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All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as tribeza.com legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

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Mint Santa Teresa as featured in this month's Travel Pick.

CONTENTS

MARCH / MUSIC + FILM

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R&B singer Mélat photographed by Matt Rainwaters. Actress Anna Margaret Hollyman and producer Bettina Barrow photographed by Claire Schaper.

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DEPARTMENTS

ON THE COVER Gary Clark Jr. photographed at Antone's Nightclub by Harper Smith.

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Social Hour p. 22

Travel Pick p. 92

Kristin’s Column p. 28

Karen’s Pick p. 96

Tribeza Talk p. 30

Dining Guide p. 98

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 32

A Look Behind p. 102

Music Pick p. 33

FEATURES

Art Pick p. 34 Event Pick p. 36 Community Profile p. 42 Community Pick p. 44 Style Profile p. 84 Living with Leah p. 88

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A moment from New Orleans' Seaworthy restaurant.

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Peaceful, Easy Feeling p. 48 Tuned Up p. 56 Heaven Sent p. 68 Chosen One p. 74


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EDITOR'S LETTER

favorite for all of us to create, as it happens to be Tribeza's birthday month. Last year’s March issue was my first with the magazine, and to say I was a tad overwhelmed would be an understatement. Surrounded by musical stars, blues legends and film pros, not to mention all of the talented photographers and writers who captured said stars, legends and pros, at times I felt like a starstruck child, albeit one with a deadline. In the year since, the Tribeza team has played tennis with Ty Haney, shared a picnic table with Aaron Franklin and Tyson Cole, and saddled up in the summer heat, all for the sake of fall fashion, and that’s merely the tip of the iceberg. And I now wonder how we ever lived before meeting our multitalented art director, September Broadhead, who can be seen at right giving some serious blue steel from the bed of a vintage Chevy Cheyenne. Speaking of vintage cars, we borrowed three for this month’s “Tuned Up” feature (thanks Camille, Tim and Lydia) where we placed our favorite musicians into iconic “Dazed and Confused,” scenes. The 1993 classic seemed like the perfect vehicle (pun intended) to capture the songwriters, singers and artists we can’t get enough of. Thankfully Tomar Williams, the Los Coast crew, Torino Black, Mélat and the guys from Duncan Fellows were game to play the ‘70s part. We were all beyond excited when Gary Clark Jr. said yes to being interviewed and photographed for this month’s magazine. I have loved his music for years and am blown away by his latest album, “This Land.” The singer-songwriter and blues savant first played the Antone’s stage at the ripe age of 15, and 20 years later we captured him in the same club for this month’s “Chosen One” feature. He couldn’t have been more fun and easy to work with. But it’s never all about the music. Thanks to filmmakers like Richard Linklater and Robert Rodriguez Austin is increasingly a destination for making movies. Bettina Barrow moved to Austin when she and actress Lily Rabe decided to start their production company, Kill Claudio Productions, and has now created two projects with Austin-based actress Anna Margaret Hollyman: last year’s “Maude” and this year’s “Sister Aimee.” The film is the wild tale of America’s first evangelist preacher who may or may not have staged her own kidnapping in the Mexican desert. We sat down with Barrow and Hollyman (“Heaven Sent”) to find out more. Despite our best and most professional intentions the friends immediately disarmed us with their Drew Barrymore impressions, self-deprecating pregnancy humor and on-the-spot pedicures. My kind of ladies. All that and much more to come in the following pages. Enjoy y’all. Margaret Williams margaret@tribeza.com

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y H O L LY CO WA R T

W

ELCOME TO THE MUSIC + FILM ISSUE. A FAVORITE OF OUR READERS AND CERTAINLY A


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

M A R C H 2 01 9

18 YEARS

N O. 2 1 1

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Eyelash Extensions Lash Lifts Lash Tinting Brow Shaping Brow Tints Full Service Hair Salon

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA AND EVENTS MANAGER

512.628.0175 4410 Medical Pkwy Austin, 78756

Claire Schaper

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Krissy Hearn

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Shaleena Keefer

OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Joe Layton

PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Leah Ashley Nicole Beckley Anne Bruno Holly Cowart Hannah Morrow Hannah J. Phillips Kathryn Stouffer COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Holly Cowart Douglas Friedman Jonathan Garza Kristen Kilpatrick Joe Layton Matt Rainwaters Claire Schaper Harper Smith Jeff Wilson

ILLUSTR ATORS

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

Jessica Fontenot S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


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SOCIAL HOUR “THE FEARLESS PRINCESS AND THE RESCUE DOGS” BOOK RELEASE Local author and animal shelter volunteer photographer Bill Wilson celebrated the launch of his latest children’s book, “The Fearless Princess and the Rescue Dogs,” on January 17 at Elevé Cosmetics. Ten percent of all sales from the book will be donated to Austin Pets Alive!

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INTERIORS TOUR KICKOFF PARTY Tribeza celebrated the return of its Interiors Tour, presented by SWBC Mortgage, with a kickoff party at WeWork Barton Springs on January 24. Guests grabbed bites from Grizzeldas and McGuire Moorman Hospitality while mingling over Treaty Oak Distilling and Nine Banded Whiskey cocktails. Big Swig sparkling water and Live kombucha were also on hand. Pop-ups by Loot Finer Goods, MirMir Photo and House of Margot Blair helped everyone gear up for a day of house-hopping.

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After the tour on January 27, design lovers gathered at Side Street Home. Everyone enjoyed drinks from Santa Margherita wines, SUSTO Mezcal, High Brew Coffee, Caffe del Fuego and Rambler Water. Tiny Boxwoods, House Wine and Harper & Soul Provisions provided snacks, while Side Street Home displayed a stunning selection of home goods.

“THE FEARLESS PRINCESS AND THE RESCUE DOGS” BOOK RELEASE: 1. Nikki, Matt & Clara Boehm 2. Amy & Emerson Tondre INTERIORS TOUR KICKOFF PARTY: 3. Cameron Breed, Daniel Reali & Sarah Thomas 4. Fritzi Chavez, Brittney Williams & Scott Martin INTERIORS TOUR WRAP PARTY: 5. Moran Swain & Sydney Gawlik 6. Neville Hoad, Martin Zing & Christopher Oakland

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O E L AY TO N & J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

INTERIORS TOUR WRAP PARTY


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SOCIAL HOUR

DELL CHILDREN’S CREATE HOPE GALA Dell Children’s Foundation hosted its annual Create Hope Gala at the JW Marriott on January 19. The glamorous night saw community leaders, sponsors and guests join together to honor Dell Children’s and its mission of providing a healing place where kids can be kids. Nearly $1.7 million was raised, going toward providing vital resources and programs for the medical center’s children and their families.

HRC AUSTIN GALA DINNER

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On January 26, the Human Rights Campaign held its Austin Gala Dinner at the JW Marriott. The annual event brought together nearly 1,000 of Austin’s most influential citizens to celebrate the LGBTQ community’s successes and further engage in the important work of the Human Rights Campaign. Featured musician Shea Diamond gave a powerful performance, while Hannah Gadsby, Sylvia López and Todd Canon were the honorees of the night.

On January 30, Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar rolled out the red carpet for the U.S. premiere of “The Gentleman Driver,” a documentary by filmmaker Mario Mattei that gives an inside look into four world-class businessmen who moonlight as race car drivers at the highest levels of motorsports. After the screening, moviegoers headed to The Highball for an after-party, where they got a chance to chat with gentleman drivers Mike Guasch and Ricardo Gonzalez. DELL CHILDREN’S CREATE HOPE GALA: 1. Kumara Wilcoxon & Louisiana Longwell 2. Katherine & Matt Gallagher HRC AUSTIN GALA DINNER: 3. Erin Gurak & Sylvia López 4. Dustin Reid & Bobby Covington THE "GENTLEMAN DRIVER" PREMIERE AND PARTY: 5. Bijou Finnley, Tatiana Arias, Camille Armstrong & Amy Edwards 6. Aidan Masher & Tara Chapman

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I G U E L A N G E L & J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

THE "GENTLEMAN DRIVER" PREMIERE AND PARTY


SOCIAL HOUR

2019 ANGELINA EBERLY LUNCHEON On February 1, the Austin History Center Association’s Angelina Eberly Luncheon brought together 300 history enthusiasts to The Austin Club, home of the Old Millett Opera House. Starting with a coffee reception accompanied by music from pianist Margaret Wright, the event raised essential funds to help support the organization, with a portion of the proceeds funding the Austin History Center of the Austin Public Library.

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CASABLANCA GALA

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On February 2 at the JW Marriott, CASA of Travis County highlighted its mission of building brighter futures for Austin’s children with its 26th annual CASAblanca Gala. Austin Children’s Choir and aerialists from Duo Ascension kicked off the night with special performances before the telling of unforgettable stories about children and their CASA volunteers. Due to the generosity of 900 attendees, a record-breaking $1.17 million was raised, giving 585 children the voice of a CASA mentor.

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Taste of the Nation for No Kid Hungry began its 2019 season in Austin on February 7 at Fair Market. Local chef Bryce Gilmore of Barley Swine and New Waterloo culinary director Amanda Rockman cohosted the evening, which showcased 30 of Austin’s best culinary artists and mixologists for a truly delectable night.

2019 ANGELINA EBERLY LUNCHEON: 1. Charles Peveto, Luci Baines Johnson, Nancy Toombs & Pastor Steve Manning 2. Dr. Andrew Carlson, Dr. Charlotte Canning & Dr. Marcus McQuirter CASABLANCA GALA: 3. Donella Thorpe, Yolanda Conyers & Candace Wilson 4. Ashley Wright TASTE OF THE NATION FOR NO KID HUNGRY: 5. Chef Michael Fojtasek 6. Chef John Brand & Chef Bryce Gilmore

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TASTE OF THE NATION FOR NO KID HUNGRY


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

About a Girl By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Jessica Fontenot

