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CAMILLE STYLES OFFICE TOUR

The Remaking of Four Swoon-Worthy Kitchens

TH E T R I B E Z A INT E R I OR S TOU R

10 Fresh and Fabulous Houses

N O. 197 | I N T E R I O R S

Inside the Lifestyle Guru’s Stunning New Bungalow

KITCHEN CONFIDENTIAL

17

YEARS


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CONTENTS

JANUARY 82

One of the many “Hill Country-inspired” dishes at the delightful East Austin eatery Pitchfork Pretty The view to the kitchen in Camille Styles’ new office bungalow

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FEATURES

Social Hour p. 16

Tribeza Interiors Tour 2018

Kristin’s Column p. 27 Community Profile p. 30 Tribeza Talk p. 34 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 36 Artist Spotlight p. 38

p. 42

Dream Kitchens p. 62

Camille Styles’ New Digs p. 70

Event Pick p. 40 Style Profile p. 78 Karen’s Pick p. 82 Dining Guide p. 84 A Look Behind p. 88

ON THE COVER Austin-based lifestyle expert, Camille Styles; Photography by Molly Winters


SARA SCAGLIONE | DESIGNER 1126 1/2 W 6TH STREET | 512.478.5666 SHA B B YSL I P S AU ST I N . C OM


PUBLISHER'S LETTER

Happy New Year, Tribeza Readers! Of course I love all of our Tribeza issues, but January is always a special one, because I enjoy seeing how people are furnishing their homes and living life in Austin. And with that in mind, I am excited to share that Tribeza will be holding our annual Tribeza Interiors Tour on Sunday, January 21. I hope you will join us for the day, which will finish with a fun wrap party at the Four Hands showroom immediately following the tour. This year’s tour features 10 beautifully decorated homes by some of Austin’s über-talented interior designers. The design community is thriving in our city, and this tour is the perfect way to celebrate it. For the first time ever, longtime friend of the magazine and lifestyle guru Camille Styles graces our cover. She shared a look inside the 100-year-old Central Austin bungalow that she meticulously renovated in 2017; the result is stunning and full of design inspiration. Get the complete tour on page 70. No matter the home, kitchens always seem to be the most popular gathering place in the house. In “Dream Kitchens” (page 62), some of our most beloved architects and designers share their favorite kitchen projects of the past year. Thanks to Matt Garcia, Kevin Alter, Shannon Eddings, and Element 5 Architecture for giving us a peek inside such swoon-worthy spaces. This March, Tribeza will celebrate 17 years in business, and we thank you for reading and for all your support over the years. Happy 2018 to you and yours!

Sincerely,

George T. Elliman

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ASHLEY AUSTIN H O M E S

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TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

An Austin, TX based luxury hardware and plumbing company. Owned by the Rygs, a husband and wife design team. J&L combines the expertise of their many years in the LA, CA ultra high-end building industry. Combined with their love to work hand and hand with their clients, J&L desires to provide the ultimate experience of incredible customer service, innovation and highend design. They represent renowned global hardware and plumbing lines, made by some of the most gifted artisans around the world.

17

YEARS

JA N UA R Y 2 017

N O. 1 9 7

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Staley Moore

www.jlhardwareatx.com | 512.535.5454 | info@ jlhardwareatx.com | @jl_hardware_atx

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Errica Williams INTERN

Annie Doyle PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

WRITERS

Emma Banks Nicole Beckley Staley Moore PHOTOGR APHERS

Miguel Angel Warren Chang Holly Coward Casey Dunn Leonid Furmansky Jonathan Garza Kristen Kilpatrick Leah Muse Courtney Pierce Ben Porter Taylor Prinsen Molly Winters ILLUSTR ATOR

@mollytaylorphotography

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


LOEWY LAW FIRM


SOCIAL HOUR

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POP AUSTIN VIP OPENING PARTY On November 9, art lovers gathered at Fair Market to kick off the fourth annual POP Austin International Art Show with an opening party for VIPs. Guests got an exclusive look at incredible artwork from 43 talented multimedia artists, including many local Austin favorites. The four-day event saw record-breaking attendance and art sales.

FIRST LIGHT: CREEK SHOW PRIVATE PREVIEW PARTY

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Waller Creek Conservancy held an inaugural preview party for Creek Show 2017 on November 9. Guests were the first to experience six stunning light installations along Waller Creek while enjoying music, food, and entertainment inspired by the featured artwork. All proceeds went toward the organization’s mission to provide free programming for the Austin community.

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I G U E L A N G E L & CO U R T N E Y P I E R C E

POP AUSTIN VIP OPENING PARTY: 1. Chris Johnson & Laura Villagran Johnson 2. Jeffrey & Lauren Springer 3. Noel Bridges, Lisa Fletcher & Will Bridges 4. Jennifer & Ben Beasley 5. Nidia Otero & Ugo Nonis FIRST LIGHT: CREEK SHOW PRIVATE PREVIEW PARTY: 6. Robert & Carrie Hicks 7. Janet & Wilson Allen, Peter Mullen, Melanie Barnes 8. Margaret & Ryan Lang 9. Cori Modisett & Lisl Stanton

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Come Visit Us. Shop our showroom tucked away just one mile east of South Congress at 2090 Woodward Street. Or visit us online to see what’s new, find inspiration and browse our digital catalog. Exclusively in Austin. FOURHANDSHOME.COM


SOCIAL HOUR

CAMP CONTEMPORARY On November 11 and 12, Laguna Gloria became the campground for The Contemporary Austin’s second annual fundraiser, Camp Contemporary. The elevated camping experience treated hundreds of campers to food, cocktails, live music, nostalgic outdoor activities, and hands-on workshops. All proceeds went to The Contemporary Austin’s art education programs, which serve more than 30,000 individuals each year.

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CAMP CONTEMPORARY: 1. Stephanie Strain & Margaret Rigby 2. Clayton Aynesworth & Deborah Green 3. Christie Zangrilli & Julia Zangrilli 4. Max Williamson & Chloe Ayres 5. Larry McGuire BOOK SIGNING WITH MARK D. SIKES: 6. Meredith Ellis & Mark D. Sikes 7. Gay Clifton, Claudia Burnett & Frances Thompson 8. Lisa & Jesse Womack 9. Hunter Ellis & Sarah Wittenbraker

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y WA R R E N C H A N G & TAY LO R P R I N S E N

On November 15, the JAMES showroom welcomed esteemed interior designer and author Mark D. Sikes. Hosted by local interior designer Meredith Ellis, Sikes signed copies of his New York Times best-selling book, “Beautiful: All-American Decorating and Timeless Style,” with all proceeds donated to Hurricane Harvey relief.


