Page 1

MAKING CONNECTIONS

A conversation with Stephen Harrigan and Lawrence Wright

WON’ T YO U B E MY NE I G HB OR

A photographer’s take on her neighborhood

N O. 202 | N E I G H B O R H O O D S

Becoming friends with the folks next door

SIDEKICKS

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YEARS


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CONTENTS

Photographer Kady Dunlap with her Avenue H neighbors.

JUNE / NEIGHBORHOODS

52

A shelf of Stephen Harrigan’s novels.

64

DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 20

Style Pick p. 88

Kristin’s Column p. 28

Travel Pick p. 90

Community Profile p. 30 Karen’s Pick p. 94 Tribeza Talk p. 34 Dining Guide p. 96 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 36 Tonya and Carl Fairley in their backyard.

ON THE COVER Travis Heights neighbors and friends photographed by Danielle Chloe,

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A Look Behind p. 100

Music Pick p. 37

FEATURES

Art Pick p. 42

Making Connections p. 44

Event Pick p. 44

Won’t You by My Neighbor? p. 52

Austin Neighborhood Guide p. 71 Style Profile p. 84

Past Meets Present p. 60 Sidekicks p. 64


DOMAIN NORTHSIDE OPENING SUMMER 2018 Women’s . Men’s . Accessories


EDITOR'S LETTER

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matter. They are what give a city its life and character. A mashup of the old and young, white and brown, new to town and long ensconced — neighborhoods are at their best when they represent some type of arc. This is something we sometimes get wrong, but when done right, there is a magic quality. A meal shared between neighbors is a gift and one that Chrissy Kleberg knows all too well. While always close with neighbors Mike and Joe, when her husband, Jay, left for an extended period due to work, their help and support was invaluable. Mike and Joe even went so far as to plop their table and chairs in the Klebergs’ front yard so adults, and kids (and dogs) could get together over an order from Home Slice. In “Making Connections” writer Robyn Ross shares the stories of East Austin, Travis Heights and downtown neighbors. Whether it’s playing dominoes, grilling, tending to goats, or imbibing in a nice glass of Chardonnay these friends find plenty of ways to share their lives with one another. Photographer Kady Dunlap is especially proud of the relationships she has found within her North Loop ’hood and over time has cajoled her neighbors into allowing her to photograph them. For this Neighborhoods Issue we commissioned Dunlap to re-create and expand on her initial project (“Neighborhood Watch”), and the results are striking. Neighbors of all stripes are captured in the way she sees them. New York Times best-selling authors Stephen Harrigan and Lawrence Wright certainly need no introduction — their reputations precede them. But what you may not know is, the writers are close friends and Tarrytown neighbors. With Wright’s recently published “God Save Texas” and Harrigan close to completion on his own Texas tome, we thought it the perfect time to have a chat about their relationship as writers, friends, and neighbors (“Sidekicks”). As we all know, neighborhoods aren’t only about the people in them but also about the shops, markets, and restaurants that create a home base for the community. Crestview does this very well with its iconic shopping center (“Past Meets Present”). Whether residents are popping into the Crestview Barber Shop or catching up under Little Deli & Pizza’s oak trees, this center is the heartbeat of an area that is simultaneously changing and staying the same. Through this issue we have tried to highlight the stories of people and places working to build community and make our neighborhoods more dynamic. As someone who has lived throughout Austin, I know there are endless pockets of magic throughout our city. You just have to look. Margaret Williams

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y M A D E L E I N E L A N D R Y

EIGHBORHOODS, AND THE PEOPLE WHO LIVE IN THEM,


LOEWY LAW FIRM


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

J U N E 2 01 8

N O. 2 02

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Magaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Hannah Morrow

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Teresa Clark Krissy Hearn Errica Williams INTERN

Ginny Griffin PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

WRITERS

Neal Baker Nicole Beckley Hannah Phillips Robyn Ross PHOTOGR APHERS

Warren Chang Danielle Chloe Matt Conant Holly Cowart Kady Dunlap Jonathan Garza Madeleine Landry Leah Muse Courtney Pierce Taylor Prinsen

ILLUSTR ATORS

Mackenzie Dunn Chris Nickels

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

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THE WOMENS SHOP THE MENS S HOP 52 4 NORTH L A MA R 51 2 472 5951 S OUTH CONGRES S 140 0 S OUTH CONGRES S 51 2 4 41 860 0

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SOCIAL HOUR

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TAILWAGGERS

On April 7, Austin Pets Alive! held its second annual Tailwaggers Non-Gala at 7Co. Named after film legend Bette Davis’ annual fundraiser, the party featured an exciting silent auction, celebrity mixologists, beats by DJ Mahealani, and a DesignIt-Yourself Pet Accessories station hosted by CRAFT. Proceeds went toward the organization’s shelter pets and efforts to keep Austin the “Largest No-Kill City in the U.S.”

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CASIS SPRING FLING

Parents at Casis Elementary School gathered at the Charles Johnson House-American Legion in Deep Eddy on April 7 for a Texas-themed fundraiser. “Deep in the Heart of Casis” raised important funds for campus improvements and new technology.

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The Austin Alumnae Chapter of Zeta Tau Alpha kicked off its Celebration of Life benefit on April 11. Presented by Kendra Scott, the event was held at the beautiful home of Donna Stockton-Hicks, with all proceeds going toward the Seton Breast Care Center for cancer treatment and the Zeta Tau Alpha Foundation for breast-care awareness and education programs.

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11 TAILWAGGERS: 1. Dr. Isaac Croudep, Nick Kiefer, Jamie Senthirajah & Adam Lassin 2. Patty & Joe Rotunda 3. Mary Herr Tally & Dan Jackson CASIS SPRING FLING: 4. Melissa Byrkit, Doug Byrkit, Laura Spence & Chas Spence 5. Stephanie & Todd O’Neill 6. Ronnie & Jennifer Skloss 7. Fifi Osborne, Jon Osborne, Heather Chasen & Matt Chasen CELEBRATION OF LIFE VIP RECEPTION: 8. Audrey Pendergrass, Suzanne Erickson & Amanda Koziel 9. Hal & Dinny Peterson 10. Andrea McWilliams, Donna Stockton-Hicks & Sarah Mansour 11. Susan Lubin, Brandi Horne & Marcia Levy 12. Rachel & Zack Jamail

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y WA R R E N C H A N G ,TAY LO R P R I N S E N & N I C K Y S C H R O E D E R D U E WA L L

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SOCIAL HOUR

DSACT COCKTAIL BASH

STARLIGHT SOCIAL

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Three hundred Austinites came together on April 12 for the Zilker Botanical Garden Conservancy’s Starlight Social. Emceed by KUTX program director Matt Reilly, the event featured twilight tours of the garden, gourmet bites from Austin’s leading restaurants, a dessert and coffee bar, a performance from local sensation Tomar and the FCs, and a live auction.

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MJ&M FASHION SHOW

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Renowned fashion designer Stacey Bendet, of Alice + Olivia, showcased her latest collection at the exclusive MJ&M Fashion Show and luncheon at JW Marriott on April 13. The show, hosted by Sally Brown, Amy Ingram, and Camila Alves McConaughey, marked Mack, Jack & McConaughey’s sixth year, with more than $7.5 million raised since the benefit’s launch. This year’s funds supported CureDuchenne, Dell Children’s Medical Center of Central Texas, HeartGift, the just keep livin Foundation, and The Rise School of Austin.

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DSACT COCKTAIL BASH: 1. Patrick Comerford & Erin Comerford 2. William Mullican & Jessica Mullican 3. Asha Thomas, Cameron LaHaise, Peggy Wolf & Laura Whitekettle STARLIGHT SOCIAL: 4. Christi Bozic & Ana Martin 5. Patricia Martinez, Peter Pfeiffer & Amy Voorhes 6. Rachel Warburger & Jazmyn Griffin 7. Terry O’Daniel, Tim Kasberger & Dee Kasberger 8. Brooke Leal & Anna Kid MJ&M FASHION SHOW: 9. Amy Ingram, Sally Brown, Jennifer Carnes, Camila Alves McConaughey & Stacey Bendet 10. Becky Urhausen & Misty Reid 11. Kerri Lohmeier & Jeannette Chibib

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A A N D TAY LO R P R I N S E N

On April 11, the Down Syndrome Association of Central Texas (DSACT) had its annual Cocktail Bash at 800 Congress. Guests enjoyed music by DJ Mel and delicious bites by Sushi Zushi and La Patisserie while supporting DSACT’s mission of providing education and support to individuals with Down syndrome, their families, and the community.


C O M E V I S I T U S ! South Congress | Lamar Central | The Domain


SOCIAL HOUR

I AM ART BENEFIT BASH

On April 14, Women & Their Work threw a 40thbirthday bash celebrating the many contributions of women to the art world. Guest donned metallic, art-inspired outfits while exploring a Yayoi Kusamainspired mirror room, a silent art auction, an art market, decadent eats, and more.

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WALLER CREEK POP-UP PICNIC

The Waller Creek Conservancy hosted its annual Waller Creek Pop-Up Picnic on April 14 in Palm Park. At this year’s picnic, guests indulged in picnic baskets prepared by some of Austin’s best restaurants while kicking back with a DJ set and watching the sun go down behind Austin’s skyline. The Waller Creek Conservancy’s mission is to create and maintain a chain of extraordinary urban parks around a restored Waller Creek.

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TEXAS YOUNG MASTERS VIP RECEPTION + AWARDS

The 2018 Texas Young Masters Awards, a joint initiative between the Texas Cultural Trust and the Texas Commission on the Arts, took place on April 16 at the ZACH Theatre. Hosted by honorary chair First Lady Cecilia Abbott, the ceremony honored 15 Texas students with $10,000 multiyear grants to enhance and build their professional artistic studies and provide access to developmental opportunities before college.

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9 I AM ART BENEFIT BASH: 1. Ryan & Lambert Holly 2. Erin Curtis, Flint Sparks & Tommy Vascocu 3. Jerome Morrison & Laura Granfortuna WALLER CREEK POP-UP PICNIC: 4. Evan & Alexandra Matthews 5. Bettina Barrow & Maya Nairn 6. Jen Pinkston, Lauren Smith Ford & Jacky Roberton 7. Ann Kasper & Tracey Nelson 8. Steve Harrison & Eleanor Bartosh TEXAS YOUNG MASTERS VIP RECEPTION + AWARDS: 9. Olivia & Cruz Ortiz 10. Gary Gibbs, Heidi Marquez Smith, Cecilia Abbott & Laura Matz 11. Ava Noble, Aisha Mpiana, Tobi Berman, Riley Canterbury, Megan Lin & Joziah German

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y WA R R E N C H A N G , C H R I S C A S E L L I & CO U R T N E Y P I E R C E

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SOCIAL HOUR

WILD NIGHT FOR WILDLIFE

Global Wildlife Conservation’s fourth annual Wild Night for Wildlife event — held at ACL Live at The Moody Theater on April 19 — highlighted the local organization’s decade of conservation success around the world. More than 400 guests were treated to a concert by award-winning singer-songwriter and activist Colbie Caillat, with this year’s concert sales supporting GWC’s mission to conserve the diversity of life on earth.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN ART DINNER

On April 20, The Contemporary Austin held its fifth annual Art Dinner at Laguna Gloria to benefit The Contemporary Austin’s exhibitions program. The enchanting evening celebrated the museum’s 2018 exhibition season, including projects at Laguna Gloria and the Jones Center on Congress Avenue. After a live art auction led by Sotheby’s, guests enjoyed live music and dancing on the lawn.

On April 21, Brooklyn Decker and Anna Dukes Delic hosted a luncheon at the Hilton Austin to benefit the Andy Roddick Foundation. The evening included a women’s leadership panel that included Maricé Brown, Gay Gaddis, and Dr. Colette Pierce Burnette and an ARF student panel. In addition, 13-year-old author Rachel Hurt donated $20,000 from the sales of her self-published book, “Guardians of the Forest.”

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WILD NIGHT FOR WILDLIFE: 1. Julie Jumonville, Kelly Green & Adria Sheth 2. Madison Moore & Colbie Caillat 3. Shefali Duggal, Adria Sheth & Rajat Duggal THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN ART DINNER: 4. Clayton Aynesworth, Deborah Green, Brian Sharples & Danielle Nieciag 5. Kathleen Irvin Loughlin & Christopher Loughlin 6. Karen Hawkins & Anna Cain 7. LeMel Humes & Suzanne Deal Booth ANDY RODDICK FOUNDATION LUNCHEON: 8. Meggie Hodge & Sean Farmer 9. Jeremy & Brittany Driscoll 10. Tara Cochrane, Dru Brown, Michelle Noteboom & JJ Langston 11. Andy Roddick & Brooklyn Decker

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y T Y L E R S C H M I T T, G E O R G E S S C H E M AG I N , B R I A N F I T Z S I M M O N S & W H I T N E Y A R O S T E G U I

ANDY RODDICK FOUNDATION LUNCHEON

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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

How the West Was Won By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Chris Nickels

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’M PRETTY SURE THAT THE NEIGHBORHOOD

I live in used to be considered the boonies. The scrubby cedar trees and half-dead grass in the front yards (the other half eaten by the legions of deer that have overtaken the area) have an unkempt look reminiscent of the days when this was considered “country.” This ain’t no nicely manicured West Austin enclave. It’s farther west. More like the Old West. There is a neighbor with a dingy RV parked in front, à la Cousin Eddie. I wonder what goes on in there, but then don’t really want to know. There are neighbors with yards and driveways cluttered with kids’ riding toys, parked askew, never put up. Christmas lights twinkle all year round. There are cool old hippie couples who work in the yard when it’s nice out. There are old cars in driveways, under pollen-encrusted car covers. There is even one of those wooden Little Free Libraries, stocked with seriously good books, next to a stand with dog poop bags and Adirondack chairs if you want to stop and read awhile. There is a half-built, precarious-looking treehouse, which stands (OK, leans) as a testament to parental good intentions and the rapid passage of childhood. One lady sits on her front porch and smokes, literally all day, barely visible to people passing by, but you can smell the smoke and hear her coughing. One cute old couple has plastic lawn furniture set up on the shady front porch under an American flag, and they greet people and wave, sipping iced tea or lemonade. One neighbor stands outside in a robe in the morning, tossing feed to the deer community that gathers religiously on his front lawn.