28 MARCH 2019 |

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I

love it when I figure out that my kids have not seen one of my thinking that he may not be there, no goodbye, no nothing, just gone. favorite old movies. I suddenly become obsessed with the idea of He wants his brilliant friend to use his brain and make a great life, not watching it with them, like somehow it will connect me to them just work construction and stay tethered to their decaying South Boston in a new way, or maybe it simply connects me back to myself? It neighborhood. A perfect illustration for my about-to-launch daughter usually begins with me shrieking: about what it means to love someone enough that you are willing to “WhatdoyouMEANyouhaven’tseen(fillintheblankmovietitle)?!?!” transcend yourself and let her go. There are things that a film can say, They look at me sideways and say something like, “Uh, that staring at a screen and watching another life story unfold, a parable that movie is old.” speaks what we cannot say to each other, or maybe not quite yet. Yeah, well, so am I (kind of). Then I try to finagle a movie night, which My undoing came at the end of the film, the scene between Damon is not the easiest thing to do with a teenager who either has heaps of and his therapist, Robin Williams, that was the culmination of all their homework or wants to be anyplace other than with me when the sun sets. therapeutic work. A breakthrough, a teary hug and the words that have I somehow recently got my daughter to watch the classic film “Good Will become a mantra of unconditional love: “It’s not your fault. It’s not your Hunting.” I know, can you believe she had not seen it before? fault.” Years of abuse, neglect, foster homes and attachment issues We Favored dinner, sat by the fire and ordered up the movie on iTunes. dissolved by persistent love, humor and acceptance. This speaks to me as I was in heaven; she was likely in purgatory. When I explained that the a woman, a mother, a friend and as a future therapist. It speaks volumes screenplay started as a final project for a playwriting about how love really does heal people and set us all class back when Matt Damon was a student at free. Williams’ death in recent years made this scene Harvard, she was appropriately intrigued. The film all the more painful and poignant, how a person "... LOVE REALLY cost a mere $10 million to produce in 1997, so part of who devoted his life to making other people laugh DOES HEAL PEOPLE it looks pretty dated, especially the fight scene — but, struggled so deeply to find his own joy and light. I hey, Matt Damon wasn’t Jason Bourne yet, so we will want to say, it’s not your fault either, Robin. AND SET US ALL cut him some slack. When Will Hunting finally realized and accepted FREE." I knew I loved this movie when it came out so many his own worth, he was ready to build a real life for years ago. At the time I saw it, I was a year away from himself. Ready to go on the big job interview, honor getting married and living overseas, two years from having my son. But his intellect and test his limits. Ready to take the car his friends bought I didn’t know any of these things, not yet. The scenes carried weight with for him and drive out to California to “go see about a girl.” Sometimes we me then, but nothing like now. Maybe it was because I was sitting on have to see a film again, after life and love have tumbled us around a bit, the sofa, next to my 17-year-old daughter and seeing the film through to really understand and appreciate it. Or see it with someone we love both of our eyes at once. Or the fact that I was missing my 19-year-old and allow it to speak without words what needs to be said from one heart son, away at college. Or maybe it’s that I finally have the compassion to another without anything lost in translation. that becomes the Rosetta stone for understanding the language of the That scene dissolved me, striking my heart center and rendering me underdog, whom we have all been at one time or another once we have speechless in a way it never did 22 years ago, when I was young and lived a bit. When Damon, aka Will Hunting, out-intellects the pompous thought passion was everywhere, in everyone, and love and connection ponytailed Harvard asshole at the bar and gets the cute girl’s phone were so easy to find. That is the kind of love I want at long last for me, number, slapping it against the glass of the café window with the iconic and I want it one day for my children — to be this person, to be with this “You like apples? How about them apples?” there is a part of every single person. The kind of person who will work through her crap, remove the feeling human that wants to stand up, scream, “YESSSSSsssss!” and debris and the resistance she has built against love, and bust through to high-five or hug the kid. the other side of fear and limitation and really, really live. Or how about when Ben Aff leck tells Damon that the best part of his To be the kind of person who has the courage to venture into the day is the 15 seconds walking up to Damon’s door every morning and unknown, and go and see about a girl.

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Keeping It WEIRD In his latest book, “Austin to ATX,” Joe Nick Patoski details what makes Austin truly Austin, from the natural beauty of places like Barton Springs to the music makers of “Austin City Limits,” lending a conversational style to the telling of the city’s history. Released through Texas A&M University Press, Patoski’s 10th book also ponders the survival of the city’s weirdness, with the changes to South Congress, Rainey Street and Austinites themselves. But what could be more Austin than thinking about how Austin used to be? JOENICKP.COM

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

At the Girls Impact the World Film Festival, high school and college students will harness the power of film to shine a light on issues that affect women. Presented by Connecther and judged by filmmakers and philanthropists, including Eloise DeJoria and Christy Turlington Burns, the festival selects powerful short films tackling topics like education, the wage gap and women’s health. The winning films will be screened on April 14 at the St. Andrew’s Dell Fine Arts Theater. CONNECTHER.ORGGITW

Fine TUNED “It dawned on me when we were cutting vocals, every song is kind of a comment about hope,” musician Ben Dickey says. For his new album, “A Glimmer on the Outskirts,” Dickey wrote 25 songs in two weeks. “That’s kind of how I work,” Dickey says. “If I get thunderstruck with a song, it’s pretty guaranteed that at least four or five will satellite around it.”

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“Glimmer” is the first release from SexHawkeBlack Records, a newly formed label from Charlie Sexton, Ethan Hawke and Louis Black. The group came together while filming “Blaze,” the Hawke-directed film about musician Blaze Foley, played by Dickey. While Hawke and Dickey had been friends for years, “Blaze” marked Dickey’s

acting debut. “Once the process started, it’s so musical, it’s so much like performing a song, which was a surprise to me,” Dickey says. “The instrument is sort of your voice, your body, your presence … I was like, this makes a lot of sense, I like this a whole lot.” BENDICKEYMUSIC.COM

P H OTO G R A P H B Y WAT T C A S E Y, CO U R T E S Y O F TA M U P R E S S , T Y E S C H E A W E S T, R E T T P E E K , C R U Z G A R C I A A N D S O N Y P I C T U R E S

TRIBEZ A

WHO Run the World?


KID

APPROVED While the gaming industry is blowing up, how can parents make sure that what their kids see through channels like YouTube and Twitch is appropriate? That was the question posed by Gerald Youngblood and Dan Chiu, who founded Tankee, a platform featuring kid-safe video game content. Launched in 2018, Tankee will be one of five Austin-based companies in this year’s SXSW startup pitch competition.

Wide Open Spaces On 200 acres on the outskirts of Austin sits New Republic Studios — a creative campus for the film community. Formerly Spiderwood Studios, New Republic celebrated its one-year anniversary in October. “We’ve had about 50 productions come through our doors this first year, so it’s been great,” says Mindy Raymond, New Republic’s president. With a mix of office spaces, soundstages and versatile landscapes, the facility can accommodate a variety of types of productions. And it just premiered its first feature film, “Sister Aimee,” at Sundance. “We’re able to let folks know what we’re doing,” Raymond says, “that we’re really investing in filmmakers and their projects.”

TANKEE.COM

NEWREPUBLICSTUDIOS.COM

CRE ATIVE CALLING Before the Austin film scene started buzzing with the likes of Richard Linklater’s “Slacker,” Catherine Hardwicke was studying architecture at UT Austin and thinking of ways to use her creativity. “I thought, as I started watching movies and animated films, you get to build special worlds and be so creative,” Hardwicke says. After studying animation and film at UCLA, Hardwicke worked with Linklater as a production designer. “He would show us really cool movies — an early Austin Film Society kind of vibe,” Hardwicke says. Inspired to direct, Hardwicke helmed “Thirteen,” her Oscar-nominated first feature, and “Twilight,” the first film in the blockbuster series. For her latest, “Miss Bala,” an action movie starring Gina Rodriguez, Hardwicke turned a creative focus to hiring, working with a 95 percent Latinx cast and crew. “In a way, as a director you kind of lead the charge and say, ‘I want to do it this way,’ and everybody got on board with that.” MISSBALA.MOVIE tribeza.com

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC JEFF TWEEDY

March 4 Paramount Theatre LUKAS GRAHAM

March 6 ACL Live at The Moody Theater DALE WATSON

March 6 Long Center

TAKING BACK SUNDAY

BOB WEIR & WOLF BROS

DAVID BALL & THAT CAROLINA SOUND

March 22 & 23 Long Center

March 23 Bass Concert Hall

JERRY JEFF WALKER 2019 TEXAS BASH

March 23 Paramount Theatre MUSE

BOB SEGER & THE SILVER BULLET BAND

March 7 Frank Erwin Center KANE BROWN MARCH 8

H-E-B Center at Cedar Park KACEY MUSGRAVES

March 9 & 10 Stubb’s BBQ

EARTH, WIND & FIRE

March 12 ACL Live at The Moody Theater SWITCHFOOT

March 23 Austin360 Amphitheater THE BOSTON POPS

March 24 Long Center

MUDDFEST 2019

March 24 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park AGAINST THE CURRENT

March 25 Stubb’s BBQ ELLA MAI

March 27 Emo’s Austin KRONOS QUARTET & SAM GREEN

March 18 Stubb’s BBQ

March 27 Bass Concert Hall

NIALS FRAHM

March 19 Emo’s Austin

BAD BUNNY

ERIC GALES

March 20 Antone’s Nightclub DAVID BOWIE ALUMNI TOUR

March 21 Paramount Theatre AMOS LEE

March 22 & 23 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

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ASO: CREATIVE EXPRESSIONS

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March 28 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park BUDDY GUY

March 28 ACL Live at The Moody Theater GUSTER

March 28 Stubb’s BBQ SHOOTER JENNINGS

March 28 The Mohawk

March 28 & 29 Emo’s Austin

March 29 Paramount Theatre

GRUPO FANTASMA

March 29 The Mohawk

URBAN MUSIC FEST

March 29 & 30 Vic Mathias Shores

THE REVIVALISTS

March 30 Stubb’s BBQ

TEXAS FILM AWARDS

March 7 AFS Cinema

KELLY DANIELA NORRIS PRESENTS: ACTION HEROINES OF THE SILENT SERIALS

March 20 AFS Cinema

THE FLY FISHING FILM TOUR

March 28 Paramount Theatre

THEATER NOTES FROM THE FIELD

HOZIER

March 31 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

Through March 31 ZACH Theatre FORTITUDE

FILM TEXAS FOCUS: DAMSEL

February 7 Bullock Texas State History Museum

BANFF CENTRE

MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL March 2 & 3 Paramount Theatre OFFICE SPACE 20TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING W/ MIKE JUDGE

March 6 Paramount Theatre

ROOFTOP FILM: SPIRIT LABOUR

March 6 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

March 5 – 15 B. Iden Payne Theatre CRIME & PUNISHMENT

March 21 – April 6 Ground Floor Theatre

ERIKA MOON PRESENTS CABARET FOLLIES

March 23 Paramount Theatre

TEATRO LÍNEA DE SOMBRA: AMARILLO

March 28 & 29 McCullough Theatre

BALLET AUSTIN: GRIMM TALES

March 29 – 31 Long Center

COMEDY ORNY ADAMS

March 13 – 16 Cap City Comedy Club FRANCO ESCAMILLA MARCH 15

ACL Live at The Moody Theater PUDDLES PITY PARTY

March 22 Paramount Theatre HATERS ROAST

March 26 ACL Live at The Moody Theater BRYSON BROWN & FRIENDS

March 27 Cap City Comedy Club ALI WONG

March 28 & 29 Bass Concert Hall CARLOS MENCIA

March 28 – 30 Cap City Comedy Club DON’T INTERRUPT ME!

March 29 The Hideout Theatre

LAST: AN EXTINCTION COMEDY

March 29 – April 27 The VORTEX

THE APRIL FOOLS COMEDY JAM

March 30 Bass Concert Hall


FAMILY PJ MASKS LIVE! SAVE THE DAY

March 6 H-E-B at Center Park FAMILY DAY

March 10 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum SPRING BREAK AT THE BULLOCK

March 18 – 22 Bullock Texas State History Museum WAKE UP, BROTHER BEAR!

March 24 – May 26 ZACH Theatre

INDYCAR CLASSIC

March 22 – 24 Circuit of the Americas ANITA HILL

March 24 Paramount Theatre WORLD GOLF CHAMPIONSHIPS - DELL TECHNOLOGIES MATCH PLAY

March 27 – 31 Austin Country Club

March 30 Blanton Museum of Art COCHON555

March 31 Four Seasons Hotel Austin

AMERICAN GIRL LIVE

March 30 Paramount Theatre

OTHER SXSW CONFERENCE & FESTIVALS

March 8 – 17 Various Locations

BLOSSOM & SOL CULTURE AND NATURAL HAIR FESTIVAL

March 16 Huston-Tillotson University RODEO AUSTIN

March 16 – 30 Travis County Expo Center ST. PATRICK’S DAY FESTIVAL

March 17 Jourdan-Bachman Pioneer Farms

MUSIC PICK

BLANTON BLOCK PARTY

ASTER AFTER DARK SUNDAY SUPPER April 14, 7 pm Lake Austin Spa Resort, Aster Cafe Join Chef Wayne Brooks from 827 Ray’s Kitchen + Cellar and Lake Austin Spa Resort Executive Chef Stephane Beaucamp for a gourmet supper with wine pairings. $85 per person plus service and gratuity. Space is limited, please RSVP at (512) 372 7341.

