap p. 26

Life + Style LOC A L LOV E p. 72

S T Y LE PRO FI LE p. 74

Community + Culture PROFILE p. 32 KRISTIN ’S COLUMN p. 35 TRIBEZ A TALK p. 38

72 74 Food + Thought

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K AREN ’S PICK p. 82

DINING GUIDE p. 84

Arts + Happenings

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT CALENDARS p. 42

82

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT p. 44 EVENT PICK p. 46

44 14 NOVEMBER 2017 |

A Look Behind !…! p. 88 tribeza.com

William Eggleston Untitled, from the Los Alamos Portfolio, 1965-74


Old Enfield 1625Watchhill.com Private Listing | $2,450,000

Barton Creek 4017VeranoDr.com $3,695,000

Old Enfield 2307Windsor.com Private Listing | $4,175,000

West Lake Hills 517Buckeye.com Private Listing | $6,495,000

West Lake Hills 1404WildcatHollow.com Private Listing | $6,950,000

West Lake Hills MilburnEstate.com Private Listing | $10,000,000

Global Connections. Local Expertise. World Class Marketing. Kumara Wilcoxon

West Lake Hills 513KonstantyCir.com $3,750,000

Global Real Estate Advisor #1 Producer Company-Wide 512.423.5035 Kumara@sothebysrealty.com Pemberton KumaraWilcoxon.com

2700OakhurstAve.com Private Listing | $3,950,000


PUBLISHER'S LETTER

T

HIS MONTH’S ARTS EDITION COULD NOT BE TIMELIER, SINCE THIS NOVEMBER

also marks the official Art Month for Austin. We have highlighted many of the arts events that are happening across the city throughout this issue, as well people and places making their mark in Austin’s thriving art scene. Take a peek inside artists’ studios, get tips from them on how to design a creative space of your own, hear from art collectors on who they are collecting now, find out how local art dealers select the right art for their clients’ homes, and more. And then we also preview what we deem

as one of the most exciting things happening in the city right now: the opening of the new Austin Central Library. It’s stunning, so run, don’t walk, to see it. We also look back on September’s Tribeza Style Week #14 Presented by Lexus. It was yet another great week in which we celebrated style, fashion, design, and delicious food across four events, which each drew fun and interesting fans. We hope you enjoyed reading about the Drivers of Style in the September issue and maybe even got the chance to meet these style setters during Style Week events. Of course we could not have done Style Week #14 without the help of our many sponsors. Our week-long drink sponsors always help make the party, and many event-goers enjoyed the specialty cocktails from Deep Eddy Vodka and Ben Milam Whiskey, or a bottle of Stella Artois. And the extraordinary efforts of the interior designers and the chefs involved in Dinner x Design did not go unnoticed. Each table was truly a work of art, and each menu was delicious and devoured by the guests. We were excited to bring back Tribeza Movie Night sponsored by Neiman Marcus at the Stateside Theatre, where we showed First Monday In May. Neiman Marcus dazzled the guests with an array of the newest fall fashion on beautiful models and treated VIP guests to a wonderful gift bag and special seating. Finally the Tribeza Fashion Show did not disappoint. It was bigger and better than ever, with Robin Colton Design as the sponsor creating a grand runway design and Jose Luis Salon creating glamorous hair and makeup looks for the models. I hope you enjoy the recap of another epic week just after Social Hour. Visit Tribeza.com for more pictures and a video of the Fashion Show by Kyle Osborn. Sincerely,

George T. Elliman

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LOEWY LAW FIRM


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

16 YEARS

N OV E M B E R 2 017

N O. 1 9 5

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Staley Moore COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Errica Williams INTERN

Annie Doyle PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Staley Moore Charlotte Spratt PHOTOGR APHERS

Miguel Angel Holly Cowart Casey Dunn Leah Muse Wynn Myers John Pesina Dagny Piasecki Courtney Pierce Breezy Ritter Bailey Toksov

ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


SOCIAL HOUR HILL COUNTRY NIGHTS On September 15, Hill Country Conservancy hosted its 11th annual fundraising gala, Hill Country Nights, at ACL Live at the Moody Theater. Along with an incredible performance by Shakey Graves, guests enjoyed a delectable spread from The Salt Lick and exciting auction prizes. A recordbreaking $495,000 was raised to help ensure that land, water, and access to nature are here for generations to come.

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ALTATUDES GRAND OPENING

JANET ST. PAUL GRAND-OPENING BENEFIT

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Janet St. Paul Studio for Hair and Beauty celebrated the grand opening of its stunning new salon in the 2nd Street District, as well as its selection by French botanical haircare brand PHYTO Paris as its U.S. flagship salon. The event, “Vibrations Françaises,” benefited Texas CASA and CASA of Travis County and featured other French-inspired local Austin brands Le Politique and V Spot. HILL COUNTRY NIGHTS: 1. Gladys & Chi Lee 2. Melissa & Padraic Dillon 3. Randy, Farrah Jewel & Allyson Scott 4. Ryan & Taylor Steed 5. Leslie & Rob Gandy ALTATUDES GRAND OPENING: 6. Dusty McCormick, Alta Y. Alexander & Tam Hawkins 7. G.V. Clark & Noah Diggs JANET ST. PAUL GRAND-OPENING BENEFIT: 8. Nicole Descoteaux & Mark Gunn 9. Francois Hourcastagnou & Janet St. Paul 10. Conrad Diaz & Rachel Sweeten

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O E L AY TO N , M I G U E L A N G E L A N D B A I L E Y TO K S OZ

Altatudes strutted down the proverbial runway with its Grand Opening celebration September 18. The upscale boutique showcased unique modern, contemporary designs and brands threaded together with traditional tailoring. Owner Alta Y. Alexander featured high-end and local designers, while guests nibbled delectables, sipped “Exalted Lemonade,” and listened to live sounds under a glass chandelier tent. Attendees received discounts, drawings, and parting gift bags with customized miniature Altatudes hangers.


CHRIS O NG CHRIS LLO NG BROKER BROKERASSOCIATE ASSOCIATE ||

5 1 25. 1228.92.8693.06 0 | |c hcr h i sr@ a na rner seisdi deennt itai al .l c. coom n ggaauussttiinn..ccoom m 300 i sg @ogtot e t tsem sm m || cchhrrii ss ll o on g o tgtoetstm n arne sr ei ds e m e sam i dnetni at il arl eraelae l setsat taet e || ggoot tt teessm maannrreessiid de en n tt ii aall..ccoom


SOCIAL HOUR

STUDIO 54KLIFT Forklift Danceworks hosted Studio 54klift, an epic dance party fundraiser on September 22 at Gather/Impact Hub. The event featured DJ Mahaelani, MC Tigre Liu, drinks by Ania Robbins and Half Step, food from El Chile and Tiny Boxwoods, lighting by Natalie George, portraits by Sarah Bork Hamilton, a great silent auction and raffle, and, of course, lots of dancing!

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THINKERY’S IMAGINARIUM Thinkery’s annual gala IMAGINARIUM 2017 took guests “to the moon and back” on September 22. Supporters raised over $530,000 for Thinkery’s Open Door Initiative, which provides free admission and scholarships for thousands of families in need. The evening featured a performance from Golden Dawn Arkestra, special guest Senator Kirk Watson, a live auction led by Heath Hale and the Cowboy Auctioneers, and an after party with DJ Felix Pachéco.

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AUSTIN PARKS FOUNDATION’S PARTY FOR THE PARKS

STUDIO 54KLIFT: 1. Juliet & Dason Whitsett 2. Stacie Gillett & John Pell 3. Julio Martinez & Ashley Card Martinez THINKERY’S IMAGINARIUM: 4. Alan & Karen Ware 5. Rachel Irvin & Katie Fenton 6. Trish Young Brown & Greg Brown 7. Anne Swift, Kirsten Ross, Jamie Chandlee & Carly Christopher 8. Steve Carlson, Danneel Ackles , Gino Graul & Susan Espinoza AUSTIN PARKS FOUNDATION’S PARTY FOR THE PARKS: 9. Beth & Mat Hames 10. Andy Wisner, David Smith & Chris Long 11. Loren Mullins & Aly Stroobandt

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B A I L E Y TO K S OZ , CO U R T N E Y P I E R C E A N D B R E E Z Y R I T T E R

Austin Parks Foundation hosted its annual fundraiser Party for the Parks on October 4 at Brazos Hall. The event was a huge success, surpassing its fundraising goal and raising over $160,000. The celebration, which also coincides with the organization’s 25th anniversary this year, featured bites from Launderette, Kemuri Tastu-ya, Chicon, Juliet Italian Kitchen, and Peached Tortilla, as well as drinks by Austin Cocktails, Zilker Brewing Company, and Austin Eastciders.


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HIBIT

COUNTRIES

-UP

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SOCIAL HOUR

TRIBEZA OCTOBER ISSUE RELEASE PARTY On October 4, TRIBEZA and guests celebrated the release of the October Architecture Issue at the stunning B&B Italia showroom. Sensational scents from Slow North filled the air along with groovy beats from DJ ulovei. Friends were treated to delicious bites from October Dining Pick Garage Cocktail Bar and sweet treats from Tiny Boxwoods, while drinks were provided by local favorites Mighty Swell Cocktails, Austin Eastciders, and Big Bend Brewing.

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KELLY WYNNE ANNIVERSARY PARTY Kelly Wynne held its one-year anniversary bash on October 5 at the Domain NORTHSIDE, co-hosted by style influencers Kaki Gaines and Cristina Facundo. Guests snacked on hors d’oeuvres by Second Bar & Kitchen while enjoying swag bags, raffle prizes, and major discounts. Ten percent of the evening’s proceeds benefited local nonprofit Helping Hand Home for Children.