SOCIAL HOUR

JUNIOR LEAGUE OF AUSTIN’S A CHRISTMAS AFFAIR The Junior League of Austin launched its yearly holiday market, A Christmas Affair, at the Palmer Events Center on November 15. Guests were treated to drink and food stations from Dagar’s Catering, music from DJ2DQ, and a silent auction. Across the four-day event, visitors shopped an assortment of goods from more than 200 vendors from across the country.

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BEAUTIFY BASH Keep Austin Beautiful hosted its Beautify Bash fundraiser on November 16 at the UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum. The event featured live music from Akina Adderley, a wine pull, a raffle, a mission walk, and a silent auction, all benefitting the nonprofit’s annual programming. The event also honored Keep Austin Beautiful’s annual award recipients, recognizing the individuals, groups, and businesses that champion environmental stewardship in the Austin community.

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AUSTIN OPERA’S “CARMEN”

JUNIOR LEAGUE OF AUSTIN’S A CHRISTMAS AFFAIR: 1. Sheridan Butler & Tyler Binford 2. Mimi Braun & Scott Menden 3. Rebecca & Nicco Azari 4. Jen Galbraith & Julie Hall 5. Tom Sellers, Araminta Sellers, Pasha Moore & Wroe Jackson BEAUTIFY BASH : 6. Christie Barany & Brooke Dahlbert 7. Amy Reinarz & Tiffany McMillian 8. Carson & Rosalyn Barnett AUSTIN OPERA’S “CARMEN”: 9. AJ Meditz & Marissa Rosas 10. Lillyan & Trey Duck 11. Matthew Wagner & Lauren Winship

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A , CO U R T N E Y P I E R C E & WA R R E N C H A N G

On November 16, Austin Opera held UrbanNites at the Opera, a cocktail party for the showing of its latest production, “Carmen.” Visitors donned dashing opera attire while delighting in hors d’oeuvres and signature ROXOR Artisan Gin cocktails before the start of the show.


Shown: The nap-worthy, cloud-like Pack sofa.

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SOCIAL HOUR

KEY TO THE CURE More than 500 partygoers attended Key to the Cure on November 17, benefitting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation of Central Texas. Key to the Cure featured food by celebrity chef Tim Love, live entertainment by the Brass-A-Holics, and a rooftop after-party sponsored by Tito’s Vodka. Vista Equity Partners was the presenting sponsor of the event, which raised more than $350,000 for cystic fibrosis research and care.

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THE KINDNESS CAMPAIGN’S TASTE OF KINDNESS Guests came together on November 30 for The Kindness Campaign’s Taste of Kindness, hosted by Andra Liemandt, Erin Driscoll, and more. It was a night of light bites, live music, and most important, kindness. Every dollar raised went toward providing lifesaving curriculum to schools across Austin.

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CAMILLE STYLES + TARGET HOLIDAY BRUNCH

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10 KEY TO THE CURE: 1. Jacob Kirkpatrick, Callie Kirkpatrick, Paige Montgomery & Ryan Montgomery 2. Lindsay Dillard & Kathleen Seiders THE KINDNESS CAMPAIGN’S TASTE OF KINDNESS: 3. Erin Driscoll, Jenny Mason, Andra Liemandt & Donna Tryba 4. Ned Snyder & Justin Bayne 5. Al Koehler & John Thornton 6. Larissa Ness, Mandy Prater, Andra Liemandt & Jenny Mason of The Mrs. 7. Todd & Stephanie O’Neill CAMILLE STYLES + TARGET HOLIDAY BRUNCH: 8. Kate Turpin & Carmen Collins 9. McKenzie Smith & Kristen Mezzenga 10. Jennifer Rose Smith, Camille Styles & Jordan Fronk 11. Caroline Pinkston & Lauren Petrowski

22 JANUARY 2018 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y B E N P O R T E R , J O N AT H A N G A R Z A & H O L LY CO WA R T

On December 8, local lifestyle guru Camille Styles and Target held a holiday brunch celebrating her latest position as the retail giant’s official entertaining expert. Guests got a look at her brand new studio while enjoying a delicious meal created by June’s, a festive hot cocoa bar, and fun swag bags from Target’s Holiday Collection.


SOCIAL HOUR

TRAIL OF LIGHTS NIGHT LIGHTS PREVIEW PARTY The Night Lights Preview Party for the Austin Trail of Lights at Zilker Park took place on December 8, with proceeds going toward the Trail of Lights Foundation and STARS at the Trail. The party offered guests delectable bites from local restaurants, chic drinks, special holiday entertainment, live music from Whiskey Shivers and more, a classic-car show, a Maker’s Market curated by Edible Austin, and an opportunity to experience the Trail of Lights like never before.

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BLACK FRET BALL

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TRAIL OF LIGHTS NIGHT LIGHTS PREVIEW PARTY: 1. Dominique Pitts & Preston McAdams 2. Tania Ortega & Gerzain Peralta Herdia 3. Gabriela & Eric Clift BLACK FRET BALL: 4. A. Whitney Brown & Kevin Lance 5. Stacey Berlow & Jeffrey Fry 6. Matt Ott & Jackie Venson 7. Weston McGowen, Mason Bushard & Michael Hernandez 8. Matthew Leslie, Sarah Macklin, Ian Cochran, Gillian Dirscoll 9. Cole Jones, Patricia Newlin & Justin Newlin

24 JANUARY 2018 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y CO U R T N E Y P I E R C E & J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

On December 9, Black Fret donated more than $200,000 in grants to 20 extraordinary Austin bands at the annual Black Fret Ball. This year’s event was presented by Dell and held at the Paramount Theatre, where guests enjoyed performances by many of the 2017 Black Fret nominees. To date, Black Fret has given $500,000 in grants to local Austin artists.


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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Radically Transformed

By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

LOVE A BRAND-NEW YEAR.

I love clean slates, fresh starts, new calendars, new journals, and starting over. I love the process of making resolutions and setting goals and reflecting back over the previous year. One of the best gifts I ever got for Christmas was something called the Mastermind Journal. A good friend gave me one two years ago, and I was hooked before mid-January. It begins with an interior inventory, where you chronicle the successes from the prior year. I like to include the setbacks and detours too; it keeps it real. Then you create a list of goals for the new year, tribeza.com

| JANUARY 2018

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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

with steps and plans for each one. Then you get a chance to get crafty, which usually makes me roll my eyes, but I sucked it up and followed instructions. I spend a cold early January afternoon at the coffee table by the fireplace, cutting up magazines and gluing them onto a dream collage. A dream collage is time-consuming but so worth it. It feels different from a list of resolutions or goals because it’s visual and emotional, so your right brain gets invited into the planning process, not simply the boring, bossy left. My images aren’t just about things I want per se, but more the way I hope to feel as I cultivate my dreams. They say that if you write a dream or goal down, the odds of it coming true increase. If you combine the words with pictures, merging intention with desire, I believe the likelihood of manifestation must be even higher. Just last January I cut out several images of mountain trails and vistas, tapping into my longing for more adventure. Six months later, I ran 107 miles around the Alps in France, Italy, and Switzerland. I cut out an image of a fire in the fireplace and waves hitting the sand. All year long I made time to rest and look at things that made me feel content and peaceful. I also took my kids on a trip to the beach. I cut out an image of a couple’s hands entwined, and I became more grateful for the kind and beautiful man in my life. I cut out a silhouetted image of a woman doing yoga in Warrior Two pose, and I practiced so much yoga that I found the warrior place in me where peace and ferocity meet and stand strong. I cut out an image of a stack of books, and

