Page 1


simplicity is the ultimate sophistication.

Austin 2236 West Braker Lane 512.451.1233 San Antonio 18603 Blanco Road 210.545.4366

www.CopenhagenLiving.com

furniture and accessories for your modern lifestyle


6401 RUSTY RIDGE

1902 E. 14TH STREET, UNIT B

Leslie Davenport

Elizabeth Shands

GOTTESMAN RESIDENTIAL R E A L E S TAT E 914 GARNER

3336 MT. BONNELL ROAD

Mark F. Moore

Laura Gottesman

1901 STAMFORD LANE

1705 ALAMEDA DRIVE

Megan DeLeeuw

Mason Quintana

gottesmanresidential.com 512.451.2422

2 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


EXTRAORDINARY

FLOOR SAMPLE

40-70% OFF THOUSANDS OF FABULOUS FINDS AT THE DEEPEST DISCOUNTS EVER. FOR A LIMITED TIME: ENDS 1/27/19

DOMAIN NORTHSIDE | MGBWHOME.COM tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

3


4 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


G H O S T HIL L T E X A S B O URB O N

AN AGREEMENT BETWEEN T H e PA S T A N D T H E P O S S I B L E . The only way to honor centuries of spirit-making is to relentlessly try to do it better. By tweaking traditional techniques and focusing on grain-toglass sourcing of Texas panhandle corn and soft red winter wheat, we’re blending art, science and a trial-by-fire expertise to lean whiskey forward. We love tradition, but to create a tangible taste of place, you have to have the courage to be curious.

PURSUIT OF THE CURIOUS

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

5


6 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


LOEWY LAW FIRM

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

7


8 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


casey woods photography

commercial + residential w w w . k e l l e c o n t i ne.c om

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

9


Amy Rung Wilson & Goldrick

Anna Lee Moreland Properties

Beth Carter Moreland Properties

Charlotte Lipscomb Compass

Chris Long Compass

Debbie Lowe Moreland Properties

Cindy Goldrick Wilson & Goldrick

Clayton Bullock Moreland Properties

Cord Shiflet Moreland Properties

Crystal Olenbush AustinRealEstate.com

Dara Allen Compass

Darin Walker Kuper Sotheby’s

Gary Dolch Compass

Dru Brown Wilson & Goldrick

Eric Moreland Moreland Properties

Eric Copper Austin Portfolio RE

Meet Austin’s Top Luxury Realtors

Greg Walling Moreland Properties

Jocelyn Johnson Gottesman Residential

WWW.ELITE25AUSTIN.COM Jeannette Spinelli Austin Portfolio RE

Jana Birdwell Kuper Sotheby’s

Nicole Kessler Compass

Joe Longton Kuper Sotheby’s

Kathleen Bucher Austin Portfolio RE

Kathryn Scarborough Engel & Volkers

Kumara Wilcoxon Kuper Sotheby’s

Laura Gottesman Gottesman Residential

Megan DeLeeuw Gottesman Residential

Will Steakley DEN Property Group

Robin Banister Compass

10 JANUARY 2019 |

Shannon Windham Gottesman Residential

tribeza.com

Stephanie Panozzo Compass

Tammy Koen Gottesman Residential

Trey Phillips Moreland Properties

Wade Giles Moreland Properties


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

11


Photo by Nick Simonite

Exceptional homes for inspired living. BurnishandPlumb.com

12 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

Construction Co. Local. Level. Loyal.


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

13


Turn lights to makeup mode. Okay.

Turn lights to makeup mode. Okay.

Verdera® Voice with KOHLER Konnect

Say hello to a smarter routine. Voice control, personalized preferences and the intuitive technology of KOHLER Konnect™ products give you next-level control of your kitchen and bathroom experiences. Visit our showroom or learn more at KOHLER.com/KohlerKonnect. 9503 Research Blvd Austin, TX 78759 512.382.7939 KohlerSignatureStoreAustin.com

14 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

15


68

CONTENTS

A scene from the new Carpenter Hotel. The hotel's Lady Bird mural peeks from behind a luggage cart.

96

JANUARY / INTERIORS

Joann's Fine Foods is this month's "Karen's Pick."

ON THE COVER: The Eva street bungalow, photographed by Casey Dunn.

84

Artist Mia Carameros in her studio.

DEPARTMENTS

Event Pick p. 38

Dining Guide p. 100

Community Profile p. 44

A Look Behind p. 104

Tribeza Talk p. 32

Community Pick p. 48

FEATURES

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 34

Style Profile p. 84

Tribeza Interiors Tour p. 52

Music Pick p. 35

Style Pick p. 88

The Hills Are Alive p. 62

Travel Pick p. 92

Building on the Past p. 68

Karen's Pick p. 96

Seeing Green p. 76

Social Hour p. 22 Kristin’s Column p. 30

Art Pick p. 36

16 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


Courtney Oldham Broker Associate 512.809.5495 courtney.oldham@compass.com

150 Silver Charm Dr Under Contract

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

17


EDITOR'S LETTER

strangers, no one is immune from my curiosity. How many times have we all said yes to a dinner party we were perhaps on the fence about, all because it’d mean we’d get to wander into a new home and space. Just me? I highly doubt that. This endless fascination with the way people live dovetails quite nicely with my personal favorite event of the year: Tribeza’s Interiors Tour. On Sunday, January 27, we now all have an excuse to wander into strangers’ homes. Run-of-the-mill houses these are not. Designed by Austin’s most talented and creative interior designers, some for others and some for themselves, these stunning spaces span all manner of color palette, inspiration and design sensibility. I’m just as excited as you are. And for those homes not on this year’s tour? We’ve got you covered. The following pages provide a nice glimpse into the colorful bungalows (“Seeing Green”), perched properties (“The Hills Are Alive”), hotels (“Building on the Past”) and artist studios (“A Fine Line”) that compose our fair city. In all honesty, this issue became much more about what we could justify eliminating, versus including, since Austin is #blessed with any number of talented spatial designers and artists. A special thanks to Casey Dunn and Hannah J. Phillips, whom we were lucky to work with on two stories. We’ve done our best and hope you enjoy seeing these homes as much as we enjoyed bringing them to life in these pages. Still not enough? Not to worry. Moving forward, we are planning to incorporate more of these glimpses into each month’s magazine. Welcome to 2019! All of us here at Tribeza hope it’s a wonderful year for you and yours.

Margaret Williams margaret@tribeza.com

18 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H B Y A A R O N P I N K S TO N

I

LOV E PE E K I N G I N TO OT H E R PEO PL E ' S H OM E S . F R I E N D S , FA M I LY,


One will truly own a piece of Austin history with 1111 West 9th Street. This Classic Old West Austin home was built in 1910 and seamlessly blends vintage charm with contemporary style. Discerningly restored and updated in a timeless manner, that will preserve its integrity for years to come. - Kumara Wilcoxon 1111W9TH.COM

1506WESTOVER.COM

THEWPENTHOUSE.COM

215BELLARIVA.COM

1404WILDCATHOLLOW.COM

Kumara Wilcoxon, Global Real Estate Advisor GLOBAL REAL ESTATE ADVISOR, #1 PRODUCER COMPANY-WIDE

5 1 2 .4 2 3.5 03 5 ku m a ra @ s ot h e bys re a l ty.c o m ku m a raw i l c oxo n .c o m

@Kumarawilcoxon


TRIBEZ A

18 YEARS

AUSTIN CUR ATED

JA N UA R Y 2 01 9

N O. 2 0 9

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Margaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

September Broadhead

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Shaleena Keefer Katie Steckler PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Claire Schaper

OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Joe Layton

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Neal Baker Nicole Beckley Sarah Kitchel Joe Layton Abby Moore Hannah Morrow Hannah J. Phillips Brittani Sonnenberg COPY EDITOR

Stacy Hollister

PHOTOGR APHERS

Jana Cantua Holly Cowart Casey Dunn Leonid Furmansky Joe Layton Erin Reas Claire Schaper

EXHIBITION OPENS FEBRUARY 9, 2019 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

ILLUSTR ATOR

Jessica Fontenot

S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


Come Visit Us. Shop our showroom tucked away just one mile east of South Congress at 2090 Woodward Street. Or visit us online to see what’s new, find inspiration and browse our digital catalog. Exclusively in Austin. FOURHANDSHOME.COM


SOCIAL HOUR BELYDIA GALA On November 8, guests donned their best ’60s-inspired cocktail attire and headed to Hotel Van Zandt for the first-ever beLydia Gala. Along with bites from Uchi’s Tyson Cole, guests enjoyed a live and silent auction benefiting beLydia’s mission of preventing child sex trafficking.

14

SAFE STORYBOOK GALA

2

HEARTH & SOUL GRAND OPENING Lifestyle shop and community gathering spot Hearth & Soul celebrated its grand opening in the heart of Tarrytown on November 16. The full day of events started with a complimentary Ignite Your Life yoga class and ended with a homemade pizza and beer tasting. Hearth & Soul plans to host fitness classes on its outdoor patio and inspirational events with Austin’s top lifestyle experts.

BELYDIA GALA: 1. Doug Congdon, Scott Vermillion & Jeremy Williford 2. Pradeep & Fabiola Thorat SAFE STORYBOOK GALA: 3. Cindy Klatt & Michelle Long Held 4. Theo & D'Andra Ulmer HEARTH & SOUL GRAND OPENING: 5. Mikaela Henson & Sophie Transou 6. Claire Schaper, Bailey Taber, Morgan Swain & Bowen Rechner

22 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

4

3

5

6

5

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B R I D G E T DA E H L E R , B O B B Y S C H E I D E M A N N , E M M A R O G E R S , A N D J O E L AY TO N

The SAFE Alliance, a merger of Austin Children’s Shelter and SafePlace, held its annual Storybook Gala on November 10 at Fairmont Austin. The theme was “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” with SAFE’s Guardian Award presented to Bob Ellis and Gretchen Rathgeber Ellis. Attended by 680 people, the event raised nearly $1.2 million for the The SAFE Alliance.


Chris Long Exceptional Service. Powerful Network. Recognized consistently by the Austin Business Journal as one of Austin’s top real estate brokers—Chris offers the same level of dedication and expertise now paired with cutting edge technology and nationwide network.

Broker Associate | 512.289.6300 chris.long@compass.com chrislongaustin.com


SOCIAL HOUR

KENDRA SCOTT FLAGSHIP GRAND OPENING Friends and family celebrated the launch of the new Kendra Scott flagship store on South Congress Avenue with a party on November 15. Guests were treated to mystery gift boxes, music by DJ Nixx, aerial performances and a “unicorn” drawn carriage. Before saying goodnight, everyone stepped out onto the heated patio for a surprise performance by the UT marching band.

Hops for Hope showcased this year’s contributing Hope Artists in partnership with “Not For Sale,” a traveling global art exhibit curated by FYT Branding to support the development and growth of art parks around the world. This exhibit kicked off November 17 with the Hope Preview Night & Art Party held at Fair Market, where guests mingled with featured artists while sampling small bites inspired by the Hope Artists’ murals.

1 11

2 22

WELL AWARE’S GLOBAL IMPACT AWARDS On December 1, Well Aware, a non-profit that provides solutions to water scarcity, honored Kenyan-based Dr. Auma Obama at the second annual Global Impact Awards. Held at the Central Austin Library, the Rockin’ in a Winter Waterland themed night also highlighted Well Aware’s implementation of 54 clean-water projects with a 100 percent success rate, transforming more than 240,000 lives in East Africa.