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KATIE KIME COTTAGE LAUNCH PARTY

TRIBEZA OCTOBER ISSUE RELEASE PARTY: 1. Katerina Elter, Arikan Elter, Irina Saunina & Kevin Alter 2. Kylie Hoffman & Taylor Wilson 3. Peter Pfeiffer, Patricia Martinez & Eldon Rude KELLY WYNNE ANNIVERSARY PARTY: 4. Madison Hanusa & Audra Beck 5. Carol & Katie Crowley 6. Cristina Facundo, Kelly Wynne Ferguson & Kaki Gaines KATIE KIME COTTAGE LAUNCH PARTY: 7. Sean Meagher & Nick Elkins 8. Corra Dunigan, Jennifer Welch & Kristen Nix 9. Katie Kime & Greg Henry 10. Caroline Pinkston, Avery Cox & Merrilee McGehee

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T A N D M I G U E L A N G E L

On October 11, Katie Kime debuted the KK Cottage, her newest event space and showroom for decorators and wholesale in East Austin. Guests got a first-hand look at the new space, with interiors inspired by her latest home collection.


A RC H I T E C T U R E

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DESIGN

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Laura Gottesman, Broker 512.451.2422

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O P P O RT U N I T Y

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Gottesman Residential Real Estate

gottesmanresidential.com

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11 0 3 l i v e o a k r i d g e . c o m


TRIBEZ A

ST Y L E WEEK14 #

P R E S E N T E D BY

highlights

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FASHION SHOW

Robin Colton & Luis Aragujo

Tribeza Style Week wrapped up with a bang with the Fashion Show at Fair Market. Sponsored by Robin Colton Studio, this year’s runway show featured stunning models dressed in high-fashion looks from Austin’s top boutiques, including Maya* Austin, Co-Star, By George, Estilo, The Garden Room, RedBird Boutique, thredUP and more, with models styled by Jose Luis Salon. The VIP gathering before the show was sponsored by SWBC Mortgage and Tru-Skin Dermatology with pop-up shops by Petrallure, Kalologie 360 Spa, and Robin Colton Studio; a Gypsy Floral bar; 2nd Street District swag bags; bites from Salt Traders Coastal Cooking and Boiler Nine; and specialty cocktails from Deep Eddy Vodka, Ben Milam Whiskey, Topo Chico, and Stella Artois.

Maureen Staloch, Lisa Parrish, Ana Stapleton & Patti Rogers Matthew Redden & Lillian Steckel

Errica Williams, Sheila HawkinsBucklew & Alta Y. Alexander

PHOTOG R A PHY BY B R EEZ Y RIT TER A N D JOH N PES I N A

Hugh Grey & Michelle Broll

Laura Craddick & Jenny Mason Amanda Tatom & Suzanne Erickson

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TRIBEZA STYLE WEEK KICKOFF PARTY Sabrina Vela & Kale Schulte

Tru-Skin Dermatology pop-up lip bar by Elevé Cosmetics Staley Moore & Kristie Gonzales

Michael Kirsner, Claire Winslow & Sasha Ortiz

Gertie Wilson & Ginger Averitt

Jennifer Carnes, Cassie LaMere & Emily Aarvig

Models in Neiman Marcus fall fashions

Taylor Jarrett & Dagny Piasecki

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Jennifer Rose Smith & Carmen Collins

Tracey Nelson & Ann Kasper

MOVIE NIGHT AT THE STATE THEATRE TRIBEZA and Neiman Marcus partnered to host a special screening of “The First Monday in May,” a film that offers a unique behind-thescenes look at the famous Met Gala, one of New York’s premier cultural events. Guests noshed on chic movie bites and drinks before the show.

P H OTO K I CG KO R AFPFHPA B YR T Y P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y J O H N P E S I N A . MOV I E N IG HT PH OTOG R A PH Y BY B R E E Z Y R IT TE R .

The 14th annual Tribeza Style Week kicked off at the swank 800 Congress building on September 21. Portraits of eight standout Austinites—this year’s official drivers of style—were unveiled with our presenting sponsor, Lexus of Austin. The evening was also sponsored by Tru-Skin Dermatology, which helped guests get glam with a one-of-a-kind pop-up lip bar by Elevé Cosmetics. The MOODxMoss photo yurt was on-site and provided a space in which partygoers could have their aura captured by Polaroid. Specialty drinks from our week-long sponsors Ben Milam Whiskey, Deep Eddy Vodka, Stella Artois, and Topo Chico were on hand, as were bites from some of Austin’s best restaurants including Bullfight, Puli-ra, and La Patisserie.

DJ ulovei


DINNER X DESIGN

Nick Brandt & MK Fechtel

The unforgettable Dinner x Design event returned for its second year, featuring a dynamic group of Austin’s interior designers and chefs with cocktails created by Ben Milam Whiskey, Deep Eddy Vodka, Topo Chico, and Stella Artois. Designers Robin Colton Studio, Ann Lowe Edgerton, McCray & Co., Allison Jaffe Interior Design, and Breathe Design Studio awed attendees with the stunning tablescapes they created, all of which were then perfectly paired with the culinary stylings of some of Austin’s top chefs, including Justine’s Brasserie, Kemuri Tatsu-ya, Contigo Austin, Foreign & Domestic, and Olive & June. London Grey Rugs and Loot Rentals sponsored the event, giving the space an elegant touch.

P H OTO D I NGNREARPX HD BY ES IG N PHOTOG R A PHY BY COU RTN E Y PIERCE

Alice Dentler & Ann Edgerton

Grace Hall & Chris McCray

Sardi & David Nerissa

Cassie LaMere, Nicki Prian & Ross McLauchlan

Steven Debose & Allison Jaffe tribeza.com

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1100 E 5TH STREET, AUSTIN, TX 78702

FAIRMARKETAUSTIN.COM

(512) 710-8832


COMMUNITY + CULTURE CULTURAL DISPATCHES FROM AUSTIN’S CREATIVE COMMUNITY The mural on the Paul Loya Gallery in Culver City, California is one of the many colorful installations by the on the rise Austin-based artist Will Bryant. PHOTOGRAPH BYWILL BRYANT

PROFILE

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Color Waves WILL BRYANT By Charlotte Spratt Photographs by Casey Dunn

A  

S AN ENTERPRISING HIGH SCHOOL

student in Texarkana, Will Bryant and his pal decided to start a “T-shirt company.” The concept? Make up their own band merch for all the cool bands…that never came to their hometown. “We didn’t know what screen-printing was, so we made stencils with x-acto knives and used fabric blow pens to create one-off shirts,” he remembers. “We sold a few, but we’d get behind on orders and would nearly hyperventilate and stay up all night to try and finish them late at night. It wasn’t a good business model at all.” He initially thought he would major in business at Mississippi State, where his parents went to college, but he was lured away after falling for the charm of the dilapidated art building, which led to his majoring in graphic design. After graduation, he immediately started working as a freelance illustrator and has made murals for Adidas, a cover for The New York Times Magazine, and T-shirts for Nike. Bryant and his family returned to Austin last year after getting his MFA at Portland State University. He says: “Now, here I am 10 years later and I’m very fortunate to still be working for myself.” When did you realize you were going to be an artist?  I suppose I can recall some important moments in my childhood that contributed to me becoming an artist, but it wasn’t until college where things

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really clicked. I met some influential professors (Kate Bingaman-Burt) and started deejaying ridiculously themed parties. Under the moniker “The Hooded Deer” I would do installations, and make merch for each show (i.e., “Sweatageddon, the sweat that ends all sweat”). That was an important time for me creatively. It helped shape my voice, gave me an opportunity to experiment with style, and diversify my interests.

What do you think of as your first big break into the industry? One of my first big client projects was making merch for The Polyphonic Spree and Good Records out of Dallas. That was huge for me! Then fast-forward to about six months after college graduation, I landed a global T-shirt line project with Nike (2009), and that helped build my confidence. It also made it seem that working as an


independent illustrator and artist was an actual career path.

CO L L A B O R AT I O N W I T H N I CO L L E C L E M E T S O N

You have installed murals at Portland’s Airbnb office, Austin’s Facebook office, a gallery courtyard in LA, and many more. What has been your favorite project? It would have to be working on an Adidas project for the NBA AllStar Weekend this past February in New Orleans. A lot of my childhood dreams and current interests came together in the form of a mini-basketball court installation that I covered in wild line work over the course of three days. I mingled with NBA and WNBA stars, dribbled and dunked on a court that I covered, and loved everyone involved. Every aspect of the project was incredible— from the agency, the client, other artists involved, and the food. To top it off, my wife was my assistant for the project, and we went on dates every night (without the kiddo)! You sometimes spend countless hours on a details installation. What kind of music do you listen to while you are in mural mode? A lot of Afrobeat and Ghana highlife, ’90s hip-hop, and psychedelic stuff show up in my headphones most frequently. Some favorites are William Onyeabor, Dur-Dur Band, Lijadu Sisters, Digable Planets, ATCQ [A Tribe Called Quest], Chance The Rapper, Talking Heads, Toro y Moi, and CAN. I sometimes listen to mixes that I make, but I enjoy fluidity of albums. Your work often features vibrant colors: What are you currently into? Pink and seafoam are longtime favorites, but I’ve been exploring more subdued palettes lately (i.e. hunter green, khaki, desaturated red-orange, navy). 

Your “I survived another meeting that should have been an email” ribbon is one of our favorites. How did that idea come to you? It came to me after leaving a meeting. It just felt like such a waste of everyone’s time to go over a printed PDF that I had already looked at in my

Were you surprised with how viral it went? Yes! That’s really the only thing I’ve made that has circulated in such a way. It was featured on the front page of Reddit, all the joke Instagram accounts (uncredited, of course), and around the blogosphere. Even my mom’s Facebook friends posted it not knowing that I had made it!