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M Y Y E A R WA S DR A M AT IC A LLY DIFFER EN T BEC AUSE I CL A R IFIED W H AT I WA N T ED IN M Y LIFE (A N D W H AT I DIDN ’ T) A N D COM MIT T ED TO MOV ING IN T H AT DIR ECT ION.

between grad school texts and the reading pile next to my bed, I fed my brain with mind-opening food. I cut out a photo of a woman laughing with her children, and over time I aligned my parenting to reflect my value of connection and communication rather than my fear-based, copout desire to control. The relationships I have with my kids and the atmosphere in my home have radically transformed. None of these things happened immediately, and there were plenty of face-plants and eff-ups along the way, but these things evolved. My year was dramatically different because I clarified what I wanted in my life (and what I didn’t) and committed to moving in that direction. The visual, visceral reminder of how I wanted to feel served as an ongoing reminder of why this mattered to me in the first place, and it helped me

stay on track. More than a list of tasks, it resembled a manifesto. More than to-dos, it ventured deeper, into to-bes. After the dream collage, the year breaks down into monthly goals, weekly goals, and daily intentions. I write down eight intentions every single morning. And maybe best of all — each month has a full-page gratitude list — I love looking back over the year and seeing the accumulated awareness of blessings. There may be no greater progress than the ability to see and be thankful for what you already have, who you already are. Gratitude is more than a baseline; it’s a springboard. 2018 is here, opening and unfolding right now. We can choose how we want to meet it. What we do in the interior workshop becomes who and what is expressed on the outside.


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Image: La Montaña rus de D.C. Duncan (detail), oil on canvas, 77 x 77 inches


COMMUNITY PROFILE

Celebrated tile designer Erin Adams recently started her own line of beautiful tiles (pictured right).

Erin Adams, Tile Designer

CUSTOM MADE WITH LOVE FROM AROUND THE WORLD By Anne Bruno Photographs by Kristen Kilpatrick

I

N THE ART AND BUSINESS OF DESIGN, THOSE WHO PUSH BOUNDARIES

the furthest rarely find that a straight line leads to the most interesting places. Instead, it’s the unexpected discoveries made on life’s side trips that provide fuel to move the creative journey forward. “Growing up surrounded by art, it’s the last thing I wanted anything to do with,” says celebrated tile designer Erin Adams with an ironic smile. “But once I figured out how to make my own kind of art — not something precious but something to live with — it felt right.” A design professional for more than 30 years, Adams has been named Innovator of the Year for Product Design by the Chrysler Corporation, been nominated for the Cooper-Hewitt Designer of the Year award, and seen her work featured in Dwell, Interior Design, O, The Oprah Magazine, and Architectural Digest. After creating collections for prestigious brands like Ann Sacks and New Ravenna, which makes glass and stone mosaic tiles for high-end commercial and residential spaces, Adams has recently stepped out with her own, eponymous brand now based in Austin.

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the Arts in Ketchum, Idaho. After graduating from UT, I went to the Pratt Institute in New York for three years for a master’s in ceramics. I ended up staying in the city a while and founding a gallery of my own. Did you know from your work in ceramics that you wanted to design tile? No. I was actually doing jewelry in New York and took my earrings around to stores like Henri Bendel. They said, “Come back after you have more to show us.” I got into housewares and started using glass in mosaics, which no one else was doing at the time. When I went back to Bendel, they liked it, and soon other high-end stores started carrying my housewares too. It was fine, but at some point I realized these pieces were just senseless objects. How was the work in your gallery different from the work you were producing and selling to retailers? In the gallery, what we were creating were singular environments, not objects, for specific shows. For instance, when we transformed the space for a Dia de los Muertos exhibit, no one in the city had ever seen anything like it. It was the most fun, and it got a lot of attention. Nightclubs and a few celebrities started asking me to design their spaces. Creating environments, architecture to live in, is what I discovered I really loved. Ultimately, that’s how I came to tile. I can mix the influence of folk art with sophisticated modern design. Tile has muscle to it, permanence, and a story. I love the possibilities.

What’s the seed that led you to a career in design? My mother, who was an artist, opened one of the first folk-art galleries in San Antonio before folk art was really respected for what it is. We traveled a lot to Oaxaca and all around Mexico. I love the humanity in something made by hand; that’s the kind of art I’ve always been most attracted to. Growing up, I was surrounded by artists and saw a lot of them who took their work so seriously that it had a precious aspect to it. I hate anything serious or pretentious. If you need a plaque to understand whatever you’re looking at, I just think that’s crazy. That kind of thing really made me want to run from art. I went to UT and started studying psychology, doing ceramics on the side. One day, a designer was in my mother’s gallery and saw some of my plates in a box on the floor and asked if there were more. At that point, my mother said she knew I was good and sent me off to the Sun Valley Center for

Most creatives, regardless of their field, talk about getting into a zone. What’s that look like for you? I’ve always been kind of a tomboy, and I like getting my hands in the dirt. I like what’s raw. I’m in my zone trying different things, especially when I’m traveling. The passion and soul in places that might be called third-world countries are so evident. I’ll go to a factory, say, in India, China, Turkey, or Poland, and pretty quickly, I find that I’ll need to get out of the business office and go where the workers are mixing the colors and materials. I’ve visited many places some might describe as risky, but the smile on my face is huge when I’m interacting with people who practice a traditional craft as it might’ve been done ages ago. And then, I try new things. In Indonesia, when I took some paint and started putting it on teak, the factory owners were appalled. But if you don’t do something different from what’s already been done, why do it at all? Your designs and materials vary widely: free-form to geometric, smooth porcelain and marbles with inlaid metal to matte caustic cement, studded leather and painted teak. What’s the unifier behind such divergent styles? tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

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AUST IN ST ILL FEELS V ERY IN DEPEN DEN T TO ME . T H AT ’S SOMET HING I WA S LOOK ING FOR . IT FEELS DIFFER EN T FROM A N Y OT HER PL ACE IN A MER IC A . I LOV E T HE PEOPLE; I LOV E T HE EN ERGY.