KENDRA SCOTT FLAGSHIP GRAND OPENING: 1. UT Band with Kendra Scott 2. Whitney Wolfe Herd, Kendra Scott & Alex Williamson HOPS FOR HOPE: 3. Miles Starkey 4. Matt Gutierrez, Sloke & Clayton Lillard WELL AWARE’S GLOBAL IMPACT AWARDS: 5. Greg Davis & Alva Sim 6. Monica Netherland Hopkins, Newton Hopkins & Mary Elizabeth Ellis

24 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

3

5

4

4

6

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J A R E D T E N N A N T, J O N AT H A N G A R Z A , M AT T C H A R N I T S K I A N D K E L S E Y A P P L E B A U M

HOPS FOR HOPE


SOCIAL HOUR

DANCING WITH THE STARS Presented by Lexus of Austin & Lakeway, the Center for Child Protection held the biggest dance party of the year on December 1 at the JW Marriot with its 12th annual Dancing With the Stars Austin. Full of glamour, exhilarating entertainment and eye-catching routines, the evening benefited young victims of abuse in Travis County. Dancer Kendall Beard McMinn took home the coveted mirror ball trophy at the end of the night.

KEYHOLDER ’18

14

On December 4, the Women’s Fund at Austin Community Foundation hosted Keyholder ’18 at the ZACH Theatre. The evening, which focused on investing in Central Texas women and children, featured keynote speaker and awardwinning journalist Suzanne Malveaux of CNN, who shared her extraordinary journey with guests.

2

TRIBEZA DECEMBER RELEASE PARTY

DANCING WITH THE STARS: 1. Glenn Ball & Holly Mills Gardner 2. Kendall Beard McMinn KEYHOLDER ’18: 3. Toya Bell, Diane T. Land & Marjorie Clifton 4. Rachel Sibley TRIBEZA DECEMBER RELEASE PARTY: 5. Jay Tillman & Elysse Landrum 6. Raquel Garcia, Shawn Watwood & Cory Baker

26 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

4

3

5

6

5

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C H A R L E S Q U I N N A N D E R I N R E A S

On December 6, friends of Tribeza came together at Native Hostel to celebrate the December issue and the 15 Austinites selected as 2018’s People of the Year. Partygoers enjoyed bites and specialty cocktails by Austin favorites Thai Fresh, Maize Bakery, Nine Banded Whiskey, Treaty Oak Distilling and Fronks before slipping into the MoodbyMoss booth to get their aura captured.


After more than three decades selling Austin's finest properties, I've collaborated with Compass, a technology-driven, futurefocused, real estate solution. Call me; I speak real estate.

Charlotte Lipscomb REALTORÂŽ

|

|

CRS, CLHMS, Million Dollar Guild 512.789.6225 charlotte.lipscomb@compass.com CharlotteLipscomb.com tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

27


HRC|ATX

2019 HRC Austin Gala Dinner tickets are on sale! Purchase now and support equality, love and local legislative progress.

Saturday, January 26, 2019 at the JW Marriott www.HRCATX.org

28 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


Coming Soon, Westlake

1206 Falcon Ledge

2324 Townes Ln.

compass.com

Sold, Tarrytown

4501 Amarra Dr.

Sold, Barton Creek

Dara Allen Broker Associate

5912 Waymaker Cv.

Sold, Davenport Village

512.296.7090 dara@compass.com

All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdrawal without notice. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed. Nothing herein shall be construed as legal, accounting or other professional advice outside the realm of real estate brokerage. Compass is a licensed real estate broker. Equal Housing Opportunity.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

29


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

30 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


I

feel as though it was just a few minutes ago that I sat down to gather my thoughts for this issue last year. Here we are again. Another clean slate, another fresh start, another chance to do things differently, another chance to love cleanly and deeply, another 365 days to grow and learn, another opportunity to transform and transcend. I am meeting this new year as a new person. I don’t say this lightly. I am, after all, a seeker. What I mean is, there is something unquenchable and relentless inside me that wants to challenge myself — to learn and change and help and heal and serve. It’s why the pile of books next to my bed is as tall as my lampshade. It’s why I went back to school for a graduate degree in 2015, why I go to energy healers, priests, alternative doctors, therapists and meditation retreats. It’s why I run marathons and practice yoga. It’s why I’ve cultivated the kinds of friendships that I’m blessed to have. I believe the view just beyond our comfort zone is ultimately what gives us vision. Last year I took a journey running more than 100 miles through the Alps and found insight and adventure in nature. This year I took an equally arduous path — but this time it was a mountain range on the inside. In my first semester of graduate school, my theories professor mentioned a type of therapy called EMDR — Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. It sounded weird enough that it stuck with me. Basically she said it uses alternative stimulation of the right and left sides of the brain (using eye movements, a light bar or hand-held buzzers) to process memories and trauma and help your body to release and heal. Yeah, right, I remember thinking. Some weird-ass hypnosis thingy.

INTERNAL Decluttering By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Jessica Fontenot

But then she talked about a war veteran with PTSD who fell to the ground at any loud noise and had panic attacks in crowds, and a rape victim who still couldn’t go on a date more than a decade after she’d been assaulted, both of whom, after just a few sessions of EMDR, could go about their lives. Wait, what? I made a note on the top of my notebook paper that I was going to get trained in this someday. Fast-forward to last spring, when something happened in my life that almost destroyed me. In the aftermath, I could not eat and could not sleep. At the slightest sound during the night, I would jolt upright, poised, panting, sweating, my throat closing, in a full panic. I was edgy, tight, shortfused and miserable. I remembered EMDR. A dear friend recommended an amazing clinician. I went. After two sessions, I could sleep again. After a couple more sessions, I was hooked. I started clearing out the debris of old hurts and misguided beliefs that I unknowingly incorporated as The Truth About Me. I thought I was a relatively self-aware person, but let

me just say that I had no idea of what I had no idea about. Keep in mind that I have done years of talk therapy and am a semester away from being a therapist myself. Just because you know something exists, or even understand why it exists, doesn’t mean that you can change it or let it go. EMDR is deeper than that, and oddly enough, you talk very little. It literally, magically (OK, neurobiologically) helps your brain help itself, rewiring broken places and rewriting the undermining and sabotaging messages we whisper to ourselves. You know when something happens — someone does or says something that hurts or threatens you — and you freak out inside? This is your brain, your amygdala, to be precise, sending you into full-blown survival mode, fight, f light or freeze. Imagine if you could respond calmly to only the incident occurring in the present moment without having an outof-body and out-of-proportion reaction to the landslide of accumulated crap from the past? It’s happening for me. I can feel the seismic shift. I can do my work without feeling like a fraud or playing small. I can try new things without thinking I have to be good at them right away. I can open more fully and love without the wreckage and rubble of the past blocking my way in the present. I can speak my mind without minimizing myself. I can parent my children without their triggers turning me into a teenager. It is hands down the kindest, most liberating thing I have ever done for myself. I am almost done with EMDR certification training and I graduate in May. I am getting ready to take this incredible blessing I have received and start sharing it with anyone else who wants to be free. I cannot wait.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

31


BOLD STROKES Utilizing bold, bright colors, artist Robert Warenoff creates paintings that make rooms feel vibrant. His geometric patterns create the illusion of depth — imagine a cross between a Tetris game and a Magic Eye poster. First sketching a design by hand, Warenoff coaxes each acrylic-on-canvas piece to pop with modern flair. His love of color, structure and symmetry makes each highly-livable painting as surprising as it is logical. INSTAGRAM.COM/RWARENOFF_ ART

TRIBEZ A AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Custom Built When Gil Moreno and Lindsey Culpepper, two El Pasoans turned Austinites, first started working on a design project, they didn’t know how quickly it would escalate. “It just kind of snowballed,” Moreno says. In 2014 they officially opened Transmountain, issuing a run of custom-built mini-record credenzas, made from pecan and meant to hold 150 records. The aesthetic that emerged felt like a rebuttal to a more opulent style. “That’s kind of our philosophy — how can we use less and get the same [results]?” Moreno says. While they’ve done commercial work, including the giant barn doors at Barracuda and the banquettes at Nickel City, their real love is building custom furniture. See their work, on display at Northern-Southern gallery through January 26. STUDIOTRANSMTN.COM

Carving a PATH Over a decade and a half ago, Michael Wilson was working as a sushi chef in Los Angeles when he and his wife moved into a serious fixer-upper. “It was, like, a literal teardown,” Wilson says. After working to refurbish the house, Wilson decided to try his hand at making furniture, inspired by “The Soul of a Tree,” George Nakashima’s book about woodworking. With a few projects under his belt, Wilson promised to give himself a year to see if he could make a new career from his work. “After a year, I just never looked back,” Wilson says. He began doing custom work for high-profile clients, like actor Orlando Bloom and lighting designer LeRoy Bennett, before relocating to Wimberley in 2008. Since then, Wilson’s gorgeous woodwork has taken shape in tables at the Fifth & West condos and the beautiful bar inside the Line Hotel and found its way to galleries. “It started more as functional furniture in the beginning and now it’s become quite sculptural,” Wilson says. MICHAELWILSONDESIGN.COM

32 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R A N S O M A S H L E Y O F S O N O F R A N D , M I N T P H OTO G R A P H Y, A N D B R E A N N A M C K E N D R I C K

TALK


Snug as a RUG The brainchild of Alli Pozeznik, Austin Rug Co. specializes in vintage floor coverings, including unique pieces like goat-hair blankets from the 1970s and floral-patterned Turkish rugs from the 1950s. Working with rug purveyors in Turkey, Pozeznik sources rugs with distinct patterns, vivid colors and intricate geometric designs to make any space feel like home. AUSTINRUGCO.COM

Floral Sense Something borrowed, something blue — but what’s a wedding without flowers? With a knack for high-concept floral design, Bella by Sara’s Sara Mulder approaches events with an artist’s eye, utilizing flowers as a source of color and life. Floral centerpieces and garlands lend a unique vibe, and the result may be an event that feels whimsical or traditional, romantic or tropical. Since 2009, Mulder has

created floral backdrops, flower crowns and over-the-top bridal bouquets and now has a studio in Dripping Springs where she can gather floral-loving groups for special events. BELLABYSARA.COM

MODERN MILLING Whether your room needs a few new throw pillows or a complete design overhaul, MADE by Milling Around Interiors aims to please. The showroom, which held its grand opening in October, serves as both a fabric store and consultation space. Pick the perfect pattern for a new pair of curtains, peruse the extensive collection of Annie Sloan chalk paint and talk to an expert about bedding, window treatments and upholstery. MADEBYMILLINGAROUND.COM

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

33


C ALENDARS

Entertainment ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO

January 5 Paramount Theatre

ASO: VARIATION VOYAGE

January 11 & 12 Long Center

TORO Y MOI

January 25 Stubb’s BBQ

ANDREW MCMAHON IN THE WILDERNESS

January 26 Stubb’s BBQ

THE DEVIL MAKES THREE

ROB BAIRD B-DAY SHOW

January 12 Antone’s Nightclub

January 26 Emo’s Austin

RUSTON KELLY

THE OAK RIDGE BOYS

January 15 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park JJ GREY & MOFRO