Bryant collaborates with brands and other artists, like on this project with photographer Nicolle Clemetson.

inbox and literally had no questions about. Why did we waste paper? Why did someone drive across town to do this? “OK, great to see you, thanks for the coffee, OK, bye! I’ll send you an email about this meeting that we could have just covered in a two minute email.” It was silly! But that ribbon is very relatable, regardless of profession or industry—people get it.

If you are in a creative rut, what do you do to get re-inspired? Exercise, beverages, and snacks are crucial for me to get out of a rut. A change of scenery is often helpful. Shooting hoops, a bike ride, or a run help me on a daily basis, but there are occasions where I’m in a funk and that won’t even work. So then it ultimately comes down to just putting in the time and working through it. There have been moments where I keep taking breaks, waiting for something to come to me, but it turns out I just needed to spend the hours toiling it over to figure it out. I think it helps to commit to a process and not overthink how to do something—so create a bunch of work and then analyze later. I love this quote by Sister Corita Kent—“Don’t try to create and analyze at the same time. They’re different processes.” It’s Rule 8 from the Immaculate Heart College Art Department Rules.

Why is Austin a good place to be an artist? There are a lot of inspiring and supportive people doing their own thing here. That’s probably the biggest factor next to an abundance of tacos and good healthyfood options. Oh, and there are plenty of places for a solid bev (shout out to Brew & Brew, Little Brother, Flitch, Weather Up, St. Elmo Brewing, Quickie Pickie, and Juiceland). Also, I think the amount of festivals happening here results in a lot of money that goes into supporting local artists for events. tribeza.com

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Eyes to See By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

I

REMEMBER BEING ON AN ELEMENTARY

school field trip to a museum. We stopped in front of a painting that the docent explained was created by a technique called pointillism. She said that the art was made by thousands of tiny dots, which together created a larger image. This astounded me. What was she talking about? I had to get up close and see for myself. I dislodged from the class lineup when it was time to move on and walked right up to that painting, blatantly ignoring the “Do Not Touch” mandate, and pressed my small, freckled nose right into tribeza.com

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

I H AV E A LWAYS LOV ED T HE IDE A OF T HINGS T H AT LOOK DIFFER EN T W HEN YOU GET U P CLOSE . I LIK E T H AT A BOU T A RT, I LIK E T H AT A BOU T R EL AT IONSHIPS (SOME OF T HE T IME , A N Y WAY).

the canvas. She was right! Tiny pinpoint dots were everywhere. I stood there much longer than I should have, until it was discovered that I was not in line. I have always loved the idea of things that look different when you get up close. I like that about art, I like that about relationships (some of the time, anyway), and I definitely like that about people and the stories of their lives. I am a girl who likes to take a deeper, longer look—at everything. Which is why it PISSES me off that my eyesight is going down the tubes. I am a forty-something cliché with pairs of readers stashed everywhere, tucked around my house, in every purse, even in the center console of my car. If I start to wear readers on a chain around my neck, you will know I have completely given up. Or at least I no longer care what I look like, because I literally cannot see myself. At first I did not want to believe it was middle age, because who really wants to face that, right? So when I originally went to the eye doctor for the first time since grade school, I blamed my blurry vision entirely on my iPhone, because I was squinting at the damn thing all day. This was before I enlarged the text font size to such an extreme that the people sitting ten rows back on an airplane can see what I’m saying. The doctor, without any discretion or basic human compassion, replied simply, “How old are you?” “Well, I just turned 41,” I said at the time. “Clockwork,” he said. “That’s when it really starts to go.” I was not amused. I left the doctor in a huff and tried to avoid the inevitable. I stuffed

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my new prescription in the depths of my purse and forgot about it. I used the flashlight on my cellphone to read menus in “dark” restaurants, certain the lighting was an issue, not my eyes. I used the thumb-finger screen enlargement to zoom in on every single photo on my phone, just to see it at all. And I tried to be subtle about screen-shotting everything else that I needed to enlarge, which soon became pretty much everything. It was only a matter of time until I was digging out that prescription and getting a pair of very nerdy, semi-cool, tortoise shell progressive vision eyeglasses. I tried to rock them, twisting my hair in a bun and inhabiting my writer persona. In any case, I think less squinting was a good call for my crow’s-feet. Glasses worked fine, for the most part, if I always remembered them. The only time they didn’t work was when I was running. Or on my mountain trek last summer. It is not helpful to carry readers on a long run, just to see the pace and mileage on your running watch. Or to put readers in your backpack and fish them out to put on your sweaty face every time you need to consult a trail map. This was madness. After my 46th birthday, I turned myself back into the eye doctor and asked about contact lenses for the first time ever. Keep in mind that I Do Not touch my eyes. I am a semiautomatic, rapid-fire blinker. No one can put mascara or eyeliner on me but me. And if I try to curl my eyelashes, I will blink so hard while they are clamped in the curler that it’s very likely they will all pull out. So I knew that putting a lens directly from my fin-

gertip onto my eyeball was going to be a long shot. The technician took me into another office with some lenses to try, and sat me in front of a mirror. It was not the 10x magnifying mirror like I have in my bathroom, so I could not really see my eyes without my readers on, which did nothing to help the situation. She demonstrated the technique by jabbing her long, glittery nails into her cornea and pinching her eyeball until the lens popped out, then she poked it right back onto her eyeball again. “That’s how you do it,” she said, smacking her gum. “Your turn.” I swallowed a lump of fear and nausea. My armpits were sweating and my hands were clammy. I sat there, valiantly trying, for over two hours. My eyes were as red as my worst allergy attack ever, and the skin beneath them was irritated. I looked like hell. I felt worse. I did get them in, finally, and they sent me on my miserable way with a three-day trial supply and a bottle of solution that felt like acid. I was already afraid for bedtime, wondering if I would ever get them out. Being able to see was miraculously, wonderfully…awful. I loved not needing glasses, but I did not like noticing people’s chin hairs, wrinkles, gray hair, food in teeth, or booger crust. I did not like seeing myself in HD every time I looked in a mirror either. After three brutal days, I decided this was not for me. I chose to embrace my blurry vision and consider it a gift of age, a soft-focus lens to keep my life, and the people in it, beautiful. Sometimes looking too closely isn’t always the best way to see.


Patrick Puckett

WWG

Wa l ly W or km a n G a l lery

1202 West Si x th Street Aust in, Tex as 78703 wal ly workmangal ler y.com 512.472.7428 Image: Hill Country (detail), oil on canvas, 72 x 48 inches


T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

BUILT to LAST Designed by architects Charles Moore and Arthur Andersson in 1984, the Moore/ Andersson Compound, just west of MoPac in West Austin, was created to provide living and working spaces for its designers. The Compound also houses an architectural library and an impressive 2,000-piece collection of folk art. This year the Texas Society of Architects recognizes the Moore/ Andersson Compound with its 25-Year Award, an honor granted to buildings of importance that have been around for 25 to 50 years. Visitors can arrange a tour and view the spaces by appointment. CHARLESMOORE.ORG

TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Arts Outside

“One of my goals is how to educate people with beauty,” says artist George Sabra. Working as a professional sculptor in Austin since 2005, Sabra utilizes reclaimed materials to build large-scale 3-D pieces that speak to environmental concerns. Earlier this year he unveiled “The Exhausted Tree,” an 11-foot-tall tree built of reclaimed exhaust pipes and mufflers. As part of the City of Austin’s TEMPO program, Sabra created “Era Gate,” an

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organically shaped structure made from reclaimed oil barrels. Treated with a white paint, the piece’s black numbers allude to the millions of annual deaths impacted by air pollution. “This is a way of speaking about sustainability, about the environment. People are receiving a lot of information every single minute and they need something to talk to their spirit, to their heart,” Sabra says. “Era Gate” is on view through November 19. AUSTINTEXAS.GOV/TEMPO


Go NATURAL In their search for clean beauty products, stylists James Bryant and Sarah Bensley wanted to create a place where natural, organic, and crueltyfree items could easily be found. In September they held the grand opening of Sentrel, a Northwest Austin outpost stocking conscientiously created hair care and skin care products. Sample something new at the trial bar or take home a custom-made soy candle. SENTRELBEAUTY.COM

L Z R P H OTO G R A P H B Y L E T I T I A S M I T H . S E N T R E L B E A U T Y P H OTO G R A P H Y B Y TAY LO R P R I N S E N . T E X A S C U LT U R A L T R U S T H O N O R E E S O N S TAG E P H OTO G R A P H B Y M I G U E L A N G E L .

Under ONE ROOF Years before John Price helped create Trilogy or became the CEO of Vast, he was a student at UT, catching shows at La Zona Rosa. “Everybody was playing here all the time,” Price says. “I’d come Sunday for the gospel brunch and Guy Forsyth’s playing.” After the West 4th Street venue closed to the public in 2012, Price approached owner Nate Paul with an idea to relaunch the space to host private events, like those held during South by Southwest, year-round. Rechristened “LZR,” the refurbished space will house venture capital and technology firms during the day and host specific private events, such as films during the Austin Film Festival, at night. “We’re really trying to create a new thing in Austin that serves a niche and keeps alive a [certain] feel,” Price says. “It isn’t just about music anymore in Austin — Austin’s music, tech, media and film, and we’re trying to pull that all together.”