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Handwritten “Fawning Season! GO SLOW!” signs are tacked up all over the place, and traffic halts while huge deer families meander across the road and change their mind to go back across again. There is always the ambivalent fawn that can’t decide whether to go for it or not, so we wait on him too. People park in the street and have lots of stickers on their cars, letting you know where generations of children went to school, who was an honor student, what kind of dog they have, whether they own guns or eat meat, and what their tastes are in music and politics. But just like the real Old West, new people are coming in and taking over the territory. In between the little ranch-style older homes and the characters who dwell there, new people are snapping up homes, razing them, and building big, new, modern homes. If a “For Sale” sign is posted outside, blink and it will be under contract. Blink again and the lot will be empty. The old homes are modest and secluded, and the new homes are wide-open with lots of glass so you can watch the inhabitants at night like a backlit diorama. The contrast side by side is both artistic and ironic. In the new homes, fancy chandeliers twinkle within, and front yards have actual sod and landscaping. Expensive SUVs and Sprinter vans are replacing the dusty old Suburbans and

wood-paneled Wagoneers. These new people are definitely gussying up the joint. Sigh. Now I need to up my game. It reminds me of why plastic surgery is a bad idea, because once you fix up one thing, other things nearby look like hell. Now I notice that my house needs a nip and tuck. The wood on the front gate looks dry and sun-scorched and in need of sanding and staining. The back patio and front wall are mildewed and need to be power-washed ASAP. The outdoor furniture needed to be replaced two summers ago. The entire house actually needs to be repainted, inside and out. There is some wood rot under the kids’ windows, and the overworked upstairs AC unit is dripping water onto the driveway. The grass in the front yard can only really be considered grass when it’s rye season. Otherwise it’s pretty much trenched by new driver tires and consists mostly of weeds and clovers that resemble grass only because they are green. The “landscaping” is mostly land and no scaping and is comprised of scraggly rosemary bushes and a couple agave plants, because apparently the finicky deer don’t eat those. The metal roof is covered in pollen worms and dead leaves, and the gutters are overflowing. I can’t remember the last time I had those cleaned out. The trees need trimming, because they have those clingy, spidery, air plant mollusks all over them. But every time I think of doing it, it’s the wrong time of year. I planted a garden once, a few years back, when I was feeling springy and inspired. Now it’s dirt surrounded by stacked rocks and boasts a harvest of a couple toppled wire tomato cages and some weeds. It needs to be fertilized and replanted. All this talk of chores and projects is making me feel tired, inept, and overwhelmed. I probably either need to move, win the lottery, or marry a handyman.

THIS AIN’T NO NICELY MANICURED WEST AUSTIN ENCLAVE. IT’S FARTHER WEST. MORE LIKE THE OLD WEST.


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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Next in Line

A THIRD GENER ATION OF CISCO’S RESTAUR ANT & BAKERY BEGINS AS MAT T CISNEROS TAKES HIS TURN AT THE HELM OF A HISTORIC FAMILY BUSINESS

By Hannah Morrow Photographs by Leah Muse


M

ATT CISNEROS IS FUZZY ON THE DETAILS OF THE ORIGIN

of Cisco’s Restaurant & Bakery. He knows his great-grandfather founded a bakery on East Sixth Street sometime in the late ’30s and his grandfather Rudy “Cisco” Cisneros spun off his eponymous institution sometime between 1943 and 1950. Let’s go with 1950, Matt says, but he can’t prove it. “The oldest brick in this building I’ve heard of is 1901, but I can’t prove that either,” the 33-year-old says with a smile. The validity of these dates is negligible. We don’t need to know them to appreciate Cisco’s as a historic Austin hole in the wall. It wouldn’t change the fact that it’s still owned by the same family and operating in its original location, that teal brick building on the corner of East Sixth and Comal streets. It still serves the same migas and biscuits that Darrell Royal and Lyndon B. Johnson would lunch on regularly, maybe washed

down with a bloody mary (Rudy would only charge for the tomato juice, since he never bothered to get a liquor license). And though it’s technically correct that Cisco’s has new owners, Matt is hardly new to his family’s longtime restaurant. It was unavoidable, he says, that he’d eventually end up involved in the business. “I didn’t know when or how,” he says, sitting at his grandfather’s favorite table. It’s a big, round, clunky thing, with chairs that match only on the basis of worn-in upholstery. “I graduated from college, and I wanted to do a Cisco’s food trailer. That was in the works, but we realized whenever my uncle went to sell the restaurant, there’d be conflict with the owners. Funny enough, I’d be the new owner 12 years later.” Matt’s uncle Clovis inherited the Tex-Mex café when Rudy passed, in 1995. All was fine and good for a decade or two, with Clovis maintaining the joint’s eccentricities. But running a restaurant, particularly one tribeza.com

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flagged as iconic, is arduous. In 2012, a headline by beloved Austin American-Statesman columnist John Kelso read, “Cisco’s owner tired of messing with enchiladas 90 hours a week.” Clovis, then 51, had already put in his 40-something years of working at the family restaurant and was ready to retire from rancheros. By 2016, it was still for sale, albeit at a wishful price. Matt knew he wanted the restaurant but needed help. He found partners in longtime friend and Austin entrepreneur Will Bridges, general contractor Rick McMinn, and real estate investor Bryan Schneider. They agreed on a mission: bringing Cisco’s into the 21st century while maintaining its time-tested traditionalism. Of the four, Bridges, whom Matt knew from attending Austin High School, is the most familiar with this kind of undertaking. In the past decade, he’s become co-owners of Arlyn Studios, Deep Eddy Cabaret, and Antone’s Nightclub’s newest iteration on Fifth Street. “It was fitting that Bridges has done the save-local-business-type stuff before, because we didn’t want this to be a condo,” Matt says. “And it was a great operational

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partnership, because his name was tied to doing that and my name is tied to the history.” Matt met Schneider in college at St. Edward’s University, and McMinn, who is a partner at Hoffbrau Steakhouse and its sister bar, Rustic Tap, is also familiar with running an old-school, family-owned eatery. “It was four people with different expertise and specialties,” Matt says of the group. “It all flows very well.” The sale became official in 2017 and came at good timing as several of the restaurant’s comrades had succumbed to financial hardship, continuing the streak of tough times for long-standing restaurants around town. El Azteca, which opened on East Seventh in 1963, closed in September 2016. South Austin’s El Gallo closed in January 2017 after 60 years of business. The Cisneros family has long owned both the building and lot on which it sits, insulating them from rent increases. Still, the swelling of costs necessitate new traditions. “We’re adapting, but we’re not changing anything crazy,” says Matt. They’ve added merchandise, a liquor license, and live music on the first Saturday of each month. They plan on expanding their hours to include dinner and want to start catering. It’s a necessary compromise between old and new Austin, made tricky by the cultural gravity of the restaurant’s past. In the 1920s, before Rudy’s father opened Sunshine Bakery down the street from what would become Cisco’s, Mexican-Americans were making a home of East Austin. In 1926, Our Lady of Guadalupe Church moved from southwest downtown to East Ninth Street, giving the Hispanic community some sense of permanence. They planted roots and grew in numbers. Race relations remained poor until the 1950s ushered in glimmers of change. Hispanic-owned businesses, primarily restaurants, began to flourish. Cisco’s rose to the forefront of that legacy, due to the authentic fare and Rudy’s

IT’S THE HISTORY, THE CULTURE AND THE FOOD. THAT’S WHAT BRIDGES EAST AND WEST AUSTIN. IT HAS FOREVER .

OPPOSITE PAGE: Regulars

Gardner Selby and Carlos David Sanchez admiring Matt’s baby photo, proudly displayed amongst the restaurant’s memorabilia. LEFT: Cisco’s famous biscuits, best slathered with butter and jelly.

celebrity. After all, he chose the Cisco’s logo to be a caricature of his own visage, black frame glasses and cigar included. “I could never start something and be so vain that I put my face on the outside,” laughs Matt. “But he had the clout to do it, and it worked because he was so well-respected. If walls could talk, the people who have been here.” For decades, Rudy would seat newcomers in the front diner and regulars in the back rooms. It was a hodgepodge of East Side natives and West Side folks, who gladly made the trek. Before the omnipotent cellular device, politicians would roll into Cisco’s when they needed to make a deal. It was a sure bet that the right signature would be sitting somewhere in the back room, rubbing elbows with celebrities or musicians at the next table. To this day, most surfaces of the restaurant are layered in photographs, some signed and most faded with age, of those notable patrons. Kevin Costner, Ann Richards, Willem Dafoe, George W. Bush. One image is of Rudy clad in a white robe and clutching a harp, with the title “Restaurateurs’ Guardian Angel.” When you needed an East Side vote, Rudy was your man and Cisco’s was your spot. Like most members of his family, Matt grew up working in the restaurant, aware of its historic context. “It’s the history, the culture, and the food. That’s what bridges East and West Austin,” he says. “It has forever.” Now, nearly a century after that teal brick building first opened its doors, its surrounding blocks have drastically changed. And Matt intends on doing his part to keep the restaurant’s corner of East Sixth just as it’s always been: delicious and welcoming to all. “That’s what I wanted to carry on as a tradition and a value system. Everything is going on around us, but we’re not moving. We can adapt to Austin,” says Matt. “An icon and an iconic place get to live.” tribeza.com

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TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

In GOOD HEALTH Head toward the Hill Country for some much-needed relaxation and refreshment at the newly opened wellness center Alive + Well. The small gardens in the middle of the facility are flanked by health-focused services, including an infrared sauna, yoga studio, cleansing foot baths, and immersive float tank. The healthy vibe extends into the on-site restaurant, Elle’s Cafe & Coffee, featuring veggie-heavy fare like quinoa and kale bowls from the team behind Contigo.

The former site of an Enterprise rental-car facility might be the last place you’d think of transforming into a hip coffee and cocktail bar. But for the team behind Better Half, the Clarksville café that opened in February, it just clicked. “We’re stoked to be in the Clarksville neighborhood,” Better Half co-founder Matthew Bolick says. Bolick, along with his Brew & Brew partners, revamped the space and built out a full restaurant, with the help of Josephine House’s Rich Reimbolt and pastry chef Jennifer Tucker, and have future plans to open a full brewery. “We’ve got the nice patio out back where the lights are strung through the trees, and it’s kind of like you’re not in Austin almost, because it’s sort of tucked away by this little train yard,” Bolick says. “It’s hard to find that sort of zone in town anymore, especially this close to downtown.” BETTERHALFBAR.COM

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ALIVEANDWELLAUSTIN.COM

HIGH Flying Where can you climb through an obstacle course, slam-dunk a basketball, and play dodgeball on a trampoline, all in one location? Opened in April, the familyfriendly Urban Air Adventure Park invites kids and parents to bounce off the walls at its 30,000-square-foot Cedar Park location. There’s also a ropes course, climbing walls, and an indoor roller coaster, so your feet rarely have to touch the ground. URBANAIRTRAMPOLINEPARK.COM

B E T T E R H A L F P H OTO G R A P H B Y A L I S O N N A R R O . A L I V E + W E L L P H OTO G R A P H B Y C H A S E DA N I E L .

Better Believe It


CIVICS 101

E L E V É CO S M E T I C S P H OTO G R A P H B Y T W I N T Y P H OTO G R A P H Y.

“I think that a lot of people really closely follow national news … but people tend to ignore what’s happening in our own backyard,” Amy Stansbury says. As a journalist covering local issues and city council meetings, Stansbury wanted a way to bring broader attention to the impact of local government. Teaming up with designers Hal Wuertz and Jordan Shade, the trio created “A Beginner’s Guide to Local Government,” an illustrated activity book that breaks down the basics of civic engagement. “We settled on a book because we thought it was this really scalable way that we could get information out,” Wuertz says. Plus it comes with stickers. “It’s the local level that’s passing the policies that most affect you, like affordability and gentrification and traffic,” Stansbury says. “Even

Cause for Celebration

if you feel like you can’t effect change at the national level, there’s a whole world of opportunity right here in Austin for you to be engaged with and really be a leader.”

Commemorating Emancipation Day in Texas, first celebrated in 1865 with a proclamation declaring all slaves free, this year’s Juneteenth is observed June 16 with a parade and festival. The parade route extends through East Austin, beginning near Comal Street at East Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and ending at Rosewood Park, where vendors and food stands will be set up through the afternoon.

AFUNCTIONALDEMOCRACY.COM

JUNETEENTHCENTRALTEXAS.COM

BEAUTY AND BUBBLES “Being a local Austin brand, I really wanted to be able to interact with customers and give hands-on, one-on-one tips and advice,” Gertie Wilson says. After founding Elevé Cosmetics in 2015, Wilson and her sister, Ginger Averitt, opened a South Austin storefront in March, creating a stylish lounge space to try on products from the nontoxic beauty brand and sip on Champagne. “I know we

all experience the girls’ night out where we all get ready together and just glam up together, so I wanted to bring that experience to the store,” Wilson says. “We’ve had lots of support from the neighborhood and lots of people dropping by. We’re just so happy to be in this area.” ELEVECOSMETICS.COM

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: THE RAT PACK!

June 1 & 2 Palmer Events Center KELLY WILLIS

June 2 Stateside at the Paramount MOBLEY RECORD RELEASE PARTY

June 2 The Mohawk

June 16 Austin360 Amphitheater SHAKEY GRAVES

June 16 Stubb’s BBQ

June 20 ACL Live at The Moody Theater GREGORY PORTER: NAT “KING” COLE & ME

SLAYER W/ LAMB OF GOD

June 3 Stubb’s BBQ

June 20 Austin360 Amphitheater

PAUL SIMON

June 4 Frank Erwin Center 101X CONCERT SERIES: ROYAL BLOOD

June 5 Stubb’s BBQ

FLATBUSH ZOMBIES

June 7 Emo’s Austin

SHANIA TWAIN

June 7 Frank Erwin Center RAY LAMONTAGNE W/ NEKO CASE

June 9 Austin360 Amphitheater BRIAN SETZER

June 12 Stubb’s BBQ

BLUES ON THE GREEN

June 13 Zilker Park

TOMAR & THE FCS

June 15 Antone’s Nightclub

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JOHN PRINE

June 30 Bass Concert Hall WEEZER & PIXIES W/ THE WOMBATS

June 30 Austin360 Amphitheater

DIANA KRALL

June 20 Long Center

SUPERFRUIT

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POST MALONE W/ 21 SAVAGE

CAROLINE ROSE

June 21 Stubb’s BBQ

FILM SUMMER FILM SERIES: APOCALYPSE NOW REDUX

June 2 Paramount Theatre

JUKEBOX CINEMA

June 3 Beerland, Texas

ATX TELEVISION FESTIVAL

NEW FOUND GLORY

June 7 – 10 Downtown Austin

BLUE OYSTER CULT

FREE FILM SCREENING: A STRIKE AND AN UPRISING (IN TEXAS)

June 21 Emo’s Austin

June 22 Empire Control Room

KESHA & MACKLEMORE

June 22 Austin360 Amphitheater JOJO

June 25 Antone’s Nightclub UNPLUGGED: RAY WYLIE HUBBARD

June 28 Shady Grove

CHRIS BROWN

June 29 Austin360 Amphitheater SHREYA GHOSHAL

June 29 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

June 8 George Washington Carver Museum

VISUALS AND AUDIO SERIES

June 9 George Washington Carver Museum

JOHN CUSACK LIVE + HIGH FIDELITY SCREENING

THEATER LUCKY STIFF

Through June 24 Austin Playhouse SUNDAY IN THE PARK WITH GEORGE

Through June 24 ZACH Theatre

THE DANCE PROJECT: YOUR HAND IN MINE

June 8 – 10 Long Center

SOUL TO SOLE FESTIVAL

June 15 & 16 Long Center

HEISENBERG

June 20 – July 22 ZACH Theatre BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE TEXAS FIESTA 2018

June 23 Paramount Theatre

LEONARD BERNSTEIN’S MASS

June 29 & 30

COMEDY DOUG LOVES MOVIES

GREG WARREN

June 13 – 16 Cap City Comedy Club MICHAEL CHE

June 21 Paramount Theatre MO AMER

June 28 Paramount Theatre ROBERT KELLY

June 28 – 30 Cap City Comedy Club ANTHONY JESELNIK

June 30 Paramount Theatre

CHILDREN CAMPED

June 6 Domain NORTHSIDE AUSTIN SYMPHONY CHILDREN’S DAY ART PARK

June 6 – July 25 Austin Central Library

BRICKS & BLOCKS BONANZA

June 8 Thinkery

June 15 Bass Concert Hall

June 2 Cap City Comedy Club

JAWS ON THE WATER

THINGS YOU LOVE, THE MUSICAL!