January 18 Stubb’s BBQ

NAGAVALLI

January 20 One World Theatre HI, HOW ARE YOU DAY

January 22 ACL Live at The Moody Theater ATMOSPHERE

January 23 Emo’s Austin

January 26 Antone’s Nightclub

January 23 Mohawk Austin

MONSTER TRUCK

January 23 Stubb’s BBQ

LOS LONELY BOYS + LOS LOBOS

January 25 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

LANDMARKS VIDEO PRESENTS SANCTUS

January 1 – 31 ART Building Atrium

KEEP AUSTIN CREATING

January 27 Emo’s Austin

January 12 Bass Concert Hall

WHITNEY ROSE

TEXAS FOCUS: PARIS, TEXAS

January 31 Emo’s Austin January 31 Long Center

JOAN OSBORNE

January 31 One World Theatre REBELUTION

January 31 ACL Live at The Moody Theater PETER MURPHY

January 31 Paramount Theatre

January 17 Bullock Texas State History Museum

JEFF GOLDBLUM MYSTERY MARATHON

January 20 Alamo Drafthouse - South Lamar

A TUNA CHRISTMAS

Through January 6 The City Theatre

SHEN YUN

January 4 – 6 Long Center

January 10 – 19 Ground Floor Theatre

tribeza.com

MIDDLEDITCH & SCHWARTZ

January 17 – February 9 The VORTEX SWEAT

January 22 – 27 Bass Concert Hall HEDWIG AND THE ANGRY INCH

January 13 Paramount Theatre

GEORGE LOPEZ

January 19 Bass Concert Hall

ILIZA SHLESINGER

January 24 Paramount Theatre

FORTUNE FEIMSTER

January 23 – March 3 ZACH Theatre

January 25 & 26 Cap City Comedy Club

AUSTIN OPERA: SILENT NIGHT

BRIAN REGAN

January 26 – February 3 Long Center

DORRANCE DANCE

January 30 Bass Concert Hall

C.S. LEWIS ONSTAGE: THE MOST RELUCTANT CONVERT

January 31 – February 3 McCullough Theatre

THEATER

BREAKFAST AT JOE’S

34 JANUARY 2019 |

HEARTLAND

WAITRESS

BLACKBERRY SMOKE

BTSM

January 10 – 12 Cap City Comedy Club

THAT’S MY FACE: THE UNCOMFORTABLE TRUTH SCREENING

WILLIAM SHATNER & STAR TREK II: THE WRATH OF KHAN

January 30 Long Center

NIKKI GLASER

January 11 – February 3 Austin Playhouse

January 18 – February 3 Santa Cruz Studio Theater

RUTHIE FOSTER

January 26 Paramount Theatre

PARADISE

January 5 Austin School of Film

January 11 George Washington Carver Museum

BUMPER JACKSONS

JOYCE MANOR & JEFF ROSENSTOCK

FILM

COMEDY CUPHOLDERS SUPER SECRET SHOW

January 2 The Hideout Theatre

VANESSA GONZALEZ

January 2 – 5 Cap City Comedy Club

January 26 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

CHILDREN TORTOISE AND HARE

Through January 27 ZACH Theatre

GRETEL! THE MUSICAL

January 7 Paramount Theatre

LITTLE TEXANS: TEXAS BEASTS

January 10 Bullock Texas State History Museum THE MUSIC OF THE BEATLES FOR KIDS

January 13 Mohawk Austin

P H OTO G R A P H B Y G E O R G E S A L I S B U RY

MUSIC


DRAGONS LOVE TACOS & OTHER STORYBOOKS

January 26 One World Theatre PITCH YEA!

January 27 Stateside at the Paramount THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR SHOW

January 27 Paramount Theatre

THE SWOON EVENT

January 19 Springdale Station

3M HALF MARATHON

January 20 Stonelake Blvd.

APL AFTER DARK: SLUMBER PARTY

January 25 Austin Central Library

WINTER TREE FEST

OTHER

January 26 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

ICE SKATING ON THE PLAZA

ACL LIVE AT THE MOODY THEATER, JANUARY 22, 7 P.M

FREE WEEK

January 1 – 7 Various Locations VINTAGE CHRISTMAS TREE PAINTING

January 9 Lala’s Little Nugget

AUSTIN WOMEN’S RALLY

January 19 Texas State Capitol

January 19 Circle Brewing Company

THE MARKET AT SCH

January 19 South Congress Hotel

MARTIN LUTHER KING MARCH & FESTIVAL

January 19 Huston-Tillotson University

Hi, How Are You Day By Neal Baker

Through January 21 Whole Foods North Lamar

COOKIES & CRAFT BREWS

MUSIC PICK

ROMAN HOLIDAY January 17–20 AFS Cinema Join AFS Cinema as they celebrate the work of legendary wardrobe designer, Edith Head. Throughout the month of January they will be screening her greatest triumphs in the field of storytelling through costume. Alongside Roman Holiday four other films will be presented: The Lady Eve, The Heiress, The Sting and The Great Race.

Down on Guadalupe and 21st, you can always find a friendly amphibious face asking the same question: “Hi, how are you?” Behind Austin’s favorite friendly frog is artist and musician Daniel Johnston, an important longtime contributor to his artistic worlds as well as his home in Austin. Johnston’s career has long been marked — though never defined — by an ongoing struggle with mental illness, and the simple message of his famous mural provides the inspiration behind the new Hi, How Are You Project. The nonprofit stands in support of open conversation about mental health within communities and on a national scale. As a result of the organization’s efforts, January 22 — Johnston’s birthday — was named Hi, How Are You Day by the city. 2018 saw the first such celebration, taking place at The Mohawk and featuring a fistful of Austin musicians celebrating Johnston’s art. This year’s celebration promises even more; in addition to its relocation to ACL Live at The Moody Theater, the night will be headlined by The Flaming Lips, Yo La Tengo, The Moth and the Flame, and Built To Spill’s Doug Martsch, with the music starting at 7 p.m. and playing into the night. In addition to the coming together around music, the event and its participants believe in the removal of the stigma connected to the topic of mental health and the realization of a culture of communicating with one another about the unseen problems affecting so many of us.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

35


ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts Through January 5 Dimension Gallery

THE MATTER AT HAND: DARCIE BOOK & SARAH HIRNEISEN

Through January 5 ICOSA Collective

CHAPEL SHRINE: PAINTINGS BY JOHN PATRICK COBB

Through January 6 Mexic-Arte Museum

ED RUSCHA: ARCHAEOLOGY & ROMANCE

Through January 6 Harry Ransom Center JULIO ALBA: SOÑADORES

ART PICK

The Color Inside, a James Turrell Skyspace By Joe Layton

STUDENT ACTIVIT Y CENTER, THE UNIVERSIT Y OF TEX A S, THROUGH JANUARY 6

This month’s pick isn’t something new, but rather a work that has been around since 2013. James Turrell’s The Color Inside sits in the center of the University of Texas campus, atop the Student Activity Center, and at times can feel as though it’s hiding in plain sight. This winter is a perfect time to visit the transformative installation, a large pod whose interior light — both constructed and natural — is always changing. The real “show” begins in the evenings when the sun is setting. Inside the hushed space there is plenty of seating in the round (though many visitors choose to stand or lie on the floor). Overhead is the oculus, which, when you look up, captures the changing sky as it morphs with the setting sun. Turrell’s installations, peppered throughout the country, are a source of inspiration for many. Drake has confirmed that his video for “Hotline Bling” was directly inspired by Turrell’s work. Regardless of your take, you can be sure that experiencing Skyspace is quite a different ride than popping into a gallery. Most fascinating is how many thoughts one can have in the time it takes the sun to set. Maybe this is part of Turrell’s intention, this silent contemplation affected by the changing colors of the sky and LED lights. Maybe not. An hour at sunset in the Skyspace is time very, very well spent, with the light and experience changing moment to moment. But as the great LeVar Burton says, “You don’t have to take my word for it!”

36 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

NORIKO AMBE: PARALLEL WORLD

Through January 12 Lora Reynolds Gallery PEGGY WEISS

Through January 12 Gallery Shoal Creek HUMA BHABHA: OTHER FORMS OF LIFE

Through January 13 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center DERRICK FORE: HERE & NOWHERE

Through January 23 Julia C. Butridge Gallery LET’S TAKE A WALK

Through January 26 Art For The People

Through January 6 CAMIBAart Gallery

THE PINK PARACHUTE PROJECT

MAKING AFRICA: A CONTINENT OF CONTEMPORARY DESIGN

HEART, RAIN, AND WHIMSY

Through January 6 Blanton Museum of Art NACIMIENTOS: TRADITIONAL NATIVITY SCENES FROM MEXICO

Through January 6 Mexic-Arte Museum NIC NICOSIA

Through January 7 Bale Creek Allen Gallery ERIN SHIRREFF

Through January 12 Lora Reynolds Gallery NIGHT VISION

Through January 12 Davis Gallery

Through January 26 Art For The People

January 3 – 30 Old Bakery & Emporium TALKABOUT: EVERYTHING YOU EVER

January 5 Women & Their Work

ELIZA THOMAS: SEEING THROUGH DARKNESS

January 5 – 26 Wally Workman Gallery JAY B. SAUCEDA: TEXAS FROM ABOVE

January 26 – June 16 Bullock Texas State History Museum

J A M E S T U R R E L L , T H E CO LO R I N S I D E , 2 013 . P H OTO B Y F LO R I A N H O L Z H E R R . CO U R T E S Y O F L A N D M A R K S , T H E P U B L I C A R T P R O G R A M O F T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F T E X A S AT A U S T I N .

FIVE SKIN TEN SKIN


O L IVIASHOPPE.COM WE ST WO O DS SHO PPING C ENT ER 3 2 0 1 B E E CAVE S R OAD . AUST IN T EX AS 7874 6 ( 5 1 2 ) 4 1 9 .7 6 6 7 . INFO @O LIVIASHO PPE.CO M


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

Women’s March By Neal Baker DOWNTOWN, JANUARY 20

In case you missed it, the recent midterm elections were game-changing. The country saw a record number of women running for office, leading to a remarkable tally of firsts among those elected to congressional and gubernatorial positions. At the same moment, the election season was marked by a visible increase in diversity in several respects, sometimes in the least likely of places. To some, the sudden defiance of precedent may not have seemed so surprising at all. Eras, movements and waves have been shifting the earth under Americans for some time now, with people becoming more vocal and more willing to demonstrate, perhaps the most visible example being the Women’s March on Washington. The two years since the first occurrence of the event, in 2017, have seen changes in conversations everywhere, and with the encouragement of the recent election results, the grassroots campaign plans to fill the streets once more. As in previous years, a network of sister marches will coincide with the central event in D.C., organizing supporters all over the map. In Austin, the peaceful assembly will take place on the 20th of the month and will parade through downtown toward the capitol. It’s a free and all-inclusive event dedicated to speaking out about women’s rights and issues. And if past years are any indication, you can expect that the turnout will be high and that change will be in the air.

38 OCTOBER 2018 |

tribeza.com

700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12–11, Th–Sa 12–9, Su 12–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN–LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12–4, Th–Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6,  F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa–Su 10–6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Azie Morton Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu–F 10–4, Sat–Su 12–4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y H A N S M I L L E T T

MUSEUMS


WWG

Wa l ly W or k m an Gallery

Eliza Thomas 1202 W.est 6th Street Austin, Texas 78703 wallyworkmangallery.com 512.472.7428 image: Spider Lily III (detail), ink on kozo paper, 39 x 72 inches


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com AO5 GALLERY 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 ao5gallery.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu–Sa 12–6 bigmedium.org

40 JANUARY 2019 |

CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 camibaart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: Sa 10–6 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M–Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–7, Su 12–5 firstaccess.co/gallery FLATBED PRESS AND GALLERY 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10–5, Sa 10–3 flatbedpress.com

tribeza.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8–5, Sa 8–3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th St., Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa–Su 11–4 linkpinart.com LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11–6 lorareynolds.com LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5–8, Sa–Su 12–5 massgallery.org

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12-6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M–F 10–6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 1600 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu–F 10–5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992 2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 fbgartgallery.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997 4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992 3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997 0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997 6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307 3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456 9667 urbanherbal.com


Grow old with me, the best is yet to be.

Chair 7 | Designed and Produced in East Austin Springdale General | 1023 Springdale Road | Building 8F

Original. Authentic. Local. Oil Paintings by Eli Halpin

42 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

Eli Halpin Gallery & Gift Shop 1023 Springdale Rd Austin Tx elihalpin.com


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

43


COMMUNITY PROFILE

Pillows with Purpose AT HELPING HAND HOME, ONE AUSTIN DESIGN FIRM TAKES COMFORT TO A HIGHER LEVEL By Anne Bruno Photographs by Claire Schaper

Austin Design House partners Kat Reyes, Aimee Laughlin, Taylor Wilson and (not pictured) Jess Pearce.