ONE QUESTION with HEIDI MARQUEZ SMITH In August Heidi Marquez Smith, the former executive director of the Texas Book Festival, became the executive director of the Texas Cultural Trust. We asked: What are her biggest priorities for the organization? “The trust has done an incredible job of trying to be at the forefront of art and education. Our focus is to increase awareness and support of the arts in Texas. So many things have happened to education legislatively overall, and the fine arts in particular have always been targeted. We really want to ensure that we help to improve the quality of education, ensuring that fine arts remain in the curriculum. And also to stimulate economic growth throughout the state — I don’t think many people are aware that annually the arts industry generates $5.5 billion for the Texas economy or that one in 15 Texas jobs is in the creative industry, so the arts are keeping our workforce competitive.” TXCULTURALTRUST.ORG

LZRATX.COM

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architecture & interiors

THE WORLD WE LIVE IN IS THE ONE WE CREATE northarrowstudio.com

512.464.1184

lootrentals.com lootfinergoods.com 3312 duke rd. austin, texas 78724

photo by paige newton


ARTS + HAPPENINGS WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO A scene from Rich Cali’s recent exhibit with Mother of God Ceramics at the Preacher Gallery, “The Vessel and the Void.” PHOTOGRAPH BY WHITNEY AROSTEGUI

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C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC THIRD EYE BLIND November 1 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater MARIACHI USA FESTIVAL November 4 Circuit of the Americas SAINT MOTEL November 4 The Mohawk

TEGAN AND SARA November 15 & 16 Paramount Theatre

GALANTIS November 24 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

ALT-J W/ MARIAN HILL November 15 & 16 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

HAYES CARLL November 24 Paramount Theatre

21 SAVAGE November 16 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater

JOHN MCLAUGHLIN & JIMMY HERRING November 30 Paramount Theatre

LOS LONELY BOYS November 16 – 18 Antone’s Nightclub

EVERCLEAR November 5 Emo’s Austin MICHAEL MCDONALD November 6 ACL Live at the Moody Theater OLD CROW MEDICINE SHOW November 10 Bass Concert Hall 101X CONCERT SERIES: TOADIES W/ LOCAL H November 10 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater SOUND ON SOUND FESTIVAL November 10 – 12 Sherwood Forest COURTNEY BARNETT & KURT VILE November 11 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

TORI AMOS November 17 ACL Live at the Moody Theater KASE 101 PRESENTS KIP MOORE November 17 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater RAY WYLIE HUBBARD’S BIRTHDAY BASH November 17 Paramount Theatre GENE SIMMONS November 18 3TEN ACL Live BLUE OCTOBER November 18 Stubb’s Waller Creek Amphitheater BBQ AUCTION AND CONCERT W/ NEAL MCCOY November 18 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

LINDSEY BUCKINGHAM & CHRISTINE MCVIE November 15 Bass Concert Hall

GLADYS KNIGHT November 19 Paramount Theatre

THE NEXT & BEST IN AUSTIN MUSIC November 15 3TEN ACL Live

ENRIQUE IGLESIAS & PITBULL LIVE! November 22 Frank Erwin Center

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SIMPLE PLAN November 30 Emo’s Austin

FILM AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL Through November 2 Various Locations AUSTIN POLISH FILM FESTIVAL November 2 – 5 Various Locations AUSTIN JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL November 4 – 10 Regal Arbor Cinema at Great Hills THE HOUSTON FILM COMMISSION’S TEXAS FILMMAKER’S SHOWCASE November 7 AFS Cinema MOVIES IN THE PARK: MUPPET CHRISTMAS CAROL November 9 Ramsey Park ROOFTOP ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN FILM SERIES: GRAY MATTERS November 15 & 16 The Contemporary Austin

FEMME FILM FRIDAYS: THE BIG SPOON November 17 Bullock Texas State History Museum FRIDAY NIGHT FLIX: THE ADDAMS FAMILY November 24 Lone Star Court TEXAS FOCUS: INFINITY BABY November 30 Bullock Texas State History Museum

THEATER A TUNA CHRISTMAS November 1 – December 25 ZACH Theatre THE SEAFARER November 3 – 26 The City Theatre THE CRUCIBLE November 8 – 19 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre AUSTIN OPERA PRESENTS CARMEN November 11 – 19 The Long Center AUSTIN SHAKESPEARE PRESENTS MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING November 15 – December 3 The Long Center SETH RUDETSKY, DECONSTRUCTING BROADWAY November 16 McCullough Theatre A CHRISTMAS CAROL November 22 – December 31 ZACH Theatre


CLEAR TO PARTLY CRAZY November 24 – 26 Stateside at the Paramount RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER: THE MUSICAL November 24 & 25 The Long Center

COMEDY MICHELLE WOLF November 2 – 4 Cap City Comedy Club BOT PARTY 3.0 November 3 – 5 The Long Center TOM SEGURA November 4 Paramount Theatre JIM GAFFIGAN November 4 & 5 ACL Live at the Moody Theater DEMETRI MARTIN November 9 Paramount Theatre ROY WOOD JR. November 17 & 18 Cap City Comedy Club BRENDON WALSH W/ ZAC BROOKS November 17 & 18 The Velveeta Room

CHILDREN FOSSIL FEST November 4 & 5 Old Settler’s Heritage Association

WURSTFEST November 3 – 12 New Braunfels AUSTIN POWWOW November 4 Travis County Expo Center

PINKALICIOUS THE MUSICAL November 5 Paramount Theatre

TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL November 4 & 5 Texas State Capitol Building

PJ MASKS LIVE! November 7 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

AUSTIN CELTIC FESTIVAL November 4 & 5 Fiesta Gardens

FAMILY DAY November 12 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden

TEXAS MONTHLY BBQ FESTIVAL November 5 City Terrace at The Long Center

TEEN NIGHT November 17 The Contemporary Austin PEPPA PIG LIVE! November 29 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

OTHER THE TEXAS CONFERENCE FOR WOMEN November 2 Austin Convention Center 2017 U.S. VINTAGE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS November 2 – 5 Circuit of the Americas

JOHN HODGMAN November 18 Paramount Theatre

CHRISTMAS AT THE CASWELL HOUSE November 2 – December 10 Daniel H. Caswell House

THE LUCAS BROTHERS November 24 & 25 Cap City Comedy Club

AUSTIN HOMEBREW FESTIVAL November 3 Saengerrunde Hall

2017 FALL FESTIVAL & CORN MAZE Through November 5 Barton Hill Farms

MAUREEN DOWD & CARL HULSE November 18 The Long Center TURKEY TROT November 23 The Long Center SANTA ON THE TERRACE November 24 The Long Center ZILKER TREE LIGHTING CEREMONY November 26 Zilker Park PLANET TEXAS 2050 November 29 Paramount Theatre

CAMP CONTEMPORARY November 11 – 12 Laguna Gloria JACK HANNA’S INTO THE WILD LIVE! November 12 Paramount Theatre ANNIE LEIBOVITZ November 13 The Long Center A CHRISTMAS AFFAIR November 15 – December 3 Palmer Events Center WIZARD WORLD COMIC CON November 17 – 19 Austin Convention Center CHUY’S CHRISTMAS PARADE November 18 Congress Avenue tribeza.com

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A R T I S T S P OT L I G H T | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts PATRICK PUCKETT: LOW PLACES November 4 – 25 Wally Workman Gallery POP AUSTIN INTERNATIONAL ART SHOW November 9 – 12 Fair Market DENISE PRINCE: OBJECT LESSONS Through November 10 Women & Their Work

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

RICH CALI By Tribeza Staff

Rich Cali’s father, who is an artist, could usually be found at the drafting table working on projects, and it wasn’t long before his son followed suit with projects of his own. “Creating has always been part of my daily practice, from my younger years up though present day — DIY publications, photography, graffiti, and into fine art — it’s always been a constant,” he says. His latest exhibit The Vessel and The Void, which just closed last month at the Preacher Gallery, was made in collaboration with Diana Welch from Mother of God Ceramics and featured striking ink-on-paper paintings of palms and vessels in black and gold as well as ceramics in unexpected shapes. The innovative creative agency, Preacher, has a permanent gallery space in its downtown offices and with curator, Jason Archer, the outfit is hosting art shows that have become wildly popular. All the works from the show are then available on Preacher’s website for purchase. “This body of work explores the conversation between the organic, the free-form, and the meditative in practice, in relation to the intentional, clean, and thought-out elements and practice. I feel a similar relationship in the process and works of Mother of God,” he says. Cali and his wife moved to Austin at the end of 2005 and have found an “an incredible support system” in the city. “If there’s something that you’re passionate and honest about, Austin will get behind you,” he says. “There’s such a heavy influence by other likeminded makers and doers in this city. We all, as a whole, keep the wheels in motion.” For more information on Cali, visit webbartgallery.com.

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ART ALLIANCE AUSTIN’S ARTBASH November 10 Native Hostel CREEK SHOW 2017 November 10 – 18 Waller Creek 2017 TEXAS BIENNIAL Through November 11 211 E Alpine Rd EAST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR November 11 & 12, 18 & 19 Various Locations 2017 HOPS FOR HOPE November 18 & 19 Fair Market RACHEL STUCKEY: GOOD DAYS & BAD DAYS ON THE INTERNET November 18 – January 11 Women & Their Work

TEMPO 2017 Through November 19 Various Locations BLUE GENIE ART BAZAAR November 24 – December 24 Blue Genie Art Bazaar THE AFTERLIFE OF ARTIFACTS Through November 25 Davis Gallery THE OPEN ROAD: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE AMERICAN ROAD TRIP November 25 – January 27 Blanton Museum of Art DANCING WITH DEATH Through November 26 Blanton Museum of Art JOHN LANGFORD: NEW PAINTINGS 2017 Through November 26 Yard Dog Art Gallery UMLAUF PRIZE 2017 Through November 26 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum DIEGO Y FRIDA: A SMILE IN THE MIDDLE OF THE WAY Through November 26 Mexic-Arte Museum LOVE TO DEATH: COMMUNITY ALTARS Through November 26 Mexic-Arte Museum

P H OTO G R A P H B Y W H I T N E Y A R O S T E G U I

TRAVIS HEIGHTS ART TRAIL November 4 – 5 Travis Heights Neighborhood


UMLAUF PRESENTS

BERNSTEIN 100 AUSTIN

NOVEMBER 12 | UMLAUFSCULPTURE.ORG

PERFORMANCES INSPIRED BY BERNSTEIN 100 MASS | COCKTAILS | DINNER & WINE PAIRINGS


E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA

EVENT PICK

CAMP CONTEMPORARY By Tribeza Staff

Laguna Gloria NOVEMBER 11–12

The Contemporary’s annual event under the stars has become one of the hottest tickets in town. For $3,500 for two tickets or $5,000 for four, guests stay in beautifully appointed tents on the grounds of Laguna Gloria, where a magical evening begins with a cocktail hour, followed by a feast of local fare prepared in an open-air tent by Larry McGuire. Special musical performances and late-night and early-morning camp festivities like lounging in hammocks, stargazing, bird-watching or just exploring the 14-acre grounds are also included. Chaired by Deborah Green with a committee of creative heavy hitters like Brooklyn Decker, Liz Lambert, James Moody, and others, the unforgettable evening raises funds for the museum’s award-winning art education programs, which serve 30,000 children and adults annually. For more information, visit thecontemporaryaustin.org.