While I’d call myself something of a pigpen, I crave order. I love structure and boundaries. I’m known for my mosaics, for strong horizontal and vertical lines. I like how these boundaries and patterns all fit inside the eightby-eight format I design in. And I’m frequently surprised by what happens when the eight-by-eight squares are arranged together! The process of experimenting and coming up with the designs is very organic, but it’s definitely ordered. Mainly, I want people to live in the environment my tiles create. Whether that’s a Hollywood Regency-style marble or something with more of a folk-art feel. Hang a picture on it, do whatever, just don’t treat it like it’s high art. I don’t do precious! You’ve worked for some big luxury brands in the design industry and on both coasts. Why your own brand now? I realized I’d been giving away my art to others for years. I absolutely loved working with Ann Sacks, but there’s something about doing things yourself, under your own name. I like being able to go direct to the source and have my own private clients too. The relationships I have here, as well as the ones I get to build across the globe, are so important to me. In China, I spend time working with groups of women who are building something for themselves. I see things with my own eyes, because I can be there for longer than just a few days. Being able to collaborate with them helps me and can help change their lives at the same time. I think my work is bowing down to tradition and bringing it to more people so the aesthetic can keep going forever. The traditional craft isn’t stuck in the past but is being propelled forward. A sampling of Adams’ designs

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Why Austin? I’m an eighth-generation Texan, but when my family moved to Austin several years ago, I hadn’t been here in 20 years. It’s changed since then, but coming from Southern California, Austin still feels very independent to me. That’s something I was looking for. It feels different from any other place in America. I love the people; I love the energy. After a trip, I’m always glad to come home. That feeling tells me I’m in the right place. tribeza.com


January 27-28 PALMER EVENTS CENTER

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T R I B E Z A TA L K

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

COSMIC CONCEPT “The whole concept is this duality,” Paul Oveisi explains. “We have the old and the new, the coffee daytime and night bar-time, the indoor and outdoor — we’re kind of fusing those two worlds. That became our theme for the place.” To build out the concept behind Cosmic Coffee + Beer Garden, Oveisi, the former Momo’s owner, relied on the nuts and bolts of old Austin, repurposing raw materials like metal and wood from sites in the surrounding South Austin neighborhood. The onetime auto body shop is now a coffee shop whose bar backsplash features white tiles integrated with reused cedar. Other

cool features: a bar façade composed of wood paneling repurposed from a 1960s home remodel, light fixtures from an old warehouse, and 12-foot walnut communal tables handcrafted by Growler Domestics. COSMICCOFFEEBEER.COM

GREEN Living Green space doesn’t just have to be outdoors. Whether its hanging greens or small potted plants, fresh foliage can liven up an interior space. At the Fox Den’s East Austin outpost, they offer up bright light-loving begonias and prayer plants. For low-maintenance options, try East Austin Succulents for small succulents and cacti, or add just a touch of color with some bromeliads from Tillery Street Plant Co. THEFOXDEN.CO, EASTAUSTINSUCCULENTS.COM, AND TILLERYSTREETPLANTCOMPANY.COM

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DISCOVERING the DETAILS For Wendy Dunnam Tita, the 2018 president of AIA Austin, a love for interiors surfaced at her first architecture job in New York, working on projects from the site-selection stage down to defining the details of light fixtures. “I felt like I had discovered an entirely new profession working in that environment,” Tita says. “That really opened my eyes to interior architecture, interior design, and even the role of art and furnishings in our experience of architecture.” A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, Tita returned to Austin from New York and is currently a principal at Page, working on projects like The Ruby hotel in Round Rock and Block 71 downtown. “I almost always start a project thinking about how I want somebody to feel when they’re in the space,” Tita says. And she delights in the details. “Sometimes a moment like the button you push on an elevator or the way that your hand touches a handrail, it can be as important as looking at something in a big picture.” It’s her plan to share her passion through AIA Austin’s events and outreach. “We want, in a celebratory way, to highlight the work of all the different communities of makers and artisans and architects and designers,” Tita says. AIAAUSTIN.ORG

CO S M I C CO F F E E + B E E R B A R P H OTO G R A P H B Y J U L I A K E I M

TRIBEZ A


SOLID GOODS After opening the modern-furniture store Five Elements in 2010, Jonathan and Stacie Fox found themselves wanting an outlet for home pieces with a different vibe. In 2016, the husband-wife team opened SOLID, a home furnishings outpost with an eclectic aesthetic. The South Lamar showroom boasts handselected pieces, including antique rugs, sleek leather sofas, and hardwood dining tables. The mix of rustic and vintage items, from tufted club chairs to funky decorative sculptures, can bring warmth and personality to any room. SOLIDAUSTIN.COM

S O L I D H O M E F U R N I S H I N G S P H OTO G R A P H B Y J E N N I F E R H E N RY; P R I N T P R E S S P H OTO G R A P H B Y C H R I S G R AY

Go BOLD

“When I’m doing custom jobs, I take any element that speaks to me and condense it all into one little square, which is really fun, because it’s a challenge to try to figure out how,” says Paige Russell. To create the artwork for a custom scarf for the Hotel Saint Cecilia, Russell looked to the interiors, touring the rooms and noting the elegant rugs and the penny tiles in the showers. “They have these celestial themes throughout, in their logo and throughout their interiors — kind of this star and moon, almost a churchy vibe,” Russell says. After graduating from Savannah College of Art and Design, Russell launched ELOI in 2014, a brand that translates her bold graphic art onto silk scarves and bandannas. While planning to settle in San Francisco, Russell detoured to Austin and decided to stay. Since then she’s built patterns for the Austin Motel and the Columbus Museum of Art, and she says

In Living COLOR

it’s always her hope that people will display the scarves on their walls. “Ninety-seven percent of people do not, but I love the way they look when they are framed.”

At Waller and E. Cesar Chavez, the colorful PrintPress building opened in September as a hybrid place for co-workers and artists. The debut show, “PRISM,” featured the work of painters and photographers, turning the daytime co-working space into a gallery. The main building features polished concrete floors and vibrant triangles of color bursting from white walls. Artists can also rent rooms in one of the five cottage studios.