44 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


Helping Hand Home's newly redesigned Therapeutic Family Room.

P

ONDER THE QUESTION OF THE

most versatile home-design element and what comes to mind? The humble throw pillow, of course. This one simple object (whose powers increase when artfully multiplied) is hailed not only for its ability to transform a room with just the right color, pattern or texture, but also for creating the crucial difference between a space that is beautiful and one that is beautifully inviting. For a group of talented interior designers, custom pillows provided the start to their growing full-service design business as well as their most rewarding project to date. Taylor Wilson, who with her mother, Aimee Laughlin, Jess Pearce and Kat Reyes make up Austin Design House, explains: “When we came over a few months back to donate some pillows, we walked

into the room and just looked at each other. I knew we were all thinking the same thing.” The room they walked into was the Therapeutic Family Room at Helping Hand Home for Children, a nonprofit organization that cares for Austin’s most vulnerable and one Laughlin had long been involved with. “My mom has volunteered there for years, and I actually worked there at one time,” Wilson says. “So when we had some extra pillows to donate, we called and they said, ‘Sure, we’d love to have them.’” What the designers found was a project waiting to happen, and pillows were just the beginning. According to Julie Freeman, Helping Hand Home’s director of development, the Therapeutic Family Room serves multiple purposes and is a place where the kids’ comfort and creativity are especially important. “The kids here have been through so much,

and learning to trust and express themselves is very important,” Freeman says. “We use this room not just for playtime but for family visitations and for our Buddy program, where a volunteer is matched with a child and they spend one-on-one time together on a regular basis. That time — with one adult friend who focuses just on them — means the world to the kids. Our volunteers sometimes bring in the child’s favorite food for lunch, or they might read a book together or just sit on the couch and talk about whatever the child wants to.” Knowing that the room serves as a safe space for hearts to heal as well as everyday kids’ activities like watching TV and playing, Laughlin, Wilson, Pearce and Reyes set their sights on more than just a refresh. They started a GoFundMe page to buy all new furnishings and give the room a complete makeover. “We ran evtribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

45


The AvalosMartinez family was connected through Helping Hand Home's foster care and adoption program.

erything by the clinical therapist to be sure what we were doing made sense in terms of meeting the children’s needs,” explains Reyes. The room’s color scheme began with a painting Laughlin had fallen in love with on a market trip and purchased, with no particular client in mind. The pinks, blues, whites and yellows create a playful but soothing palette, making it a perfect fit for the space. The rug and performance fabric on the sofas and pillows were chosen for their durability as well as soft textures. (With several children and grandchildren among them, the designers are well-schooled in the wear and tear kids can inf lict on a living room.) “We looked at all the elements and then asked ourselves what would be the most durable and safe, while at the same time create a really

46 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

warm and homey environment,” Wilson says. Throw pillows dot the floor, while a chalkboard wall and magnets allow for creative expression. Lighting, a big factor affecting people’s moods, was a key consideration; existing can lights were updated with new LED bulbs, and a decorative new ceiling fixture replaced an old one. With donated items like a 60-inch flat-screen TV, Wii Games and a table for Legos, along with the pro bono services of contractor Lynn Stackable of Stackable & Associates, the room feels both comfortable and stylish, a place just right for kids and adults to come together. As Wilson says, “This is really built for the long haul, and we had so much fun doing it, especially knowing how the space will be used. It’s definitely been a special project for us.”


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

47


COMMUNITY PICK

A Taste for Style DESIGN MAVEN CHANEL DROR TURNS OUT FAMILY FAVORITES IN HER HYDE PARK BUNGALOW By Margaret Williams Photographs by Claire Schaper

48 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

C

HANEL DROR AND HER

husband, Eric Tarlo, recently made the leap from downtown apartment living to calling a Hyde Park bungalow home. Along with the general excitement (terror) that comes with being a first-time homeowner, the couple were thrilled that their new house came with a detached garage. Dror, an executive producer at Camille Styles — she was Styles’ first hire eight years ago — immediately had visions of guesthouse splendor, despite the dilapidated state in which they found the 400-square-foot garage space. After a five-month renovation, led by dear friend and architect Scott Parks, Dror is happy to report

that the area is “now a fully functioning and very pretty guesthouse. It’s an uplifting space. Our first guests were my sister and nephews. The idea of a three and four-year-old boy with my freshly painted walls and floors didn’t stress me out at all.” We’re happy to report that the backhouse survived the rowdy visit. Along with a keen eye for everything having to do with design and style, Dror is known to be quite the cook, especially when it comes to making her Israeli family’s favorite dishes. We couldn’t help but ask the producer and stylist to share her favorite recipes with us, and while we were at it, we took a peek inside the breezy, personal and light-filled space.


Hummus is a staple in the Dror–Tarlo household.

“I’ve always loved to eat, so as soon as I found myself on my own after high school, without my mother there to prepare yummy meals for me, I took it into my own hands to cook up the things I was craving ... I typically prepare Friday night Shabbat dinner for the two of us, which tends to look a lot like what I’ve prepared today and is usually inspired by the Shabbat dinners I grew up with.”

“For me, no dish is complete without a generous sprinkling of finishing salt. For Eric, it’s hot sauce.” “Eric and I bought our house in February 2018, and at the time, the detached garage was in really bad shape. Years before, it had been converted into a recording studio by local singer-songwriter couple Bruce Robison and Kelly Willis. When we came upon it, it was in complete disrepair. The entire project took five months but it’s now a fully functioning guesthouse. I like to think it still maintains a bit of Bruce and Kelly’s musical magic!”

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

49


COMMUNITY PICK

r e w o l f i Caul h e l u o b Tab e

Gluten-Fre

INGREDIENTS

•1 head cauliflower or 1 bag frozen cauliflower rice •3 medium cucumbers, diced •2 celery stalks, diced •2 stalks green onion, sliced using both the white and green parts •1/2 cup dried cranberries •1/2 cup parsley, chopped •1/2 cup cilantro, chopped •4 tablespoons sliced almond

INSTRUCTIONS STEP ONE: If using fresh cauliflower:

Bring salted water to a boil, and boil cauliflower for exactly 2 minutes. Strain cauliflower until dry, then pulse in food processor until sized to a small grain of bulgar.

STEP TWO: If using cauliflower rice: Follow package instructions to prepare. This typically involves simply defrosting the cauliflower in a large nonstick pan until cooked through. STEP THREE: Combine all ingredients in a bowl except the sesame seeds. Toss to combine. STEP FOUR: Before serving, top with the juice of 1 freshly squeezed lemon, olive oil and salt and pepper to taste, then toss to coat evenly. Sprinkle with sesame seeds for a beautiful presentation.

Serves 4 to 6

50 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


“Both my parents are Israeli, and most of my family, including my sister, lives in Israel today. I’ve grown up eating Israeli food — which, like Israel’s population, is a fusion of foods from all around the Middle East, Africa and Europe — but only in recent years have I begun cooking the dishes my mother and grandmother make. I truly feel that it is the most delicious cuisine, and thanks to a few popular chefs, cookbooks and restaurants, the rest of America is catching onto the amazingness that is Israeli food as well.”

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

51


TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2019 —

PR E S E N T E D B Y S W B C MORT G AGE

Get a sneak peek inside the one-of-akind homes that will be on this year’s tour.

52 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


P H OTO G R A P H S BY K R I S T E N K I L PAT R I C K

Sarah Wittenbraker SARAH WITTENBRAKER DESIGN

If minimalism conveys simplicity, then interior designer Sarah Wittenbraker is a maximalist through and through. A mother of three, Wittenbraker is no stranger to happy chaos. In fact, she embraces it. Her goal when designing clients’ homes is to create authentic environments, so it’s no wonder the details of her own space came together organically. Wittenbraker introduced color into her 4,500-square-foot Tarrytown home slowly, starting with a vibrant floral couch that served as a necessary counterpoint to what, for months, was a black-and-white living room. Complementing the colorful sofa is a subdued painting by local artist Diana Greenberg. Wittenbraker later stumbled across a vintage sky-blue bench upholstered in velvet, blending not only patterns but textures. Incorporating big patterns into small spaces is

a trademark of Wittenbraker’s interiors. Inkyblack wallpaper with psychedelic and colorful mushrooms creates dramatic contrast in the bar nook. A tiny bug crawls along the leaves of the dining room’s growing-vine motif. In the entryway, Kelly Wearstler wallpaper mimics a pegboard with its black and white designs. Her affection for bold wallpaper invokes the nostalgia of your great-grandmother’s bathroom in an enviable, modern way. But the 1960s home, redone by Josh Cummins of BuildCo, was not curated by Wittenbraker alone; she collaborated closely with architect Elizabeth Baird. The cherry on the sundae? Wittenbraker's children, Lulu, Oscar and Beatrice, weighed in on their rooms, giving the colorful space extra character. –ABBY MOORE

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

53


P H OTO G R A P H BY E R I N H O L S O N B AC K

Chris McCray and Jantzen Matzdorff Abraham Kennedy crossed the Rio Grande at age 15 with a small pack and a big dream: to own a restaurant. He worked his way through the service industry, starting as a waiter and eventually opening the restaurant he once longed for. Kennedy’s bright pink South Austin restaurant, named El Gallo, became one of Austin’s most frequented Tex-Mex spots. After the success of his business, Kennedy built a villa in Heritage Oaks, not far from Riverside Drive, where his family, two maids and a

54 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

priest resided. To keep Kennedy’s spirit alive, new owner and real estate guru Jantzen Matzdorff partnered with interior design studio McCray & Co. to give the space new life, while preserving its unique history. Renamed “Casa Cartel,” the 6,000-square-foot villa – now Matzdorff’s personal residence and available for short-term rental – has become a vibrantly-hued retreat in the heart of the city. McCray and Matzdorff traveled to the interior of Mexico, where they sourced antiques and hand-

made items in keeping with the original space. In addition to McCray and Matzdorff the project team also included Brittany Wheeler and Positive Construction. Casa Cartel’s most notable feature is the living room’s striking 20-foot custom mural painted by Curiot Tlalpazotl. This painting, in addition to a central courtyard, intricate tile work, serape-upholstered cushioning and textured chandeliers make this a space that transports and inspires. - ABBY MOORE

PORTR AIT BY CL AIRE SCHAPER

MCCRAY AND CO.