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3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: T-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S., Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DE STIJL | PODIUM FOR ART 1006 W. 31st St. (512) 354 0868 Hours: Tu-Thu, Sa 1-5 destijlaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sat & Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: T-F 10-5 space12.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sat & Su 12-5 massgallery.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F10-6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com

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A SPACE TO

Let the light in—three designers on making spaces for creating

CREATE PHOTOGRAPHS BY WYNN MYERS

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Nora McMillen Burke hosts kids art camp, Camp Canvas, in a studio in her home in Highland Park West. She also paints there.

Nora McMillen Burke Inspired by her love of folk art, native Austinite and painter Nora McMillen Burke applies textile application to paper with her brightly colored and whimsical paintings. “I’m inspired by symbols and archetypal imagery, such as the tree of life, masks, and gods and goddesses. My work attempts to highlight the common themes that connect cra! traditions from different cultures,” she says. When she and her husband, Cleve, bought a multilevel mid-century home in the Highland Park West neighborhood, Burke knew she wanted a studio, a place where she could create and run art camps for kids in the summers. So a!er a thoughtful renovation, a colorful studio fit for hosting Camp Canvas was born. “Hosting art lessons and camps has led to my exploring new techniques, and it has kindled my own creativity.”

NORA’S TIPS ON HOW TO SPARK AN INTEREST IN ART FOR KIDS: • Leave materials out on a designated area with things they have access to often. • Let them see you making things to model a creative practice. • Try new materials and encourage the process not the outcome by showing that “mistakes” can turn into happy accidents.

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WILL’S ADVICE FOR HOW TO LIVE LIKE A MINIMALIST: • Define the objects you really like, or the things that make you feel something when you look at them. • Get rid of all the things that detract, or don’t directly enhance the above. • Design and consider the space between objects.

As the design director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality, Will Fox, a Yale grad, designed this space for Outdoor Voices.

Will & Alice Fox The creative duo with model-good looks and warm, welcoming smiles, Will and Alice Fox make the most of every inch of their 830-square-foot home in East Austin’s charming Rosewood neighborhood. Will, the design director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality, and Alice, the creative director of Fox Fox Studio, use their front room, where they are pictured, a multipurpose space for living, dining, playing with their young daughter, and working. Will says: “It gets great light, so I can lay on the sofa and look out the window into the big pecan tree canopy in our front yard. I o!en sketch here, and make models for design projects, as well as have meals and spend time with my famiy.”

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Avalon McKenzie, a global senior designer for Whole Foods, at home in her studio where she paints pieces like these boots.

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AVALON ON HOW TO CREATE A SPACE FOR ART MAKING: • Maximize your space with shelving, and use the walls! • Make sure you have the right furniture for your work style. I have a large table for drawing and painting and a smaller desk with my computer and scanner. • Merchandise your art supplies. There’s nothing more tempting than an art store. I organize my supplies by color and use old Diptique candle glasses to hold all sorts of pens and brushes.

Avalon McKenzie From her light-filled studio, Avalon McKenzie has designed catalogs for Free People, created beautiful hand-lettering for Victoria’s Secret, and painted for her own enjoyment. By day she works as a Global Senior Designer for Whole Foods Market, where she just wrapped art directing Whole Foods’ holiday campaign. On weekends, she can usually be found jumping between pen and paper and the computer in her minimalist-chic Hyde Park home, which she shares with her husband, designer Cody Haltom. “I think having the right tools, and being able to quickly experiment, makes all the difference,” she says. “This room just has good energy. Even though it’s a modest space, it’s one that I love spending time in.” For more info on McKenzie and her work, visit avalonmckenzie.com. tribeza.com

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DEALERS

ART

Former Austiniste, Arturo Palacios, of Art Palace, at home in Houston.

When it comes to buying and selling art, there can be a lot to learn. From a gallery owner with over three decades of experience to an artist with a newly launched site built on bartering, here we get some insight on the creative ways to acquire new art. BY NICOLE BECKLEY PHOTOGRAPHS BY WYNN MYERS

Arturo Palacios, Art Palace At the helm of Art Palace Gallery for the past 12 years, first in Austin, until 2009, and now in Houston, Arturo Palacios has focused on building communities and offering continued support to a roster of artists who can develop in their careers, including Austin-based Deborah Roberts and Barry Stone. “Usually before I start working with any artist, I’m watching that artist’s work for quite a while before that artist even knows I’m curious,” Palacios says. While he attends art fairs, typically recommendations come to Palacios from friends or colleagues. “Something I really enjoy about the business is helping someone get started; getting them their first art purchase, that’s

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TRUST YOUR INSTINCTS AND DON’T BE AFRAID.”

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Scenes from Arturo Palacios’ celebrated Houston gallery, Art Palace.

really fun.” On the buyer side Palacios has a perspective-driven view. “Trust your instincts and don’t be afraid. Remember that collecting art is over time a diary of your life,” Palacios says. “Your tastes change, your experiences change, you grow. Things that you bought 10 years ago would not be the things you’d buy today, but that doesn’t make them bad or less in any way, just different. That’s where you were in your life.” artpalacegallery.com

Margo Tate, Tate Art Advisory “I think that art advisors are a good group of people to bounce ideas off and help solidify what you want to collect and the direction you want to go,” Margo Tate says. Since starting Tate Art Advisory three years ago, Tate has helped buyers find the perfect pieces for both residential and commercial spaces. “My mom is an artist, and I’ve grown up surrounded by her friends that are collectors and artists,” Tate says. Moving into art advising seemed like a natural fit. Tate works with clients to discover the artists they connect with and the right pieces for their space, frequenting Austin galleries like Lora Reynolds and art fairs, including Miami’s Art Basel and New York’s Frieze. “Sometimes I go for a specific exhibit, sometimes I just like to pop in and see what I can discover,” Tate says. Other times a space calls for a completely tribeza.com

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Art advisor Margo Tate found the right artist to create an installation at Facebook’s Austin headquarters. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEAH MUSE

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Twyla, the Austin-based art curation company that sells limited edition works, recently helped select pieces for Austin blogger Camille Styles’ new office bungalow. Together they chose the “Chianti Pop Green” by Guy Dill and “Grounding” by Carolanna Parlato.

custom work, such as the installation piece “Origin/Migration,” which Beili Liu built from thousands of pieces of hand-coiled ribbon for the Domain 8 lobby. “Every time I leave the space, I’m like, ‘Nothing else could have worked but this piece,’” Tate says. tateartadvisory.com

Brian Sharples, Twyla “Twyla was founded on the concept of trying to build an art business for the next generation of art consumers and collectors,” says Brian Sharples, CEO of the online art marketplace. Officially launched in October 2016, the company sprang from the want to cut through the perceived mysticism of the art-purchasing world — offering transparent pricing, high-quality art, and easy shipping — and making it fully accessible online. “We find that a lot of our buyers are people who’ve bought new houses or they’re remodeling houses or rooms and they love art, but they have to make a choice between buying an original for $10,000 and buying five big stunning pieces from us for the same amount of money or less,” Sharples says. To build its contemporary-focused collection, Twyla enlisted a team of curators to recruit the 130-plus artists who create the limited-edition works, including sculptural artist Miya Ando and textile artist Travis Boyer. Each piece is produced as an archival print that gets framed and shipped with a 30day, money-back guarantee. Austin residents can also view some of the works in-person, as Twyla’s turned part of its downtown office into a gallery space. twyla.com

Jeffrey Butterworth, Arter Barter “I have been doing drawing and painting since I was a little kid and I’ve never really done anything with it, so I had all this stuff that I’d collected and I didn’t have any place to put it,” Jeffrey Butterworth explains. This dilemma begged for a creative solution, and at the end of August, Butterworth launched Arter Barter, an online marketplace built on the idea of exchanging art and goods with no cash involved. The bartering system keeps things interesting, with Butterworth trading his bold pop art-style paintings (a style he describes as sitting “somewhere between Raymond Pettibon and The Far Side”) for items like new tennis shoes, a telescope, and even a gourmet meal. “A friend took a week-long cooking class in Italy, and she asked how much pasta it would take to barter, and I said, ‘I don’t know, a lot.’ She showed up with a lot of pasta,” Butterworth says. tribeza.com

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Lauren Greenberg, curator of Work in Progress Gallery, in her South Austin home pictured with work by a few of the artist she represents.

BUY SOMETHING YOU LOVE OR INVEST IN A PIECE THAT MAKES YOU FEEL HAPPY, THAT DRAWS THAT OUT OF YOU.”