“A Thousand Thoughts:” Kronos Quartet and Sam Green By Holly Cowart BA SS CONCERT HALL , MARCH 27

Two imaginative forces have joined to create a one-of-a-kind live documentary experience that explores our collective human connection to the power of music. “A Thousand Thoughts” is the latest project from Academy Award-nominated filmmakers Sam Green and Joe Bini, who unravel the story and impact of the classical string ensemble Kronos Quartet. As Green narrates in front of archival footage, interviews and images, he’ll be joined onstage by the world-renowned group. Kronos are no strangers to shaking things up. This type of multimedia collaboration has been ingrained in the quartet since they were founded by violinist David Harrington in 1973, who formed the group after becoming fascinated by composer George Crumb’s “Black Angels.” The electric string piece included unconventional and surreal effects like gongs and spoken word, sparking infinite possibilities in Harrington of what classical music could represent. Kronos Quartet’s bold approach has since led them through an impressive and creative list of collaborations, often transcending the boundaries of a singular genre. Strings and bows blend harmoniously to reimagine songs by the likes of rock legends, Mexican folk artists and modern pop stars. It’s no surprise that in their 40 years, they have won global acclaim and numerous awards, including a Grammy and the esteemed Avery Fisher Prize.

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Fashion designer Brandon Maxwell fitting a model in his studio.

ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts JANINE ANTONI AND ANNA HALPRIN: PAPER DANCE

Through March 17 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

THE PROPELLER GROUP: THE LIVING NEED LIGHT, THE DEAD NEED MUSIC

THE SECRET ART OF DR. SEUSS

BUMIN KIM: WALK THE SKY

HOPSCOTCH: LIGHT AND SOUND

CONVERSATION W/ ARTIST LOUIE PALU

NATE OTTO

SATELLITE ART SHOW

Through March 25 Ao5 Gallery

Through March 31 6100 Airport Blvd.

“Now or Never:” An Exhibition of Work by St. Edward’s Photo Alumni By Holly Cowart ST. EDWARD’S UNIVERSIT Y FINE ARTS GALLERY, THROUGH MARCH 15

We have all at some point been confronted with the terrifying feeling of venturing into the unknown. Standing at the precipice of possibility, filled with both fear and excitement, we have had to stop, take a deep breath and jump. Finding a sense of purpose through leaps of faith embodies the current exhibition at St. Edward’s University’s Fine Arts Gallery. Ongoing through March 15, “Now or Never” showcases the work of eight photo alumni (all of whom graduated in 2007 or 2008): Jaime Alexis, John Clendenen, Matt Ellis, Monika Kratochvil, Michelle Leedy, Brandon Maxwell, Jessy Price and Ryan Slack. Using multiple mediums, like photography, videography and sound installation, the show as a whole paints the picture of the unexpected and intertwining journeys these artists have taken. Meeting in the university’s photocommunications program, the students became close while working together on assignments. Although their paths took different directions after they completed their degrees, one by one they all found themselves living in New York. Collectively, they work for an impressive list of companies, such as Condé Nast, Droga5 and VICE Media, and in many cases, themselves. Among them are master retouchers, independent photographers, associate producers and creative directors. Most importantly, to one another, they are friends. Before the gallery reception on March 14 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., hear them speak about their experiences on a panel moderated by former professor Bill Kennedy.

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March 5 – August 18 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

DENISE ELLIOTT JONES: DOES IT MATCH THE SOFA

Through March 17 Dougherty Arts Center

ART PICK

JAMES SURLS: WITHOUT, WITHIN

Through March 31 Yard Dog Art Gallery SHELLS, SHORE & WINGS TO MY EYES

Through April 3 Old Bakery & Emporium

NO ME OLVIDES (DO NOT FORGET ME)

March 1 – 30 Big Medium Gallery POP N’ COLOR MARCH 1 – 30

Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery ELIZABETH CHAPIN: DECONSTRUCTING NOSTALGIA

March 2 – 31 Wally Workman Gallery A SHARED VISION

March 2 – April 13 Davis Gallery

March 8 – May 26 Blanton Museum of Art

March 9 – April 18 Women & Their Work

March 12 Harry Ransom Center

March 13 – 17 The Museum of Human Achievement NOW OR NEVER EXHIBITION RECEPTION

March 14 St. Edward’s University Fine Arts Gallery WWI AMERICA

March 16 – August 11 Bullock Texas State History Museum COPIES, FAKES, AND REPRODUCTIONS: PRINTMAKING IN THE RENAISSANCE

March 23 – June 16 Blanton Museum of Art ABRAHAM CRUZVILLEGAS

March 30 – July 14 The Contemporary Austin


YOU DESERVE TO FEEL GOOD.

Introducing the first Cannabis Concept Store in Texas

1105 E 6th St Austin 78702 mineralhealth.co

ELI HALPIN GALLERY Gift Shop & Art Studio


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

ABC Kite Fest By Holly Cowart ZILKER PARK, MARCH 31

At the end of the month, thousands of colorful kites will streak across the sky above Zilker Park, marking both the triumphant return of spring and the 90th ABC Kite Fest. First held in 1929 by the Exchange Club of Austin as a competition to inspire creativity in children, the family-friendly gathering has since become a beloved Austin tradition. Free and open to all, visitors can partake in a Fun Run, compete for the top spot in eight different kite contests or simply kick back and watch the action unfold. The long-standing event is also embracing new traditions like MossFest, a concert with exciting activities and vendors geared toward the kiddos, now in its fourth year. Founded by Jessica and J. Pieratt after the sudden passing of their son, Moss, the show was created to honor the toddler and his infectious love of music. By raising awareness for Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood, the concert gives a support system to those dealing with tragedy and spreads joy to the younger generations. The fest has one main rule: Be considerate of others. Local food trucks and kite vendors will be on-site, with proceeds benefiting nonprofits Communities in Schools of Central Texas and the Moss Pieratt Foundation. Starting at 10 a.m., grab your family, friends and neighbors and join in raising a kite to another 90 years.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org


Elizabeth Chapin Wally Workman Gallery 1202 W. 6th St. Austin, TX 78703 wallyworkman.com 512.472.7428 Tues-Sat 10-5pm Sun 12-4pm image: Blue Lace Marco, acrylic on canvas with neon, 60 x 48 in.


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M–Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa–Su 11–4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12-6 mondotees.com

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 1600 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com/austingallery WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org

INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


SPARROW Interiors & Gifts

Accessories Furniture Jewelry Lighting Design Gifts Rugs Artwork 2714 S Lamar Blvd. info@sparrowinteriors.com @sparrowinteriors www.sparrowinteriors.com


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SWBC Mortgage Cameron Breed

Choose the lending adviser who top realtors, referral partners, and clients are all thankful to have on their team. Vice President & Senior Loan Officer

512.531.1805

cbreed@swbc.com www.cameronbreed.com

720 Brazos Street B-100 I NMLS #216391 Š 2019 SWBC. All rights reserved. Loans are subject to credit and property approval. Other restrictions and conditions may apply. Programs and guidelines are subject to change without notice. Rates are subject to change daily. Corporate office located at 9311 San Pedro Avenue, Suite 100, San Antonio, TX 78216. SWBC Mortgage Corporation, NMLS #9741 (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org).

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Melody Makers HOW THE GROUNDWORK MUSIC PROJECT USES THE UKULELE TO FOSTER A LOVE OF MUSIC By Nicole Beckley Photographs by Croft Fite

T Students play and perform songs on the ukulele, which serves as an introductory instrument for kids learning to play music.

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WICE A WEEK, AT BLACKSHEAR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL,

the sounds of ukuleles and children’s voices can be heard from Marisa Jefferson’s second grade class. Through games, songs and practical instructions, kids learn to play music, thanks to the Groundwork Music Project, a nonprofit organization that provides free and low-cost music lessons to children who might not otherwise have the opportunity. Jefferson’s students have been taught by Daniel Piccuirro, one of Groundwork’s instructors. “It’s really helpful to have a teacher who can have empathy for them and have fun with them and still have the structure that we need so that the classroom doesn’t turn into chaos, which it very easily could when you give 20 seven- and eight-year-olds ukuleles,” Jefferson says. Established in 2006 by Neal Kassanoff, Groundwork emerged from Kassanoff’s love of music. “I really came about this as a songwriter first,” Kassanoff says. “And it was my own writing that I used to get some pro-


grams started for preschool-aged kids.” After graduating from Emory University in Atlanta, Kassanoff made his way to Austin, “I did a graduate program in school psychology at Texas State, but all the while I was thinking, I need to focus on my art. I need to make music for a living,” Kassanoff says. While penning songs for Carolyn Wonderland and Guy Forsyth, Kassanoff also started to write music for children, setting the early stage for Groundwork. Today the program works with a broad group of ages, from 18 months up to adults, but concentrates on elementary-school students. “There’s a lot of interest in programs for kids aged five to seven, so we’ve really tried to create a program that suits that age,” Kassanoff says. That includes teaching kids an instrument: a ukulele. “The ukulele is inexpensive. Its barriers to entry are low,” Kassanoff says. “It’s easy to play with little hands and can be a bridge to more-demanding finger strength and complexity that might be involved with the guitar or viola or violin.” Instructors use the ukulele to introduce songs, highlight the differences between notes and chords, and teach melody, harmony, technique and rhythm. As students gain confidence with playing the ukulele, there’s a sense of fun that emerges, too. “There just seems to be a real civilizing inf luence; you don’t need a lot of external behavior cues. They really are motivated by playing the music itself,” Kassanoff says. “You can see their joy in what they’re doing, their enthusiasm and their excitement. The confidence and the building of self-esteem is something that just becomes woven in and becomes very natural, which is the way it should be.” Since its inception over a decade ago, thousands of students have participated in Groundwork programs, learning musical skills through after-school and in-school sessions, and current programs are running with Blackshear and

Harris elementary schools. “My experience has been that Groundwork has really wonderful teachers that are also gifted musicians, and that’s really why it works so well,” Jefferson says. Kassanoff recalls a parent whose preschool daughter went through one of the programs. “He said, ‘I always knew that she was musical — she knew how to sing, she knew how to make music — but the program provided the opportunity for her to really learn to love music.’ And I really can’t imagine a higher compliment than that.” The Groundwork program also provides opportunities for students to perform for their friends, family and the community. At Blackshear, students have performed at the George Washington Carver Museum, Cultural and Genealogy Center. “I had a parent say how excited she was to get to see her son play ukulele, because, I think for a lot of people, it’s something that their kid might have told them about, but unless they have a ukulele at home, it’s not something they’ve really gotten to show off at all,” Jefferson says. Additionally, students, young musicians, Groundwork teachers and professionals also play in the Groundwork Music Orchestra, which typically performs the second Sunday of the month at Cherrywood Coffeehouse and the fourth Saturday of the month at The Hive, in South Austin. The performances offer young players the chance to showcase skills and celebrate music that can be enjoyed by both kids and parents. “When you’re in a room of people singing the same song, there’s something really special about that,” Jefferson says.