Rebekah Gainsley and Laura Roberts RGAINSLEY INTERIOR DESIGN, LAURA ROBERTS DESIGN Laura Roberts’ lifelong design journey began with her childhood interest in sewing and weaving and continued through her studies at the Art Institute of Chicago. An interior designer since 2002, Roberts brought this education and experience to her collaboration with fellow designer Rebekah Gainsley on Gainsley’s own home. Gainsley, who shares the home with her two children, also brings a rich and varied background, in both social work and architecture, to her projects. The deceptively understated space features clean lines, an artful combination of richly saturated colors with paler hues and large windows that display Shoal Creek views. Gainsley’s well-curated art collection adds an unmistakable touch, and pieces from Black Sheep Unique, Scott + Cooner and her travels punctuate the redesigned interior. Roberts’ eye for texture pairs well with Gainsley’s meticulous vision, bringing the family space to life. There is a sophisticated use of color that is both monochromatic and lively. To a trained eye the materials are exact but to others it feels effortless and inviting. Sharper silhouettes— like the geometric side tables, coffee table and desk — work in tandem with earthy tones and playful lighting to strike a balanced chord that connects with the greenery outside. Roberts and Gainsley have created an urban oasis in the middle of a bustling city. - SARAH KITCHEL

P H OTO G R A P H S BY L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

55


P H OTO G R A P H S BY RYA N N F O R D

Killy Scheer

An English major turned interior designer, Killy Scheer’s design work has taken her across The United States and Texas. Taking “an intellectual, researched-based approach to design,” she founded Scheer & Co. in 2013 with the “belief that a home should feel elegant and familiar.” A part of 2015’s Tribeza Interiors Tour, where she collaborated with architect Chris Sanders of Sanders Architecture; this time around the two have once again partnered on a layered and artfilled space. Scheer has revamped the new family home he shares with his wife Hannah Temple and their two kids. The 1910 house on Hemphill Park features three bedrooms, three and a half baths and a detached garage apartment. Scheer, who describes the project as “a study in style mixing,” dived headfirst into the challenge, marrying Sanders and Temple’s clean and modern tastes to the existing architecture and history of the home. To strike the right balance, Scheer kept everything functional and durable but also employed stately finishes: metallic fixtures, vintage textiles and rich colors including orange, berry and peacock blue. Scheer’s favorite feature of the redesign? The powder room, adorned with paperback-book wallpaper and offset by a tangerine door, or “any room with wallpaper, really!” “What truly excites me about the house,” Scheer says, “are all the unexpected moments of whimsy and all the pieces that make it so unique to our clients.” - SARAH KITCHEL

56 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

I N T E R I O R S T Y L I N G B Y A DA M F O R T N E R

SCHEER & CO. INTERIOR DESIGN


P H OTO G R A P H S BY T W I S T TO U R S

Kristen Nix

KRISTEN NIX INTERIORS Houston native Kristen Nix earned a bachelor’s degree in Communications from the University of Texas at Austin before heading east for a taste of the Big Apple. In New York, Nix worked in the fashion department of Vogue. After returning to Texas, she became the art director for Neiman Marcus’ “The Book.” Her artistic endeavors led to an interest in interiors. Nix pursued further education at Houston Community College and gained experience under London-based designer Kelly Hoppen and decorator J. Randall Powers. Kristen Nix Interiors was built on the solid foun-

dation of schooling, fieldwork and mentorship. Nix’s own home — a 4,000-square-foot midcentury remodel on Balcones Drive — was overhauled thanks to CB Crafted Homes and Nix’s talent for creating serene and luxe spaces. Her designs utilize the natural light that streams in from the home’s vast windows. Sunshine gleaming on shiplap walls breathes life into the home and its abundance of houseplants. Along with breathability, balance is a primary focus in Nix’s designs, evident in the home’s living room. To make the monochromatic space ap-

pear multidimensional, Nix incorporates both modern and vintage pieces. Glass end tables and a chrome fireplace juxtapose antique pottery and classic board games. The amalgamation of eras results in a timeless design. Symmetry is accomplished through color as well. The otherwise neutral home shows its playful side in her children’s rooms, where splashes of red and blue distinguish the youthful spaces from the mature ones. A mother of three boys, Nix makes space for functionality without sacrificing sophistication. - ABBY MOORE tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

57


Maureen Stevens

MAUREEN STEVENS STYLING & DESIGN Cabinetry & Design, Stevens transformed the home for her clients, a fun and young couple with a clear vision, who recently moved from New York to Austin. Stevens’ aesthetic shines through in this project. “Part Parisian, a dash of Victorian and a pinch of midcentury modern” perfectly encapsulates the redesigned space: a bathroom with whimsical black-and-white wallpaper and the intricate silver feet of a claw-foot tub; mint green

kitchen cabinets with a handmade Moroccan tile backsplash; a clean, crisp breakfast nook surrounded by windows. “I love a room full of storytellers,” says Stevens, detailing her fascination with pieces and knickknacks that inspire and make a house a home. This project tells a story in and of itself, a unique and refreshing expression of the collision of beautiful, thoughtful details and charming taste. - SARAH KITCHEL

PORTR AIT BY ANDREW CHAN

Maureen Stevens’ passion for design goes back as long as she can remember. Her work has taken her from collaborating with friends to working with HGTV.com, Make It Over magazine and the Austin American-Statesman. Stevens describes her design style and philosophy as “well-edited and immensely functional,” and her project on Frazier Avenue is exactly that, with an added touch of Victorian modern. Working with Quick Residential Solutions and Kitch

P H OTO G R A P H BY L AU R E N LO G A N

58 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


P H OTO G R A P H S BY W Y N N M Y E R S

Kim West

WELL DRESSED SPACE Houston, Brooklyn and London were all home to designer Kim West before she moved to Austin. The unique markings of each city inspired her eclectic style and also her business. After returning to Texas, West found herself disappointed in the local selection of décor and design offerings and swiftly teamed with like-minded designers Callie Jenschke and Kristin Gish to found Supply Showroom. Their boutique showroom sources textiles, wallpaper, furniture and other design elements from around the world, supporting small vendors and bringing independent style to their clients. West’s own home, a 3,200-square-foot bungalow done in collaboration with Craig Hoverman of DIG:A Architecture & Design, is a testament to the designer’s love and mastery of color and pattern play. Bold motifs are blended fearlessly across wallpaper and upholstery, all working in concert to allow for a space that feels relaxed and fun. Despite her affinity for daring design, West knows when the eye needs a rest. Her pastel kitchen of sky-blue cabinets and glazed tile provides just that in a home whose design feels effortless. To retreat further into the property, West and her husband Dave, built a backhouse made of hemlock wood. The stained-black structure serves as both an office space and a guest home and happens to be stationed right beside the property’s pool, where the couple and their two children cool off for most of the year (it is Austin after all). West’s home is a reminder that despite her many moves, her roots are in Texas. - ABBY MOORE

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

59


P H OTO G R A P H BY PAU L B A R D AG J Y

Lisa Parker

A former ballerina with a 13-year Ballet Austin career under her belt, Lisa Parker turned her talents to interior design in 2006. Drawing on her training and experience with both classical and modern dance, Parker has built her second career on adeptly combining traditional design with modern styles to create elegant, sophisticated and fresh spaces. Working in collaboration with LaRue Architects, Reynolds Custom Homes and Land West

60 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

Parker was focused on creating a beautiful and functional home for her client’s, an active family of five. Furniture designed by Parker, and custom made by Flitch and Petrified Design, work alongside geometric light fixtures and a bold art collection to create a space that is organic, playful and elevated. The beautifully situated home, with sweeping downtown views, has a plethora of floor-to-ceiling windows, allowing for natural light to fill the

spacious first floor. Parker’s selection of bright white pieces further lighten the space, while plush fabrics like mohair and velvet in rich colors — think teal, magenta and midnight blue — provide balance. Throughout the home she describes, “using small spaces wrapped in fun wallpaper to create little jewel boxes.” Working alongside the home’s modern architecture Parker has managed to create a playful, chic space that feels livable and warm. - SARAH KITCHEL

P O R T R A I T B YC L A I R E S C H A P E R

LISA PARKER INTERIORS


TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2019 —

PR E S E N T E D B Y S W B C MORT GAGE

JANUARY 27, 2019

THE SIXTH ANNUAL TRIBEZA INTERIORS HOME TOUR

Come meet the interior designers who inspire us and see the stunning, colorful and unique spaces they have created.

TOUR SPONSORS

VISIT TRIBEZA.COM/INTERIORS-TOUR-2019/ FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION tribeza.com | JANUARY 2019 61


The Hills are Alive This Westlake home strikes a balance between Swiss minimalism and Texas traditionalism

By HANNAH J. PHILLIPS Photographs by CASEY DUNN

62 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


OPPOSITE: The distilled fireplace with soapstone inset hearth and plaster surround creates a minimal feel: no corbels, no mantel, no decorations.

N

estled in the Stratford Hills neighborhood above Redbud Trail, this beautiful home tells a story of connections and contrasts. Dark steel and handcrafted plasterwork balance natural elements like wide wood floors and gilded branches of the dining room’s Paul Ferrante light fixture. Connected in a seamless flow by exterior and interior glass details, each room creates a subtle interplay between light and dark, organic and industrial, minimal yet curated. First built in 1998 by Dalgleish Construction and updated in 2012 by Mark Ashby Design and Dallas-based architect Jessica Stewart Lendvay, the same powerhouse interiors team was tapped a few years later when the home was once again sold to its current owners.

The clients, a Texan and his Swiss-born wife, wanted to create a European midcentury modern look that wouldn’t seem out of place in Texas. Also from Switzerland, Ashby’s senior designer Michele Lorenz understood the sources of their inspiration and worked to incorporate that European sensibility without fighting the home’s natural Texas setting. “We always start with honoring the architecture,” says Christina Simon, who assisted Lorenz on the project and is now a senior designer at Ashby. “We don’t like to push a house; we want to maintain its personality while still incorporating the client’s vision.” Details like limestone in the dining room create a link to the Stratford Hills setting, while an overall effect of visual restraint allows the clients’ art collection and furniture to take center stage. The bleached European oak floors are one of the best examples of that interplay, adding a Scandinavian touch in width and color but with a Texan functionality. Custom-made and handbrushed, the 10-inch planks were specially engineered to expand and contract according to the often-temperamental Texas climate. The minimalist floors also allow the couple’s furniture to shine, showcasing pieces like the special Jens Jensen chairs in the lounge. Likewise, the clean white walls highlight the clients’ eclectic art collection of modern prints and traditional oil landscape paintings: The Ashby team worked with Dalgleish on the plasterwork above the fireplace and on the handrail of the stairs. The material alone stands as a work of art. “The decision to put more-classical pieces together with modern ones — especially in a space that’s already so restrained with white walls and tall ceilings — allows you to relax,” says Lorenz. “A lot of decorating is in the details that you don’t notice but you experience.”

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

63


The team added a glass breezeway, which highlights the property's stunning downtown views.

Clean white spaces work with the clients' art collection to create a curated look that feels effortless.

64 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

65


66 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


The Ashby team, led by Lorenz, incorporated organic lines to add movement and create balance. The Noguchi paper light fixture above the stairs brings in a tactile element. “The light that a paper fixture puts off is just so charmed,� Simon explains.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

67


68 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


Building on the past The home of a former trade union becomes The Carpenter Hotel

BY MARGARET WILLIAMS PHOTOGRAPHS BY JANA CANTUA

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

69


H

Have you been to the Carpenter yet? Approaching the new hotel, a low-slung unmistakably midcentury structure, it's easy to think it was always there, tucked off Lamar amongst the pecan trees, a friendly neighbor to Pecan Grove RV Park and Casa de Luz. The word "Hotel" is painted atop the double doors. So subtle you could even miss it. You keep going. To the left is the living room, or, in this case, the hotel lobby of your low-key dreams — distressed leather couches, coffee cup rings, a record player actually being used. To the right is what, at first glance, seems to be some sort of benevolent principal’s office, where instead of grumpy hall pass instructions from a Kleenex-wielding administrator you receive directions to the hotel’s eatery, Carpenters Hall, from an earnest and bespectacled millennial — this is, in fact, the check-in desk. By now you have the inclination that this gem of a spot may be Austin’s newest in a rash of hotel arrivals, but thoroughly charmed by the unfussy vintage-modern interiors, friendly staff and light-filled café, you forge ahead. Another set of double doors leads onto a shady courtyard anchored by undulating terra-cotta walls and the pool they surround. You look up and there she is — a five-story tower of guest rooms defined by an earthy and geometric steel façade. You’ve done it — you’ve managed to find the hotel within this hotel. Welcome to the Carpenter. Your new old favorite. I sat down with Jack Barron and Jen Turner, partners in both life and work, whose hospitality group, The Mighty Union, has projects in cities like Portland, Honolulu and San Antonio. Their latest is The Carpenter Hotel, Austin's newest spot for laying one's head, sipping coffee, playing records or gathering for a meal.