June 9 The Contemporary Austin Laguna Gloria

JOSH WOLF

TOTALLY COOL TOTALLY ART THEATRE CAMP

June 15 – August 18 Beachside Billy’s at Volente Beach Resort

MOVIES IN THE PARK: HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON

June 21 Patterson Park

June 2 – June 30 The Hideout Theatre

June 7 – 9 Cap City Comedy Club

SECOND SATURDAYS: FOR THE BIRDS

June 11 – August 1 Doris Miller Auditorium


THE MANY ADVENTURES OF WINNIE THE POOH

INTERNATIONAL DAY OF YOGA CELEBRATION

IF WISHES WERE FISHES

JUNETEENTH 2K, PARADE & CELEBRATION

June 23 Bullock Texas State History Museum

June 23 – July 1 Long Center

OTHER ROB LOWE

June 1 Paramount Theatre SALSA SOIREE

June 1 Domain NORTHSIDE MAUDIE’S MOONLIGHT MARGARITA RUN

June 7 Walter Seaholm Drive

REPUBLIC OF TEXAS BIKER RALLY

June 7 – 10 Travis County Exposition Center

BUBBLEPALOOZA

June 9 Long Center

A CONVERSATION WITH PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON

June 10 Bass Concert Hall

SOUTHERN LIVING IDEA HOUSE

June 15 – November 15 Northwest Hills

June 16 Texas Capitol Lawn

June 16 Britton, Durst, Howard, Spence Center GREATER AUSTIN COMIC CON

June 16 & 17 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park TEXAS ROLLER DERBY

June 16 & 30 Palmer Events Center

BOOKPEOPLE PRESENTS: DAVID SEDARIS

June 17 BookPeople

TRAILER FOOD TUESDAYS

June 19 Long Center

AFRICAN AMERICAN BOOK FESTIVAL

June 23 George Washington Carver Museum & Library AUSTIN ICE CREAM FESTIVAL

June 23 Fiesta Gardens

FUN STOP 5K & FEST

June 23 Downtown Austin

FIRST THREE PAGES LIVE

June 26 ColdTowne Theater

MUSIC PICK

Shakey Graves By Neal Baker

STUBB’S BBQ, JUNE 16

Alejandro Rose-Garcia has been having some strange dreams. Better known as Shakey Graves, the Austin artist behind the lo-fi folk ramblings of “Roll the Bones” (2011) and the impassioned blues rock of “And the War Came” (2014) comes to us now in a different place than when we last saw him. What in his music is normally characterized by sharp attitude and a sun-bleached aesthetic is now beginning to shift and ooze with color. All of this unfolds on his latest release, “Can’t Wake Up,” whose nods to bedrooms and fairy tales lift his Americana songwriting off the ground. Welcoming new instruments, more-diverse influences, and a lot more imagination has resulted in a work that is grander and more saturated than anything he’s done before. Shakey Graves is returning home on June 16 to play a show at Stubb’s as part of the tour for this new record. One thing about his music-making that will doubtlessly remain unchanged is the energy and excitement that he brings in a live setting. Rose-Garcia is happy to one-man-band his way into your heart, stomping on a kick drum and a tambourine, but he plays just as well with friends (his duets with Esmé Patterson are particularly unforgettable). Now blowing up his arrangements and expanding his textures, he invites countless new opportunities for flair in his performances. And if there’s anywhere that he’s going to really bring the heat, it’ll be here in his hometown. tribeza.com

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts FAUSTINUS DERAET: CHILANGO SUBCONSCIOUS

Through June 9 Dougherty Arts Center MISHA PENTON

Through June 9 CAMBIAart Gallery MAGNIFICENCE OF SEVEN

Through June 16 Art For The People CYNDA VALLE

ART PICK

… of Warp and Weft By Neal Baker

DAVIS GALLERY, JUNE 9 – JULY 21

Ever wonder why we use so many metaphors? The “roller coaster of emotion” that you went through at the movies was in most ways nothing like an actual amusement park ride: no grinding metal, no G-forces, and likely less screaming. So what is it that makes this sort of figure of speech so effective? The same can be asked about art, with valuable comparisons to be found in the unlikeliest of places. Beginning June 9, with a run into July, the Davis Gallery is presenting “…of Warp and Weft” a side-by-side study of two Austin artists whose methods could hardly be more different but whose creations share visual and conceptual themes in wonderfully unexpected ways. Caprice Pierucci’s wooden sculptures defy the dry stiffness of their medium through their modeling into smooth, interlocking strands — they suggest motion but are frozen in time. Charles Heppner takes macro photos of cheesecloth on black backgrounds, revealing the individual fibers and the way they condense, expand, and overlap when crumpled and torn. Separately, each individual’s art attracts its own comparisons. Pierucci’s sculptures sometimes appear as networks of blood vessels, the porous insides of bones, or the convoluted bodies of organs and organelles. Heppner’s photos often look as though they map out terrain — mountains or deep faults, as if from above — or sometimes clouds and ocean currents. But together, it’s easy to see how these images of the world both inside us and around us are made from the same elements, with both artists making use of organic lines in complex systems. One possible takeaway: Maybe there’s more value than we realize in the connections we make between one another and the world around us.

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Through June 24 ART on 5th

LIMINAL: SYDNEY YEAGER

Through June 30 Gallery Shoal Creek

JIMMY DESCANT ART SHOW

June 2 – July 29 Yard Dog Art Gallery

LENKA CLAYTON: THE DISTANCE I CAN BE FROM MY SON

June 2 – September 2 Blanton Museum of Art

ANCESTRAL MODERN

June 3 – September 9 Blanton Museum of Art

PISSARRO LEGACY: 5 GENERATIONS

June 9 – 30 Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery JEN GARRIDO: SOLO SHOW

June 9 – 30 Wally Workman Gallery

BRANDON SNOW: PRESENT PAST | TENSE

June 9 – July 8 ART on 5th

...OF WARP AND WEFT

June 9 – July 21 Davis Gallery

CHANGARRITO PROJECT

June 14 – August 26 Mexic-Arte Museum YOUNG LATINO ARTISTS 23: BEYOND WALLS, BETWEEN GATES, UNDER BRIDGES

June 15 – August 26 Mexic-Arte Museum

MARGAUX CRUMP: THE LURE

June 16 – July 26 Women & Their Work

REBECCA ROTHFUS HARRELL & WILLIAM T. CARSON

June 16 – August 11 CAMBIAart Gallery

FROM THE PAGE TO THE STREET: LATIN AMERICAN CONCEPTUALISM

June 30 – August 26 Blanton Museum of Art


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

EVENT PICK

Austin Ice Cream Festival By Neal Baker

FIESTA GARDENS, JUNE 23

If you live in Austin, you already know what the summer has in store. Once the season is in full swing, sometimes the most you can ask for is that the daily high has only two digits. But it wouldn’t be Texas without a little sun, and the fact is that Austin knows how to make the most of the heat. Even on days when you want to stay cool in the AC, there are always reasons to step outside, and this month they culminate at the Austin Ice Cream Festival. The event, which takes place on June 23, is an annual gathering at Fiesta Gardens on Lady Bird Lake that features more frozen desserts than you could ever want. The only question is how you want to get your brain freeze on: while hanging out on the lawn listening to live music? As a follow-up to some trailer food? Or, if you’re efficient, maybe shoveling everything down as part of an ice-cream-eating competition? The gathering is of course family-friendly (and dog-friendly!) during the daytime (10 – 3 p.m.) but this year’s festival comes with a part two, after the kids go home. After Dark is a reopening of the event with a fresh batch of musicians and an assortment of desserts that just might get you buzzed. Talk about summer vibes.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y A N D R E W H O L M E S

MUSEUMS


WWG

Wally Workm an Gallery

J e n Ga rrido 1202 W. 6th St. Austin, TX 78703 wallyworkman.com 512.472.7428

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A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: S 12–5 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa & Su 11-4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu-F 10-5 space12.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa & Su 12-5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 russell–collection.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F 10-6 twyla.com/austingallery WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com


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44 JUNE 2018 P H OTO G R A P H B Y


MAKING

CONNECTIONS GOOD NEIGHBORS WILL WATER YOUR PLANTS WHILE YOU’RE ON VACATION. GREAT NEIGHBORS ARE PEOPLE YOU LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING WHEN YOU GET BACK. HERE’S HOW AUSTINITES IN THREE DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE CITY HAVE BUILT RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE FOLKS NEXT DOOR BY

ROBYN ROSS PHOTOGRAPHS BY

P H OTO G R A P H B Y

DANIELLE CHLOE

These Travis Heights neighbors raise a glass.

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RESERVED: TABLE FOR SEVEN

The knock reverberated through the house, and Chrissy Kleberg went to answer it with squirmy five-month-old Amelia in one arm. When she opened the door, Joe Holm and Mike Hondorp, her next-door neighbors, stood on the stoop, grinning. Hondorp held out a drink that looked suspiciously like a cocktail. Holm proffered a Mediterranean salad and some of his famous cornbread. Kleberg smiled with relief. “Come on in, guys,” she said. Her husband, Jay, was out of town on business for two and a half months, and her neighbors’ instincts couldn’t have been better. It was the first of many times during Jay’s absence that Holm and Hondorp showed up, ready to provide dinner and hold the baby so Chrissy could have a moment to herself. One of the two men checked in with Chrissy three times a week, making sure she and daughters Sophia, Katherine and Amelia were all right. Managing a big family, several pets and a house was easier with help a few steps away. “It’s nice to know that somebody next door has your back,” she says. In the roughly five years they’ve lived next door to one another on a leafy street in Travis Heights, the neighbors have helped each other in practical matters: bringing in packages from the porch. Lending an egg or sugar for baking, or a ladder for

household repairs. The Klebergs have an extensive costume closet, including several wigs, and Jay threw a yacht-rock–themed 40th birthday party last year. “Joe was out of town, so I was by myself getting ready,” Hondorp says. “I asked, ‘Hey, do you guys have a captain’s hat and a life jacket?’ Chrissy’s like, ‘Yep, come on over.’” The families socialize together regularly: in March, the whole crew strolled South Congress Avenue in the annual Easter pet parade organized by Jo’s Coffee (Amelia was wearing a bunny costume, and Holm and Hondorp’s dogs sported bunny ears). The adults attend fundraising parties and South by Southwest events together. When

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The Kleberg family shares a meal of Home Slice Pizza with Joe Holm and Mike Hondorp, their next door neighbors.

“AS KIDS, WE SPENT OUR WHOLE LIVES OUTSIDE. IT’S FUN TO BE ABLE TO DO THAT AS ADULTS.”

P H OTO G R A P H B Y

–MIKE HONDORP

the Klebergs’ oldest daughter, Sophia, had a piano recital at home, she invited Holm and Hondorp, who showed up with flowers. (She also writes them letters from camp every summer.) Holm and Hondorp tied the knot in October 2016, and they invited the Klebergs. “It was the most genuinely romantic, heartfelt wedding that I’d ever been to,” Jay says. Yet some of the neighbors’ best interactions have been impromptu dinners and downtime at a table Holm brought over to the Klebergs’ yard. Growing up, Holm spent spare moments at a picnic table his neighbors had set in their front yard. We need one of those, he realized. Now the table is the default gathering place for a"er-work beverages, kids’ projects, or pizza on a spring evening. If Holm and Hondorp have children one day, Hondorp says, they’ll use the Klebergs as a model. “The kids are so involved and free to do what they want to do,” he says. “They can play in the front yard, and [their parents] aren’t freaking out about it. I did that as a kid — we spent our whole lives outside. It’s fun to be able to do that as adults.” tribeza.com

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

CULTIVATING A FARM AND A COMMUNITY

It’s dinnertime on the urban farm, and Jon Hallmark carries a bucket of feed for the backyard goats: Carolina, Turkey, and Turkey’s two-monthold baby, Little Richard. Chickens dart between his legs and scamper past his wife, Hannah, and next-door neighbor Tonya Fairley. “Turkey ate a peach!” Hannah cries, as Fairley laughs at Little Richard, who’s nibbling her boot. “Stop eating from the peach tree!” Hannah gives Turkey a forceful pat, sending her away from the garden and back to her own pen. When Hallmark bought his house on Sanchez Street in East Austin 10 years ago, it needed a lot of work. He set to remodeling it on evenings and weekends, the same hours Tonya’s husband, Carl, would spend on his front porch or back patio. Carl and Tonya had lived on Sanchez Street for a decade — long enough to see gang activity and crime decrease and old neighbors move away. Carl started to mosey over to the chain-link fence that separated his and Hallmark’s backyards. Come over and have a beer, he’d offer, and Hallmark, then single, would accept. “I liked him right off the bat, because I knew he was going to be an extremely good neighbor,” Carl says. “He’s one of the most kindhearted persons I know.” Those evening beers on the patio gave Hallmark a chance to notice an overgrown, poison-ivycovered section of the Fairleys’ backyard. In his second year on Sanchez, Hallmark offered to clean up the jungle if he could put a garden there — and a gate between the backyards. Sure, the Fairleys said. Hallmark got to work, installing the gate and later, each time with the Fairleys’ blessing, adding

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“PART OF BEING A HOMEOWNER IS TREATING YOUR NEIGHBORS WITH RESPECT.” –JON HALLMARK

P H OTO G R A P H B Y

The Hallmark and Fairley neighbors hang out often, typically over a grill.

chickens, goats, pigs, bees, and, for a time, rabbits, to the back end of both deep lots. Other neighbors visited the farm, and Hallmark added more gates between yards, until half the block was connected. “It’s kind of a backyard thoroughfare,” Hallmark explains. Then came “The Walking Dead.” Hallmark was a fan of the postapocalyptic television show, but he didn’t have cable. Midway through season two, he asked Carl if he could come over and use the extra TV the Fairleys kept on their patio. On that chilly night, Hallmark was bundled up on a lawn chair, absorbed in the action, when Carl opened his back door and asked what he was watching. “‘The Walking Dead,’” Hallmark answered. Fairley let out a hoot. “Get in here,” he said. “That’s what I’m watching.” Hallmark and the Fairleys started convening every Sunday night to eat dinner and watch the show, a tradition that has continued for six seasons. “That was a huge jump in our relationship,” Hallmark remembers. The Hallmarks married two years ago, and the Fairleys attended their wedding. Now the patio gatherings include the two couples, along with the other members of the Fairleys’ household: their two daughters, younger son, and five-year-old granddaughter. It’s not uncommon for other neighbors to drop by, see the group socializing around the fire pit, and invite themselves over. The street has organized events — barbecues, potlucks, a crawfish boil — but it’s the impromptu gatherings, especially the ones that involve the karaoke machine, that everyone remembers. Like many parts of the East Side, Sanchez Street is changing. Older homes have been demolished and replaced with larger houses. What was once a primarily African-American street has become more ethnically diverse. But near the Hallmarks and Fairleys, at least, the sense of community is still strong. The key is to be intentional about getting to know one another, they say. As the newcomer, Hallmark made meeting his neighbors a priority. “In my mind, that was part of being a homeowner,” he says. “You treated your neighbors with respect and said hi to them and made relationships with them.” It’s pretty simple to get started, Carl Fairley says. “Always speak. It doesn’t hurt anything to speak to anyone. Just be kind.” tribeza.com

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OUR NEIGHBORHOOD IS THE WHOLE BUILDING 50 JUNE 2018 |

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When Mona Morgan and her husband, Jim, moved into their Seaholm Residences condo two years ago, her floor was buzzing with excitement. Construction delays on the downtown high-rise had pushed back everyone’s move-in date, but the moment had finally arrived. Between deliveries from their movers, Morgan’s neighbors propped their doors open, stuck their heads into one another’s condos, and chatted eagerly. From those early conversations, Morgan, who’s in her 60s, struck up a friendship with two 30-something couples on her floor who took to calling her “Mona Mom.” “We were kind of like the Mom and Dad on the hall,” Morgan says of herself and her husband. They invited their neighbors over for wine nights and an Academy Awards party and acted as a sounding board for the couples. The younger residents even occasionally asked, Hey, Mona Mom, do you have Tylenol? It was just like asking a neighbor for a cup of sugar in days gone by, Morgan says. “But now you can text.” These days she’s helping other residents form close relationships through the Seaholm social committee. “High-rise living is a big change from the neighborhood,” Morgan says. With more than 270 units on 20 residential floors, the tower packs hundreds of people into a building with a footprint smaller than a city block. Instead of meeting neighbors across the fence or on leisurely walks, Seaholm residents run into their neighbors in the hallway or the lobby. “Our neighborhood is the whole building,” says DeEtte Brownlee, a Seaholm resident who handles the social committee’s budget. “Our neighbors are all around us, all the time.” That close proximity — at the mailbox, or in the elevator — offers chances to meet people every day. Brownlee has met good friends during evening strolls in the courtyard with her golden retriever and goldendoodle. “We have a little pack, and we know each other’s names and all the dogs’ names. Over time, we’ve built these relationships through the dogs.”