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COMMUNITY PICK

Gold Rush Vinyl owner and founder Caren Kelleher.

T

Making and Breaking Records GOLD RUSH VINYL IS CHANGING THE RECORD-PRESSING GAME By Kathryn Stouffer Photographs by Claire Schaper

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UCKED AWAY IN AN UNASSUMING

office building east of I-35, Caren Kelleher and the Gold Rush Vinyl team dance alongside a slew of record presses, boilers and coolers, machinery reminiscent of a brewery. The culmination of a superior infrastructure, pinpointed temperatures and a whip-smart team, Gold Rush has managed to create top-quality vinyl with efficiency in an industry notorious for its slow turnaround. Kelleher built this burgeoning empire with the future in mind, and her confidence in Gold Rush is apparent as she gracefully maneuvers between machine repairs, managing the company’s 100plus clients and plotting the future of her business. Traditionally, the process of creating physical records could take anywhere from four to eight months, but the Gold Rush team has streamlined it to four to six weeks. “We’re a plant that does everything end to end. Artists send us music and art and we do the rest,” explains Kelleher, talking through the process as if she were narrating “Record Making for Dummies.” The magic begins with a master lacquer, an “aluminum disc covered in nail polish enamel, essentially.” A cutting engineer will then cut the original grooves with a lathe. Based on how bass-heavy or quiet a record is, grooves are cut at varied distances to allow for the most dynamic sound. The master lacquer is then sprayed with silver, placed in water with nickel deposits and electrocuted — a process more formally known as electroplating — which yields a stamper, a negative of the record. Next, polyvinyl beads are melted to create a disc known as a “biscuit.” The biscuit is pressed on the stamper and the excess


NEED TO FINISH DESIGNING THIS SPREAD. STILL ROUGH

vinyl is trimmed. “Before we trim it, it looks like an oversized Belgian waffle,” Kelleher notes. The whole process takes 30 seconds per record, and is completed with a hand inspection and sleeving. The Gold Rush team’s attention to detail and unprecedented quality make the newcomer a leader in the industry. Out of the hundreds of thousands released records, only 48 have been unusable. Most plants will toss 30 to 40 percent, whereas Gold Rush tosses only about 2 percent. The team is making, and breaking, records. Kelleher’s personal foray into music began at a young age in Washington, D.C., and continued as she moved across the country. “I was always the kid in high school making mixtapes and staying up too late taping off the radio,” Kelleher says. Fast-forward to Harvard Business School and then a stint in San Francisco, where she worked on the launch of Google Play by day and managed a handful of bands by night. It was during that time that the idea bloomed. “My clients had a willingness to pay for a faster turnaround, and not a single plant in the world would take our order,” she says. “The capitalist in me said, ‘That’s silly.’ ” The Live Music Capital has been an ideal fit for Gold Rush and Gold Rush a godsend for the city. “The record labels here have been huge champions of ours. I’m blown away by the diversity of talent here and humbled by the way

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COMMUNITY PICK

Scenes from Gold Rush's North Austin warehouse.

Austin shows up for its own kind,” explains Kelleher, bursting with affection for the city. She is passionate about keeping the Austin music scene viable for local artists and equipping them so that they can continue to make art. As for Kelleher’s take on digital music, she sees it as living symbiotically with her analog productions. “Vinyl would not be having this resurgence without digital. They go hand in hand,” she says. “Digital music and vinyl should coexist, but it is special to hold something tangible, to read the liner notes, to see the vision an artist had for an album and to hear the music how the artist intended it to be.” Kelleher lights up when envisioning Gold Rush’s next steps. From creating new jobs to exploring sustainable options and expanded product lines, there is no shortage of potential and no limit in Kelleher’s mind. When asked about crazy requests, Kelleher says it’s been pretty mellow, minus a rainbow-colored record for the band Turkuaz. “No one’s asked us to put blood in their records yet,” she says. As for her dream pressing? Anything reissued from the Beatles. At the end of the day, Kelleher is matter-of-fact about her mission. “I just want to grow this and put Austin on the map as the place to get your vinyl made,” she says. “I love it here. I never want to leave. Texas forever. I own a forklift that goes 3 miles per hour, so yeah, I have to stay.”

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PEACEFUL, EASY FEELING An artful collaboration mixes music, design and a spectacular setting for the relaxed home of Danneel and Jensen Ackles By Anne Bruno. Family portrait by Jeff Wilson. Interior photographs by Douglas Friedman. Styling by Marcus Hersh.

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UCCESSFUL COLLABORATIONS OF ANY KIND ARE A LOT LIKE A MUSICAL JAM SESSION: Artists at the top of their game come together and let their creative juices flow. According to longtime Austin interior designer Fern Santini, the same is true with a good design project, and the home of Danneel and Jensen Ackles proves her point. When clients, architect and interior designer freely share ideas and each person’s perspective shines through the process, something unique comes into being. The Ackleses, who have three children under the age of six, are both actors. Jensen, originally from Dallas, is now in his 14th season as star of the CW’s “Supernatural,” and Danneel, a native of Lafayette, Louisiana, may be best known for recurring roles in the Harold & Kumar movies as well as for her stint as bad girl Rachel on “One Tree Hill.” After years in California, the Ackleses were ready to reclaim their geographic roots and chose Austin as their permanent home and the place to raise their young family. “Danneel and Jensen really identify with Austin’s creative culture and have quickly become part of the community,” says Santini. “They’re bold and energetic people, friendly and informal — Austin is a natural fit for them.” The Ackleses hired Santini and architect Paul Lamb (the two have worked together on numerous projects) to undertake the extensive renovation of the lakefront home they purchased four and a half years ago. Lamb, who hails from New Orleans, calls the completed transformation a reflection of the Ackleses’ free-spirited nature and describes the couple as part of “a new generation of Southern bohemian progressive thinkers who celebrate taking risks.” At 7,500 square feet, with multiple living spaces to accommodate everything from dinner parties and adult gatherings


OPPOSITE: Wood-clad walls and substantial beams warm the color-filled sunken living room. "Phenomena" by Austin artist Ysabel LeMay hangs above a custom banquette. RIGHT: Lamb's addition of a two-story screened porch spoke to Danneel's Louisiana roots. The dining table is crafted of a 1,900-year-old cypress sinker log from waters near New Orleans.

around the bar to impromptu music-making to family football-watching Sundays, the Ackleses’ home is built for entertaining. Within the generous scale, an abundance of natural materials — wood and native stone play a prominent role inside and out — are featured, lending intimacy and warmth to every room. Imagine a cool young family who knows how to have a good time. Put them in a lakeside lodge and you’ve got the feel of the Ackleses’ digs. Santini, who is based in Austin but travels internationally to source materials and work with clients, credits the successful multiyear project to an almost instant connection and continuous communication. “We all bonded pretty quickly,” Santini says of the relationship she and Lamb have with the couple. “When everyone has fun and gets into the flow of a true collaboration, that’s when the magic happens. “I’ve never had just one particular style, and while Danneel loves rustic, they’re the same way,” Santini notes. “It’s much more of a feeling and a way of living that combines periods and materials. It’s hip and historic, current and vintage. That keeps a space feeling timeless and not dated.” To wit, color and texture abound in artful layers throughout the home. Unique vintage finds from across the globe play off au courant pieces to create a setting that feels at once laid-back and energizing. Music was a strong common denominator that inspired a number of design elements. “We share this love for the music and that whole vibe of Laurel Canyon in the late ’60s. It’s what I grew up on — still my favorite — and Danneel and Jensen actually lived there for a while. Sometimes Danneel and I felt like our inner hippies were meeting,” Santini says. “The music and art scene here is one reason I know they feel so at home in Austin.” tribeza.com

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Trove wallpaper lines the master bedroom walls, which also feature sliding panels. In the sitting room, reclaimed barn wood on walls and ceiling frames the lakefront view.

"

It’s much more of a feeling and a way of living that combines periods and materials. It’s hip and historic, current and vintage. That kind of mix is what keeps a space feeling timeless and not dated.

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ABOVE: A painting by Kenton Parker hangs above the fireplace, just opposite the kitchen. OPPOSITE: Bold patterns liven the pool room with tiled floors, hide-upholstered game table chairs and a steel and wood spiral staircase.

Stories the Ackleses told Santini and Lamb about gatherings in their Laurel Canyon house — friends sitting on the floor, drinking wine, listening to music and playing guitar — informed the relax-and-get-comfortable energy that permeates the sunken living room. There, views of the lake are showcased along with Jensen’s guitars and pieces of art from the couple’s eclectic collection, which is growing with the work of local artists. Santini notes the “out in the open” aspect of the room’s handcrafted McIntosh stereo system; celebrating something she’s spent most of her career trying to hide for clients is definitely a welcome change. Along with making the most of the waterfront site (the initial draw for the Ackleses), for Santini and Lamb authenticity was a key driver from the start. “The house as it was had no real architectural integrity or identity,” Santini explains. “We gutted the inside. Paul took out walls to bring in more natural light and brought in materials that are the real deal.” Post oak floors, hand-planed beams and barn wood ceilings in the master suite all attest to the duo's “no props” mantra. “I can honestly say that Danneel and Jensen are two of the biggest risk takers I’ve worked with,” Santini says. “It’s hard to describe how freeing — and fun — that is. Danneel and I would brainstorm on an out-there idea, and Jensen would say something like, ‘I don’t know if I get it, but you two just keep going.’” If Danneel and Santini’s back-and-forth riffing on ideas sounds more like a mind meld than a brainstorm, it sometimes was. “We’d find ourselves emailing at two in the morning, thinking about exactly the same thing!" Santini says. For the Ackles, it's that kind of creative collaboration that resulted in nothing short of a smash hit. Music plays a part in Santini's next venture, a limited number of one-of-a-kind, move-in-ready homes she's calling the Fern Santini Collective. Each home's public launch event will benefit an Austin nonprofit; the first home, now under construction, will partner with HAAM (Health Alliance for Austin Musicians).

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Tuned Up Take a slow ride with the cool kids. Our favorite musicians help us recreate iconic scenes from Richard Linklater’s 1993 classic, “Dazed and Confused.” Let the good times roll.

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Matt Rainwaters & Stevie Sweeney Kinney Laurel

PHOTOGRAPHS BY STYLING BY

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o a C st s o L

Trey Privott (vocals), Megan Hartman (bass), Natalie Wright (keys), John Courtney (guitar) and Damien Llanes (drums) Vibe: Rock, soul and psych tied together by Privott’s distinctive vocals. Up Next:Their "Monsters" single will be released this month, followed by the full debut album, "Samsara," this June. Look for SXSW shows, plus spring and summer tour dates with St. Paul & The Broken Bones and Gary Clark Jr. Heard on Set: “I’m from Georgia, and I saw ‘Dazed and Confused’ with friends from Texas. I remember being in shock, because I grew up more sheltered, and the things that happened in the movie were definitely not happening in my community. But it was good. Made me party harder.” - Privott

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Hair and makeup by Hannah Zieschang Shot on location at Bedichek Middle School


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Mélat

Mélat (solo artist) Vibe: R&B with notes of soul and pop. Up Next: Look for the singer's "Weak" video and a new project titled, "After All" this spring. Heard on Set: “My brain is this weird mishmash of old-school jazz, Ethiopian music and Willie Nelson. And then there’s my Mariah Carey and Whitney Houston side.” - Mélat Shot on location at the Northwest Park baseball field

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T

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o n ri

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Saúl Arteta (guitar) and Sisi Berry (vocals), with (not pictured) Jared Blair (bass) and Cruz Crase (drums). Vibe: Edgy rock with Spanish influences. Up Next: Look for their "Mama" single and music video this March, followed by the full album "All the Lights are On," this spring. Heard on Set: “Our song ‘Oh’ was used in an Austin Convention Center promo. It starts off with 'Alright, alright, alright.' And then it pans to us, and I thought, Oh my God, Matthew McConaughey’s basically on our song.” - Berry Shot on location at Top Notch

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s w o l l e n F a c n Du

Tim Hagen (drums), Cullen Trevino (vocals, guitar), Colin Harmon (vocals, guitar), Jack Malonis (keys) and David Stimson (bass). Vibe: Indie pop meets classic rock and roll. Up Next: Fresh off a recording session in Chicago, they’ll be releasing a new EP, titled "Eyelids Shut" this spring. Catch the guys live at Antone's on March 8, before which they will have wrapped a tour with Post Animal and Ron Gallo.