70 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

ABOVE: The hotel's living room-esque lobby. RIGHT: The soaring metal screen added to the building's facade was designed by LAND and crafted by Blue Genie. FAR RIGHT: Staff member Alison Harris pictured at check-in.


Built in 1948, the hotel's main building housed Carpenter Union Local 1266 until 2014. Employees have seen many members of the Carpenters Union come visit the new hotel.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

71


72 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


"

OPPOSITE: A scene from the hotel's courtyard pool and the entrance to Hot L Coffee, the Carpenter's on-site cafe. "As the new building came together [a 93-room tower built by DPR Construction], which is essentially very modern," explains Turner, "we wanted to do these Jeffersonian undulating walls. They became the jumping-off point for Pharis Design's landscape plan."

I like this idea of a narrative that flows throughout."

Margaret Williams: You just opened. How

have the first few weeks gone? Jack Barron: Great. Fun for us. We want everyone to have the opportunity to discover us on their own. MW: When did you first see this building? Jen Turner: About five years ago. JB: This project is distinctly Austin in so many ways. It’s right next to a park, it’s right near the lake, it’s filled with pecan trees, it’s indoor-outdoor. It’s also very simple and straightforward. With this project we’re preserving character, keeping green space, creating levels of density, but we’re doing it because that’s our business model, that’s our whole program. MW: Have you always worked with historic buildings? JT: Jack more so. I worked for an architecture firm [Tod Williams Billie Tsien] for 11-something years. We did all brand-new, from the ground up, so that’s kind of where, I think, our experience comes together. JB: What interests me and Jen and our group is trying to stay true to the life of a place and translating that into a public space. That’s really what the hotel and restaurants are an excuse for. Right now we are working on something in San Antonio. Five old buildings. Right on the

River Walk. Two courtyards, two restaurants, a bar, a department store, a record store. JT: It’s kind of like a mini-Pearl. It’s an architect’s dream, figuring out all that interstitial space. JB: And we also have a weird one in Honolulu. It’s 20 rooms on top of a Chinese restaurant. MW: How did that come about? What’s the progression from Portland [Barron is a former partner in the Ace Hotel Group and still owns the Ace Hotel Portland] to Austin to San Antonio to Honolulu? JT: We are partners with the real estate guys [John Davenport, TMU development partner], who we first met here in Austin on this project. Once we started working together, they were like, “Oh, so we can go out and get these funky things, and you guys will make something of that?” So now they’re really game. JB: So they sent us the oldest Chinese food restaurant in Chinatown, called Wo Fat. They sent me a picture. I didn’t even call anybody else. I didn’t talk to Jen, I didn’t talk to Donald [Kenney, a partner in the Mighty Union]. I wrote back to get that building now. Now we just have to figure out how to get to Hawaii from Texas, which is not easy. MW: You’re both from Texas, but Jack you spent so many years in Portland and Emily you were in

New York for close to 15 years. Did you always know you would make your way back? Or was it a surprise that you ended up in Austin? JT: It was a surprise, a surprise together. When we met, we both wanted a change. JB: It’s all one thing, us coming together and moving back to Texas. MW: Where did you both grow up? JT: I grew up outside of Houston essentially, in little towns that are now the suburbs of Houston. JB: I was born in Dallas, but my grandparents lived here in Austin, so we were always here. What’s funny is, even 10 years ago parts of South Austin felt like the end of the world. MW: When I was young, driving to Green Pastures [now Mattie’s] was an outing. JB: Right, like Broken Spoke was the country. MW: With so many hands on a project of this size, how do you wrangle the creative direction? What’s the balance between letting everyone do their thing but also making it feel cohesive? JT: It’s all coming from us. Jack and I and my sister, Emily, we do all the interiors. But it’s also lots of collaborating. Sometimes we’ll come up with the idea and sometimes we’ll react to one. MW: What’s the story with the banners, mural and other unique pieces throughout the hotel? JB: I like this idea of a narrative that flows

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

73


At the helm of Carpenter Hall (pictured left), the hotel's restaurant, are head chef Grae Nonas, Christina Skogly Knowlton and Andrew Knowlton. Turner's sister, Emily, one of the team's interior designers, found vintage bowling alley banquettes at Round Top Antiques Show. "We decided we would do those everywhere," Turner explains, "and had new ones made – everyone has a good seat."

throughout. We had done a mural in The Suttle Lodge [another Mighty Union property in Oregon] that was a visual map, so we gave Caleb [Everitt] and Ryan [Rhodes] from LAND the same sort of direction and they got it right away. JT: There was a banner here, left over from the union guys, from the turn of the century. It was beautiful. It had all that iconic masonic imagery — the fringe at the bottom — but it fell apart. We tried to take it out of the case — it was a horror movie. It just turned to dust. So when Ryan and Caleb gave us this banner design, it was a slam dunk. MW: Tell me about working with the architect, Scott Specht. JT: Scott made the whole space very elegant. It was great working with him, since we’re architects too. A lot of Scott’s work is stuff you

74 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

don’t even notice. Some of the best things he did aren't the first things you notice, but you experience. MW: How do you start? Do you start small and work out, or start big and work in? JT: I’m gonna say both. I like to go between both. So does Jack, actually. But Jack doesn’t get into particular detail until he’s ready to go there. JB: Most of the super-hardcore details in here Jen did, and she’s very detailed. I tend to work in much broader strokes, but I also tend to see things from the beginning. Everyone will wrestle with me, but we usually end up close to where I started off. MW: Do you start fresh with each project, or is it one long conversation? JB: We have a point of view, and that is brought to each project.

JT: We’re never going to hit you over your head with our work. We’re always subtle, and we riff on different places. For instance, even though there isn’t anything here that is explicitly Bauhaus, it’s in there. JB: This place is about light and trees, and that’s the first thing it’s about. It has to be. Again there’s a bunch of people involved. And you know you’re doing something right when the people that are attracted to come work for you are really great people. Right now we have the most amazing, wonderful people. JT: The all make it better and give it life. We want there to be layers of discovery. JB: Layers of discovery, quote that! I love that our biggest sign is a hundred feet back from the curb, behind a pecan tree. It’s awesome.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.


"When Jen and I came down here for the first time, basically what we told them [John Davenport and TMU Development] we would do is exactly what happened ... we talked terra-cotta buildings, we talked about a Quonset hut (pictured above), we talked about courtyards and preserving as many trees as possible," says Barron. tribeza.com | JANUARY 2019

75


HANNAH J. PHILLIPS

BY

PHOTOGR APHS BY

CASEY DUNN

Seeing

GREEN A Bouldin bungalow is transformed into a colorful oasis in the heart of South Congress

76 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


OPPOSITE: Interior designer Sara Oswalt used a textured toile wallpaper with unexpected urban scenes alongside Shou sugi ban shiplap in the clients conservatory. tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

77


The coffee table is one of a few '80s elements peppered throughout the house. OPPOSITE: Architecht Elizabeth Baird, interior designer Sara Oswalt and landscape architecht Shaney Clemmons.

78 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


T

he A-Team behind this refreshed and reimagined urban retreat includes architect Elizabeth Baird, interior designer Sara Oswalt of Purveyor Design and landscape artist Shaney Clemmons of Shademaker Studio. All sole practitioners and solo business owners, the three women were thrilled at the chance to collaborate with one another – and with a home-owner willing to take creative risks in his restored Eva Street cottage. “You don’t get many opportunities for feedback when you work alone,” says Baird, “so it was really great to act as sounding boards for things like the color of the stucco, the green trim on windows and cabinets. Sara really pushed me creatively — hopefully we all did — and Shaney’s work really brought it all together, since we have so many views to the backyard.” That connection to the outdoors was imperative to all three women, shining through in big and small details throughout the home. Tearing the house down to its studs allowed Baird the freedom to shift the traditional front windows to a placement that invites more natural light. In the bright green kitchen, window sliders lead to the lush backyard, while a new glass breezeway marked by geometric black and white flooring draws the eye toward the dining room extension. Here, picture windows frame Clemmons’ bamboo screen outside, while plants hang from steel shelves (Oswalt’s own design) to create a greenhouse effect. Another shared aim was to maintain a connection between the original house and its newer elements, flowing between the original footprint in the front to the more-modern addition in the back. The dark breezeway into the kitchen acts as a gateway between old and new, but you have to look closely to notice some of the subtle details that mark the transition. The shiplap is original to the home, but has been charred to charcoal black using a Japanese Shou sugi ban technique, which Oswalt had considered playing with in her own home. With a background in fashion and photo-shoot styling, Oswalt loved the client’s willingness to let the team experiment with details like the wood-charring

and a mix of colors like bright green, gray, red and orange throughout. “He was really open and trusting, and he didn’t want it to be just a normal house,” says Oswalt. “That made it an open canvas: We were always asking how it could look different.” The intentionally sarcastic wallpaper, used in what came to be known as the conservatory, incorporates the client's humor and style. The green toile design appears traditionally French at first glance — until you notice that the usually rustic pattern instead features city scenes like an old woman on a park bench and a guy getting mugged. “The client is really eclectic,” according to Oswalt, “so the take on the house was kind of humorous and not so serious — a wacky mix of stuff that all still flows. I always try to come up with five elements that will connect every room. With him, the elements were just more mixed. We were calling it Bavarian/Scandinavian/modern with a hint of ’80s.” Perhaps the best place to see that mix is in the dining room, as one looks forward to the front of the home. From that vantage point, the charred wood adds a Bavarian touch to the dark, Scandinavian-inspired fireplace, and you can see the progression of green from the front mint trim, to forest green toile, to the kitchen’s pop of primary. That final touch of bright green brings in the hint of ’80s, intensified by a built-in shelf to showcase the client’s vintage sunglass collection. Access from the living room to the upstairs master suite (made more open and luminous by Baird’s addition of two dormers) is via painted terra-cotta stairs, which also happen to reference the backyard’s crushed granite gravel path. Outside, a Hotel Saint Cecilia-inspired cement bench “acts as an anchor,” says Clemmons, “directing your focus to the house when sitting outside and looking back in.” The L-shaped bench brings that backyard connection full circle, mirroring the perpendicularity of the original house and its new extension. The opposed but open corners create an organic flow between the exterior and interior while simultaneously enclosing the entire plot as a private urban enclave just steps from South Congress.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

79


80 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


"The black-and-white tile in the breezeway to the dining room extension is a shout-out to the home’s original kitchen. The asymmetrical pattern “breaks up the wood when you stand in the living room of the old house looking all the way through the kitchen to the dining room,” Baird says, as does the decorative wood pattern in the dark shiplap breezeway."

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

81


Baird created a niche for the homeowners colorful sunglass collection.

82 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


Terra-cotta painted stairs lead to the master suite and provide an opportunity to highlight the homeowner's art collection, like this numbered and signed DalĂ­ print. tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

83


STYLE PROFILE

A Fine Line MIA CAR AMEROS’ ELEGANT AND PRECISE PAINTINGS ARE A DAILY INVITATION TO OBSERVE THE NATUR AL WORLD By Margaret Williams Photographs by Hannah Haston

84 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


Carameros pictured in front of, "Golden Skin, 2018."

M

IA C AR AMEROS HA S BEEN MAKING AND CREATING

most of her life. As a young child, the El Paso native would wake up as early as 4 a.m. “My mom just wasn’t having it,” explains the artist. “She cleaned out an empty closet; decked it out with scissors, markers, paintbrushes, paint; and told me to go to my little studio. Then she would come and get me when it was time to start the day. My mom really championed the creative part of me from a very young age.” These early nudges toward creativity came naturally in a family where art was always valued and easily incorporated into everyday life. Carameros recalls weekends marked by estate sales and antiques store outings and family trips that revolved around museum and gallery visits. In fact, on one such trip she remembers, “My parents bought my brother a painting that really spoke to him — he was 14. Now it hangs in his home. Pretty unusual.”