ELOI.US

PRINTPRESS.CO

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC FREE WEEK 2018

January 1 – 7 Various Locations

BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY

January 5 Come and Take It Live

W.C. CLARK BLUES REVUE

January 6 Antone’s Nightclub

January 18 Paramount Theatre

BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB

January 19 Stubb’s BBQ

January 10 Paramount Theatre

January 12 ACL Live at the Moody Theater AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS BELLA AND THE BEAST

January 12 & 13 Long Center

BON IVER

January 20 – 22 ACL Live at the Moody Theater THE MOODY BLUES

January 21 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park JOSEPH KECKLER

MILKY CHANCE W/ LEWIS CAPALDI

January 13 Emo’s Austin

January 23 & 24 Long Center SLEEP

January 25 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

ROB BAIRD

January 13 Antone’s Nightclub

KOOL & THE GANG

TERRY ALLEN & THE PANHANDLE MYSTERY BAND

January 13 Paramount Theatre

BLACK LABEL SOCIETY

January 14 Emo’s Austin

January 26 ACL Live at the Moody Theater G3 2018: JOE SATRIANI, JOHN PETRUCCI & PHIL COLLEN

January 27 ACL Live at the Moody Theater THE SHOW WITH CHRIS THILE

2CELLOS

January 27 Bass Concert Hall

January 18 Frank Erwin Center tribeza.com

THEATER

January 30 Emo’s Austin

SHEN YUN

TESSA VIOLET & SECRET MIDNIGHT PRESS W/ GIVE ME MOTION

THE IMMIGRANT

January 30 Stubb’s BBQ

January 5 – 7 Long Center

January 5 – 28 Austin Playhouse

ANTON CHEKHOV’S UNCLE VANYA

January 19 The Mohawk

January 20 Paramount Theatre

JOSH RITTER & THE ROYAL CITY BAND

KUTX PRESENTS: MARGO PRICE

ENTER SHIKARI

JOHN HIATT & THE GONERS

TODD SNIDER

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AIMEE MANN W/ JONATHAN COULTON

FILM THE LORD OF THE RINGS TRILOGY FEAST

January 14 Alamo Drafthouse - Slaughter Lane TEXAS FOCUS: BARRACUDA

January 18 Bullock Texas State History Museum ESSENTIAL CINEMA: AGNÉS VARDA’S MUR MURS

January 21 & 23 AFS Cinema

FEMME FILM FRIDAYS: SIGNATURE MOVE

January 26 Bullock Texas State History Museum

January 12 – February 4 The City Theatre

FINDING NEVERLAND

January 16 – 21 Bass Concert Hall

FRONTERAFEST 2018

January 16 – February 17 Hyde Park Theatre

BALLET FOLKLÓRICO DE AUSTIN VIVA CHIHUAHUA

January 20 George Washington Carver Genealogy Center

SANCHO: AN ACT OF REMEMBRANCE

January 25 & 26 McCullough Theatre

ADRIADNE AUF NAXOS

January 27 – February 4 Long Center

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

January 31 – March 4 ZACH Theatre


COMEDY 50 FIRST JOKES

January 3 Spider House IAN BAGG

January 3 – 6 Cap City Comedy Club MEN ARE FROM MARS – WOMEN ARE FROM VENUS LIVE!

January 13 McCullough Theatre

RODNEY CARRINGTON

January 13 Bass Concert Hall JOEY DIAZ

January 18 – 20 Cap City Comedy Club JAKE FLORES W/ ARIELLE NORMAN

January 19 & 20 The Velveeta Room JOE ROGAN

January 25 Bass Concert Hall

CHILDREN CHILDREN’S BOOK FAIR

January 6 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center LITTLE TEXANS: CHOO-CHOO

January 11 Bullock Texas State History Museum GO, DOG. GO!

January 14 Paramount Theatre LAS AVENTURAS DE ENOUGHIE

January 19 – February 25 ZACH Theatre PETE THE CAT

January 20 One World Theatre SNOW DAY

January 20 Science Mill

WILD KRATTS LIVE!

January 28 Bass Concert Hall

OTHER ICE SKATING ON THE PLAZA

Through January 15 Whole Foods Lamar

FIRST THURSDAY ON SOUTH CONGRESS

January 4 South Congress

CHIPPENDALES 2018

January 11 Emo’s Austin

MIGRATIONS WORLD MUSIC & DANCE FESTIVAL

THE PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE

January 24 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park

HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS WORLD TOUR

January 26 Frank Erwin Center

STAR OF TEXAS TATTOO ART REVIVAL

January 26 – 28 Palmer Events Center

CAPTAIN SCOTT KELLY

January 31 Paramount Theatre

January 12 – 14 Austin Scottish Rite Theater GET FIT 2018!

January 14 Ballet Austin

MARTIN LUTHER KING MARCH & FESTIVAL

January 15 Huston-Tillotson University

NEIL DEGRASSE TYSON

January 16 Long Center

AUSTIN BOAT & TRAVEL TRAILER SHOW

January 18 – 21 Austin Convention Center

CITY-WIDE GARAGE SALE

January 20 & 21 Palmer Events Center

3M HALF MARATHON

January 21 Various Locations

TRIBEZA INTERIORS TOUR

January 21 Various Locations

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts RACHEL STUCKEY:

JOSÉ PARLÁ MURAL

GOOD DAYS &

UNVEILING

BAD DAYS ON THE INTERNET

January 26 Robert B. Rowling Hall

Through January 11 Women & Their Work

SPRING 2018 SEASON OPENING

JOHN BOCK: DEAD + JUICY

January 26 Visual Arts Center

Through January 14 The Contemporary Austin

DESERT TRIANGLE PRINT CARPETA

PRACTICAL ACTS

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

OF PERCEPTION

January 26 – May 27 Mexic-Arte Museum

Through January 14 grayDUCK Gallery

FOTOGRAFÍA Y NUEVOS MEDIOS

WANGECHI MUTU

José Parlá A CRITIC A LLY AC CL AIMED A RT IST M A K ES HIS M A RK ON T HE U T C A MPUS W IT H T HE HELP OF L A NDM A RKS

Through January 14 The Contemporary Austin

VAUDEVILLE ARTIFACTS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING

January 5 – 21 Link & Pin Gallery

By Emma Banks

JUAN LUÍS JARDÍ

It’s no secret that UT’s McCombs School of Business is growing — literally, with the new 458,000-square-foot Robert B. Rowling Hall — and now that expansion will come with an artful twist: a custom mural from acclaimed artist José Parlá set to hang above the grand entrance to the new building’s Zlotnik Family Ballroom. And Parlá isn’t quite working alone, per se. The artist’s expansive 4,000-square-feet mural is made possible by Landmarks, UT’s public art program. Founded in 2008 with Andrée Bober at its helm, Landmarks works to mirror the campus’s increase in size with a matched increase in the school’s art collection and art programs. Parlá’s mural will be a quintessential depiction of Austin, with its central themes lying in both the city’s natural and urban environments. With the artist’s signature style of collage, pulled impasto surfaces, and calligraphy on display, the mural is sure to challenge its viewers both visually and otherwise, with multiple narratives of life in Austin woven throughout the piece. And Parlá is in good company; it’ll join the more than 40 works Landmarks has commissioned since its founding by critically acclaimed artists such as Sol LeWitt and James Turrell. The mural is slated for unveiling in spring 2018, in conjunction with the opening of Rowling Hall. It will be Parlá’s most ambitious to date — and help to further establish the campus as an international arts destination.