Shot on location at the Northwest Park baseball field

Heard on Set: “We all live together — well, not Colin, because he’s married and that would be weird, but the rest of us do.” - Hagen

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T

ar and the F m o Cs ms of T a i l l i rW a om

Tomar Williams (vocals) with (not pictured) Andy Tenberg (guitar), David Earl (organ), Mitch Fischels (bass) and Paul Kresowik (drums). Vibe: Self-described soul band. Up Next: Keep an eye out for the band’s SXSW official showcase and a new album, tentatively titled "Rise Above," out this spring. Heard on Set: “I was raised on soul and jazz and have been playing music since 1979. My brothers and I started a band, and before I knew it, I found out I could sing.” - Williams

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Hair and makeup by Hannah Zieschang Shot on location at Bedichek Middle School All clothing by Prototype Vintage, Feathers & Bunny Sweeney


T H E WO M E N S S H O P THE MENS SHOP 524 NORTH LAMAR 512 472 5951 SOUTH CONGRESS 1400 SOUTH CONGRESS 5 1 2 4 4 1 8 60 0 BYG E O R G E AU ST I N . C O M

AC N E S T U D I O S

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D R I E S VA N N OT E N I SA B E L M A R A N T

B OT T E G A V E N E TA

ENGINEERED GARMENTS

KHAITE

PROENZA SCHOULER

B R U N E L LO C U C I N E L L I

LO E W E

GABRIELA HEARST

MAISON MARGIELA

SA I N T L AU R E N T

CELINE

SIMON MILLER

MARNI

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G O L D E N G O O S E D E LU X E B R A N D

NAK ARMSTRONG

S TO N E I S L A N D

COMMON PROJECTS

OFFICINE GÉNÉRALE

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Heaven SENT

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Producer Bettina Barrow and actress Anna Margaret Hollyman on how Austin’s film industry helped make their new film, “Sister Aimee,” a reality By Hannah Morrow Photographs by Claire Schaper

A

spellbinding evangelist preacher. A pioneer of early broadcast marketing. A performer who gave the Broadway treatment to the Bible. A Canadian-American single mother and three-time divorcée. Only in Hollywood would a character like Aimee Semple McPherson have been absolutely real. In 1926, at the peak of her fame, McPherson was reportedly kidnapped. Stories of her whereabouts were above-the-fold news nationwide, and rumors flew until her reappearance in Mexico five weeks after she vanished from a Santa Monica beach. Despite grand jury inquiries, what really happened in the duration of her disappearance remains unconfirmed. It’s where the story allows for some creative license — and where Austin-based producer Bettina Barrow and actress Anna Margaret Hollyman pick up with “Sister Aimee.” In the dramatized account, McPherson (Hollyman) slinks past the Southern border with her exhausting lover, Kenny (Michael Mosley), and their rebel-with-a-cause guide Rey (Andrea Suarez Paz). Trouble inevitably ensues. Barrow and Hollyman both have Texas ties but didn’t meet until 2015’s SXSW after having migrated from Los Angeles. Hollyman was a highlight of last year’s festival with “Maude,” a short film she wrote, directed and starred in, and Barrow has been producing here in partnership with Lily Rabe and their company, Kill Claudio Productions, since 2016. Barrow and Hollyman return to SXSW this year with “Sister Aimee,” their first feature film together. The movie, which premiered at Sundance, is an objectively wonderful piece of independent art. It’s also a colossal testament to Austin’s filmmaking community. “ ‘Sister Aimee’ is an Austin movie,” says Hollyman, who added the film couldn’t have happened without local support. “It’s not easy to make a film,” Barrow adds, “but I can’t imagine a place that makes it easier on you than Austin, Texas.” I caught up with Hollyman and Barrow to talk about their working relationship, the new film and how Austin answered their filmmaking prayers.

OPPOSITE: Bettina Barrow and Anna Margaret Hollyman at Barrow's Travis Heights home. ABOVE: Behind the scenes of "Sister Aimee." tribeza.com

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"Sister Aimee's" film crew shown in New Mexico during the last week of production.

HANNAH MORROW: How was Sundance? ANNA MARGARET HOLLYMAN: So fun! We were just talking about it. Bettina had to be there for over a week. How many days were you there? BETTINA BARROW: Yeah, I was there for 10 days. HM: I didn’t know it was that much of a production. AMH: When you’re an actor you can just fly in, fly out — I flew in Thursday and flew out Monday, and it felt really long to me. I kept looking at [Bettina] on Instagram like — she’s stuck in Park City! She’s in the vortex! HM: The main purpose of these festivals is to find a distributor, right? Is that why producers and directors are there longer than the actors? Can you tell me about that process? BB: Not all festivals [are about distribution] — Sundance is really where distributors from L.A. and New York go to buy movies. The independent films have obviously been made independent of a studio or a distributor, so your goal going in is to sell the movie. You typically stay the whole time when

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you’re on the production side to be with the filmmakers, because these festivals are also really about supporting the writers and directors. AMH: I feel like being a producer at Sundance, the point is to stick around as long as possible to meet other filmmakers or industry people. Producers also have so many projects on deck, so it’s good to get their next project out there as well. Nothing happens without producers. BB: I had a ton of meetings with production companies and other filmmakers for subsequent projects. HM: How does SXSW compare? BB: South by is an awesome festival and also one of the most exciting festivals in a lot of ways. “Sister Aimee” is an Austin movie. Anna Margaret is obviously our lead, and we have so many other great supporting roles that were local actors, plus our producers and our incredible crew. HM: You shot the bulk of the film here, right? BB: Right. We shot three weeks and then the last week in New Mexico. It was incredible.

HM: Anna Margaret, you’re the one who first introduced writer-directors Marie Schlingmann and Samantha Buck to the story of Aimee Semple. AMH: Yeah. I worked on a short with Sam and Marie in Dallas a couple years back called “The Mink Catcher.” I brought up Sister Aimee when they were visiting me out in Los Angeles — I was talking about my fascination with L.A. and how history is everywhere but it fades into the background. But there’s this huge temple right on Echo Park Lake and you’ve seen it a million times if you’re driving down Sunset — it’s called the Angelus Temple. It was Sister Aimee Semple McPherson’s congregation. The movie covers a very specific portion of her life, which was outrageous and scandalous, but her entire life’s work is just overwhelming. There’s so much to mine there. So I think I unintentionally planted the seed and was like, you know you can’t walk from Aimee now! Sam and Marie did an amazing job on “The Mink Catcher,” and then Bettina came on board when they began working on a feature based


Hollyman and Barrow met in 2015 and have worked together on two projects. Both women happen to be pregnant with their second child.

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Austin.

"We couldn’t have done it anywhere besides

"

on the short called “The Big D.” I had a sneaking suspicion they would get along, and I was like, “You know, Bettina will understand [‘The Big D’] script better than anybody, I think, as a producer.” BB: Aw. AMH: I mean, truly. So the three of them at a certain point decided to take on “Sister Aimee.” HM: The interesting thing about “Sister Aimee” is, even though it is a period piece, it doesn’t necessarily feel super-nostalgic. The film is framed in the ’20s, but the narrative runs much larger than just that decade. AMH: Yeah. I think it’s pretty amazing what they’ve achieved. When we were on set and doing the work — I hate using that term, “doing the work” [she laughs] — but now, just because of what’s happening in our nation’s culture, it’s kind of remarkable how many themes they managed to explore. You know, there’s this disappearance but also somehow weaving in the Mexican Revolution and this very specific time of Mexican history when they were killing Catholics. They really have an uncanny ability to write a compelling period-piece script, taking on a topic that plays in the past and threading the zeitgeist of our time throughout it. BB: It feels really timely. HM: The film is also a lot of genres — Western, romance, comedy, drama, musical. BB: From the producing side, it’s kind of an epic movie to make on our budget level. It meant shooting a super-old car; it meant a stage for a musical; it meant guns for the Western. We needed wide-open spaces; we needed confined spaces. To make it work aesthetically as well as in our budget was difficult, but we had an incredible production designer, Jonathan Rudak and director of photography, Carlos Valdes-Lora. The production value looks so high in a large part, in my opinion, because of them. We also had so much support from Austin in every way. That was the only way we were willing to do it. We couldn’t have done it anywhere besides Austin.

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AMH: It’s getting harder to shoot in Texas, and there’s less and less production happening in a lot of ways. Everything about this project begins and ends with the script. Everyone who read it had the same response: It’s one of the most compelling, page-turning scripts. I do think so many people came on in good faith in a way that truly only Texans do. There may be a lack of industry in a lot of ways here, comparatively to L.A. and New York, but Texans and their generous response to this movie were the reason it happened. BB: I think the benefit of being away from the noise of the industry is that you actually do get to hear notes and ideas from filmmakers and writers in a way that is very sincere. Sometimes when you’re in Los Angeles, you can feel like you exist in a vacuum, because everyone is doing the same thing. Here, where everyone has a different style or tone, you can objectively come together and help. AMH: For all the challenges of it not being the base of the industry — there’s always this feeling like maybe you’re missing out on something or that all the opportunity is out there — the reality is that it allows you to create something pretty unique without the noise of what’s happening at the time. No one telling you, “That’s not selling right now.” BB: To be able to play at Sundance and SXSW the last two years with Austin-based productions makes us feel like — [she laughs and changes to a joking voice] we must be doing something right. Oh no, we’re going to sound like real assholes. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.


1214 West 6th St Austin,TX 78703 www.juliangold.com (512) 473-2493 tribeza.com

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CHOSEN ONE

Gary Clark Jr. reflects on his Austin childhood, twenty years of playing the blues and his new album

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IA SM MS IT H


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Gary Clark Jr. shot on location at Antone's.