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

85


The artist next to, "Paris During Winter," as she manipulates a found branch on her studio wall.

‘‘

SC A N N ING PL A N TS , M A N IPU L AT ING T HEM , T U R N ING T HE T HR ESHOLD DOW N … T H AT SCR EEN-PR IN T ING CL A SS WA S T HE C ATA LYST TO W H AT I DO NOW.

Childhood daybreak crafting led to an adolescent interest in collecting and pressing plants, and by high school the textile design enthusiast was rearranging her school schedule so that she could audit an apparel design class at a local tech school. “As a high schooler, that was my dream for myself, as a fashion designer,” remembers Carameros. After four years of studying high school art (technically not allowed) and summers spent at Savannah College of Art and Design, the Coronado High grad left for art school in the San Francisco Bay Area, eventually transferring to St. Edward’s University as a visual studies major. This move proved to be a crucial one, as St. Ed’s is where Carameros met professor Hollis Hammonds, herself a multimedia installation artist, who

86 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

would became a pivotal instructor and mentor. Hammonds and Carameros would talk beauty, concept and philosophy for hours, and these exchanges encouraged the now oil painter to hone in on the yearlong project that would become her senior thesis: “Forty-five small paintings based on two friends’ experiences of suffering and dealing with major loss,” explains Carameros. In the midst of the painter’s senior thesis she happened to take printmaking and was asked to pick one subject matter to focus on. She chose plants. Despite a childhood love for f lora and fauna, she isn’t quite sure what precipitated the decision, but before long she was “scanning plants, manipulating them, turning the threshold down … that screen-printing class was the catalyst to what I do now.” After graduation, and without access to a printing press, the artist began painting her romantic and sparse imprints. An offhand “in process” photo sent to designer Hanna Seabrook (a fan of Carameros’ work) that was then shared on social media set the wheels in motion for larger career moves. Carameros explains, “It was 2013 and social media had just become a place to share work and gain a following.” By 2014 she had her first exhibition — a group show at Agave Print with photographer Kate LeSueur — and after 4 years of working full-time and painting in her spare time, Carameros decided in August 2017 to fully pursue her career as an artist. Now represented by gallerist Wally Workman, Carameros says she “wants to keep focusing and working on this until I’m 80. It’s really more of a practice now. I am always on the hunt. It’s a daily invitation to keep my eyes open. The plant has to speak to me. Sometimes I’ll pick something and it won’t come out at all. This process gives me a lot of room to fail gracefully. It’s just a plant. If it doesn’t work out, it’s OK.” By the looks of it, things are working out just fine.


MIA’S PROCESS •Picks a plant and presses it. The pressing can take anywhere from a week to a month depending on how much cellulose the plant has. •Scans the pressings. Mia has a digital archive of everything she has ever pressed. •Views the plant through a compositional lens — removing a leaf, for instance. •Projects the edited pressings, using a ’50s projector, onto paper. Mia says she “prefers paper to canvas. Something about it is precious.” •Draws and paints the projection. Mia explains that she goes into “surgery mode” when she starts painting. “I have to position my body a certain way,” she says. “I like that I have to be present and precise. The process requires a lot out of me and I enjoy that.”

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

87


STYLE PICK

The High Art of NOT FREAKING OUT ABOUT Interior Design An index card essay by Brittani Sonnenberg

88 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


" HOW WOU LD I FILL T HE ROOMS? W H AT K IN D OF F U R N IT U R E DO I E V EN LIK E? "

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

89


STYLE PICK

" I ' V E FOU N D T H AT I LOV E A RT DECO LOOK ING ST U FF, MID - CEN T U RY MODER N, NOT SO MUCH ."

90 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

91


T R AV E L P I C K

Santa Fe Y G R A NDMOTHER IS H ARD TO MISS. THOUG H SHE

sits below most lines of sight, in a crimson-red wheelchair, no less, she sports electric-pink lipstick without occasion. She’ll tug, often impatiently, on your sleeve with daintily weathered hands lit up by a bright manicure. The most arresting of attention is the jewelry she stacks like armor, absent of minimalist concern, her thin wrists cuffed with silver bracelets and her chest plated by beads and pendants. (“If you can’t see it from the road,” she’ll tell you, “then keep going.”) In the past 15 of her 87 years, she has amassed a museum-worthy collection of Native American jewelry and wares, collecting pieces on her annual visit to Santa Fe.

92 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y C L A I R E S C H A P E R A N D R O B E R T R E C K

M

By Hannah Morrow


La Fonda on the Plaza, then and now. LEFT: A scene from the Canyon Road arts district.

The weekend trip has become somewhat notorious in my family. My mom and aunt follow in tow with too much luggage and an appetite for Hatch chiles. My dad waits at home for some art that he will inevitably hate but stay mum about. My sister and I get a call between their first and second margarita to hear about where they went and what they found. This fall, as they planned their Southwestern pilgrimage, we asked to tag along. And so, in October, three generations of women set out to the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Santa Fe’s history is inimitable. The oldest capital city and the second-oldest city founded by European colonists in the United States, Santa Fe is more than 400 years old, but the land was occupied by indigenous peoples for centuries prior. By 1540, Spanish explorers claimed the land, with Franciscan missionaries joining them in the 17th century. Revolts by the Pueblo Indians of the region caused possession of the territory to change hands, and tumultuous periods came and went. When Mexico gained independence from New Spain in 1821, so with it went Santa Fe, until New Mexico was ceded to the United States in 1848. With a history so long, varied and often marked by conflict, the city of Santa Fe is now somewhat of a dream. Blue desert skies are punctured by the nearby mountains, which include the Santa Fe Ski Basin, only 16 miles from Santa Fe’s central plaza. Walking through town, you find yourself admiring those signature adobe pueblos, with their soft edges and sunbaked facades, which shelter artists, museums, shops and cafés. (The architectural style has remained consistent since 1957, when it was mandated in the name of preservation.) Originally a presidio, the Santa Fe Plaza is the heart of tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

93


ABOVE: A view from within Georgia O'Keeffe's Ghost Ranch, a short drive north of Santa Fe.

94 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

the city and is ringed by historical structures in the Pueblo, Spanish and Territorial styles. The Palace of the Governors, built around 1610, is the longest continuously occupied public building in the country and now acts as a museum. Under the palace’s shaded front porch, known as the portal, Native American artisans lay their handmade jewelry and more out daily for sale. In terms of opportunity, the portal is rare; buying jewelry directly from local artisans is an excellent way to support the art and historical significance of Native American pueblos, tribes and nations. For more-upmarket shopping, try nearby Malouf on the Plaza for apparel, art and Navajo rugs or Ortega’s on the Plaza for a wide selection of regional designer jewelry. On a weekend visit, it’s ideal to stay near the plaza, too. Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi is a luxurious boutique hotel, with well-appointed accommodations that blend modern and native influences. With 180 rooms, La Fonda on the Plaza’s present structure was built in 1922. Even if you don’t stay at the property, meander through the lobby to enjoy its rich legacy and a margarita at the rooftop bar, the Bell Tower, during warmer months. My family has made a habit of staying at the more intimate Inn of the Governors for its value and charm. Delicious daily breakfasts

P H OTO G R A P H S B Y H E S T E R A N D H A R DAWAY, V I E W LO O K I N G E A S T F R O M O ’ K E E F F E ’ S A B I Q U I U B E D R O O M , 2 01 0 . © G E O R G I A O ’ K E E F F E M U S E U M , CO U R T E S Y O F TO U R I S M S A N TA F E & S WA I A , C L A I R E S C H A P E R A N D PA R K E R H I G G I N S .

Meow Wolf is an immersive art experience that can be enjoyed by all ages.

T R AV E L P I C K


are included, as are tea and sherry served every afternoon, a pool and hot tub, and free parking. During colder months, rooms that feature kiva fireplaces are a worthwhile splurge. Santa Fe is a mecca for visual artists. The most famous and commonly associated with the region is painter Georgia O’Keeffe, who visited New Mexico for 20 years before moving permanently to Abiquiú, about 50 miles north of Santa Fe, in 1949. To celebrate and learn more about her legacy and life, visit the Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. The museum, the only in the world dedicated to a sole female artist from North America, boasts more than 3,000 works. For something a bit more eclectic, art collective Meow Wolf has produced a 20,000-square-foot installation named “House of Eternal Return.” The production, like a lot of contemporary art, is experiential and tricky to explain but well worth a couple hours of exploring. The Museum of International Folk Art is another fascinating experience. Unlike with Meow Wolf, this museum would be better explored with a guide, who can offer the context and significance of the museum’s many artifacts.   Whether or not you’re in the market for art, meander up Canyon Road, just a few blocks from the plaza. While professional artists had been visiting Santa Fe to study its scenic beauty and culturally rich history since the late 1800s, many have also made it a permanent home, leaving more-urban cities for New Mexico’s clean, dry air, thought to cure the rampant respiratory diseases of the time. With their health in order, artists built homes and studios throughout the neighborhood. Now, the lower half-mile of the road is an internationally recognized arts district, with more than 125 galleries, boutiques and restaurants in a short six-block span. Another noteworthy district is the Santa Fe

Railyard, which hosts a beautiful farmers market on Saturdays. In terms of cuisine, Tex-Mex fans will be delighted to try the twists that New Mexico brings to its somewhat similar plates. For atmosphere and location, The Shed is a go-to if you’re looking to try red-chile enchiladas or blue-corn specialties close to town. For lunch on the run or a breakfast-taco fix, El Chile Toreado is unbeatable. Cafe Pasqual’s is legendary, so be sure to make a reservation, or if you’re looking for something more off the beaten path, try local favorite Jambo Cafe for African homestyle fare. On the Saturday night of our visit, with my grandmother already tucked into bed, my mom, my aunt, my sister and I sat at the bar of El Farol on Canyon Road. We sipped wine and shared plates, switching to margaritas as a reggae band (God help us) began a set. My aunt and I rolled our eyes as my mom and sister — both the older sibling — rose to dance. I thought about my grandma. How she had created this. About what it must feel like to spend time with your daughters and your daughters’ daughters. What it’s like to leave an electric-pink kiss on the high cheekbones that you’ve passed down. To accessorize with reckless abandon. What it must be like to be nine decades into a life and enjoy a city that has lived so long and so well, too. It must be wonderful.

An interior shot of La Fonda on the Plaza.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

95


KAREN'S PICK

Joann’s Fine Foods WELCOME TO THE DINER OF YOUR DRE AMS By Karen Spezia Photographs by Holly Cowart

96 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


I

T’S A MARRIAGE MADE IN FOODIE HEAVEN:

Two of Austin’s finest hospitality groups have coupled up to create an adorable offspring named Joann’s Fine Foods. This new all-day diner is the love child of McGuire Moorman Hospitality (MMH) and the Bunkhouse Group. If MMH’s Larry McGuire and Tom Moorman aren’t familiar, their restaurants — Jeffrey’s, Clark’s, Perla’s, Lamberts, Pool Burger, Elizabeth Street Café, Josephine House and June’s All Day — certainly are. And Liz Lambert’s Bunkhouse Group boasts beloved Austin coffee shop Jo’s, plus stylish local lodging like Hotel San José, Hotel Saint Cecilia and, most recently, the Austin Motel, in which Joann’s is located. The 1930s motor lodge, known for its iconically phallic neon sign and hippie slogan “So Close Yet So Far Out," was recently given a thoughtful (and much needed) refresh by Lambert and her team. Enter MMH, which stepped in to help update the existing eatery, and this past Septem-

ber, Joann’s Fine Foods was born. This nostalgic South Congress joint manages to elevate the diner concept, while still keeping it weird. Joann’s is a tribute to classic diner culture but also to Lambert’s mom, an elegant West Texan whose signature red-lipstick smooch is its featured logo. Although it’s a diner, don’t come looking for some greasy spoon. As with all MMH and Bunkhouse properties, everything is just so, from the custom china to the monogrammed napkins. This is a diner with panache. Supple teal leather covers the booths and bar stools that surround the crimson counters and open kitchen; textured stainless steel and glistening multicolored subway tiles line the kitchen walls and backsplash; there’s overhead pendent lighting, decorative stained glass and groovy ’70s-era beaded curtains. It feels authentically vintage even though it’s completely new, save for the original terrazzo floor.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

97


A tribute to classic diner culture, Joann's serves breakfast, lunch and dinner in a colorful, 70s-inspired atmosphere where large picture windows preview the action on South Congress.