LEFT: Members of

the Seaholm social committee playing a game of dominoes. ABOVE : Kathy McConnell Fad, Peggy Powers, Bridget Hunt, DeEtte Brownlee, Gail Ryser and Nancy Germond.

But Morgan, Brownlee, and other members of the social committee don’t want to leave those relationships to chance. So they organize monthly ladies’ happy hours and parties for Independence Day and Christmas. Other women have formed a book club, and a group has begun playing dominoes on the building’s 10th-floor pool deck. Members sustain their competitive spirits with wine and snacks from the Trader Joe’s next door. “We’re still learning how to play it correctly, but it’s quickly turning into the kind of game where everyone talks smack to each other,” says Nancy Germond, a regular player. The social committee even held a special event to celebrate the end of the 2 a.m. concrete pours for a nearby condo building — and an end to the nights of interrupted sleep. The drink served for the occasion? The “cement mixer.” “Just by being in the building, I’ve met so many people,” Brownlee says. “I think if I’d lived in a single-family home, it would have taken me a lot longer to get to know people.” Morgan agrees. “We just decided to get involved and make Seaholm our home and make it as social as we could. And the best part is that we don’t need a coat or an umbrella, or have to deal with traffic, to go see our neighbors.”

GETTING TO KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORS: A HOW-TO • Hang out in the front yard. Add a bench or table and invite the neighbors to meet you there for dinner. • Be willing to ask for help and to borrow things from one another. • Organize a structured social event — a potluck or a happy hour. • Consider using a chain-link fence instead of a privacy fence in the backyard. • If you live in a high-rise, defy the rule of elevator silence. Use that time to get to know the people you’re riding with. • Offer to carpool to the grocery store. If there are tasks you and your

neighbors are going to do anyway, do them together. • If you regularly chat with people in the neighborhood park, or while you’re walking your dog, take the relationship one step further with a low-key invitation: “Hey, Friday evening we’ll be out in our front yard. Feel free to come on by.” • Be intentional about knowing your neighbors. On close-knit blocks (or floors), residents can always point to a person who took the initiative to get people together. Be that person. tribeza.com

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Won’t You Be My

N

eighbor

A PHOTOGRAPHER TURNS HER EYE ON THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UP HER EVERYDAY COMMUNITY BY

MARGARET WILLIAMS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

KADY DUNLAP

Kady Dunlap’s photographs shine a light on community and neighbor relationships. There is no disputing this. And yet Dunlap admits that even she didn’t realize this was the central theme of her work until a few years ago. She was working on a project for a community-based nonprofit in Dallas and explains, “I was shooting their kitchen, their clinic, but I was most drawn to people delivering food to their neighbors. They were my favorite images of the whole project … It’s not the medical clinic, where people are being diagnosed. It’s not the kids getting to play on a safe playground. That is all super important. But I kept coming back to the neighbor images.” This moment of clarity led her to go back and analyze earlier work — portraits of refugees living side by side, group shots of friends in developing countries whose relationships were based on proximity — and she saw neighbors being woven into most of her prints. Dunlap explains that it can be hard to be a photographer in a new place asking people to take their picture, and if she can create a connection with one person, then o"entimes she can get in with the whole neighborhood.

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

Dunlap moved into her own home on Avenue H in the North Loop section of Austin 10 years ago and almost immediately started to become friends with her neighbors. “I started walking my dog and seeing my neighbors more,” she says. She describes the instinct as initially practical, since she lives alone, but that over time she and her block-mates really got to know one another. “Having friends nearby is great, so you just turn your neighbors into friends!” Some of Dunlap’s neighbors have lived in North Loop for most of their lives, and she loves hearing their stories. She lights up when describing the handful of old-timers who built their own homes in post-WWII Austin along the then-dirt roads. She exclaims that there used to be an airplane hangar in the neighborhood: “One of my neighbors, who’s now passed away, he’d just walk up there and fly planes. It’s so cool, you know?” She loves this shared oral history. When I ask about how she and her fellow Avenue H-ers (with the occasional Avenue G resident) spend time together, she reflects that most evenings they sporadically come together in their front yards as dogs and kids run underfoot. But she also quickly clarifies that a group of friends are on a text chain, the back-and-forth of which will o"en lead to a walk and dinner at Foreign & Domestic or an official Avenue H (all the way from 45th to 54th) book club meeting. About a year ago, Dunlap started documenting her neighbors and capturing their distinct traits. She describes this initial series as “I see you sitting reading in your chair, or I see you tending your garden. I’m your neighbor, we know each other, and this is how I see you.” In honor of our neighborhoods issue, we commissioned Dunlap to re-create and expand on her initial portrait series, which consisted of five images. Years of community revealed itself as neighbor a"er neighbor streamed into Dunlap’s backyard on a damp spring night. While some were hesitant to have their picture taken, most were excited and proud to have a light shone on their neighborhood and all game to help their friend. Their neighbor. tribeza.com

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“THIS IS A NEIGHBORHOOD ... AND JUST A REAL SWEET P L ACE TO B E .”

K A DY D . , P H OTO G R A P H E R OF THIS SERIES

WON DE RFU L

C AT R . , R E S I D E N T S I N C E ‘ 9 6 , F O S T E R C AT L O V E R

“WE ARE ALL I N DIVI DUALS AND THERE ARE LOTS O F G R E AT I N DIVI DUALS H E RE .”

C L I N T O N A . & V I C K I E P. , S T E E L D R U M P L AY E R A N D RETIRED UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS LIBRARIAN

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“THERE ARE A LOT OF KIDS, THREE OF WHICH ARE OURS, AND W E H AV E LO N GTI M E ORIGINAL RESIDENTS W H O H AV E LIVED HERE SINCE THE B EGI N N I N G.”

MELISSA, TA L L U L A H (8 M OS .), TH EO (2 YRS .), E N ZO (6 Y R S .) & E R I C P.

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“OF ALL THE NEIGHBORHOODS I’VE LIVED IN THIS IS MY FAV O R I T E . . . I B RI N G COO KI ES T O E V E R YO N E ON SPECIAL H O L I D AY S . ”

J O N AT H A N E . & JAKE, LIVED I N AUSTI N SI NCE ‘ 76 , D ES I G N E R AND MAKER O F G U AYA B E R A S H I RTS

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“I BOUGHT MY HOUSE W H E N I WA S ... LET’S JUST S AY I B O U G H T THE HOUSE 22 Y E A RS AGO. IT WA S N ’ T V E RY W A L K A B L E AT FI RST BUT N OW YO U C A N WA L K ANY WH E RE .”

H OWA R D B ., R E S I D E N T S I N C E ‘ 9 5

P R I N E & A N N E T T E P. W I T H H A W K E R

“ E V E R Y B O D Y I S N E I G H B O R LY AN D I LI KE TH E CLOS E PROXI M IT Y TO TH E B U S LI N E .”

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“ I LOV E TH I S AREA AND HAPPENED T O M E E T K A D Y. WE SHARE THE SAME B I R T H D AY ! ”

H A N S A . , LO N GT I M E M A I L C A R R I E R , O R I G I N A L LY FROM GHANA

“WE’VE HAD A N I CE LI FE H E RE .”

JAM ES A ., RESIDENT S I N C E ‘4 8 , G R A N D F AT H E R A N D F AT H E R

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“I GREW UP HERE WITH MY G R A N D PA R E N T S . I US E D TO GET UP ON TH E ROOF OF MY HOUSE A N D WAT C H M O V I E S AT THE BIG CHIEF D RIVE- I N .”

B R EN DA AN D DAN I B . WITH GOLDIE, MET IN GERMANY WH I LE B R EN DA WA S S E RV I N G I N T H E M I L I TA R Y

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IN CRESTVIEW, ONE OF AUSTIN’S QUINTESSENTIAL FAMILY-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOODS, THE MORE THINGS CHANGE, THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME BY

ANNE BRUNO

ILLUSTRATIONS BY

MACKENZIE DUNN

There’s not an inch of Crestview where something’s not going on these days. A lot’s happening in this neighborhood!” So says Leon Noren, and he ought to know. Though I’ve been frequenting the Crestview Shopping Center since my first life-altering bite of a Little Deli & Pizza pastrami on rye nearly 20 years ago, I’m a relative newcomer. Noren and his late wife of 63 years moved to Crestview in 1977. They joined an enclave of families in one of several North Austin suburbs that were developed to accommodate Austin’s booming post-World War II population. A handsome 87-year-old who grew up “just over the big hill on 9th Street, which was actually pretty far west of downtown back then,” Noren shares that he’s seen a lot of change in Austin over the years. He tells me that the city is definitely busier than it used to be, but his keen observations on the shi"s taking place around him lead me to believe he’s not a man to miss a beat. “I see a lot more young people walking in the neighborhood. It started out that way, with lots of young families, and now, that’s who’s moving back in. I think it’s great.” For 41 years, he’s lived a few blocks from what many consider the heart of the ’hood, the Crestview Shopping Center. “I walk up to Little Deli behind my wheelchair at lunchtime most days of the week. I usually get the soup, and then I like to sit out here for a while before I walk home,” Noren says, laying out his routine. On the sunny a"ernoon we meet, his wheelchair is positioned as it is most weekdays: along the breezeway, where he can exchange pleasantries with passersby while taking in the action at the picnic tables under the shopping center’s giant oak. The neighborhood’s mature trees and the growing number of locally owned shops and eateries within walking distance of the homes are only a few of the factors that make Crestview a bright star on Austin’s map of desirable places to live. In recent years, the shady streets have beckoned more young families with strollers to join the longtime middle-aged residents and even a few of the originals, now in their late 80s and 90s. On the a"ernoon I visit with Noren, I see an older woman with a walker enter Arlan’s Market, followed by a 30-something dad leading his toddler by the hand. “I’LL TELL YOU THE TRUTH:

Jen Pinkston, whose family moved to Crestview two years ago, was born and raised in Austin. A"er graduating from UT, Pinkston moved to Los Angeles. “I thought I’d be out there maybe a year or two and then come back,” explains Pinkston. “But ten years went by, and in that time I met my husband and we had our first child.” While Pinkston and her husband, Aaron, a producer for “The Ellen DeGeneres Show,” had friends and successful careers in California, a Fourth of July trip to Austin in 2015 put their life in Los Angeles in sharp contrast with the one they might enjoy at a slower pace with family in Austin. “We were at Lake LBJ, where my grandparents had a place. I grew up going there in the summers, and it was so fun to be out there again with our daugh-

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has maintained most of its original layout and facade. The businesses within the center have changed over the decades, but only by degrees when compared with most shopping locales around town; the original Crestview Pharmacy shut its doors only last year. Neighborhood staples like a grocery store, an auto repair shop, and a place to get your hair cut or a bite to eat are all still there, making the center as essential to its neighbors as it was more than 60 years ago. “I always say this place is a hidden treasure,” Ricky Wilson tells me. A certified master bench jeweler, Wilson has been in the area for 30 years and occupied a small jewelry showroom and repair and manufacturing storefront at the Crestview center since 2007. “I have wholesale customers too, but I like being the neighborhood jeweler. The people in this neighborhood have been great to me, and I wouldn’t want to be anywhere else. It’s like a small town,” he says, “and everybody’s on a first-name basis.” Pam Harries is only the fourth owner of the Crestview Barber Shop, one of the center’s original establishments. She tells me that Wilson is right, that everybody knows everybody and the place is a community hub. An oldschool vibe permeates the barbershop, with personal service and big red chairs to match. The customers’ requested haircuts, however, run the gamut these days, from the traditionnel — favored by most of the shop’s older customers — to modern fades and buzz cuts. “We pretty much do it all here, and we have fun doing it,” Harries says. She

ter, my sisters and their families, and my mom and dad. It was just such a different feeling from being in L.A. Aaron loved it too, and we sort of looked at each other and said, ‘So why are we not living in Austin?’ ” That weekend trip set in motion plans for the Pinkstons to get back to Austin permanently. Because Aaron’s job already involved a lot of travel, working outside of Los Angeles didn’t pose a huge problem. Jen, who worked as a wardrobe stylist, had started a lifestyle blog, TheEffortlessChic.com, in 2011. Since their move, she has expanded the blog and given birth to the couple’s second child. “We walk so many places ... to Brentwood Park, or out for a taco or coffee, and to Little Deli for pizza on Friday nights. Our four-year-old goes to nursery school at a church in the neighborhood. And the people here couldn’t be more friendly,” she says. “I love that there’s young families and older people too. One of our neighbors across the street is in her 90s. She and her husband were among the first families in Crestview, and she told me how he carried her across the threshold of their house! I’ve loved learning from her what the neighborhood was like back then, when they first moved here.” Seek out the Crestview Shopping Center (it’s not located along any of the area’s four-lane thoroughfares) and you’ll find Austin’s past meeting its present, set in the middle of tidy residential streets. Built in 1952, the center

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had worked at the shop long before buying it from a friend. “So I’d gotten to know a lot of the longtime customers,” Harries explains. “And one of the women who works here with me has been with the shop for over 20 years. This is the kind of place where customers bring in homemade jars of pickles to share with us and we serve hot buttered rum in December. We have customers who got their first haircut here and now bring in their children or grandchildren for theirs.” Occupying the spot between the BriteLights Acting Studio (a fixture at the center for 28 years) and Little Deli is a new addition to a longtime tenant, Project Transitions. Two years ago, the nonprofit, which provides supportive living, housing, and recuperative care and hospice services for people with HIV and AIDS, recognized an opportunity to use the front part of its office space to launch a spinoff of its popular Burnet Road Top Drawer thri" store. As manager Stephanie Lightbody explains, “Top Drawer Crestview is more of a vintage clothing and home decor boutique. We open and close later, so we get a lot of people stopping in a"er lunch or dinner next door.” Showcasing an impressive amount of eclectic style in a small space, from Hermès ties and embroidered Mexican dresses to a mint-condition transistor radio, the oneof-a-kind feel seems to fit perfectly in a place where the throwback vibe is a big part of its attraction. Friday and Saturday nights at Little Deli’s picnic tables are perhaps when the shopping center is most reminiscent of the times in which it was built.