While by day Butterworth works as a creative director at GSD&M, by night he paints and makes trades — with collectors and causal art lovers. “If you can connect those kinds of communities, it opens up another door to people who may really enjoy art but feel like they don’t have any access to it,” Butterworth says. arterbarter.com

Wally Workman, Wally Workman Gallery “When I first started the gallery, we sold fine-art posters. We would get the collections from the Louvre or the Met,” Wally Workman says. While on-trend in 1980, a few years later Wally Workman Gallery transitioned to selling all original work, as the Austin art market evolved. “Most of what we sold [then] was up to $1,000. Now our average sale is closer to $3,000,” Workman says. Today, with 57 artists in its stable, the Wally Workman Gallery opens a new show each month in its two-story West Sixth Street space, highlighting contemporary painters like Will Klemm and Mallory Page and figurative work like this month’s Patrick Puckett exhibition. “Unlike other retailers, I think galleries have a unique position in that art is something most people would like to see before they want to make a purchase, unless someone’s familiar with the artist and the surfaces and the texture and so forth,” Workman says. And a!er 37 years she’s still excited to present new work. “This is the best job

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in the world. I just love it,” Workman says. wallyworkmangallery.com

Lauren Greenberg, Work in Progress Gallery Sometimes there’s an aha moment that sets you down a certain path. For Lauren Greenberg, that moment came at a restaurant in New Orleans when she spotted a painting by Leroy Miranda Jr. “I just inquired about it, and we ended up going to his house and seeing all his work,” Greenberg says. While she’s been collecting art for the past five years, last year Greenberg began representing Miranda, including hosting an art show in her home during South by Southwest. She also took on Barcelona-based sculptor Diego Cabezas a!er originally spotting a piece of his through a fashion brand’s blog she follows on Instagram. “I like to diversify what I’m representing,” Greenberg says, noting that Instagram is her go-to source for discovering new talent. A!er shipping a container of Cabezas’s work from Spain to the U.S., and selling it almost faster than she could post photos, Greenberg’s arranged for the artist to come to Austin for six weeks and sculpt. Followers to her @Work. in.progress.gallery account, of which there are 10,000, can get the latest updates. For art admirers, Greenberg offers this advice: “Buy something you love or invest in a piece that makes you feel happy, that draws that out of you.” workinprogress.gallery


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The Collectors ART FANS FROM EVERY CORNER OF THE CITY SHARE THE STORY BEHIND THEIR FAVORITE PIECE BY CHARLOTTE SPRATT

BETTINA BARROW

PHOTOGR APH BY WYNN MYERS

Former actress turned lawyer turned film producer, Bettina Barrow lives in a modern South Austin abode with her husband and young daughter. When it comes to art buying, she tries not to be impulsive. “I hope to buy art that means something to me because of the subject matter or because of the artist,” she says. She is pictured in the living room of her Elizabeth Stanley-designed home, which she deems a more adult sitting area since it’s not exactly kid friendly. The painting above her fireplace is by NYC-based artist Robert Kelly and was acquired by Barrow last winter. She says: “I love the combination of Robert’s work with the ceramics and the color of the furniture. This space makes me happy.” tribeza.com

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JESSIE KATZ Restauranteur Jessie Katz’s most treasured piece of art is this etching by artist Jim Dine (1972), entitled “Braid.” Her grandparents owned an art gallery in San Antonio for 30 years, and the piece hung in their home for as long as Katz can remember. She inherited it, making it the most special piece of art in her home. It rests on her desk, next to painted roses she found at the City Wide Garage Sale. “I’ve been going there for 10 plus years now, and never miss it. The vendors are pretty special, and they have some amazing stories, too,” she says. The couple lives in Barton Hills in a bright and airy (and plant-filled space) along with their three chickens, a baby pig and two dogs. “I pretty much have a farm,” she says with a laugh. Art books that Jessie received from her grandmother line the room. “Inside every book are magazine or newspaper clippings on the artist that my grandmother represented. She annotated all of them. It feels like a surprise every time I find one,” she says. “It’s a nice way to stay connected to her.” When it comes to buying art, Jessie believes in following her intuition while not shying away from taking a risk. Katz will open a new restaurant and coffee shop with her husband Andy in the Windsor Park neighborhood in January.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY WYNN MYERS


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DAN DYER

PHOTOGRAPH BY DAGNY PIASECKI

Musican Dan Dyer lives in a cabin in the woods of Cedar Creek, a rural area east of Austin. There he has found a space to write music, tinker with his various welding projects. and throw some epic camp cooking parties. His inviting abode is full of the work of many artist friends like Butch Anthony, Jack Sanders, Evan Voyles, and Alexandra Valenti. “My basic philosophy when buying art is simple—”Do I love it?” he says. Above the mantle in his den where he usually starts each morning by journaling or reading, is a painting entitled “Milk Cow” by artist John Henry Toney. He says: “I love being able to put things on the mantel above the fireplace, and the bookshelves directly opposite are where I get to collect, compose and organize artifacts, books and other pieces that are meaningful to me.” tribeza.com

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JAMIE CHANDLEE

PHOTOGR APH BY DAGNY PIASECKI

Jamie Chandlee worked at the Facebook Austin office before becoming a partner in Rank & Style, a fashion website devoted to top 10 lists of the best in lifestyle products. Jamie and her husband Blake have collected many beautiful pieces for both their white stucco Mediterranean style home in Tarrytown and for their modern New York apartment which features paintings by well known artists like Peter Tunney and Lance Lestcher. The Chandlees travel around the world and have also acquired pieces in places like San Miguel, Mexico. “We like to buy art that has relevance or meaning to us,” she says. She is pictured with a piece entitled “Valet” that is by local artist Philip Durst. This is her second piece by the artist who she first fell in love with a!er buying one that he made entirely out of La Croix cans. “Valet” is made of valet tickets. “We love the colors, and how it pops in the space,” she says.” tribeza.com

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“ clothes mean nothing until someone

lives in them.” ~ M ARC JACO B S

Exhibition organized by Aperture Foundation, New York. David Campany and Denise Wolff, curators. This project is supported in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Support for this exhibition at the Blanton is provided by J.P. Morgan Chase. Details at www.blantonmuseum.org

9 LOCATIONS AROUND AUSTIN NOW AT DOMAIN NORTHSIDE

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Shop our cutting-edge apparel, unique accessories and gifts, as well as, our fabulous jewels!

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luxroxboutique.com

THROUGH JANUARY 1 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu FREE ADMISSION


LIFE + STYLE HOW WE LIVE RIGHT NOW A peek inside Austin’s new Central Library, an architectural fete by Lake Flato and Shepley Bulfinch. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEONID FURMANSKY

LO C A L LOV E

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ST YLE PROFILE

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LOC AL LOVE | LIFE + ST YLE

POP AUSTIN Now in its fourth year, this annual showcase features multimedia artists from around the world. Participants include LA street artist Mr. Brainwash, Beijing creators the Gao Brothers, and visual art from Austin’s own Bob Schneider. One-day pass: $20. At Fair Market, November 9–12. Visit popaustin.com

LOCAL LOVE

ART ALLIANCE AUSTIN’S ARTBASH

IT’S OFFICIAL — THE CIT Y OF AUSTIN AND THE POP AUSTIN INTERNATIONAL ART SHOW HAVE DECL ARED NOVEMBER AUSTIN ART MONTH. E XPLORE THE CRE ATIONS OF LOCAL AND GLOBAL TALENTS AT THESE EVENTS.

Compiled By Nicole Beckley

HOPS FOR HOPE During the second weekend of EAST, 20 breweries and 20 artists team up for two days of exciting visual experiences. Featuring large-scale murals and VR immersion, the event is produced by HOPE Events, the group behind the HOPE Outdoor Gallery. Now in its fourth year, expect music, food, and work from Shepard Fairey, Luis Angulo, and Mike Judge. Single-day tickets: $15. Fair Market, November 18 – 19. Visit 2017hopsforhope .splashthat.com

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Art Alliance Austin celebrates the start of EAST with this annual celebration. Focusing this year’s theme on ideas around immersion and mobility, seven Austin artists have created works addressing the topics. The work debuts at ARTBASH and will be on display to the public during EAST. General admission tickets: $45. Native Hostel, 807 E. 4th St., November 10. Visit artallianceaustin. org/artbash2017


CREEK SHOW

THE OPEN ROAD Beginning November 25, the Blanton Museum of Art presents a photography exhibition highlighting scenes from the open road. As car culture evolved in the post-World War II era, photographers crisscrossed the U.S. capturing images of rolling landscapes and everyday living. General admission tickets: $9. Blanton Museum of Art, November 25–January 7. Visit blantonmuseum.org

Downtown, after nighttime has fallen, take a stroll along Waller Creek and you’ll be met with an array of electric art. Six installations illuminate areas along the water with unique lightscapes as part of Waller Creek Conservancy’s fourth annual Creek Show. Free. Waller Creek, between 5th and 8th Streets, November 10–18. Visit creekshow.com

DANCING WITH DEATH

THE OPEN ROAD EXHIB ITON PHOTOGR APH BY STEPHEN SHORE. WALLER CREEK PHOTOGR APH BY AMY RPICE. DANCE S WITH DE ATH EXHIB ITION ART BY JOHN B ELL . E A ST AUSTIN STUDIO TOUR PHOTOGR APH BY ANDREW REINER .

In the 16th Century paintings, drawings and prints throughout Europe regularly featured images of the “dance of death.” Pieces in this exhibition offer various depictions of mortality, from the jovial to the macabre. General admission tickets: $9. Blanton Museum of Art, until November 26. Visit blantonmuseum.org

BIG MEDIUM’S EAST & DUE EAST Kicking off on November 9 with Due EAST, the East Austin Studio Tour (EAST) runs for two weekends, offering the public a chance to peek into the studios of working artists. The free tour includes over 500 artists, displaying work in galleries, temporary exhibitions, and private and public spaces. Free. Various locations. Due EAST, November 9. EAST, November 11–12, 18–19. Visit east.bigmedium.org tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

Austin’s New Central Library WITH UNIQUE FE ATURES AND GR ANDLY SCALED PUBLIC ART, THERE’S A LOT MORETO CHECK OUT THAN BOOKS By Anne Bruno Photographs by Leonid Furmansky

Above: facing Lady Bird Lake, the Central Library takes a place of prominence in Austin’s ever-evolving skyline. Right: inspired by Austin’s grackles, artist Christian Moeller brings a few of the birds inside with his kinetic sculpture appropriately titled “CAW.”