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G

ary Clark Jr. walks down the stairs at Antone’s Nightclub, and immediately I have a good feeling. He’s warm with our photographer, asking after her husband and son, and

when I sheepishly remind him that we went to

high school together, thinking the connection might sound silly, he jumps right into the name game. My younger sister, check. Barry and Dax, check. We’re off. Clark is still young but, at 35 has been playing guitar and performing the blues for a solid 20 years. Twenty years. His first performance was at 14, and by 15 he and classmate Eve Monsees, his self-described mentor, whom he famously thanked in his Grammy-acceptance speech, had been tapped by Clifford Antone himself to play onstage at the club’s then-5th-and-Lavaca location, with legends like James Cotton and Pinetop Perkins. Despite years of hard work and local acclaim, the virtuoso guitar player was essentially a broke, struggling musician when Eric Clapton called him up (well, technically Doyle Bramhall II did the calling) to be part of his 2010 Crossroads Guitar Festival. That performance led to a deal with Warner Bros. and 2012’s “Blak and Blu,” which earned the musician the 2014 Best Traditional R&B Performance Grammy for the track “Please Come Home.” Clark’s follow-up, “The Story of Sonny Boy Slim,” was released in 2015, and he debuted his newest album, “This Land,” on February 22. All three albums share Clark’s seemingly effortless combination of blues, rock, soul and R&B, with the first steeped in rock and the second marked by twangy notes. I’ll leave the descriptions there and just say that both are fantastic. But “This Land” is something different, more grown-up, with a sharper edge. Its title single is a statement against both the general and personal

film seems to reference everything from Billie Holiday’s “Strange Fruit” to Adam and Eve’s serpent, all while protesting the hate imbued in the Confederate flag and ending on a note of victory for the young boy featured throughout. During our conversation, Clark easily moves between talking about his wife, model Nicole Trunfio; two young children; musical influences; and days gone by at Austin High, joking that despite his less than stellar attendance and grades, the school inducted him into its Hall of Honor a few years back. Clark is funny, laid-back and quick to shine a light on all those who have helped make his success possible. Just imagine what the next 20 years might hold.

racism Clark has experienced and is accompanied by a powerful video directed by Savanah Leaf. The short

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Margaret Williams: What’s it like for you being in

GCJ: I can’t believe it’s been 20 years.

Austin? You grew up here, but now Austin is a whole

MW: That must be crazy to hear, especially because

thing and you’re super-successful. What’s that been like?

you’re only 35.

Gary Clark Jr.: It’s been a trip. I left here in 2011 and

GCJ: But it’s right. We played our first gig in 1998.

went on the Bonnaroo Buzz Tour. Me and the Future-

MW: Was this your show with Pinetop Perkins and the

birds, we opened up for Grace Potter. I left and I didn’t

Muddy Waters band?

come back for months, and it was the first time that I

GCJ: No, that was our first show at Antone’s, but the

had been gone long enough to see the change. But the

first ever was at Joe’s Generic Bar. A guy named Appa

thing for me about this town is, the same people that

Perry called me up and invited me to this thing called

had shown love since day one were still here showing

Appa’s Blues Power. That’s where I cut my teeth.

love. I came back to a lot of love regardless of how the city looks.

All these great people: Stevie Ray Vaughan, before Double Trouble; Uncle John Turner; Alan Haynes; Tony

I think when we were young, we always wanted a little

Redmond, who taught me how to play slide. He’s the

more excitement, and now we got it and we’re com-

one who introduced me to the word “twang” and what

plaining about it.

that meant as a musician and a guitar player from Texas.

MW: You’ve been playing music since you were a kid

Erin James introduced me to a bunch of musicians and

and playing in clubs since you were 15. How did you ac-

asked me to play in a band. Steve Wertheimer at Conti-

tually learn to play guitar?

nental [Club] — so many people.

GCJ: Eve and I, we would do the research, listen to the

They would say, “Buddy Guy’s in town, let’s all go to

radio and she would dub tapes for me. We would sit and

Antone’s. Jimmie Vaughan’s in town, let’s go.” Clifford

rewind these videotapes and audio cassette tapes and

introduced me to Jimmie Vaughan, Pinetop Perkins,

figure it out like, “That’s a B minor. No, I don’t think that’s

James Cotton, all these great legends that started this

a B minor. I think that’s a D major.” And musicians we

music. Cut to 2003 and Jimmie Vaughan is inviting me

were playing with, they would pull us aside. Whether it

to go on tour with him. I was right out of high school.

was before a set or the middle of a set, they’d be like,

MW: Not a bad first tour.

“This goes like this. We’re gonna play a 2, 4, 5 change,” or

GCJ: I drove straight to Phoenix — had never been

whatever. I’d say, “What is that?” So we had these lessons

anywhere but Memphis for a few days. And then Cal-

on the spot.

ifornia, all the way up to Washington, all the way through

Years and years of that. Fifteen years of going

Montana, and then back home. And then every Thurs-

through a musical maze and finally coming out the oth-

day Larry [McGuire] and Will [Bridges] would hook me

er side. If I’d had YouTube as a kid, oh nobody could’ve

up with a show upstairs at Lamberts. They’d give me

stopped me.

some barbecue, some drinks. I would play until everyone

MW: Clifford was a big advocate of yours. Who else

got tired of me and wanted to turn the game on. I would

has pulled you up and along over the past 20 years?

be fighting with a game on the TV and I’d be like, “Ah,

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f--- it, I’ll just go to the bar,” and I’d watch the game also.

that I grew up on. Plus Sheila E., who played with Prince

I was doing the broke-musician thing, had my lights

and has her own records, played percussion. I decided to

turned off. I couldn’t pay my landlord, Claire. God bless

open up and bring in people who could make it all better.

her. And in 2008 Doyle called me up and said, “Eric

After all these years, it’s about time.

Clapton wants you for his Crossroads Festival in Chi-

MW: The video for your single “This Land,” which you

cago.”

made with director Savanah Leaf, is beautiful and in-

I’m like, “Yeah, right. Eric Clapton, Eric Clapton?” MW: I love this new album. What’s been the progres-

tense. GCJ: Yeah, it’s a lot.

sion from “Blak and Blu” to “The Story of Sonny Boy

MW: It seems like it’s part of a growing canon, in the

Slim” to now “This Land”?

same vein as videos by Childish Gambino and Beyoncé.

GCJ: I think just living life. I try to be a better musician

Why now?

every day. I try to practice every day. I try to learn anoth-

GCJ: Art really reflects life. While I was writing this re-

er instrument as much as I can.

cord, a lot of what I was seeing in the news was racist,

I think up until recently, I had a hard time having anybody telling me what to do. I finally let go of that. I tell the guys [Jacob Sciba, co-producer and engi-

whether it was outright or underlying. I felt this weird change. I think for a while we all felt like we were “cool.” And then things changed.

neer, and Joseph Holguin, second engineer], “You’ve

And it’s hard, because even though I’ve experienced

lived in this room, we know what we like, we know what

this [racism], it isn’t my life every day. I mean, growing up

the vibe is. Let’s pay homage to what came before us

you had to be open. That big concrete box [Austin High

and the next wave of things that are going to happen.”

School] we went to forced you to be around all types

We listened to everything from local artists to Quincy

of people. We all looked different, came from different

Jones to Bruno Mars to Kendrick Lamar to Leon Bridg-

economic backgrounds and religions. You’re playing

es. Just anything and everything. I did my last record on my own, for the most part. For this record, I wanted to make a band of really great musi-

"It's been a trip."

cians.

basketball with this person, eating lunch with that person.

MW: So how does the band factor into the process of

It was this bubble, I guess you could say.

what we’re all listening to?

Not perfect but we went to school with the pres-

GCJ: We pulled in drummers J.J. Johnson, Brannen

ident’s kids and we went to school with kids who had

Temple, Alex Peterson, just giving the young guys a

nothing.

shot. John Deas, who’s an amazing keys player, and

MW: So what happened exactly? Was the inspiration

also Mike Elizondo. He’s a great bass player out of L.A.,

for the song and video personal?

played on a lot of Dr. Dre stuff, a lot of the hip-hop stuff

GCJ: I go all over the world — thousands of people ev-

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ery night, and they all look different. Then when I came

my family here. I was close with my grandmother and

back home, I was confronted with a situation where I was

had cousins to run around with. That made me always

made to feel less than, in front of my child. It felt like rapid

remember where I came from and not do anything to

rewind. My kid’s askin’ me why I’m upset, why is he saying

mess up that seat at the Thanksgiving table. I want to

these things to you?

raise my kids knowing how important it is to be around

I wouldn’t have made it a big deal normally, but when

family. If I can just have my kids grow up here and Aus-

I turn around and see my kid’s face — at three years old

tralia, where my wife is from, I’ll be happy.

it’s not the right time to explain to him why this man is

MW: What’s music like for your kids?

saying these things, but I was angry about it. I couldn’t let

GCJ: We show them a lot of music, just like my parents

this go, and I remembered a time growing up when kids

did for me. My kid only wants to hear Michael Jackson’s

were shouting the n-word to me and “Go back to Africa”

“Bad,” and he likes to hear my cover of “Come Together,”

with Confederate flags in my face.

which I think is awesome, ’cause he thinks I’m cool with

I really talked to Savanah about where I came from and what that memory meant. Let’s get rid of these

Batman [Clark covered the song as part of the “Justice League” soundtrack].

images that have been meant to offend people. I don’t

Sammy Davis Jr. is one of our favorites to listen to

want to see it anymore. I don’t want to have to have my

together. The song that he loves the most is “Mr. Bojan-

kids see it anymore. Whether you’re red or blue, let’s

gles,” and Michael Jackson learned a lot from Sammy

break it down. This land is mine just as much as it is yours

Davis Jr. He doesn’t even understand the whole full cir-

and the next person’s.

cle that Jerry Jeff Walker wrote that song and Django

Sometimes you gotta turn and think about reality and step outside of your comfort zone. I got in the studio, just popped off [the song] and hit up Savanah, and she

[Walker’s son] and I went to school together. Where this song comes from is where we’re from, and he loves it. So next time I see any of the Walkers, I’d like to thank

was like, “I got you.”

them for my son’s favorite song.

MW: How have you settled into the new phase of your

MW: It’s a good song.

life with a family? GCJ: I love being a dad. Me and my wife were talking about being parents in New York or L.A., but I got all

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GCJ: Yeah, it’s a great song. We’re doing our part. We’re bringing it all together, you know. This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.


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STYLE PROFILE

Lone Star BROOKLYN DECKER: ACTRESS, FINERY CO-FOUNDER AND LIP SYNC PHENOM RECEIVES AUSTIN FILM SOCIET Y’S RISING STAR AWARD By Hannah Morrow Portriat by Kristen Kilpatrick

B

she can’t find her phone. There’s a beat, then it hits her. “Oh my god,” she says into the device already at her ear. “That was mom brain.” The lapse is entirely forgiven — I have no kids and look for my keys while they’re in my hand more than I care to admit — and she can really bear no blame. Decker’s life has a lot of moving parts. This month, the supermodel turned actress will be recognized for a few of those parts by the Austin Film Society at its annual Texas Film Awards. The Rising Star Award, which has previously been given to Armie Hammer and Jesse Plemons, highlights her growth as an artist, as well as her entrepreneurial and philanthropic efforts. She says that despite dabbling in local theater as a kid, acting wasn’t on the table as a career. “My mom was a critical care nurse; my dad was a respiratory therapist; my brother is a firefighter. They were saving people’s lives,” says Decker of her early aspirations. “It had nothing to do with entertainment or creativity.”

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P R O D U C T I O N S T I L L S CO U R T E S Y O F N E T F L I X .

ROOKLYN DECKER AND I ARE ON A CALL WHEN SHE SAYS


Decker shown alongside "Grace and Frankie" costars June Diane Raphael and Martin Sheen.

A few years after getting scouted at a mall in Matthews, North Carolina, she moved to New York to pursue modeling in 2005. In lieu of a college experience, she furthered her education by working with an acting coach. “And that was it. I fell in love with the language, and it was fun to have something to read and work on,” she says. “It was a really innocent entrance into acting.” While continuing to grace magazine covers, most notably Sports Illustrated, Decker took on smaller roles until her big break, 2011’s “Just Go With It,” alongside Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston.