Families gather to share pizza, kids run around under lights strung in the trees, and adults take time to catch up over a beer or glass of wine. There are no large-screen TVs, the atmosphere is relaxed, and no one seems to be in a hurry to go home, or anywhere else. According to Kelly Chappell, a partner in Galaxy Cafe, Zocalo Cafe, and Top Notch, something new is on tap for the center. Chappell is teaming up with fellow neighbor and Crestview Neighborhood Association president Mike Lavigne on a concept they plan to open sometime this summer. Taking a break from a meeting with contractors on the renovation of the space formerly occupied by the pharmacy (which, at one time, housed a soda fountain), Chappell tells me, “We’re working through details on The Violet Crown Clubhouse now. The Clubhouse will be a gathering place for kids and parents alike. We’re looking forward to offering a variety of things, including ice cream, pinball, and a flexible party space.” As Leon Noren and I wrap up our visit on the breezeway, our conversation is politely interrupted by the deli’s friendly manager. “Leon, you’ve got a phone call inside. Can you spare a minute to come in and take it?” the manager asks. Returning, Noren apologizes for the interruption and tells me that the call was from his friend Dana, from Meals on Wheels. She’s one of the reasons, he explains, that I won’t find him at the Crestview Shopping Center every day. Fridays are when Dana comes by with lunch. It’s been a standing appointment for 13 years and counting. Some good things just keep on going. tribeza.com

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y

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A conversation with friends of 30-plus years, Lawrence Wright and Stephen Harrigan

Sidekicks

MARGARET WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT CONANT

P H OTO G R A P H B Y

BY

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To meet writers Stephen Harrigan and Lawrence Wright — Steve and Larry to most — one would imagine they have been pals since their childhood days. The two friends and Tarrytown neighbors have an easy rapport that is equal parts joking and admiring. Before our interview even officially began, Wright was already ribbing Harrigan about his delicate coffee-drinking (or lack thereof) sensibilities. When Harrigan described his one and only encounter with coffee as scarring — he may have even gone so far as to call it “his worst day” — Wright quips, “We have it pretty easy over here in Tarrytown.” Both men happen to have been born in the same Oklahoma City hospital and lived in Abilene during the same period, but they didn’t actually meet until 1980, when both were working for Texas Monthly. Friends since the ’80s and around-the-corner neighbors since the’90s, the two have been meeting for breakfast, along with a few other regulars, every Monday for roughly 30 years. This friendship, which also extends to their wives and kids, is used by Wright as the backdrop for his newest book, “God Save Texas: A Journey Into the Soul of the Lone Star State.” The book, which, for the record, was enjoyed equally by this native Texan and her non-native husband, details Texas’ past and present through vignettes focused on oil drilling, Texas’ cities, and presidential history, to name a few. And while not quite collaborators, since both writers work solo, Wright and Harrigan are certainly as close to colleagues as one could imagine. Harrigan, whose love of history easily shines through in his novels, is in the process of finishing a book on Texas. He says his will be “more of a doorstop than Larry’s … but there are places where they coincide.” Given that their friendship plays such a pivotal role in “God Save Texas” — the book is even dedicated to Steve — I was thrilled to sit down and talk with these writers, friends, and neighbors.

Wright’s bestseller “The Looming Tower” next to his newly released “God Save Texas.”

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HOW DID Y’ALL END UP LIVING AROUND THE CORNER FROM EACH OTHER? LW: He was here first. SH: Larry broke into the neighborhood. LW: Yeah, I did. We [Larry has been married to

his wife Roberta for 48 years] were living in Travis Heights, in a duplex we owned. I was out of town when we found this house and I had to fly in — you know I’ve always loved this street. Anyway, one of the appeals was that it was in the same neighborhood with Steve and with some other friends of ours — the Magnusons and Greg Curtis lived in the neighborhood at the time. It was a real writers’ nook. HOW HAS IT CHANGED YOUR FRIENDSHIP OR WORKING RELATIONSHIP, BEING IN SUCH CLOSE PROXIMITY TO ONE ANOTHER? LW: I don’t think it’s changed it a lot, do you? SH: Well, we pick each other up to go places

more. Every Monday, I’m waiting out there for Larry to ride by on his bike so we can ride our bikes to breakfast and brave the traffic. LW: We do carpool a lot.

MARGARET WILLIAMS: TELL ME MORE ABOUT THIS BREAKFAST CLUB. WHO’S IN IT? LARRY WRIGHT: Bill Brands [H. W. Brands], presi-

dential historian at UT, and Greg Curtis, the former editor of Texas Monthly. STEVE HARRIGAN: I remember it was your idea, and that was probably 30 years ago. LW: Yeah, Bill Broyles [acclaimed screenwriter] was part of that group at that point, and it’s always been at Sweetish Hill [Bakery]. SH: I mean, we started at Night Hawk. LW: I thought we always ate at Sweetish Hill? Anyway, for decades we’ve been at Sweetish Hill, and occasionally we have visitors. Denis Johnson used to come. We really miss him. SH: He wrote “Jesus’ Son.” He’s probably one of the most influential fiction writers of our time, really. He taught at the Michener Center [for Writers] off and on for a long time. LW: But beyond being a famous writer, he was one of the most original people I ever met. I really loved him. He was a great guy. He passed away not too long ago. Occasionally a woman comes. I’ve invited Mimi [Swartz] .

“ I T ’ S A V E RY F R I E N D LY N EIGHBORHOOD, A N D I A L S O L OV E T H E FAC T T H A T I T ’ S I N A F O R E S T. E S S E N T I A L LY, T A R RY T OW N IS A CEDA R EL M F O R E S T.”

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT TARRYTOWN? LW: It’s got a lot of interesting characters. Mat-

thew McConaughey used to live across the street, and we’ve got other notables. But it’s a very friendly neighborhood, and I also love the fact that it’s in a forest. Essentially, Tarrytown is a cedar elm forest, and when you’re flying over Austin, you can scarcely see the houses buried in some of the tallest trees in the whole city, and I really like that. SH: And it’s in the middle; it’s central. There’s no way we [Steve’s wife of 48 years is Sue Ellen] could afford to live here now. We moved to Cherry Lane in 1981, I think, or ’80. We had a house in East Austin, and we sold it and were able to buy a house here. It’s a great walkable neighborhood. Two or three times a week I go on a long walk around the neighborhood. tribeza.com

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ONE THING TO NOTE ABOUT OUR FRIEN DSHIP — IT’S G E N E R A T I O N S D E E P. O U R C H I L D R E N ARE CLOSE FRIENDS.

Wright at his Tarrytown home.

HAVE EITHER OF YOU THOUGHT ABOUT MOVING, AS THINGS HAVE CHANGED, TO SOMEWHERE

interest in going to ride our bikes along the Mission Trail in San Antonio?’ And so we did, and I told Larry we needed to stop at Buc-ee’s, ’cause that’s what Texas is all about. LW: Buc-ee’s really became a key. Yeah, you unlocked the whole book for me. SH: And I didn’t know that I was actually going to be in the book, or that it was going to be dedicated to me, which was very touching. It’s weird to read about yourself. LW: I told you pretty early on that you were in it. [Larry interrupts himself to grab a pair of binoculars and look at a bird in his backuard.] I think that’s a — what is that poor guy? We’ve been getting a lot of goldfinches.

ELSE IN AUSTIN? LW: Roberta and Sue Ellen have both threatened

STEVE, I’D LOVE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT THE

to downsize. I said, ‘You go find me a place that has an office, a music room, a garden, and a pool, and then I’ll consider it. So far, that hasn’t come to anything, but it’s a constant theme. SH: We thought about moving, because all our kids and grandkids are up north. Which is not much to complain about, but it’s a long commute to get together at kids-eat-free night at Luby’s.

BOOK YOU’RE WORKING ON, OR FINISHING,

SO I’M CURIOUS, STEVE, IF YOU KNEW THAT YOUR FRIENDSHIP WAS THE BACKDROP FOR LARRY’S NEW BOOK. DID Y’ALL COMPARE NOTES? SH: Well, Larry and I’d done some research

together. Because I was writing a Texas book too. And so I called you up and said, ‘You have any

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BECAUSE IT SOUNDS LIKE A DIFFERENT TYPE OF

practice — is, keep it short [laughs]. And I’m trying to decide now, for instance, should I write about the bike ride on the Mission Trail? LW: I think it’s kind of a cool idea. Mine would start with it, and yours would end with it. WHAT WAS THAT DAY IN SAN ANTONIO LIKE? STEVE, YOU SAID IT WAS YOUR IDEA TO GO ON THE MISSION BIKE RIDE? SH: Well, I’ve always wanted to do it, and Larry

and I found a way to do it together, and it was great. It was, for one thing, a trip through time, because you start way down south at one of the earliest missions and you end up in downtown San Antonio at the Alamo. LW: Of course, it was helpful for me to go with Steve because he’s such a historian. So I was getting a tutorial as well as a workout.

TEXAS BOOK FROM LARRY’S. SH: They’re very different. Larry’s, I think — its

I KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN. I’VE BEEN REDISCOV-

motor is really contemporary text, where we are now and where we’re going. Whereas mine is the history of Texas from the beginning to maybe now. It covers some degree of politics and everything else — culture, history, music, arts, sports. Whatever is part of Texas history will find its way into my book, I think. But also it’s gonna be a lot longer than Larry’s. LW: Well, you’ve got so much to cover. SH: One of the things I’ve learned in my life as a writer — a lesson I’ve never been able to put into

ERING THE HISTORY OF THOSE PLACES AS AN ADULT. AS A KID, YOU’RE KIND OF DRAGGED THERE, AND NOW WE ARE TAKING OUR KIDS TO ALL THE OTHER MISSIONS, BESIDES THE ALAMO, AND THEY’RE AMAZING PLACES. LW: They’re wonderful spots. It’s where Texas

history really began, and there’s not much that gives you that sense of permanence. SO WHY DO Y’ALL GET ALONG SO WELL? BECAUSE YOU’RE SIMILAR OR DIFFERENT?


SH: Well, we’re pretty different in a lot of ways. I

remember the first time I met Larry was — what year did you come here? LW: Well, it would’ve been ’80, because when I came in ’79 — the article that took me to Texas was for Look magazine and was about the 12 men who walked on the moon, and it would’ve been in July or August of ’79, ’cause that was the tenth anniversary of the first moon walk. SH: I remember we had lunch — LW: At the Pit. SH: Was that where we had lunch? LW: Yeah, that’s where everybody walked to. SH: Right, yeah. And we talked — we were comparing gripes about being freelancers. LW: There was a sense of parallelism. Even though our personalities are different, we’re engaged in the same enterprise, and a lot of the things that arrest me intellectually are also preoccupations of Steve’s. SH: I read in Larry’s book that my personality is inflexible. LW: There’s that. I’m much more flexible. One thing I think it’s important to note about our friendship — it’s generations deep. Our children are close friends. And they sometimes have something equivalent to our breakfast thing. Roberta and Sue Ellen meet for breakfast at the same time, and our daughters Caroline and Dorothy have started — well, it’s more of a cocktail version. That’s really delightful that they have that continuing connection.

A selection of Harrigan’s novels. Wright has a shelf in his home solely devoted to his friend’s writing.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. Lawrence Wright’s “God Save Texas: A Journey into the Soul of the Lone Star State” was published by Knopf in April of this year. Stephen Harrigan’s “A Friend of Mr. Lincoln: A novel” was published by Knopf in 2016. His as yet untitled work on Texas’ history will be released in 2019. tribeza.com

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WHAT WHAT READERS ARE READERS ARE SAYING... SAYING... 61%

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S U B S C R I B E T O T R I B E Z A AT T R I B E Z A .C O M


S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

AUSTIN NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDE F R O M N O R T H W E S T H I L L S TO B A R TO N H I L L S A N D E V E RY W H E R E I N B E T W E E N , A U S T I N ’ S TO P R E A LTO R S S H A R E T H E I R FAV O R I T E P L A C E S TO E AT, D R I N K , S H O P A N D P L AY.

C ONTENT

AND

D ESIGN

BY

S TAV C REATIVE

S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

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KEVIN BURNS // SEAHOLM & DOWNTOWN Kevin Burns founded Urbanspace after graduating from The University of Texas

KEVIN’S SEAHOLM & DOWNTOWN

at Austin. With over 20 years of experience and $750 million in transactions

Merit Coffee — 222 West Ave., Suite 120

in Central Austin real estate, he is passionate about the urban lifestyle. Kevin

Originally from San Antonio, this new neighborhood coffee shop is my favorite place to stop into every morning.

lives, works, and plays in downtown with his wife and two daughters. He focuses on both condo project sales as well as central Austin luxury homes. Kevin has owned and operated Urbanspace in the Seaholm District since 2000. KEVIN@ URBANSPACELIFESTYLE.COM | 512.848.8722 | URBANSPACELIFESTYLE.COM

Irene’s — 506 West Ave. The best neighborhood bar - it has a fresh aesthetic with great drinks and food. Seaholm Plaza — Walter Seaholm Dr. Our neighborhood gathering spot is perfect to unwind after the workday while my kids and dogs play. Violet Crown Cinema - 434 2nd St.

Kevin, owner of Urbanspace, stands in front of the Independent, the firm’s newest exclusive elite condo listing in downtown Austin.

This is the best movie theater in town, and I love coming here with my kids when we find time for a movie night. Ranch 616 — 616 Nueces St. Best restaurant to meet up with friends and enjoy a Ranch Water. What’s that, you ask? Stop by and find out. Whole Foods — 525 N Lamar Blvd. I mean, who isn’t obsessed with this giant grocery store? You cannot beat the fish counter for a healthy lunch or dinner. Urbanspace Interiors — 801 W 5th St., #100 This place is a market leader for modern furnishings and design. You’ll find great stuff here to up your interior space. Moody Theater — 301 W Willie Nelson Blvd. Amazing place to grab a drink, listen to live music, and experience the best of Austin. Library — 710 W Cesar Chavez St. Coolest Library in the world. True Food Kitchen — 222 West Ave., Suite HR 100 Great patio for people watching and my go-to for a healthy meal.

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LAURA GOTTESMAN // OLD ENFIELD + OLD WEST AUSTIN

NEED PICTURE

Laura Gottesman, Broker-Owner of Gottesman Residential Real Estate, is widely known throughout the city for her energy, professionalism, and knowledge of the Austin real estate market. She has consistently been among the top agents in Austin. Working with buyers and sellers, Laura has a knack for thinking creatively and offering “out of the box” solutions. Two of her favorite neighborhoods are Old Enfield and Old West Austin, because of their historic atmosphere and convenient locations. The streets are lined with stunning Live Oak trees, and the homes are beautifully maintained, making it one of the most prestigious areas in Austin. LAURA@GOTTESMANRESIDENTIAL.COM 512.657.4966 | LAURAGOTTESMAN.COM

LAURA’S OLD ENFIELD & OLD WEST AUSTIN “I love Austin and everything it has to offer – the people, the food, the activities, the natural resources – I am such a fan of the Austin lifestyle. It’s this enthusiasm for Austin that led me to residential real estate, a career about which I am passionate!” Laura is photographed in Pease Park in front of the Yippee Ki Yay statue.