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January 26 – May 27 Mexic-Arte Museum

January 6 – 27 Wally Workman Gallery JAMES SURLS

January 12 – March 3 Flatbed Press & Gallery PRINTAUSTIN

January 15 – February 15 Various Locations IN DEPTH: A GROUP SHOW

January 20 – February 24 Davis Gallery GAIL CHOVAN

January 20 – March 1 Women & Their Work

January 29 – July 15 Harry Ransom Center


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A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com

EVENT PICK

The Sky Is Not the Limit: Lessons From a Year in Space A ST RON AU T SC OT T K EL LY R EFL EC T S ON HIS HISTORIC Y E A R IN SPACE By Emma Banks

JANUARY 31

Astronaut Scott Kelly spent a year in space—historic, record-breaking, and epic by every definition, his 340 days on the International Space Station taught us more about human nature and the future of space travel than we thought possible. Mirrored in practice by his identical twin brother Mark’s year on Earth, the pair have unprecedented knowledge of what it means to go beyond expectation and accomplish the truly remarkable. Now with a recently released debut novel under his belt (“Endurance: A Year in Space, a Lifetime of Discovery”), Kelly is headed to Austin’s Paramount Theatre, where his recollections and lessons learned are sure to captivate and inspire. Kelly’s key takeaway from his journey, which set the record for the single longest space mission by an American astronaut, is in fact quite simple: There is no limit to what you can accomplish. With an inspirational story of personal perseverance and, consequently, some universal truths to share, this is one event whose value may just be priceless.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: T-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S., Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DE STIJL | PODIUM FOR ART 1006 W. 31st St. (512) 354 0868 Hours: Tu-Thu, Sa 1-5 destijlaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sat & Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: T-F 10-5 space12.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sat & Su 12-5 massgallery.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F10-6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com

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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

SP ONS OR E D B Y T R E E HOUS E

Get a sneak peek inside the stunning homes that will be on this year’s tour. BY

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ANNE BRUNO

I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY B U F F S T R I C K L A N D ; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

tribeza.com


From the terra cotta tile floors in the kitchen to the earth tones, warmth and refinement are present at every turn throughout this beautifully decorated 5,500 square feet Tarrytown home by Andrea Giles.

Andrea Giles /

ANDREA LEIGH INTERIORS

Having worked with the owners of this 5,500-square-foot home in the past, Andrea Giles describes the collaboration on the design of her clients’ new home—“They really gave me the reins on all design choices,” she explains, “but I like to think that my understanding of them is what allowed me to feel as though I was just projecting them into the house.” Giles is a former attorney who has been in the design business for six years. Using both the right and le! sides of her brain is especially appealing to Giles; she relishes the unique combination of creativity and management required to achieve a desired result. For this nature-inspired home, the kitchen was designed in the first few meetings. Giles and her clients share a love for the terra-cotta tiles chosen for the kitchen floor and let that set the tone. In keeping with a theme of bringing the outdoors in, brick adds warmth to the entry. Giles’ favorite design elements are many, and include a window seat created for one of the client’s sons, who chose his bedroom specifically for its superior sunset-watching location; the master suite’s his-and-hers closets, which give the mother of three boys an ultrafeminine space; and a piece of art commissioned from Erica Huddleston, which allows the living room’s television to be beautifully hidden, remain centered in the room, and, at the clients’ request, off the mantelpiece. tribeza.com

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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

Wall Street alum turned designer Allison Crawford reimagined this South Congress bungalow into a modern eclectic hideaway.

Allison Crawford /

ALLISON CRAWFORD DESIGN

Allison Crawford’s career began on Wall Street. Once she realized that her creative impulses weren’t being met in the marketing field she had prepared for, her life and career took a turn, as she decided to study interior design at New York University. Since then, she has lived and worked in Austin, Dallas, and New York but finds Austin the best fit, enjoying the city’s supportive environment for both creatives and entrepreneurs. With a keen appreciation for the aesthetics and culture of worlds very different from her own, Crawford says that travel is her primary source of inspiration. On her trips (which have included stops in all seven continents), Crawford seeks out artisans whose work she can incorporate into current projects. Her modus operandi for designing a home starts with art: “Art and lighting are typically selected first,” she explains, “and then everything else falls into place.” In her own 1,600-square-foot Cra!sman-inspired home, Crawford sourced the art from dreamy locales like Cuba, Paris, Montreal, and Isla Holbox. Most of the interior pieces are vintage, which reflects her desire that every space she creates, whether for clients or for herself, tells a story. A home, she says, is much more than an inhabitation, and this one beautifully illustrates Crawford’s point. “I surround myself with design elements that remind me of people I love, fond travel memories, and current trends I find inspiring.” Crawford was drawn to the real hardwoods in this South Congress house, which was in good shape when she found it, she notes. She painted, added all new lighting and window treatments, and then brought in decor to create a space she describes as “modern eclectic.” For the front door, she says, “I had to paint it in a purplish-pink hue. Everyone loves a pastel door!”

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P H OTO G R A P H S BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y


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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

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Marilee McGehee brought bold colors and tribal touches to this contemporary home.

Merrilee McGehee /

MERRILEE MCGEHEE DESIGN

P H OTO G R A P H S BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

Merrilee McGehee’s career in design is a direct result of a creative trajectory that led her from one artistic passion to the next, including work as an artist and actress in Los Angeles, New York, and her home for the past 18 years, Austin. A!er remodeling a small house she’d purchased, a friend who loved the results asked for McGehee’s help. Diving in, McGehee discovered that interior design satisfied so many of her creative needs; requests for her help continued, and a design business was born. “I wholeheartedly believe that a home should not just be something pretty to look at but an extension of our best creative selves or, collectively, that of our family,” she says. “It’s where your personal creative truth should flourish and enrich your state of being. That’s when amazing things can happen.” Her work on the remodeled 3,700-square-foot contemporary home encompasses modern and bold tones that complement an array of artistic patterns and eclectic pieces. McGehee and her client, a photographer who had worked under Annie Leibovitz and Bruce Weber, bonded over their love of bold colors and an out-of-the-box design approach. “This has been a collaboration of artistic minds searching for something true, comfortable, and fearless,” McGehee explains. “I especially loved weaving in elements of her travels: African masks and colorful baskets juxtaposed with a high-gloss fuchsia bookcase in the library. In the media room, I married a large photo of a spiraling galaxy in space with a metallic flecked rug, and in a powder room, I blended strictly patterned, bold, neon-colored drapes with a modern chinoiserie wallpaper.” tribeza.com

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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

Katie Kime /

KATIE KIME, INC.