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

I

Susan Lambe, the city’s Art in Public Places administrator, oversees Austin’s collection of more than 250 pieces of public art, located in places like the airport, convention center, parks and streetscapes.

F YOU ’ VE DRIVEN, WALKED, OR BIKED DOWN CESAR CHAVEZ

Street over the past several years, you’ve likely noticed that with so much going on — and up — it’s hard to stay focused on what’s in front of you. Now that the construction fences are gone and the doors of the city’s most anticipated public building are open, it’s time to stop what you’re doing and take a look in and around Austin’s new Central Library. Boasting 200,000 square feet over six floors, the $120 million library says a lot about Austin today: what we value and where we’re going. The building sits near the mouth of Shoal Creek at Lady Bird Lake and commands a prominent place in a skyline that the city’s first permanent settlers, who occupied the same spot in the 1800s, could have never imagined. Knowledge, technology, and inspiration are the new library’s watchwords and an in-person visit reveals the many ways each word comes to life. Located in the Seaholm EcoDistrict, the heart of downtown’s urban revitalization, the library’s flagship facility was designed for ultra-flexibility and to accommodate a lot more than books over the next 100 years. The building’s overall design is the result of an architectural joint venture between the prestigious San Antonio and Austin firm Lake Flato and one of the country’s oldest architectural practices, Shepley Bulfinch, whose portfolio includes university and public libraries around the world. David Lake, who grew up near Mount Bonnell, says that the building ref lects the unique kind of energy Austin is known for. “The feel is exuberant,” he notes. “The skylight in the atrium beams light down, and it bounces off every opaque surface in the space. As you climb the stairs, you’re always moving toward the light at the top.” Lake says, “It’s like moving upward and advancing in knowledge.” Features that make the new Central Library a distinctly Austin-centric gathering space include an on-site cafe; a bike corral with room for 200 bicycles; a gift shop featuring local, sustainable literary-themed merchandise; a cooking demo area; two reading porches; a 350-seat special events center indoors, and an outdoor amphitheater; a green roof lush with native plants; and a solar energy generating system. You can also expect all the high-tech goodies a city like Austin demands in the form of 150 self-checkout devices, three RFID-enabled book-return drops that look more like ATMs, public-use Macs and PCs, and a tech petting zoo. And not to neglect the basics, the Central Library has a capacity for 350,000 volumes, with 589 comfy, colorful seats giving patrons plenty of choices for the perfect spot to settle in and stay a while.

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Not to be outdone by the stunning views and volumes of fact and fiction, the new public art commissioned for the Central Library provides an equal source of inspiration. The energy it brings to the site is palpable, with work that’s large-scale, kinetic, and experiential. Susan Lambe, who oversees the City of Austin’s Art in Public Places program, explains that — as has been the case with the city’s collection of over 250 pieces in the airport, convention center, parks, and other public places — the selection process for art at the new library was a careful one, both long and complex. It involved input from the public, and a selection panel of art professionals advised by stakeholders, as well as representatives from the city’s Art in Public Places panel, Arts Commission, and ultimately the Austin City Council. “It’s a privilege and a responsibility,” Lambe says. “It’s a very thoughtful process, because our job is to bring public art to the community in the most beneficial way.” More than just enhancing a public space, it entails creating what ultimately become Austin’s cultural landmarks. “The artwork needs to respect and respond to the city’s values. Each piece must also be sustainable, something the city can maintain on a long-term basis,” says Lambe. The art at the new Central Library meets all of these criteria and more. The 37-foot-tall signature sculpture installed on the sunbathed wall of the atrium is appropriately titled “CAW,” as it most closely resembles a giant red cuckoo clock overtaken by blackbirds. From the side, you can catch a glimpse of the motor (built in Germany by one of the world’s oldest clock-making firms), which controls the gentle motion of the giant, swinging pendulum.


Staircases and floating walkways meander through the six-story atrium.

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

‘‘

It’s a privilege and a responsibility … More than just enhancing public space, [public art] entails creating what ultimately become Austin’s cultural landmarks.” An LED screen featuring a mystical blackbird responds to motion around it, causing the bird to strike lifelike poses.

Mounted on an adjacent wall on the fifth level of the building is an accompanying oversized, circular LED screen depicting a mystical blackbird set in a Texas landscape. The screen’s frame contains a sensor, which responds to movement around it and sets the bird in motion; its head moves into natural poses instantly familiar to anyone who’s encountered Austin’s prolific grackle population. Lambe recounts that Christian Moeller, who created “CAW,” says he was entranced by the grackles on his first visit to Austin, many years before he knew he would create art here. The artist, whose portfolio includes largescale work around the world, researched blackbirds and discovered their significant presence in literature and mythology. The representation of the birds, with whom we share our city and who carry on about their business just outside the library’s walls, in combination with the homey feeling of a cuckoo clock contributes a strangely domestic element to the library’s overall ambience. Moeller notes the communal nature of blackbirds’ behavior and that some types of blackbirds are among “the most intelligent animals on the planet ... What do I want to convey to the people of Austin? Nothing they wouldn’t already know. You don’t have to like them. Just live with them like we do with any other neighbor.” Lake, who was present at the artist selection, says he appreciates the choice of Moeller’s “CAW” because, among other reasons, it’s “very particular to Austin.” Immediately outside the library are completely different kinds of art to

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take in. “Wander,” created by local artists Chris Gannon, Chadwick Wood, and Brockett Davidson, is a playful interactive piece that starts at a sculpture called the “Beacon.” It invites participants on a real-life “choose your own adventure” that takes players to historic sites, public art installations, and the eclectic nooks and crannies of Austin’s urban core. Working with local writers and illustrators, the artists created four narratives accessed via a mobile app or a printed piece checked out from the library. Some of the art seamlessly incorporates public safety into its design. Probably the most technically site-specific piece is “Power Picket,” by artists Nader Tehrani and Dan Gallagher. By necessity, the work straddles the line between art and infrastructure. The installation, composed of pigmented precast concrete pillars on its north and south sides and perforated metal panels on the east and west, acts as a physical barrier around the EcoDistrict’s electric power substation. “’Power Picket’ is a beautifully artistic solution to a real-world problem of safety and security,” Lambe explains. “The cost to move the electric substation was prohibitive, so Austin Energy asked us to collaborate on a solution.” Not only does the work address practical concerns, but it also offers differing visual experiences to passersby, depending on their speed and mode of travel. “It looks one way to a pedestrian walking by, and offers a completely different experience to someone seeing it from the window of a moving car, a bike, or a nearby high-rise.” Austin artist Judd Graham’s work, located along the street between Shoal Creak and the power station, also incorporates functional safety in


The rooftop garden, lush with native plants and a Live Oak, offers spectacular views of the city and Lady Bird Lake.

a very organic way. His work titled “Array” is comprised of hand-forged and densely textured steel sleeves, which are installed over nine of the bollards that define the pedestrian space from the road. The companion piece, “Spin,” made from the same materials as “Array,” measures seven feet tall and rotates on a hidden axis. As its name suggests, the piece begs for a friendly nudge to move the heavy pillar from stillness into spinning motion. The most massive (and, for kids, possibly most huggable) of the new public art installations is “Crullers,” a group of three pieces inspired by beloved

animals like elephants and hippos and the many definitions of family. Texas artist Sharon Engelstein used steel armature, milled foam, and pigmented glass fiber-reinforced concrete to create the imaginative grouping. Big Mama Baby and Little Mama nestle together on the grass across from the library, seeming to wait patiently for Tall Solo, who appears to have wandered over to Third Street and West Avenue. Though not representing any family of creatures in particular, “Crullers” still conveys a sense of kinship; each member looking out for one another, right at home in their new neighborhood with the library at its center. tribeza.com

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Photo by Diana Walker; Liberty, Gijs Bakker. Pin photography by John Bigelow Taylor: American Flag, Ann Hand; Serpent, Designer Unknown; Cowgirl Hat, Ultra Craft.

LBJ Presidential Library | Now open through January 21, 2018 Step inside the fascinating, bold, and distinctive world of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright in the exhibition Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection. Experience the jewelry and stories related to more than 200 pins and brooches Albright wore as diplomatic, social, and political tools. Only at the LBJ Library-see a display of jewelry worn by Lady Bird and Lyndon Johnson. LBJ Library exhibition sponsored by Lexus of Austin and Lakeway. Exhibition made possible by Museum of Arts & Design and Bren Simon, and for the exhibition catalog by St. John Knits. Read My Pins will be accompanied by a book, Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box, published by HarperCollins. LBJ Library Exhibition Sponsor:

www.LBJLIBRARY.org

A Christmas Affair

The Palmer Events Center | November 15-19, 2017 SHOPPING & EXCITING EVENTS TO KICK OFF THE HOLIDAY SEASON: PREVIEW PARTY & SHOPPING | NOVEMBER 15 BRUNCH | NOVEMBER 16 SANTA PARTIES | NOVEMBER 17-19 EARLY SHOPPING & CHAMPAGNE | NOVEMBER 18 TEEN & TWEEN FASHION SHOW | NOVEMBER 18

MARKET DAYS |NOVEMBER 16-19 BUY TICKETS ONLINE AT: JLAUSTIN.ORG JLAUSTIN.ORG

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#ACHRISTMASAFFAIR


FOOD + THOUGHT A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON OUR LOCAL DINING SCENE

Boiler Nine’s industrial yet warm interiors are a welcoming spot to enjoy one of our favorites like the Berkshire Pork Ribs. PHOTOGRAPH BY LEAH MUSE