Caffé Medici — 1101 W Lynn St. Best latte in town and a cool old school bungalow to hang out in. Jeffrey’s — 1204 W Lynn St. One of Austin’s best restaurants is actually a neighborhood institution. Don’t miss the warm and moody bar area. It is a perfect place to meet up for a cocktail after work. Good Company — 918 W 12th St. Great finds for women’s clothes, jewelry, and home goods. Kick Pleat — 624 N Lamar Blvd. Beautifully designed store with fabulous women’s clothing and accessories - great shoes, too!

Wildflower Organics — 524 N Lamar Blvd., #101 They sell the very best in linens and home accessories. My addiction to Legna sheets started at Wildflower. Clark’s Oyster Bar — 1200 W 6th St. It just makes me happy to go here! Try June’s sparkling rosé with the Crab Louie salad. Divine! Third Space — 1013 W Lynn St. This darling salon is home to some of the best stylists anywhere!

Josephine House — 1601 Waterston Ave. The absolute best place to sit outside and watch the world go by. Outdoor Voices — 606 Blanco St. Tyler Haney started an athletic apparel cult. If you are #doingthings in Austin, you are wearing Outdoor Voices. Wally Workman Gallery — 1202 W 6th St. Wally represents some of my very favorite artists like Diana Greenberg, Mallory Page, Honora Jacobs, and Joyce Howell.

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KUMARA WILCOXON // PEMBERTON

As Kuper Sotheby’s number one producer for three consecutive years and $95 million in sales in 2017, Kumara Wilcoxon has established herself as a top influencer in Austin real estate. She maintains a well-known presence, commitment, and passion for the intricacies of the Austin market and lifestyle. Kumara loves selling real estate and helping people find the right property, but the relationships she builds in the process are what brings Kumara the most joy. KUMARA@SOTHEBYSREALTY.COM | 512.423.5035 KUMARAWILCOXON.COM

KUMARA’S PEMBERTON Kumara loves the historic nature of Pemberton Heights with its wide streets, towering live oaks, and charming small-town feel.

Knockout Boxing — 1211 W 6th St. Boxing is a great workout and the perfect way to relieve stress. I always leave Knockout feeling energized and ready to tackle the day. Pool Burger — 2315 Lake Austin Blvd. This eccentric new burger joint has a tiki bar vibe and serves cocktails and burgers from a 1968 Airstream. Valentines — 1515 W 35th St. Valentines is the cutest! I love that I can run in last minute and find an outfit for any event.

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Castle Hill Fitness — 1112 N Lamar Blvd. Castle Hill has the best trainers and offers a multitude of classes. Amid is the most amazing trainer! Josephine House — 1204 W Lynn St. This restaurant is my go-to spot to meet clients and friends. It has the perfect outdoor patio. Estilo Boutique — 2727 Exposition Blvd. Estilo has such an amazing and unique collection of clothing. Stephanie, the owner, has the best taste and has curated a wonderful selection of clothing and accessories.

Pease Park — 1100 Kingsbury St. You have to check out the new art installation by Patrick Dougherty! Aloe Skin + Body — 2414 Exposition Blvd. #203 I love Aloe’s holistic approach. You have to try the hydrafacial! Wildflower Organics — 524 N. Lamar Blvd. I love their bedding and bathroom accessories. Their Legna sheets are life changing! Uchiko — 4200 N Lamar Blvd. Sushi is my favorite food. Uchi/ Uchiko has the best Sushi and most creative dishes.


JUDE GALLIGAN // RAINEY DISTRICT Jude Galligan is Broker-Owner of TOWERS Realty, one of the most influential firms in Austin’s condo market. Through his publishing of real estate editorial at TOWERS.net, Jude is known internationally as the go-to expert on downtown Austin real estate. His insights are shared with his firm’s agents and clients, from home buyers to private equity groups. Jude is a local employer, a community engager, and supports the discussion shaping how cities grow. JUDE@TOWERS.NET | 512.236.8898 | TOWERS.NET

JUDE ’S RAINEY DISTRICT Waller Creek Boathouse — 74 Trinity St. From renting kayaks to chilling out at Alta’s Cafe overlooking the lake, this is one of the most peaceful spots in downtown Austin. L’Estelle House — 88 1/2 Rainey St. The owners have been Rainey believers since the ‘90s and bring authentic comfort and culture to the neighborhood. Royal Blue Grocery — 51 Rainey St. This neighborhood bodega is an indispensable part of the Rainey Street district. Hotel Van Zandt — 605 Davis St. This hotel has moved the district forward into the next era, and boasts a great restaurant-lounge, Geraldine’s. Banger’s Sausage House & Beer Garden — 79 Rainey St. Banger’s hits the Rainey vibe just right. We’re excited about their expansion, too! Ann & Roy Butler Hike-and-Bike Trail The trail is a great bike and pedestrian connector to Lady Bird Lake and the rest of downtown. Little Lucy’s Mini Donuts Truck — 74 Rainey St. Because donuts. G’raj Mahal — 73 Rainey St. The best Indian pakoras I’ve ever eaten. Full stop. Icenhauer’s — 83 Rainey St. Michael Hsu Architecture worked on this bar’s renovation, setting a high bar for bungalow rehabs on Rainey. Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center — 600 River St. The MACC, as it’s known, is quietly one of the best-architected buildings in downtown.

“The MACC is one of the most under-celebrated architectural masterpieces of this city.” Jude’s favorite part of the Rainey District is its distinct character.

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AMY DEANE // ROLLINGWOOD For 15 years, Amy Deane has worked closely with her husband and top luxury custom homebuilder at their family-owned business, Michael Deane Homes. Amy’s role was finding off-market properties for their clients; now she is setting records as she offers up her talents to Moreland Properties. Amy describes Rollingwood as “Modern-Day Mayberry” – a feeling of small-town suburbia where every neighbor knows your name. Children roam the streets at play during the day and the neighbors there work hard to build a sense of community with men’s and women’s social clubs, and regular neighborhood gatherings. AMY@MORELAND.COM | 512.695.4820 | AMYDEANE.COM

AMY’S ROLLINGWOOD RedBird Boutique — 3663 Bee Caves Rd., #2C RedBird Boutique is a fashion sweet spot known for its thoughtfully curated mix of emerging and known designers. Bay Hill Design — 3663 Bee Caves Rd., #4C Just minutes from the heart of Rollingwood, Brooke Anderson and her team offer everything you need to freshen the style of your home! Rollingwood Park and Playground — 403 Nixon Dr. I’ve spent countless hours with playgroups at this wonderful park. Call ahead and request use of the Pavillion for birthday parties. Yeti — www.yeti.com Don’t get caught walking the streets here without a Yeti tumbler in hand. The founders are Rollingwood neighbors, and we fell in love with the neigborhood while building their homes. Austin Nature and Science Center — 2389 Stratford Dr. ANSC offers amazing hands-on discovery and science programs for all the children of Austin. Their summer camps are a favorite for kids who love to get dirty and explore! Yoga Vida — 3620 Bee Caves Rd. This was my first place to try yoga in 1999 when it opened as Austin’s first hot studio. A great place to exercise the mind, body, and spirit. Texas Honey Ham — 3736 Bee Caves Rd., #6A It’s my weekly stop for ranchero ham and egg breakfast tacos and the best chef salads. Tide Dry Cleaners — 3267 Bee Caves Rd. Tide Dry Cleaners is eco-friendly, and offers a high-quality, personalized service to help customers keep things fresh and clean. Ruby & Violet — www.shoprubyviolet.com I love all of Austin’s talented local artisans, and this neighborhood artist is one of my faves! Megan makes hand-crafted jewelry with pave diamonds, labradorite, druzy, horn, and more!

Amy on shoot at the first home MDH built in Rollingwood in 2007 belonging to renowned architect, Ryan Street.

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New Alternative Skin Care — 3355 Bee Caves Rd., #606 BB Keville at New Beginnings provides the most amazing organic facials, keeping my skin dewy and hydrated.


ANNA MORRISON LEE // TARRYTOWN

Austinite Anna Morrison Lee was born and raised in Tarrytown. With almost a decade of real estate experience, she has been a member of Austin’s Elite 25 group for the last five years. She offers exceptional service and attention to all of her clients while focusing on building relationships founded in confidence and trust. Anna’s family ties to Tarrytown span generations, and she loves sharing personal connections and memories with sellers and buyers in the neighborhood. 512.968.6419 | ANNAMORRISONLEE.COM

ANNA’S TARRYTOWN Anna, member of Austin’s Elite 25 group, is photographed in front of a home near Laguna Gloria’s lagoon on Lake Austin.

Aloe Skin + Body — 2414 Exposition Blvd. #203 This spa is great for holistic skin care, especially the arcona pure facial and the 80-minute deep tissue massage. Breath and Body Studio — 2415 Exposition Blvd. Power Vinyasa is a great class to get your sweat on while focusing on mind and breath. Laguna Gloria — 3809 W 35th St. This is the best place in Austin for looking at art and taking classes. It brings back childhood memories for me of when Fiesta was held on the grounds!

Maudie’s — 2608 W 7th St. My favorite Tex Mex spot in Austin! Deep Eddy Pool — 401 Deep Eddy Ave. I love swimming and watching movies here in the summer. Mayfield Park — 3505 W 35th St. My sanctuary for escaping and finding a respite from this evergrowing city. Fabi + Rosi Restaurant — 509 Hearn St. Delicious, locally-sourced food that is made in-house. And the atmosphere is very enjoyable!

Tarrytown Pharmacy — 2727 Exposition Blvd., #105 I have used this pharmacy since it was located in Tarrytown Village and had a soda fountain station. Party Cat in Casis Village — 2727 Exposition Blvd., #119 The colorful little shop is the perfect place to grab personalized gifts for anyone on your list. Lions Municipal Golf Course — 2901 Enfield Rd. One of the city’s most popular courses. In 1924, the Lions Club opened Lions Municipal, the first public golf course in the city.

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CARL SHURR // TRAVIS HEIGHTS CARL’S TRAVIS HEIGHTS

A Travis Heights resident and top-producing Realtor in the 78704 zip code, Carl is involved

Central Standard — 1603 S Congress Ave. I love their patio for drinks, amazing food and great people-watching.

in many aspects of the South Austin real estate market. He works with long-time residents, transplants, builders, developers,

Stacy Park — 700 E Live Oak St. Walk your dog on the trails, enjoy the creek, and swim at Big Stacy Pool.

and business owners in the area. One of his favorite features of the Travis Heights area is the walkability. This, combined with such

Enoteca Vespaio — 1610 S Congress Ave. Hands-down my favorite Italian food in Austin.

proximity to Downtown Austin and Lady Bird Lake make it his favorite neighborhood in Austin.

South Congress Ave. Walk the Ave., stop for a slice at Homeslice Pizza, shop at Stag or Sunroom, or enjoy a coffee overlooking Congress at TOMS Roasting Co.

CARL@CARLSHURR.COM | 512.944.5977 CARLSHURR.COM

Carl on the patio at Central Standard

Rippner Tennis at South Austin Center — 1000 Cumberland Rd. Play tennis or join a clinic with some great pros.

ELLEN TROXCLAIR + ELIZABETH MATSON // LAKE AUSTIN Troxclair Residential Real Estate is a luxury brokerage that brings exceptional industry knowledge, expert negotiation skills, and full spectrum customer service to all of their clients. The cornerstone of their referral-based business is building lasting relationships with each client and delivering results. Whether serving on non-profit boards, supporting local businesses, or spending time outdoors with their families, they love building community in this unique city. ELLEN@TROXCLAIRRESIDENTIAL.COM | ELIZABETH@TROXCLAIRRESIDENTIAL.COM | 512.710.7010

TROXCLAIR’S + MATSON’S LAKE AUSTIN West Lake Beach — 2509 Westlake Dr. A local favorite, this casual swimming spot is full of activities for the whole family. Laguna Gloria — 3809 W 35th St. Whether you visit for a sophisticated wedding or a quiet walk in the sculpture garden, this historic venue is a beautiful place to spend an afternoon.

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Lake Austin Spa Resort — 1705 S Quinlan Park Rd. This peaceful retreat is the perfect place for a staycation. Mount Bonnell — 3800 Mt. Bonnell Dr. With iconic views of Lake Austin, bring a picnic, take a selfie, and stay for the sunset. Hula Hut — 3825 Lake Austin Blvd. Pull the boat up for margaritas, Hawaiian fajitas, and views of the lake. Head next door to Mozart’s for dessert!

Ellen and Elizabeth at The Contemporary Austin – Laguna Gloria


DOUG ROBERTS // HIGHLAND PARK WEST DOUG’S HIGHLAND PARK WEST

Doug Roberts grew up in a real estate family, and it is deeply embedded in his DNA. He has developed a reputation for working

Fonda San Miguel — 2330 W N Loop Blvd. I discover something new each visit, and I never get tired of spending time with friends and family amongst a culinary art gallery.

closely with his clients through every single detail involved in complicated real estate transactions. Doug finds great satisfaction and daily motivation in watching the thriving

Highland Park Elementary — 4900 Fairview Dr. Some of the best families in Austin, and it feels like our own little neighborhood secret.

careers and growing families he has worked with for many years. Doug has been a top producer at Moreland Properties for 15 years and is the commissioner of the Texas Real

Westwood Country Club — 3808 W 35th St. Beautiful grounds to play year round.

Estate Research Center. Doug specializes in every aspect of central Austin real estate. DOUG@MORELAND.COM | 512.731.5105 WWW.MORELAND.COM

Doug at the Umlauf Sculpture Garden

Mayfield Park — 3505 W 35th St. Mayfield Park is a great place to go on hikes down by the lake and socialize with the peacocks. Pint House Pizza — 4729 Burnet Rd. Fresh pizza and beer. Need I say more?

MASON QUINTANA // BOULDIN CREEK Mason’s journey to Austin was common, falling in love with both the city and his wife while at the University of Texas. Mason started his real estate career in 2012 and was invited to join Gottesman Residential in 2015. Mason knows that buying or selling a house is difficult and isn’t above sweeping floors and moving furniture to help a client get ready for an open house. His favorite neighborhood is Bouldin Creek, which offers people a chance to live close to the Lady Bird Lake trail. MASON@GOTTESMANRESIDENTIAL.COM | 512.740.8008 | MASONQUINTANAREALTOR.COM

MASON’S BOULDIN CREEK Fresa’s — 1703 S 1st St. This is where my friends and family meet on Sunday afternoons to drink margs and eat tacos. No better spot in town! Sandy’s Hamburgers — 603 Barton Springs Rd. If you want an original taste of Austin, look no further. Must. Get. The chocolate-dipped soft-serve.

La Patisserie — 602 W Annie St. The salted caramel macarons go great with an espresso. El Alma — 1025 Barton Springs Rd. I ride my bike past El Alma a few times a week and the smell of fajitas and fried chips gets me every time. Caffé Medici —1100 S Lamar Blvd., #2125 Technically not in Bouldin, but it’s a short walk for the best cortado in town!

Mason at Fresa’s newest location on S 1st

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ELIZABETH SHANDS // BRYKER WOODS ELIZABETH’S BRYKER WOODS

Elizabeth was born and raised in Austin and is a graduate of TCU. She is an active member of

Tiny Boxwoods — 1503 W 35th St. My go-to for brunch and a chocolate chip cookie.