Katie Kime is well-known for her product design, but by virtue of working in wallpaper, furniture, and materials like Lucite, she’s grown to love designing the spaces in which her pieces live. “I love creating something from nothing,” Kime says. “When a design in my head becomes a sketch, which then becomes an upholstered piece of furniture, it’s very rewarding. I feel the same way about transforming a space that’s outdated, or even draining to be in, and then renovating it into a space that inspires and brings life.” The main house of Kime’s remodeled residence is 5,000-square-feet. The Southern-style columns on the traditional Texas limestone exterior reflect Kime’s Southern roots, as does the contrast between the light stone and black trim. “I’d call my interior styles ‘modern eclectic,’” she says. “I’ve always tended to mix things that seemingly wouldn’t go together, like very traditional

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furniture with bright, bold prints. In the main living areas of the house, there is color and pattern, with touches of my signature flair but less than my normal style, as I wanted those rooms to feel calm and peaceful for our family.” Kime’s favorite elements in the home are two sets of custom doors she created with local woodworker Kenneth Atkisson. The one downstairs was designed as an homage to her favorite nook in the bar of the Bergdorf Restaurant, a spot Kime always visits alone during trips to New York City. The other is upstairs. “We used Fine Paints of Europe to create a finish that is so highgloss that not only can you see your reflection, but it took almost two weeks to paint one wall and one door,” she says. “The places in the house where there’s true art and cra!smanship are my favorite and inspire me to look for more areas to do that.”


I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY M O L LY W I N T E R S ; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

Vibrant product and interior designer Katie Kime’s whimsical Westlake home is not to be missed.

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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

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Clean and simple design brings soothing tone to this North Central Austin abode by Robin Colton.

Robin Colton /

ROBIN COLTON STUDIO

P H OTO G R A P H S BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

A!er a successful 10-year career in fashion design, Robin Colton returned to school in the late ’90s for a degree in interior design. Since that transition, fashion continues to be a point of inspiration for Colton, who says she’s mindful of cra!smanship and details with each new project. For the interiors of this remodeled two-story, 2,000-square-foot modern condominium in North Central Austin, Colton’s clients were a young couple who loved adventure. The space is clean and embraces the idea of open lo! living. “Working with them throughout the design process,” Colton says, “was an enjoyable and boundary-stretching experience. They were very open to ideas that went beyond what might typically be done in a space like this.” The home maintains a modern white-and-so!-gray palette throughout, while featuring moments of fun color. The first floor’s living-and-kitchen space was designed with the clients’ entertaining style in mind, one of whom had been a bartender. Having bar items at the ready but out of the way of the cook was important. This function was integrated into the living area’s cabinetry, within a stone’s throw of the kitchen island. Direct access to the backyard was also added for grilling and entertaining. In the utility area, details created not only more storage but thoughtful solutions for dog supplies. Colton created the biggest changes to the home by reworking the space on the second floor. The spa experience the clients wanted in the bathroom was achieved by placing a large shower centered on the wide opening into the space, with a tub placed just in front of it. Large-scale tile from New Zealand sets the tone with a natural elegance that fits into the modern environment. tribeza.com

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INTERIORS TOUR

Kimberly Renner radically transformed a 1960s era office building into her showroom and a 5,000 square foot urban loft home overlooking Shoal Creek.

— 2018 —

Kimberly Renner / THE RENNER PROJECT

“Design runs in my family, so I guess you could say it’s in my DNA,” remarks Kimberly Renner. “I came into design via construction, having spent many years running a design-intensive remodeling company. That was the original iteration of The Renner Project.” Renner has lived in Austin for more than 30 years and built her reputation on 20 years of historic-home restorations throughout the city. She sees The Renner Project as a constantly evolving source of inspiration for customers, offering them both one-of-a-kind pieces from all over the world as well as design services. Renner skillfully mixes iconic 20th-century pieces with highstyle antiques for an end result that’s completely original. In 2014, she and her husband purchased a deserted 16,000-square-foot 1960s-era office building in Central Austin. She adapted the multistory structure overlooking Shoal Creek into a unique store, interior design studio, warehouse, and 5,000-square-foot urban lo! home. “The best decision I made for the lo! was to expose the ceiling trusses,” she explains. “It reveals the adapted reuse history of the property. But I’m an art historian at heart, so my favorite objects within our space are all pieces of art, especially the dark and moody ones. Our favorite room is the kitchen. It’s all concrete, brick, and steel, with a Belgian oak table that seats 12. Because the building sits within the canopy of a historic oak tree, it feels like a treehouse. Renner says she loves guiding clients to develop collected interiors. “I specialize in the art of collecting,” she says, “and love clients who are open to personalizing their interiors with found objects, vintage pieces, and antiques.”

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P H OTO G R A P H S P E T E R V I TA L E


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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

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Christen Ales /

A neutral palette with clever pops of rust and green hues give the close to 4,000 square foot home by Christen Ales an inviting feel.

CHRISTEN ALES INTERIOR DESIGN

I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY M E R R I C K A L E S ; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

The courtyard homes common in Latin and African cultures inspired the architecture of this newly built modern farmhouse. Inside, Christen Ales infused the 3,788-square-foot home with natural elements and textures, using a mostly neutral palette of black and white throughout the first floor with pops of rust and green. “I wanted it to feel very livable and functional for a family, while still having a stylish appeal,” Ales says. “The overall space gives a feeling of tranquility and comfort.” Thirteen years into her career in design, with six as principal of her own firm, Ales loves using her creativity on a daily basis to help people achieve happiness in their home, promoting their overall well-being. “I also really value the relationships I make with the homeowners and others involved in the creation of these beautiful spaces,” she says. This home started as a spec for one of Ales’ builder-developer clients and was quickly purchased by the current homeowners, who loved all the finishes and lighting Ales had selected and chose to continue working with her to furnish and decorate the interiors. Ales’ clients were downsizing from a larger, traditional French country house in Barton Creek and wanted a more-modern aesthetic in their new space. Only a few pieces of furniture and decor with sentimental value made the move with them, along with their carefully curated art collection, which features works by many of Austin’s established artists as well as emerging talents. Examples include a Court Lurie in the entryway, an Elizabeth McDonald Schwaiger in the living room, and a Lance Letscher collage in one of the daughters’ bedrooms. “The daughters’ rooms are amazingly girlish but still have a timeless aesthetic to last through the teenage years. I especially adore the pink room. I just feel so happy when I walk in it.” tribeza.com

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INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

Co-owner of Nest Modern John Allison showcases his 20 years of design experience in this modern stunner.

John Allison /

NEST MODERN

In the interior design of a newly built 3,000-square-foot home, John Allison lets simple, clean lines define the space. Allison describes the home as “urban modern,” designed to fit a narrow city lot. Dark oak floors and Italian furniture mix with midcentury modern pieces and an original art collection. To customize specific elements within the space, Allison collaborated with Dominique Levesque Construction. Allison has lived in Austin since 2001. His 20 years of experience includes working for several showrooms at the Atlanta Decorative Arts Center before eventually starting his own residential design service. His decision to enter the business of design was influenced at a young age, he says, by an “overly stylish” grandmother and his father’s interest in architecture. “What I enjoy about what I do is the ability to utilize my passion for good design,” he says, “and connect with clients while I help them to reimagine their space.” Perfect for entertaining, the home’s open kitchen features mahogany cabinets and concrete tile. Both the dining and living rooms flow into an outdoor entertainment area with a pool and spa. Allison cites designing an outdoor space that could accommodate numerous features in a small urban backyard as one of the biggest challenges. In the end, he says, it all came together beautifully, with a living, dining, kitchen, and lounge area, as well as a bit of grass to ensure the happiness of several dogs.