Since then, Decker has guest-starred on a number of shows, including FOX’s “New Girl”

and ABC’s “Ugly Betty.” More recently, she starred in fellow Austinite and AFS-backed filmmaker Andrew Bujalski’s “Support the Girls” and is a regular cast member on Netflix’s “Grace and Frankie,” the five-season dramedy featuring Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin. On top of a successful series and two small children (three-year-old son Hank and 15-month-old daughter Stevie) with husband and tennis champion Andy Roddick, Decker serves as chief design officer for the fashion web

platform Finery, which she launched in 2015 with journalist and former news anchor Whitney Casey. “At the end of the day, it comes down to boredom,” says Decker, who’s philanthropic efforts extend to the Special Olympics, the Sierra Club and the Austin-based Andy Roddick Foundation. “I think there is ambition but a general curiosity and fear of boredom that drives my activity. Asking myself, will I be fulfilled by this project? If not, what’s the next thing? What can I create? What can I do better?”

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STYLE PROFILE

Rapid Fire With Decker WHAT ARE YOUR NICKNAMES? Double Agent Decker. WHEN YOU WERE A KID, WHAT DID YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GREW UP? A veterinarian. WHAT DO YOU WANT TO BE WHEN YOU GROW UP NOW? A really happy grandma — not anytime soon!

THE MOST SURPRISING THING ABOUT TEXAS WHEN YOU MOVED HERE? Austin is such a melting pot of ideas. I love that you can have a UT booster sitting next to a woman with purple hair, and they can be the best of friends. FAVORITE MEAL IN AUSTIN? The chef’s tasting menu at Uchiko — whatever they want to make me.

WHAT’S ALWAYS IN YOUR PURSE? A pacifier.

AN ACTING ROLE YOU WOULD LOVE TO PLAY? Steve Carell in “Little Miss Sunshine” — it was so funny

WHAT’S SOMETHING THAT RECENTLY MOVED YOU? Microsoft’s Super Bowl commercial — I cried. It was beautiful and inclusive.

and sad and great. Ellen Page in “Juno.” That sort of slice-of-life filmmaking I really like.

IN HONOR OF YOUR RECENT “LIP SYNC BATTLE,” WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO KARAOKE SONG? Anything off the Beyoncé “Lemonade” album. WHAT SPORT OR GAME CAN YOU BEAT ANDY IN? The only thing I’ve ever been better at than him is rock climbing — we’ve only done it once.

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SOMETHING YOU LEARNED FROM JANE FONDA? Never stop serving people. She’s constantly working to help people; she never stops. SOMETHING YOU LEARNED FROM LILY TOMLIN? Always play on set, even if you’re breaking all the rules. There was a moment where she stuck her tongue in a bowl of cereal puffs, and it made the trailer.

MOST INVINCIBLE YOU’VE EVER FELT? Giving birth.

WHOSE CLOSET WOULD YOU MOST WANT TO RAID? Grace Kelly’s.

SOMETHING YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED TO DO? Learn Spanish fluently.

BESIDES FINERY, WHAT APP DO YOU USE THE MOST? Slack.

WHAT’S YOUR GO-TO ARTICLE OF CLOTHING OR ACCESSORY? A black blazer.


G HOS T H IL L T E X A S BO UR BO N

AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN T H e PA S T A N D T H E P O S S I B L E . The only way to honor centuries of spirit-making is to relentlessly try to do it better. By tweaking traditional techniques and focusing on grain-toglass sourcing of Texas panhandle corn and soft red winter wheat, we’re blending art, science and a trial-by-fire expertise to lean whiskey forward. We love tradition, but to create a tangible taste of place, you have to have the courage to be curious.

PURSUIT OF THE CURIOUS tribeza.com

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LIVING WITH LEAH

On the Road A DAY TRIP TO THE ROUND TOP ANTIQUES FAIR By Leah Ashley

I

love the Round Top Antiques Fair. Whether you’re after French antiques, unusual artifacts or bargain-bin deals, there is something for everyone at one of the nation’s largest f lea markets. The fair takes place twice a year, once in the spring and once in the fall, and its “tents,” or “fields” (lay speak for the independent venues that make up the collective experience), manage to take over roughly 25 miles on either side of Highway 237. This year, the spring gathering runs from April 1 through April 6. I highly recommend you make the trip, even if just for a day. Seeing all that the fair has to offer in such a quick window may seem impossible, but luckily for Austinites, Round Top is only about an hour and a half outside the city. With the right strategy and a few clever tips, you’ll be able to enjoy the magic of this unique experience and bring home a few treasures, all before sundown.

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H O L LY CO WA R T A N D N ATA L I E L AC Y L A N G E .

F YOU LOVE OTHER PEOPLE’S OBJECTS, THEN YOU ARE GOING TO


HAVE A STR ATEGY: When planning your day

it’s important to have an idea of what you are looking for. Every year, I make a list of items that I’m in the market for. A rug for the guest room, a vintage bed for my son’s room and side chairs for our living room are some of the things I’ll be on the lookout for this year. Plus I make sure that I have all the measurements I need, and I set a budget. It can be easy to get distracted when you see miles and miles of tents, all filled to the brim with pre-loved pieces. WHAT TO BRING: Since I want to have a full day

of shopping, digging and exploring, I usually hit the road at sunrise. The most important thing to remember is that this event takes place in cow pastures, so dress appropriately. Dressed in jeans, a T-shirt and a hat, I like to throw on my most worn-in pair of cowboy boots, because I know they will be the most comfortable for a day of exploring. I also like to wear a crossbody bag, a backpack or even a fanny pack so that my hands are free to dig and haul. A couple of things that I always throw in my bag are sunscreen, disinfecting wipes, water and cash. It’s hard to haggle on price when vendors have a credit-card transaction fee and while most dealers do take credit cards, cash is still king. GET INSPIRED: I like to start by visiting the high

end venues first: Big Red Barn, Marburger Farm and The Compound. You will have to pay a $10 admission fee at Big Red and Marburger (parking included) but it’s worth it to see gorgeous antiques, sourced by individual vendors, from all over the world. These three strongholds of the fair are a great way to see trends and learn more from experts. Plus The Compound’s perfectly curated and gorgeous barn is reason enough to visit. And as with any flea market or antiques fair, even the upscale ones, there are always deals to be found. Who knows what you may stumble upon for your own space...perhaps the mid-century Italian oil painting of your dreams. tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK

LUNCH ON THE GO: Now that you are fully

inspired, it’s time to refuel at some of Round Top’s most famous spots. A favorite of mine is Royers Cafe, where the Junkberry and Texas Trash pies are to die for. I'm also a fan of the Junk Gypsies flagship store, which, yes, offers more shopping but also has food trucks and live music set up outside. And if you get stuck in the tents of Marburger, never fear – there's an excellent open-air “cafe,” where the brisket sandwiches served up by Back Porch BBQ (out of La Grange) are always an excellent decision.

of Warrenton (just down the road from Round Top) to Excess 1 and Excess 2. The barn stalls here are filled with vendors that have a little bit of everything – think German beer hall picnic tables, turn-of-the-century nautical accessories and piles of French wooden cutting boards. The wares are reasonably priced but also thoughtfully collected, and you really can find some killer deals if you’re willing to dig a bit. From there head next door to the open field of Warrenton, where it’s time to explore what feels like the world’s largest garage sale! Vendors here are always open to haggle, so bring cash and your best poker face. GIVE THOSE BOOTS A BREAK: After a full day

of shopping, hunting and digging, cool down with a cold one at the famed Zapp Hall. Often, it will have a great band and even serve burgers outside. It’s a fine place to end the day and recap all the fabulous treasures you found. Happy hunting!

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P I E I M AG E CO U R T E S Y O F R OY E R S . P H OTO G R A P H S B Y N ATA L I E L AC Y L A N G E A N D A P R I L P I Z A N A .

TIME TO DIG: After lunch head toward the town


COME CELEBRATE THE S TUFF THAT ART AND DREAMS ARE MADE OF at D REAMLIF E, Women & Their Work’s spring benefit Bash. April 6, 2019 • 8-11pm At the Daphne in Travis Heights

DreamLife DreamLife will be an avant-garde night channeling the subconscious wilderness where art is born, with a Dance Performance by Jennifer Sherburn's troupe; a Tarot Lair with Sister Temperance; Celestial Face Paint; Roving Phantasms; Surrealist Projections; Psychedelic Music by DJ Girlfriend; a King-Size Photo Bed; Visionary Elixirs; Divine Eats and more… Attire will be midnight constellation - star motifs, nighttime satin, silk robes and slip dresses. • You can buy tickets at www.womenandtheirwork.org tribeza.com

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T R AV E L P I C K

New Orleans A FIRST-TIMER’S WHIRLWIND BIG E ASY TOUR By Hannah J. Phillips

A just-so moment thanks to the Ace Hotel's Seaworthy restaurant. 92 MARCH 2019 | tribeza.com


Y

O U N E E D AT L E A S T T H R E E D AY S

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R U S H J AG O E , F R A N PA R E N T E A N D C H R I S G R A N G E R .

and three stomachs to do New Orleans properly — and a spare liver helps, too. First-time visitors to the Big Easy soon discover how hard it is to fit everything in, referring figuratively to the museums, music halls and monuments — and literally to the po’boys, gumbo, beignets and more. The trick is to pace yourself, as much for your digestion’s sake as to make sure you don’t miss the soul of the city while sampling everything it has to offer. Sure, check Café Du Monde off your bucket list and snap photos in the French Quarter, but don’t forget to collect the city’s smells and sounds as well: incense in the voodoo shops, the rattle of a streetcar, fresh rain on a curtain of Spanish moss and a jazz trumpet’s jubilant laugh. A short walk from the city’s main artery, the Ace Hotel invites visitors through a portal of overgrown greenery into an art deco lobby that

would win Jay Gatsby’s approval. Like New Orleans itself, the hotel’s unassuming exterior harbors hidden gems at every turn: an intimate live-music venue with speakeasy vibes at the Three Keys; three dining options for fresh, local fare; and a rooftop pool serving sips with a view. Guest rooms feature decadent dark tile and minimal décor as a welcome respite in a city that overstimulates each of the five senses. After check-in, head to the nearby streetcar stop on Carondelet to catch the St. Charles line to Audubon Park. Commissioned in the early 1920s, the line is the oldest continuously operating street railway system in the world, earning a national historic landmark designation in 2014. Hopping on at Carondelet is your best chance to snag a window seat before the Canal Street crowds pile on. And you definitely want a window seat as the streetcar chugs toward Uptown. High-rises give way to wrought-iron gates and

Greek columns of the Garden District’s antebellum homes, where beads from bygone Mardi Gras blend with the ferns of giant oaks. You will be tempted to hop off at the Tulane University stop, but patience pays off at the corner of South Carrollton Avenue, where you will find New Orleans Original Daiquiris. The dive is best known for its 190 Octane mixes, but if you’re watching your Everclear intake, opt for the House Blend. Capitalize on Louisiana’s lax liquor laws by ordering to go and then retracing your steps to the entrance of Audubon Park. Calories don’t count when you consume and walk at the same time, and the paths of Audubon Park are the perfect setting for both. The 1.9-mile loop winds over stone bridges and past weeping willows, and an extra side trip toward the zoo leads to the glorious Tree of Life. A grand example of the city’s ancient live oaks, the tree’s colossal branches create a canopy of shade,

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T R AV E L P I C K

reaching heavenward like cathedral arches and drooping down to meet the earth. Now that you’ve walked off your daiquiri, it’s high time for a three-martini lunch at Commander’s Palace before browsing the boutiques and galleries along Magazine Street. Or wander the neighborhood’s 19th-century homes. Fans of “American Horror Story” should seek out the Buckner Mansion, featured as the fictional Miss Robichaux’s on the third season. In the evening, head back to the Ace to freshen up for a night in, New Orleans-style. One of the hotel’s best perks is not needing to travel far for live music and local cuisine. Enjoy happy hour on the rooftop at Alto before sampling Seaworthy’s fresh oyster selection around the corner:

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Intimate and cozy, the bar serves wild-caught oysters from the West, East and Gulf coasts. Get back to the Three Keys early to claim a spot upstairs. Shows highlight local legends and upcoming artists alike, so check the calendar ahead of time for a sneak peek. After a late night, ease into your next morning under the palm leaf motifs inside Josephine Estelle, helmed by James Beard nominees Andy Ticer and Michael Hudman. Featuring fresh, seasonal ingredients, the breakfast menu is your chance to check the fried-chicken biscuit off your NOLA list, or pace yourself for a day in the French Quarter with the Farmers Breakfast of a poached egg and vegetables. For some of the best views in the city, head

ABOVE: Mouthwatering plates courtesy of Café du Monde and Seaworthy.