The Junior League of Austin and other local charities. She loves exploring the tree-lined streets of Bryker Woods, walking to local

Austin Flower Co. — 1612 W 35th St. My favorite for fresh blooms.

restaurants and shops or running along Shoal Creek Trail. There is a sense of community and

Breed & Co. — 718 W 29th St. A one-stop shop offering everything from home repair necessities to gifts and household essentials.

charm that is unmistakably Bryker Woods, and her family loves calling it home. As a Broker Associate at Gottesman Residential

Pilates on Kerbey — 3700 Kerbey Ln. I love walking to this intimate studio for a full body workout.

with over ten years of experience, Elizabeth is extremely thorough, detail-oriented and is a dedicated advocate for her clients. ELIZABETH@GOTTESMANRESIDENTIAL.COM 512.695.4289 | ELIZABETHSHANDS.COM

Elizabeth enjoys the Tiny Boxwoods patio

Texas French Bread — 2900 Rio Grande St. The best spot for a great cup of coffee and fresh-made bread.

LEAH PETRI // WESTLAKE After a decade in the high tech industry, Leah transitioned from the corporate world into residential real estate. At Gottesman Residential Real Estate, her vivacious personality, unwavering integrity, extensive business experience, and resourcefulness translates into long-term relationships with her clients. Leah is a native Austinite and Westlake High School graduate with knowledge and connections both professional and personal within the Westlake community. In Austin’s high demand, low inventory market, Leah has proven she can unearth the perfect home for her buyers while finding the ideal buyers for her seller clients. LEAH@GOTTESMANRESIDENTIAL.COM | 512.239.9964 | LEAHPETRI.COM

LEAH’S WESTLAKE Bay Hill Design — 3663 Bee Caves Rd., 4c My favorite spot for home furnishings and interior design.

Austin Country Club — 4408 Long Champ Dr. My favorite escape for golf, tennis, and socializing with friends.

The Grove — 6317 Bee Caves Rd., #380 Best joint for patio dining, pizza, salads, and take-out.

Valentines — 3801 N. Capital of TX Highway Carefully curated selection of women’s clothing and personal styling, ask for Marcus or Rachel! All the credit for my outfit goes to them.

Orange Theory — 3300 Bee Caves Rd., #200 My pick for working out, rowing, and personal training.

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Leah is photographed at Austin Country Club


MARK MOORE

TIM GRONDIN

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

FAREGROUND

This light and bright restaurant has a great

This is my favorite downtown lunch spot. It’s

outdoor patio that is perfect for bringing

a great place to go with a group, as there is

along my dog, Frankie. The burgers are

something for everyone. As an added bonus,

delicious, and they have ice cold Estrella

it taps into the nostalgic feeling of hanging

Beer on tap for those hot summer days. The

out in the mall food court as a kid, but with

best part is they are less than a ten-minute

elevated offerings for an adult palate.

walk from my home.

TIM@VANHEUVENPROPERTIES.COM 512. 799.3448 | VANHEUVENPROPERTIES.COM

MARK@GOTTESMANRESIDENTIAL.COM 512.771.7177 | MARKFMOORE.COM

2. JEN BERBAS POLVOS ON 1ST Polvos is my absolute favorite spot for Mexican food in town. The lively vibe, eclectic decor, and delicious frozen margaritas are what make it a South Austin

1.

3.

institution. Don’t be scared away by long waits on the weekend — the ceviche, beef fajitas, and salsa Ahumada are worth it! JENBERBAS@REALTYAUSTIN.COM 512.762.1470 | REALTYAUSTIN.COM

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S P EC I A L A DV E RT I S I N G S EC T I O N

DAVE VAN HEUVEN

ROBIE DODSON

FOUR SEASONS

LAAN RESIDENCES

After a two-year stint in Zilker, I moved back

My favorite spot at the moment is the

downtown to the Four Seasons Residences,

LAAN Residences at 3100 Manchaca in the

and I love taking advantage of the 98 San

heart of 78704’s SOLA neighborhood. This

Jacinto complex. I enjoy having a great

community of Dutch farmhouse-inspired

weekend brunch at Forthright or Trio and

homes has everything Austinites want:

then a nice walk/run or SUP on Lady Bird

modern finishes, proximity to downtown, and

Lake to burn off those yummy calories

completely walkable lifestyle.

afterward. The Four Seasons fireplace bar in the winter with the Gingerbread House

ROBIE@REILLYREALTORS.COM | 512.565.4701 ROBIEDODSON.COM

display is a holiday must. DAVE@VANHEUVENPROPERTIES.COM 512.658.0096 | VANHEUVENPROPERTIES.COM

5. KAREN KELLY SOUTH CONGRESS AVE. I love walking to Perla’s with my dog,

4.

Smooch, and sitting on the patio. It’s the best place to enjoy watching the world go by while sitting under a gigantic, centuries-old oak tree. On the weekends, I’ll pop into C-Boys or Continental Club for some live tunes. KAREN@VANHEUVENPROPERTIES.COM 512.569.5878 | VANHEUVENPROPERTIES.COM

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KO

TOP PICKS

ENI

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OF AUSTIN REALTORS

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1. CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

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2. POLVOS ON 1ST 3. FAREGROUND

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4. FOUR SEASONS 5. SOUTH CONGRESS AVE. 6. LAAN RESIDENCES

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STYLE PROFILE

The Wonder of Wandering

TAYLOR BRUCE OF WILDSAM FIELD GUIDES ON NEW VIEWS, OLD PL ACES AND THE ART OF STUMBLING INTO HISTORY

By Hannah Morrow Photographs by Holly Cowart

I

T HAPPENS ALL THE TIME. FOR THE PAST FEW MONTHS, IT’S BEEN

Crema, Italy, thanks to the harpoon to the heart that was “Call Me by Your Name.” I’m lying in the shade of a peach tree or splashing about in Canale Vacchelli. I bike past palazzos and read 16th-century French romance. It all feels very real, these not-quite-daydreams. When I think about the film, it feels like a place that I miss despite having never been, a past on which I reminisce despite having never lived. It’s a false nostalgia that the piece of art begs me to bethink.

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Bruce in his East Austin office. LEFT: The Austin edition of Wildsam alongside a selection of field guides from other cities.

In the case of Austin-based writer Taylor Bruce, John Steinbeck’s “East of Eden” lends the same peculiar sensation. Set in California’s Salinas Valley, the epic novel follows Samuel Hamilton as he settles his family on an infertile blanket of land. The Irishman and two of his sons, while out digging a well, accidently excavate a bit of black rock. The sons guess it to be a derailed locomotive or valuable ore, but Sam is slower to speculate, relishing in the possibilities of the unknown. Steinbeck wrote of Sam’s imagination, “The world was peopled with wonders.” For many readers, “East of Eden” renders the same sense of awe that I felt in “Call Me by Your Name.” Both use setting as another character, as alive and curious as any other persona in the work. It’s at this intersection of story and place that Bruce found inspiration for Wildsam Field Guides, a book series that delves deep into American cities.

The 36-year-old has long loved this concept of befriending a place through art — literature in particular. “Travel guides typically don’t capture the spirit of a place,” he says in Wildsam’s East Austin office. It’s a bungalow as pleasantly designed as the field guides themselves. “If I were going to Spain, I would read Hemingway. If it were San Francisco, I’d read Joan Didion. That’s more interesting to me as a travel companion.” Originally from Georgia, he attended college in Nashville and then spent the following eight years writing for magazines around the United States, covering music, food, and travel. While reporting, he’d stumble upon a story so lovably local that it was too niche for most publications. For example, in Louisiana, it was Juanita, who lived her whole life in a home painted top to bottom with folk art. In San Francisco, it was Guy, who has been selling flowers out of a bucket on the same corner for more than 30 years. Bruce wanted to create an outlet for these stories. In 2010, Bruce took a detour from magazines to get his MFA at Brooklyn College. Outside his studies, he was hankering to start a new project, he says, and needed to fallow his creative fields. “I had this urge to get in with the small-batch, handmade goods, but I can’t make anything,” says Bruce. “I’m not a leather guy, I can’t make furniture. But a field guide — I can make that.” He decided the first edition of his passion project would focus on his college town. Bruce returned to Nashville, seeking out local voices — artists, chefs, and songwriters who genuinely fed into the local culture. In 2012, six months of research, interviews, and memoirs were bound, and 3,000 copies were printed. They sold out online and in Nashville stores in four months. tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE

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The Wildsam team works with artists local to each city for the field guides. Artist Chris Bilheimer illustrated both Austin editions.

OUR HOPE WITH THE FIELD GUIDES IS THAT IT WILL TAP YOU INTO THE DEEPER STUFF SO YOU CAN GET A REAL, TRUE DEEP SENSE OF A PLACE.

He juggled the self-funded project with his day job in New York. A partnership with J. Crew and a job opportunity in Austin for Bruce’s wife, Robin, allowed for a move to Austin. The city became the subject of Wildsam’s second edition, connecting with hotelier Liz Lambert, welder Jack Sanders, and club owner Steve Wertheimer through friends of friends. A common observation of modern Austin is that natives are few and far between. Bruce, being a transplant himself, recognizes this both here and on a larger scale. “We’re kind of living in a time where people are a little bit unmoored and there’s a loss of deep connection to a place. That feeling of being rooted isn’t always baked in,” Bruce says. “Our hope with the field guides is that it will tap you into the deeper stuff so you can get a real, true deep sense of a place.” That deeper sense, however, is not always as bright and shiny as best-of lists and illustrations of swimming holes. For the Austin edition, this meant including an excerpt of Pamela Colloff’s “96 Minutes,” an exemplary feature on the 1966 University of Texas Tower shooting originally published in Texas Monthly. It also includes a sampling of final words by inmates meeting their death by the state of Texas. One reads, “My brother, where’s my stunt double when you need one?” “It’s like three-dimensional versus flat. The beautiful and the broken kind of in equal measure, together, can offer something more rich,” says Bruce. Wildsam turned five this past November and now boasts eight city guides: Brooklyn, Charleston, Nashville, San Francisco, New Orleans, Detroit, San Antonio, and a first and second edition of Austin. Our city’s second edition, which was released earlier this year, builds on the first with the

addition of new maps, lists, and interviews. Denver and Portland are slated to be released next, as Wildsam expands more into road-trip guides (New England and the Desert Southwest were released in 2016). It’s an awful lot of trekking for a guy who grew up in rural Georgia, vacationing on the Florida Panhandle, and crossing the country only once, to California. But Wildsam is a tribute to towns and trails. It’s a home Bruce built at that intersection of story and place, where he invites readers in for coffee and an anecdote. Thumbing through Wildsam induces that same nostalgia for a place you may have never been, or maybe shines a new light on one you’ve already visited. Who knows, the next time you catch the travel bug, you may just need a deeper dive into where you already are. tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK

Dressing for the Dog Days By Hannah Morrow Photographs by Madeleine Landry

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times: summertime in Texas. The season is notorious for high humidity and higher temperatures, ideal for a day on Lady Bird Lake or a nearby patio but not so much for a dressy affair. It’s tricky to be clean-cut when you’re dripping in sweat, but boutique owner Stephanie Coultress O’Neill has some ideas. Estilo, which she founded in 2005, is a women’s clothing store located in Tarrytown’s Casis Village. With over a decade of boutique curation, Coultress O’Neill knows comfort is a crucial component of Austin style, especially when it comes to those middle months. Here, she has styled three looks from Estilo to help you look cool even when it’s hot.

SUMMER IS ABOUT BEING FREE, FUN AND FLUID. YOUR NATUR AL SELF SHOULD COME OUT IN WHATEVER YOU WEAR .

RUBY AND VIOLET earrings, $69. SABINA MUSÁYEV Tyler Dress in Green, $375.

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LUXE DELUXE Craft Master Sweater in White, $268. McGUIRE Izabel High Rise Mini in Don’t Fade Away, $220.

SCHUTZ Zoola Shoe, $190. JOIE Clorinda Dress in Caviar, $288. NICOLE ROMANO necklace $245. VINTAGE purse (stylist’s own).

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T R AV E L P I C K

GALVESTON

A CLOSER LOOK AT THIS HISTORIC CIT Y REVE ALS PLENT Y TO DO BEYOND THE BE ACH

If you grew up in Texas, Galveston may conjure up nostalgic memories of family beach vacations, colorful Victorian homes, and views of the harbor from the porthole windows on the iconic 1877 Tall Ship ELISSA. With a growing restaurant scene, rich heritage, and recent restorations, the island has retained the quirky charm you remember while continuing to reinvent itself as a beach town destination. The first thing that may strike upon return is how much bigger the island feels than the Galveston of your youth — and how much history you missed while building sandcastles. A 74-foot statue of Lady Victory greets island guests as I-45 becomes Broadway, erected just months before the great storm of 1900 as a memorial to heroes of the Texas Revolution. Much like the iconic monument, Galveston has weathered some of the most devastating hurricanes in U.S. history. A symbol of resilience and rejuvenation, the city has rebuilt itself as a rising luxury destination, and we have the inside scoop on what to see and do. 90 JUNE 2018 |

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WHERE TO STAY The island offers a wide range of accommodations – from beach house rentals and luxury hotels to boutique bed-and-breakfasts like the soon-to-open Carr Mansion (redesigned by Austin’s own Shannon Eddings). For luxury, The San Luis Resort offers beautiful Gulf views with 250 beach-facing rooms, excellent dining options, and an unbeatable pool. For its contemporary take on Old World

charm – and for its location – the Hotel Galvez & Spa is a favorite, situated within view of the Pleasure Pier, walking distance to several restaurants, and a short bike ride to many of the island’s best attractions. The Galvez is the only historic beachfront hotel on the Texas Gulf Coast, having welcomed a host of famous guests, from U.S. presidents to Frank Sinatra, since it opened in 1911. Legend says that one guest still haunts the grounds, and the hotel hosts monthly

C A R R M A N S I O N P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M AG G I E C LO S S .

By Hannah Phillips


S U R F E R P H OTO G R A P H B Y W Y N N M Y E R S . B RYA N M U S E U M CO N S E R VATO RY P H OTO G R A P H Y CO U R T E S Y O F G A LV E S TO N C V B .

While lots to do away from the water, Galveston remains a perennial favorite with Texas surfers. LEFT: Austin-based designer Shannon Eddings drew inspiration from the Carr Mansion’s storied past. The building has served as a church, boarding house and home to former Texas governor Richard Coke. BELOW: 1877 Tall Ship ELISSA and The Bryan Museum.

ghost tour dinners and offers paranormal tracking devices for the brave and intrigued. (Our detector buzzed in the lobby, but we chose to believe it was pointing to spirits behind the historic bar and promptly ordered a cocktail.)

WHAT TO DO If you need to work off some calories before squeezing into a swimsuit, opt for a bike tour: Guests of the Galvez can use the hotel’s complimentary bikes or rent one at Island Bicycle Company. Keep an eye out for the island’s unique tree sculptures: After Hurricane Ike damaged many of the city’s oldest trees in 2008, locals commissioned artists to create wooden sculptures of birds and sea creatures — now displayed as symbols of renewal in front of homes throughout the East End Historic District. This neighborhood, along with the Silk Stocking National Historic District, showcases the island’s colorful and well-preserved Victorian, Greek Revival, and Queen Anne architectural styles. The Bishop’s Palace is the main attraction. Built in 1892, the house withstood the great hurricane of 1900, served for a time as the bishop’s residence before the diocese relocated, and is cited by the American Institute of Architects as one of the 100 most important buildings in America.