JOANN’S FINE FOODS AUSTIN MOTEL 1224 S. CONGRESS AVE. JOANNSAUSTIN.COM

98 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com

(512) 358-6054


Located along bustling South Congress Avenue, Joann’s is perfectly positioned for absorbing the local vibe through its picture windows, which capture the steady stream of pedestrians, scooters and cars that f loat by. There’s also an outdoor dining patio, lounge area and palapa-style thatched-roof bar, which overlooks the iconic “I Love You So Much” graffiti mural scrawled on the wall of adjacent Jo’s Coffee. The mood of the diner evolves throughout the day: Weekday mornings are mellow, weekend brunches attract a lively mix of locals and tourists, and evenings turn cozy as the lighting dims and twinkling votives illuminate the tables and countertops. The menu features classic American diner fare, with influences from south of the border to California. Breakfast features morning standards like French toast soaked in vanilla bean and topped with fresh-diced mango and berries. There’s also the popular Motel Platter, a have-it-

your-way feast of pancakes, eggs, hash browns and bacon or sausage. Tex-Mex favorites include huevos rancheros, pozole and, of course, breakfast tacos. For lunch or dinner, there’s the requisite patty melt and a killer turkey club sandwich, plus beef fajitas, fish tacos and chicken tinga chalupas. Be sure to start with the signature hash brown nachos, an indulgent platter of crispy griddled hash browns covered in queso, black beans, sour cream and salsa. For drinks, there’s a rotating selection of fresh-squeezed juices (with optional boozy add-ins) and a full bar, including an impressive collection of mezcals and tequilas. In true fashion, Joann’s riff on a classic diner is familiar yet uniquely Austin, thanks to the creative partnership of McGuire Moorman and Bunkhouse. Although individually outstanding, these two groups may be even better together. Cheers to a long and happy marriage!

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

99


24 DINER

THE BREWER’S TABLE

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

4715 E. 5 St. | (512) 520 8199

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates

With an emphasis on quality and community, this East

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order

Austin restaurant leaves a seat for everyone at the brewer’s

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the

up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day

table. Local ranchers and farmers source the ingredients,

f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy

breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

which are utilized in both the kitchen and the brewery to

empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

eliminate food waste. The seasonally changing menu is

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert,

unique but provides options for even the pickiest of eaters

alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche

(ask for the kid’s menu).

and rolled in coconut f lakes.

34TH STREET CAFE 1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400 This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the

BUFALINA & BUFALINA DUE

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

1519 E. Cesar Chavez St., 6555 Burnet Rd. | (512) 215 8662

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

These intimate restaurants serve up mouthwatering pizzas, consistently baked with crispy edges and soft

ASTI TRATTORIA

centers. The famous Neapolitan technique is executed

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

by the Stefano Ferrara wood-burning ovens, which runs

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

at more than 900 degrees. Lactose-intolerants beware,

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

there is no shortage of cheese on this menu!

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

CAFÉ JOSIE

BAR CHI SUSHI

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience”

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a

sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the week-

prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

ends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Rd., Ste. 400 | (512) 394 8150

CICLO

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

98 San Jacinto Blvd. | (512) 685 8300 cicloatx.com

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic

es sharing with small plates made from locally sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants

Ciclo is a modern Texas kitchen featuring locally in-

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

spired flavors and ingredients with a Latin influence,

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

James Beard Award–nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourag-

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO 1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542 3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

all brought to life through a unique collaboration between Chef de Cuisine James Flowers and world-renowned restaurateur, Richard Sandoval. Ciclo’s name reflects its focus on menu offerings that change sea-

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and dinner

sonally, from ceviches, crudos and grilled and smoked

in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share a bottle

meats to inventive cocktails.

of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

100 JANUARY 2019 |

décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

EASY TIGER 709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972 Easy Tiger lures in both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer, cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

tribeza.com


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

THE FAREGROUND

HANK’S

111 Congress Ave.

5811 Berkman Dr. | (512) 609 8077

The Fareground has a little something for everyone — with

Delicious food and drinks, an easygoing waitstaff and a kid-friendly patio all work together to make Hank’s our

six Austin food vendors and a central bar in this unique

new favorite neighborhood joint. With happy hour ev-

downtown food hall. You can enjoy meals ranging from

ery day from 3-6:30, the hardest task will be choosing

wild boar tacos at Dai Due Taqueria to made-to-order

between their frosé and frozen paloma. Drinks aside,

ramen at Ni-Komé. Remember to grab a monster cookie

the braised meatballs, chopped black kale salad (add

from Henbit on your way out to cap off your culinary

falafel!) and spicy fried chicken are a few standouts

experience!

from the craveable menu.

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

HOPFIELDS

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beau-

unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

GERALDINE’S 605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755 Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com When it’s cold outside, warm up your tastebuds with this delicious traditional corn soup. Come in for a bowl before dinner, and then make it at home with the Fonda San Miguel Cookbook, available in the restaurant or online at Amazon.com.

the week as you enjoy executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes

HILLSIDE FARMACY

and cocktails from bar manager Caitlyn Jackson.

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168 Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 501 E. 53rd St. | (512) 707 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post-bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

tiful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine and cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites.

ITALIC 123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390 Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Irene’s presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary Catherine Curren.

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE 3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808 Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience, Jacoby’s Restaurant & Mercantile transports you from East Austin to a rustic Southern home nestled in the countryside. The menu features the best dishes Southern cooking has to offer, including beef from Adam Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

101


JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

LICHA’S CANTINA 1306 E. 6th St. | (512) 480 5960 Located in the heart of East 6th, Licha’s is a quick trip to the interior of Mexico. With masa made fresh in house and a large range of tequilas and mezcal, Licha’s Cantina is a celebration of authentic Mexican cuisine. The music, food and ambiance will get you ready for a night out on the town.

JUNE’S ALL DAY 1722 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 416 1722 This wine-focused restaurant is complemented by serious cocktails and a menu of approachable bistro favorites. Inspired by Paris cafes, Spanish tapas bodegas and urban wine bars, June’s encourages sipping, noshing and lingering. The

PICNIK 4801 Burnet Rd. | (737) 226 0644 A perfect place to find wholesome food for any type of dietary restriction in a bright and airy setting. This place truly lives out the “good and good for you” concept with paleo-friendly options and thoughtfully sourced ingredients. RAMEN TATSU-YA

restaurant’s namesake, June Rodil, is a master sommelier—

8557 Research Blvd. #126

one of less than 10 in Texas—who also serves as the beverage

1234 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 893 5561

director for McGuire Moorman Hospitality.

Executive chefs and co-owners Tatsu Aikawa and Takuya “Tako” Matsumoto have perfected the art of ramen, what they

LA BARBECUE

call “the soul food of Japan.” The restaurant serves savory

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

JULIET ITALIAN KITCHEN 1500 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 479 1800 juliet-austin.com

The greatest stories are told with family and friends

LENOIR

over food and wine. Juliet Italian Kitchen embodies

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

just that, bringing nostalgic and classic Italian-

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired

American cuisine to the heart of Austin. From

prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir

family-style dinners, to weekend brunch al fresco, to

comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique,

neighborhood happy hours, Juliet Italian Kitchen is

seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine

yours to call home.

garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-

LORO

LE POLITIQUE 110 San Antonio St. | (512) 580-7651 This stylish downtown restaurant is a deliciously accurate ref lection of today’s Paris: a charming marriage of brasserie classics updated with modern f lavors. Stop by the adjoining coffee shop and patisserie in the mornings for delightful baked goods that rival the French capital itself.

2115 S. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 916 4858 Created by James Beard Award winners Tyson Cole and Aaron Franklin, this Asian smokehouse is a welcome addition to South Lamar. The expansive indoor-outdoor space, designed by Michael Hsu Office of Architecture, is welcoming and open, and unsurprisingly the food does not disappoint. Don’t miss out on the sweet corn fritters, smoked beef brisket, thai green curry or those potent boozy slushies.

tribeza.com

broths with a variety of toppings and your choice of flavor, ranging from buttery to spicy. The authentic dish is vastly different from your college ramen.

RED ASH ITALIA 303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

ROSEWOOD 1209 Rosewood Ave. | (512) 838 6205

producing regions in the world.

102 JANUARY 2019 |

THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

Housed in a historic East Side cottage, chef Jesse DeLeon pays outstanding homage to his South Texas roots with seasonal offerings from Gulf Coast fishermen and Hill Country farmers and ranchers. This new spot is sure to quickly become a staple.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

TINY BOXWOOD’S

UCHIKO

WALTON’S FANCY AND STAPLE

1503 W 35 St. (512) 220 0698

4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

609 W. 6 St. (512) 542 3380

This Houston-based brand now serves its simple and delicious

The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of

Owned by actress and Austin resident Sandra Bullock, Wal-

food in Austin’s Bryker Woods neighborhood. Favorites in-

Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and

ton’s is a dreamy brick-walled bakery, deli and floral shop. Take

clude house-ground burgers and salmon Provencal salad. Stop

Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

some pastries home after indulging in gourmet sandwiches

by for breakfast, lunch or dinner, but don’t leave without one of

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

and fresh salads for lunch, or stay for the rotating dinner menu.

the signature chocolate chip cookies!

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free options.

VINAIGRETTE

Most importantly, make it before 2 p.m. to order the legendary biscuit sandwich served only during breakfast!

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the

WINEBELLY

prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambiance, the

519 W. Oltorf S. | (512) 487 1569

salads are fresh, creative, bold and most importantly delicious,

Named one of the top-20 wine bars in America by Wine

with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates.The bistro maintains a local feel with its comfortable, laid-back interiors.

tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2019

103


A LOOK BEHIND

Meet Leah Ashley Photograph by Harper Smith

I

n keeping with all things January, this month’s Look Behind finds us looking forward with anticipation of good things to come! At the top of the list is our newest regular contributor, interior stylist and vintage enthusiast Leah Ashley. With a talent for combining vintage décor and modern life, Leah's aesthetic is beautiful but approachable, and in touch with the way busy families live and entertain today. After a stint in Los Angeles, this native Austinite, who’s been featured on ABC, CNN, the Style Chanel and HGTV, is happy to be back home, and Tribeza is thrilled to host her. Beginning this month, you’ll find Leah online at tribeza.com/living-with-leah, where she’ll be sharing her favorite tips, tricks and DIYs for creating a stylish, livable and vintage influenced home. She’ll also be popping up in our pages from time to time as we continue our quest to bring you the best this vibrant city has to offer.

5 THINGS LE AH 'S LOVING

2 3

1

4

5 5 THINGS LEAH'S LOVING Clockwise from left: Wranglers from Feathers Boutique Vintage, feathersboutiquevontage.com. Retablo Apothecary Ceramic Candle, retabloapothecary.com. Southern Loom Vintage Rug, thesouthernloom.com. Heritage Boot Co. Good Luck PeeWee Boots, heritageboot.com. Vintage Majolica Cabbage Plates, worthpoint.com.

104 JANUARY 2019 |

tribeza.com


TRIBEZA January 2019  

The Interiors Issue No. 209

TRIBEZA January 2019  

The Interiors Issue No. 209