K AREN’S PICK

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DINING GUIDE

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

Boiler Nine Bar + Grill CHOOSE FROM BRUNCH, LUNCH OR DINNER, OR THREE DIFFERENT PL ACES TO DINE, OPTIONS ARE APLENT Y AT THIS HOPPING DOWNTOWN SPOT By Karen Spezia Photographs by Leah Muse

W

HEN AUSTINITES BELLYACHE ABOUT CHIC NEW

restaurants threatening our town’s special weirdness, I direct their attention to places like Boiler Nine, a new eatery housed in an old power plant. How’s that for weird? And somehow, like most of Austin’s unique creations, it seems perfectly normal in our funky town. Since 1949, the Seaholm Power Plant has been an iconic art deco landmark along the shores of Lady Bird Lake. But for the past two decades, the hulking concrete structure lay dormant. That is until some visionary developers transformed it into a thriving mixed-use space hosting office and residential tenants, plus popular retailers like Trader Joe’s and True Food Kitchen. In July 2016, Boiler Nine moved into a sprawling 11,000-squarefoot, four-story space, designed by Austin’s STG Design, who honored the building’s original art deco roots. The result is a dazzling industrial-steampunk mashup. The multilevel restaurant offers three dining and drinking experiences — a rooftop bar, a multi level dining room, and a subterranean lounge that formerly housed its namesake boiler — each with its own unique menu. On the top floor is the Deck Nine Observatory Bar, an open-air patio with panoramic views of downtown, Lady Bird Lake, and the distant Hill Country. Its menu has a light and breezy vibe, featuring nibbles and drinks that lean toward festive frozen drinks, porch cocktails, and beachy highballs. We dove into a refreshing frozen Rio Verde cocktail, blended with tequila, Chartreuse, grapefruit, lime, and basil. The Negroni Special was classic

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From eggplant flatbread to savory salmon, Boiler Nine delivers on every front; With powdered sugar and chicory sauce, the beignets are a delectable way to start, or end the day; The interiors honor the building’s history as a power plant.

perfection, with gin, vermouth, Campari, and Gran Classico. Green curry shrimp skewers and spicy fried cauliflower were tasty bites as we watched the sun set over Lady Bird Lake. The main dining area, Boiler Nine Bar + Grill, is located on the middle two floors that overlook the open kitchen, wood-burning grill, and soaring cocktail bar. There’s also a small patio that opens onto a lush green courtyard. The modern American menu showcases wood-fired and -roasted dishes with bold, smoky flavors. For starters, the Beer Bread has become a cult favorite. The gooey sweet-and-savory roll is seasoned with caramelized onion, smoked beer fat butter, and barbecue salt and served with homemade beer jam. For sharing, the sausage platter is a sampling of three robust sausages: andouille, fennel-ginger, and smoked beef. Save room for the star entrée: oak-roasted chicken, a succulent breast with perfectly crisped skin atop charred tomatoes and zucchini, hearty croutons, fresh basil, and a drizzle of red wine vinaigrette. It’s spectacular. All of executive chef Jason Stude’s dishes pair nicely with the impressive selections of wine director Paula Rester, such as a crisp Apremont, a smooth Spanish Garnacha Blanca, or a racy white Italian Friuli.

Desserts are also terrific. The fried honey hand pies are light and tender, served à la mode with purple lavender ice cream. The Milk Chocolate Crunch is a grown-up candy bar: dense and rich and laced with peanut butter and smoked salt. It paired beautifully with a glass of ripe, juicy South African Cinsault. For nightcaps, head down to the lower-level Boiler Room, a basement cocktail laboratory that feels like a vintage speakeasy. Flickering candles, pulsing music, posh nibbles, and boozy cocktails are the rule at this sultry subterranean drinking den. You can make a night of it at Boiler Nine, roaming from level to level, or make a beeline for the area that suits your current mood. With Boiler Nine, La Corsha Hospitality Group (Second Bar + Kitchen, Mattie’s at Green Pastures) has created a winning concept that reflects Austin’s desire to embrace its funky past while still moving toward the future. BOILER NINE 800 CESAR CHAVEZ (512) 220-9990 | BOILERNINE.COM

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24 DINER

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

3663 Bee Caves Rd.

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a

burgers, all-day breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

BRIBERY BAKERY

ALCOMAR 1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161 Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner, weekend brunch, and start your visit with a blood-orange margarita and the crab and guacamole.

2013 Wells Branch Pkwy., #109 | (512) 531 9832 1900 Simond Ave., #300 | (512) 297 2720 Pastry chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confections. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine, and coffee.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR 319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884

Upscale casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting;

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas,

perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino), and locally sourced, seasonally inspired

ASTI TRATTORIA

chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails,

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

local beers on tap, and boutique wines from around

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

the world.

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

BAR CHI SUSHI

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the f lavors of her

sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

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FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

Nothing compliments the bold flavors of traditional Interior Mexican cuisine like a superb premium tequila or mezcal. Special care is taken not only with making the selections, but they’re also served to you in a vessel most appropriate for your ultimate exerience of that spirit.

culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce! Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert, alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029 Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamón Serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some sangria and enjoy the bites.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

EASY TIGER

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnam-

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

ese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and sweet

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

EL ALMA

EPICERIE

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoy-

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

ing delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday

here for a bite on Sundays.

3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

LAS PALOMAS

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 101

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior

locally sourced food with an international twist at reason-

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh FREEDMEN’S

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953 Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

CAFÉ JOSIE 1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226 Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a prix fixe allyou-can-eat dining experience. The à la carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061 South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

the desserts and even the cocktail offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue

2nd Street: 238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463 Domain: 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463

on a charming outdoor patio.

CRUaWINEbar.com

GERALDINE’S

CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect compliment to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine-preservation system with temperature control ensures optimal taste and appreciation. Toast to Summer at CRU.

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755 Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative cocktails, shareable plates, and scenic views of Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar manager Jen Keyser. tribeza.com

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GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

OLAMAIE

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides mod-

Rustic continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local, and

Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek

ern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mortadella

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with

egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry thyme cocktail.

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio

concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

more trendy goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do your-

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

self a favor and order the biscuits.

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

LA BARBECUE

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696

PIEOUS

Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner specials are

Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbe-

12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041

whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

cue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trail-

Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer,

er, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up

Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combi-

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

nation of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

L’ESTELLE HOUSE 88 1/2 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588 This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional French and Southern cuisine. Think late-night Parisian-style burgers with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for Sunday brunch.

L’OCA D’ORO

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876 Located in the Mueller development, chef Fiore Tedesco delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy

made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket is a crowd favorite and a must-try.

REBEL PIZZA BAR 7858 Shoal Creek Blvd. | (512) 457 5757 Along with its unique street-art interiors, Rebel Pizza Bar delivers updated takes on bar classics, including hot wings and waff le fries. But the pizza is the real star of this cozy restaurant, like the Get Up Stand Up pie, which packs a powerhouse of flavors that will leave you jostling for the last slice.

impressive cocktails, wine, and a great craft beer selection.

SALTY SOW

MONGERS MARKET + KITCHEN

1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337

2401 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 215 8972

Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including

Chef Shane Stark brings a casual Texas Gulf Coast sensibili-

a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu,

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

ty to East Austin by slinging fresh seafood in the kitchen and

heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

at the counter.

late-night noshing.

NAU’S ENFIELD DRUG

SNOOZE

from pastry chef Mary Katherine Curren.

JEFFREY’S

1115 West Lynn St. | (512) 476 1221

3800 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 428 8444

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

An Austin institution since 1951, this all-American soda

This Denver original serves up brunch classics with

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

fountain within an antiquated drug store gives guests an

a creative twist seven days a week, with two locations

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

unmatched experience founded on tradition. The food is

on either end of Lamar. With friendly service in an

the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcom-

simple and classic, rivaled only by the scrumptious shakes

updated diner atmosphere, Snooze is sure to start your

ing atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an Austin staple.

and hand-mixed old-fashioned sodas.

day off right.

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THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary inf luences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambience, the salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

WINEBELLY 6705 Hwy 290, # 503 | (512) 584 808 3016 Guadalupe St., Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193 Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro maintains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors. WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.


A L O O K B E H I N D 5…5

Ellsworth Kelly’s Austin

T

HE MOST EXCITING EVENT IN THE AUSTIN ART WORLD IS COMING UP WITH THE

unveiling of Ellsworth Kelly’s highly anticipated chapel-like building titled “Austin” at the Blanton Museum of Art. The famed painter, printmaker, and sculptor explores four motifs in the stunning structure — spectrum, Black and White, Color Grid, and Totem. The 2,715-square-foot building will feature luminous colored glass windows, a totemic wood sculpture, and 14 black-and-white stone panels in marble. “An intimate stone building with vaulted ceilings and brilliant colored glass windows, Austin will be realized on the grounds of the Blanton and will serve as an alluring gateway, connecting the city and The University of Texas at Austin,” Blanton director Simone Wicha says. “To be built along the sight lines of the State Capitol, Austin will be nestled within one of the largest green spaces on the university’s campus.” The Museum will celebrate the February opening with a temporary exhibit, “Form into Spirit: Ellsworth Kelly’s Austin,” which will show how the concept for the structure first came about back in the late 1940s and early ’50s, when Kelly was living in France. The first models and designs for the building were created in the mid-1980s. Said Kelly to The New York Times in 2015, when the project was announced: “Go there and rest your eyes, rest your mind. Enjoy it.”

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LONDON GREY RUGS

3001 PALM WAY STE. B | AUSTIN, TEXAS 78758 | DOMAIN NORTHSIDE 512-839-8999 | LONDONGREYRUGS.COM


TRIBEZA November 2017  

The Arts Issue No. 195