T R AV E L P I C K

GALVESTON: A POCKET HISTORY

• The island’s first European settlements were built around 1816 and named after Spanish count Bernardo Vicente de Gálvez. The Congress of Mexico established the Port of Galveston in 1825, following independence from Spain. • The city served as the main port for the Texas Navy during the Texas Revolution and later became a temporary capital of the Republic of Texas. • Known during the 19th century as the “Queen City of the Gulf,” Galveston was one of the largest U.S. ports until the storm of 1900, which is still ranked as the deadliest natural disaster in United States history. • The island is also known as the “Oleander City” for its abundance of the subtropical evergreen plant, native to Jamaica. Thousands were planted as a symbol of rebirth after the 1900 hurricane, and the city now boasts more than 100 colorful varieties.

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the catch of the day at Katie’s Seafood Market: One of the island’s main suppliers, the market is opening its own restaurant in September 2018. Pier 21 is the best place to catch harbor tours for dolphin sightings and to be a pirate for a day on the ELISSA. If rain dashes your beach dreams one day, head to Moody Gardens, home to an incredibly diverse assortment of both sea and rainforest life. Sign up to personally meet one of the penguins in the South Atlantic exhibit of the recently renovated Aquarium Pyramid (and say hi to our new friend Mo!). In the evenings, stretch your legs with a stroll along the sea wall toward the Pleasure Pier, which reopened in 2012, after being destroyed in 1961 by Hurricane Carla. Now an icon of the island, the illuminated amusement park stands over the Gulf of Mexico in the same historic location as a pleasure pier built in the 1940s.

WHERE TO EAT Get your first taste of Galveston’s local seafood selection at BLVD. Seafood, where signature dishes include the seafood samplers with the Chef’s Catch of the Day. Afterward, grab a nightcap in the lobby of the Galvez: The hotel’s wooden bar originally served secret cocktails at the Old Galveston Club, which was a speakeasy once upon a time. From Prohibition to the mid-1950s, Galveston became Texas’ version of Havana, with illegal gambling, brothels, and nightclubs smuggling Caribbean rum into the nearby port.

Hotel Galvez, opened along the seawall in 1911.

K AT I E ’ S S E A F O O D M A R K E T P H OTO G R A P H B Y W Y N N M Y E R S .

Also in the East End is The Bryan Museum, which opened in 2015 in the former Galveston Orphans Home. With more than 70,000 artifacts spanning more than 2,500 years, the Bryan presents a chronological history of “the West as it will never be seen again.” True Texans will well with pride at displays of Stephen F. Austin’s calling card and early portraits, while visitors of all ages can appreciate the sheer scale of the Battle of San Jacinto diorama — complete with Sam Houston and Santa Anna figurines. On the island’s harbor side, more activities and rich architectural history await. Postoffice Street and the Strand, downtown’s main thoroughfares, host the island’s famous annual Mardi Gras parades. Wend your way through the area’s many art galleries and antiques shops, like the quirky Nautical Antiques & Tropical Decor on Ships Mechanic Row, or stock up on local spices at the Italian market inside Maceo’s Spice & Import. If you’re on a see-food diet (see food and eat it), watch local fishermen bring in


ABOVE: The

Porch Cafe. LEFT: Ashton Villa, one of many architectural highlights.

OPPOSITE PAGE :

A S H TO N V I L L A E X T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F G A LV E S TO N C V B . P O R C H C A F E I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H B Y R O B E R T M I H OV I L .

The daily catch at Katie’s Seafood Market.

A morning on the beach will work up a healthy appetite, and The Spot makes for the perfect casual lunch. Try one of the huge po’boys made with fresh Gulf shrimp, and save room for Galveston’s own Hey Mikey’s Ice Cream at the dessert counter. Pair predinner drinks and delicious charcuterie with stunning views across the bay on the Rooftop Bar at The Tremont House, sister property to the Galvez. For dinner, Rudy & Paco is a local favorite, famous for grilled seafood and steak with a South and Central American twist. The three-tiered seafood tower is a highlight: Two layers of lobster, crab, and Gulf shrimp are arranged like a wedding cake and crowned by a generous serving of ceviche. The selection is delivered fresh daily, so call ahead to make sure it’s available. For breakfast, eat at the family-owned Sunflower Bakery & Cafe, which serves a truly magical waffle and other delicious pastries made from scratch. Or make brunch reservations on the wraparound deck at the bright and airy Porch Cafe, located in the upscale Beachtown development on the island’s east end. If you aren’t already dazzled by the gorgeous Gulf views, wait till you see the words “all you can eat pancake bar” at the bottom of the menu. Some of the best meals on the island are actually at the Kitchen Chick, which offers cooking classes from some of Galveston’s notable chefs. The shop in front sells gourmet kitchenware, and the entire experience feels like Kate Spade meets Martha Stewart. tribeza.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Épicerie Café & Grocery FRENCH-AMERICAN FARE SHINES AT THIS ELEGANT NEIGHBORHOOD CAFÉ By Karen Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

W

HAT’S GOOD HERE?” I ASKED THE GUY IN FRONT OF

me, waiting to be seated at Épicerie. “Everything,” he said. “It’s all good.” He went on to say that he lived around the corner and came here often — sometimes for lunch, sometimes for dinner, and sometimes, like on this Sunday, for brunch. He usually walked over with his wife and dog to dine on the pet-friendly patio, but sometimes he’d meet a client here, or a buddy for a little male bonding. Épicerie is like that: a welcoming café that serves many purposes for its neighborhood customers. Named after the quaint specialty-food shops in Europe, Épicerie is ultimately a charming and delicious destination for casual French-Louisiana-inspired dining and takeout gourmet treats. Like most great neighborhood joints, Épicerie takes some effort to find. You don’t just stumble on it, you seek it out. Burrowed deep into the Rosedale neighborhood off Burnet Road, it sits in the shadows of the Mexican culinary landmark Fonda San Miguel and across the street from the dive-y Around the Corner convenience store. Its ivy-covered cottage can be easily mistaken as a residential bungalow. But its food is all business. Chef-owner Sarah McIntosh knows her stuff. Raised in Louisiana on Cajun cooking, she honed her culinary chops in impressive kitchens like Thomas Keller’s Bouchon and Ad Hoc and Austin’s now-closed Olivia. At Épicerie,

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McIntosh, a Louisiana native, is known for her beignets.


The Allandale restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner.

ÉPICERIE CAFÉ & GROCERY 2307 HANCOCK DRIVE AUSTIN, TX 78756 (512) 371-6840 EPICERIEAUSTIN.COM

her varied background has been channeled into a delightful gumbo of approachable but sophisticated fare served in a casual but refined environment. The design, curated by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, has a rustic farmhouse vibe, with hardwood floors, whitewashed walls, butcher-block tables, and overhead copper lamps. A wall of windows overlooks the lovely, leafy neighborhood. Épicerie offers a full-service breakfast, lunch, and dinner but also gourmet take-away items from its small grocery. If you’re not in a hurry, I recommend dining in and absorbing Épicerie’s comfy, Continental charm. At breakfast and brunch, don’t miss McIntosh’s spot-on beignets, which my dining companions unanimously agreed were better than those at New Orleans’ iconic Café Du Monde. There’s also an elegant cured-salmon toast, fluffy brioche slices slathered with cream cheese layered with silky housecured salmon, and accompanied by capers, onions, radish, and soft-boiled egg. For Sunday brunch, there are French classics — croque madame and quiche — but also a fried-chicken sandwich dripping with tangy hot sauce and a riff on eggs Benedict, where biscuits and sausage supplant the traditional English muffin and ham. At lunch, options include French onion soup and beef tartare, plus a Louisiana fried-shrimp sandwich and fried green tomatoes. Salads include a Mediterranean-inspired bowl of beets, barley, and yogurt sprinkled with pumpkin seeds, mint, and a tarragon vinaigrette. Popular dinner entrées include mussels steamed in a fennel-and-shallot jam and steak frites. The seasonal menu also features a house-made pasta and, occasionally, McIntosh’s boudin sausage. For dessert, home-baked pastries and cookies satisfy a sweet tooth. The wine list is lengthy and fun, as is the beer list, which boasts almost 50 mostly regional choices. Bottles are also sold to go, as are many items in Épicerie’s small gourmet market, like terrific cheeses, prepared foods, fresh breads and pastries, and pantry staples like high-end jams, crackers, and exquisite Rancho Gordo heirloom dried beans. Whatever you’re in the mood for, you’re bound to find it at Épicerie. And like my new friend said, it’s all good. tribeza.com

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24 DINER

BARLEY SWINE

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encour-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

ages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

burgers, all-day breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

fried chicken.

charcuterie board.

34TH STREET CAFE 1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

soups, salads, pizzas, and pastas — but don’t miss the

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

ALCOMAR

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert,

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161

alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche

Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of

and rolled in coconut f lakes.

the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner, weekend brunch, and

BULLFIGHT

start your visit with a blood-orange margarita and the

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

crab and guacamole.

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamón

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR

Serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on

319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884

some sangria and enjoy the bites.

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting; perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

CAFÉ JOSIE 1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

Nothing “typical” about this luscious, FSM original,

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

Crepas de Cajeta. Delicate crepes float on a bed of goat’s

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

milk caramel, sprinkled with toasted almonds and

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

ASTI TRATTORIA

served with house-made cajeta ice cream. Your dessert BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

dream come true!

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061 South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends.

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

variety of sushi rolls under $10.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

GRIZZELDA’S

238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes, each fused

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with

with a range of f lavors and styles. The attention to detail in

an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on

each dish shines, from dark mole served over chicken brined

and appreciation.

Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

EASY TIGER

FREEDMEN’S

11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect complement to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine-preservation system with temperature control ensures optimal taste

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues

with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden

the f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from

downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh

the barbecue to the desserts and even the cocktail

pretzel. Complete your snack with beer cheese and an array

offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy

of dipping sauces.

platessome of the city’s best barbecue on a charming

EL ALMA 1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923 This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ 1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881 Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and sweet

outdoor patio.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

GERALDINE’S

HILLSIDE FARMACY

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt,

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the

combining creative cocktails, shareable plates, and

East Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner

scenic views of Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands

specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

every night of the week as you enjoy executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar

HOME SLICE PIZZA

manager Caitlyn Jackson.

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides modern spins on American classics. Dig into a

EPICERIE

fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

cranberry-thyme cocktail.

Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

here for a bite on Sundays.

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites. tribeza.com

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ITALIC

LAS PALOMAS

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 |

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s

laspalomasrestaurant.com

presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant

miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary

and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a

Catherine Curren.

sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE

with fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808

LENOIR

Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience,

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

Jacoby’s Restaurant & Mercantile transports you from

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

East Austin to a rustic Southern home nestled in the

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir

countryside. The menu features the best dishes Southern

comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique,

cooking has to offer, including beef from Adam

seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine

Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin.

garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wineproducing regions in the world.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local, and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

LA BARBECUE 1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

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L’OCA D’ORO 1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876 Located in the Mueller development, chef Fiore Tedesco delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy impressive cocktails, wine, and a great craft beer selection.

MANUEL'S 310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042 A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-quality regional Mexican food, fresh-pressed cocktails, margaritas, and tequilas. Try the Chile Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf shrimp, day boat scallops, and jumbo lump blue crab, or Manuel’s famous mole. Located downtown at the corner of 3rd and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat chees— caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits. THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options. PIEOUS 12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041 Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer, Pieous brings together the unlikely yet perfect combination of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket is a crowd favorite and a must-try. RED ASH ITALIA 303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax, and enjoy an exceptional evening. SALTY SOW 1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337 Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-night noshing. SWAY 1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999 The culinary masterminds behind La Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor area, complete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an unforgettable experience.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-con-

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambiance, the

WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional

scious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant,

salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly delicious,

located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers

with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.

WINEBELLY

YARD AT WALLER CREEK 701 E. 11th St. | (512) 478 1111 The YARD is not your typical hotel dining experience. Led by executive chef Lonny Huot, enjoy savory American cuisine with Texas f lavors like the Beer Braised Short Rib and the Chorizo & Pepper Jack Grits Cakes Benedict.

a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

519 W. Oltorf S. | (512) 487 1569 Named one of the top-20 wine bars in

The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of

America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an interna-

Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and

tional wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates.

Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that

The bistro maintains a local feel with its comfortable, laid-

everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

back interiors.

Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors


A L O O K B E H I N D 6…6

Secret Garden

V

By Margaret Williams Photographs by Madeleine Landry ERY LIT TLE FEEL S HIDDEN THESE DAYS, WHICH IS WHY

Jennifer’s Gardens, tucked away in Central Austin, is particularly special. The jasmine-scented oasis is truly hiding in plain sight. We knew the grounds were the perfect spot for our June minishoot, but it wasn’t until arriving that we fell in love with the free-spirited owner, Jennifer Staub Myers, and the history she shared with us. Myers, a former cardiac nurse (she recently retired from Seton Medical Center after 35 years), went to art school in the ’70s and is quick to explain, “Art and gardening are my passion.” Before purchasing the property in 1991, she didn’t tell anyone, “because I knew everyone would think I was crazy.” The lush property is home to the historic Seekatz-Gardner house, built in 1879, and has had only two owners prior to Myers and her family. While picturesque, the stone farmhouse, with its sloping lawn that backs up to Shoal Creek, hadn’t been touched in 70 years, and the gardens had been completely abandoned. Myers says when she first saw the property she thought, “I feel like I’m in France! The creek was running, and my daughter immediately started playing in the water. I knew I was going to live here. It was so weird. I kept calling, but it was too expensive. Then one day I called and they [relatives of the former owners] had dropped the price. I was the first one to know. There were no comps. They said, ‘As is,’ and that was it. It was the scariest moment. But what has happened in my life because of this house has been amazing.” After a mention in a magazine of her relation to famed French botanist André Michaux, she was flown to Paris to study 18th-century drawings at the Jardin des Plantes. And Myers also gratefully

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admits she was invited to spend four nights in the White House after Laura Bush fell in love with Jennifer’s Gardens (and my guess is, Jennifer as well). Over the years Myers and her husband, Fred, have made improvements to the home and grounds, although Myers confesses that for a time the electricity was hanging on strings and the family relied upon a nearby laundromat. After modernizing their family home, they built an art studio and most recently have added a small inn, where guests can spend the night. And in the midst of all this, Fred built an amphitheater so Jennifer’s Gardens can host musical performances and private events. Myers explains that Fred actually built the space with Lyle Lovett in mind. “But [Lyle] just doesn’t know it,” Myers says. Lyle, if you’re out there, we have the perfect spot for your next intimate gathering. Another magical opportunity just round the corner…


LONDON GREY RUGS


LIVE ATX We all have passion. And passion springs from inspiration, which begins with your surroundings. That’s what home is. Family. Friends. A sense of place. An amazing view. It’s what makes a space a home – because your home is where you truly LIVE. 5 Austin-Area Locations See More at KuperRealty.com Property: 1612 Meghan Lane

TRIBEZA June 2018  

The Neighborhoods Issue No. 202

TRIBEZA June 2018  

The Neighborhoods Issue No. 202