The tomb of voodoo queen Marie Laveau.

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y PA U L B R O U S S A R D , R U S H J AG O E , F R A N PA R E N T E A N D N O C V B .

down Canal Street to cross the Mississippi by ferry. Departing every half hour, the ferry lands at Algiers Point, a 19th-century neighborhood known as the “Brooklyn of the South” and home to the city’s Jazz Walk of Fame. Back across the river, stroll the embankment toward the French Quarter for lunch at Central Grocery & Deli, home of the unforgettable muffaletta. Italy meets the South in every bite of this sesame bread, Italian charcuterie and spicy Creole olive salad, best enjoyed with a bottle of Dixie Beer. Savor your last bites of that delicious seeded bread before venturing out into the French Quarter maze. Wander through voodoo shops, admire the architecture and visit the crumbling graves of the 18th- and 19th-century cemeteries.

St. Roch and St. Louis No. 1 are among the most popular, though after years of vandalism, the latter now requires $20 admission. Refuel and recaffeinate along the way at Café Amelie’s romantic courtyard, or let the day drinking continue at Lafitte’s Blacksmith Shop Bar. Built in 1722, the tavern is reportedly the oldest bar in the country and one of the most haunted sites in the area. For d i n ner, Ga lat oi re’s h a s ser ve d French-Creole staples since 1905, but if you forgot to pack a dinner jacket, the nearby Longway Tavern features hearty fare to gear up for an evening on Bourbon Street. To find the city’s quintessential jazz, join the queue at Preservation Hall for one of five nightly concerts; those

less patient can head to Fritzel’s European Jazz Pub as a superb alternative, maximizing time for meandering through cobblestone streets and gaslit corners. And, of course, no trip is complete without a late-night stop at the mecca that is Café Du Monde, relishing the doughy goodness of powdered sugar-topped beignets after a long day of exploring. Your pilgrimage complete, head back to the Ace for a short night’s rest before your morning flight. Falling asleep, you’ll remember that you forgot to try a po’boy or a gin fizz, but that's how every first trip to New Orleans should end, with a longer list of reasons to return.

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KAREN'S PICK

40 North CLINT ELMORE’S NEIGHBORHOOD PIZ Z A JOINT HITS ALL THE RIGHT NOTES By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

R

ECENTLY, MY HUSBAND HAD A ROUTINE

medical procedure that required a full day of fasting (OK, it was a colonoscopy, but that’s not polite dinner conversation). Ravenous afterward, his first request was for a 40 North pizza. And a 40 North fried-chicken sandwich. And a 40 North salad. With his hospital gown barely shed and his Propofol barely worn off, I drove him straight to the midtown restaurant. It just has that kind of pull. Their crave-worthy Italian food and comfy ambiance will linger in your culinary subconscious and call you back again and again. But 40 North wasn’t always so alluring. Back in 2014, it was just a modest South Austin trailer with a cluster of picnic tables, offering a small selection of pizzas and side dishes. But it gained a loyal following and eventually graduated to a full-f ledged brick-and-mortar last May, moving into a quaint Central Austin bungalow that offered patrons an expanded menu, a bar and indoor seating more refined than picnic tables (although those still exist on the funky outdoor patio).

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40 NORTH 900 W. 10TH ST. (512) 660-5779 40NORTHPIZZA.COM

Named after the latitude coordinate for Naples, Italy, 40 North specializes in Neapolitan-style pizza but now also offers Italian-inspired items like hot sandwiches, salads, vegetable-focused small plates, desserts, plus beer and wine. It’s all great. But the pizza is the star. Thin and chewy and blistered with a crispy char, it does Naples proud. There are about a dozen choices now, but the classic Margherita is simple perfection, with tomato sauce, fresh basil and creamy mozzarella. There’s a tasty white pizza topped with three cheeses, dandelion greens, pancetta and onion jam. But the pie that put 40 North on the map is the Hot Honey, a ribald combination of tomato sauce, spicy coppa and Fresno chiles, drizzled with chile-infused honey, then dotted with creamy ricotta to tame the heat.

If you can tear yourself away from the pizza, their fried-chicken sandwich competes with June’s All Day’s for the best in town. All-whitemeat chicken breast is lightly battered and fried, then dressed with a crunchy cabbage slaw, house pickles, Fresno chiles and buttermilk dressing on a soft seeded bun. Insider’s tip: It’s a steal at $7 during happy hour. There’s also an in-house roasted porchetta sammie and an Angus beef burger. Their greens also deserve top billing. The farro salad has been on 40 North’s menu since its trailer days, with the toothsome grain sharing the plate with peppery arugula, sweet red onions, cucumbers, tomatoes and kalamata olives with a white balsamic dressing. But it’s the delicate Bibb version that really knocks me out: tender

Bibb lettuce scattered with slivered shallots, radishes, olives and hazelnuts; dusted with pecorino cheese; and tossed in a lip-smacking citrus vinaigrette that deserves to be bottled and sold. It’s a lesson in restraint that allows the garden-fresh ingredients to shine through. For nibbling, there are a few thoughtful veggie side dishes, like fried cauliflower and crispy fingerling potatoes. And for dessert, there are homemade sweets like panna cotta. The wine list offers some interesting domestic and Italian varietals, and the beer choices range from classic imports to local crafts to good ol’ Coors Banquet on draft. Chef Clint Elmore left a successful legal career in New York City to pursue his love for pizza, training under legendary master Enzo Coccia in Naples, then apprenticing at Paulie Gee’s in Brooklyn. He describes 40 North as a “neighborhood pizza joint,” which is spot-on. The charming 1930s cottage is comfortable and welcoming, where the friendly staff greets the regulars by name. Young families walk over with strollers for early dinners, and hipster couples with their dogs swing by later to dine on the patio. Clutches of friends huddle in the bay window seats, catching up over pizza and wine. It’s the kind of local place that satisfies your hunger with exceptional food and graciously welcomes you, whether you’re coming from home, the office or even the doctor’s office. tribeza.com

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24 DINER

THE BREWER’S TABLE

CAFÉ JOSIE

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

With an emphasis on quality and community, this East

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order

Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone at the brewer’s

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

table. Local ranchers and farmers source the ingredients,

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

which are utilized in both the kitchen and the brewery to

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

eliminate food waste. The seasonally changing menu is

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

34TH STREET CAFE

unique but provides options for even the pickiest of eaters (ask for the kid’s menu).

CAFÉ NO SÉ

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering pizzas,

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

consistently baked with crispy edges and soft centers. The

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

famous Neapolitan technique is executed by the Stefano

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs at more than 900

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware, there is no shortage of

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

cheese on this menu!

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect complement to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art

BAR CHI SUSHI

wine-preservation system with temperature control

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

ensures optimal taste and appreciation.

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the week-

EASY TIGER

ends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer

BARLEY SWINE

garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab

6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer,

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO 1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542 3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668 A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

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BADU 1891

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

601 Bessemer Ave. | (325) 247 1891 badu1891.com

EL ALMA

Discover an extraordinary culinary experience in

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with

Llano, Texas. BADU 1891’s seasonal menu offers

unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Aus-

bold flavors and locally sourced ingredients for

tin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect

lunch, dinner, and weekend brunch. Enjoy heartfelt

for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the

hospitality, a full bar and happy hour specials, robust

everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

cigar menu, and live music every Friday and Saturday evening.

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

EPICERIE

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

French-Vietnamese eatery with a colorful menu

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

of pho, banh mi, and sweet treats. Both the indoor

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

seating and outdoor patio bring comfort and vi-

here for a bite on Sundays.

brancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 The Shoal Creek favorite, affectionately known as Fonda, has been bringing people together for more than 4 decades. Known for their Interior Mexican Cuisine and artful dining room, Fonda San Miguel is the perfect spot to share an evening with friends. FOREIGN & DOMESTIC 306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010 Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

The greatest stories are told with family and friends over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies just that, bringing nostalgic and classic ItalianAmerican cuisine to the heart of Austin. From family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is yours to call home.

This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted car-

CICLO

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300 cicloatx.com Ciclo is a modern Texas kitchen featuring locally inspired flavors and ingredients with a Latin influence, all brought to life through a unique collaboration between Chef de Cuisine James Flowers and world-renowned restaurateur, Richard Sandoval. Ciclo’s name reflects its focus on menu offerings that change seasonally, from ceviches, crudos and grilled and smoked meats to inventive cocktails.

amel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

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JUNE’S ALL DAY

LENOIR

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a

This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

kid-friendly patio all work together to make Hank’s our new

cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. In-

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir

favorite neighborhood joint. With happy hour every day

spired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering. The

comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique,

from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing between their frosé and frozen paloma. Drinks aside, the braised meat-

restaurant’s namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—

balls, chopped black kale salad (add falafel!) and spicy fried

one of less than 10 in Texas—who also serves as the beverage

chicken are a few standouts from the craveable menu.

director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

HOPFIELDS

LA BARBECUE

HANK’S

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467 A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in the world.

LE POLITIQUE 110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651 This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patisserie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

LORO

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite

Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and Aar-

has maintained the execution, top-notch service,

on Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition to

and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that

South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and

makes it an Austin staple.

open, and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

ing experiences around. Leave your worries at the door

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese-caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and

and lose yourself in the comforts of the cactus.

order the biscuits.

IRON CACTUS

New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio

606 Trinity Street | (512) 472 9240 ironcactus.com

and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

With amazing outdoor patio views, friendly service and

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best

a lively full bar, Iron Cactus offers one of the best din-

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

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A LOOK BEHIND

"You cool, man?" Our "Dazed and Confused" themed "Tuned Up" shoot involved fourteen musicians, three locations, two stylists and a partridge in a pear tree. Thankfully, photographers Holly Cowart and Claire Schaper caught some of the #bts shenanigans.

102 MARCH 2019 |

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LUXURY IS OU R SE RV I C E, OU R STA N DA R D, OU R IN S PIRAT ION. find your luxury only with kuper

5 AUST I N-A R E A LO CAT I O NS / SE E MO RE AT KUP E RRE A LT Y.CO M / P RO P E RT Y: 1 27 BIRN A M WO O D COURT

Profile for TRIBEZA Austin Curated

TRIBEZA March 2019  

The Music + Film Issue No. 211

TRIBEZA March 2019  

The Music + Film Issue No. 211

Profile for tribeza