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I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY A N D R E A C A LO ; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y


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INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

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I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY ERIN WILLIAMSON; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

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Austin-based designer Erin Williamson works for clients around the country and brought her talent to this four unit renovation of 1950s era vacation rentals on Lake Austin.

Erin Williamson /

ERIN WILLIAMSON DESIGN

Erin Williamson, whose firm handles projects across the country, began her career as an architectural photographer. Over a decade ago, she began blogging about her own renovations at Design Crisis, which then evolved into work for clients and grew into a bustling, full-time operation. Recent work includes a sprawling beach house in Maine, and her team is currently working on a large historic house in the San Francisco Bay area. She says, “Our clients are interesting people, which translates into unique spaces that evoke big personalities. We rarely repeat design elements, so we never get bored!” Williamson says the remodel of the four-unit 1950s A-frame luxury vacation rental on Lake Austin involved gutting the space, which she describes as “funky in a bad way.” Her challenge was to clean it up but leave some of the

space’s original charm intact. With a quirky bohemian vibe, each space is completely unique, with none taking itself too seriously. “The owners had a vision for the 4,000-squarefoot property, which they named Okena. They wanted an old-school feel but with a modern touch. Both are endlessly creative, generous, and a pleasure to work with,” Williamson explains. “Their collaboration and interest in all the special details are what make this project extra-magical.” The A-frame backsplash is an iconic moment that encapsulates the most recognizable feature of the property. “The poker table in the dude unit just feels like whiskey and cigars. There’s something about this place that feels like your childhood home,” she muses. “It tugs at a memory you’ve never had.” tribeza.com

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TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

Melanie Clapp & Hugh Jefferson Randolph / MELANIE CLAPP INTERIOR DESIGN/ HUGH JEFFERSON RANDOLPH ARCHITECTS

This 1,500-square-foot Travis Heights home is a collaboration between Melanie Clapp; her architect, Hugh Jefferson Randolph; and the team at Moontower Design Build. Clapp’s personal residence, which she refers to as a 1929 Texas antique house, has an urban modern interior style infused with bohemian flair. “I love the process of creating a space that feels good and inspiring. I’ve been so lucky to get to work with Hugh a couple of times,” Clapp says. “He takes the project to an even better place than I could have imagined, and the team at Moontower brought everything together. Collaborating with such talented people is what I love about this work.” In business for more than 20 years, Clapp knew she wanted to be an architect at the age of eight. Growing up next door to the “cool modern” house of one of the Apollo astronauts as well as photos, film, and television depictions of the cra! (including the father on “The Brady Bunch”) influenced her career choice. Clapp has lived in Austin since 1991 but also worked in Los Angeles. In 2014, she moved to Austin full-time. According to Randolph, Clapp’s interior designs complement his architecture, making their second collaboration a fun project. The spa-like bathroom in particular created the feeling of a boutique, a jewel-box antique home with urban modern elements. The room’s original wood floors transition to artisan cement tiles in the wet area, which features a large modern soaking tub and a rain head shower. Randolph calls the project a delicate mix of old and new and is proud of saving the home’s original wood elements and adding things like a large, modern glazed-glass window at the back of the house in the open kitchen.

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An urban modern interiors style with boho flair resonates throughout this 1,500 square foot space.

WE WANT TO THANK OUR 2018 TOUR’S PRESENTING SPONSOR, TREEHOUSE Austin-based TreeHouse is the world’s first home upgrade company specializing in curated products and home project services that promote healthy and sustainable spaces with an emphasis on high performance and design. TreeHouse is regarded as one of the most innovative retail companies, creating positive change and a hub for everything tied to thoughtful building. Customers come to find progressive products, quality design, turnkey installation services and leading-edge technology, all under one roof. To join the conversation and get tips for making your home more sustainable, visit http://www.tree.house. I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY DA N I E L C AVA ZO S ; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y


TRIBEZ A

INTERIORS TOUR — 2018 —

PR E S E N T E D B Y T R E E HOUS E

JANUARY 21, 2017

THE FIFTH ANNUAL TRIBEZA INTERIORS HOME TOUR SHOWCASING THE UNIQUE HOME DESIGN OF AUSTIN-BASED DECORATORS AND DESIGNERS PRESENTED BY

LONDON GREY RUGS

SPARROW Interiors & Gifts

VISIT TRIBEZA.COM/INTERIORS-TOUR-2018/ FOR TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION


DREAM A behind-the-scenes look at three fresh and fabulous kitchens.

P H OTO G R A P H S BY C A S E Y D U N N

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The Rainbow Bend Residence Kevin Alter and his team at the award-winning Alter Studio executed a stunning remodel of this Central Austin home with sweeping views of the Capitol. The kitchen became the most dynamic room in the house with multiple light sources and connection to many different spaces. It was a two year project. The kitchen countertops are made of honed absolute black granite with bright yellow Heath tile as the backsplash. Alter says: "We wanted to take an unremarkable home and reorganize it to take advantage of the stunning view latent in the property. We were also interested in the juxtaposition of a dynamic, modern interior with a more traditional shell — and how a collection of interior rooms could be transformed into multifaceted spaces that connect to each other and to the out-of-doors.” To see more of Alter's work, visit alterstudio.net

ARCHITECT: The Alter Studio


The Entertainer’s Kitchen As architect Matt Garcia and Donna Stockton Hicks planned the kitchen design for this new-build modern home in Central Austin, creating a large space that could accommodate the fundraisers and dinner parties Stockton o!en hosts was key. Minimalist materials and finishes result in a clean and modern look that fits in seamlessly with the rest of the home. Garcia explains: “Everything is basically hidden behind a panel to disappear into the cabinetry.” This sleek look is achieved with an exclusive Italian cabinet line called Varenna by Poliform, which is available at Scott + Cooner. The cabinets are a mix of a light-gray finish (Ghiaccio) and walnut bases. The counters and backsplash are Caesarstone Blizzard, and the range is a Wolf. All the cabinetry has integrated finger pulls and doesn’t require hardware or knobs. Now, this is less is more at its best! To see more of Garcia’s work, visit mattgarciadesign.com.

HOMEOWNER: Donna Stockton Hicks; ARCHITECT: Matt Garcia

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P H OTO G R A P H BY M O L LY W I N T E R S


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Sophisticated Boho in Travis Heights In collaboration with architect Stuart Sampley, interior designer Shannon Eddings designed this dream kitchen over a year-long renovation. “We wanted to create a space that was sophisticated and cohesive while being fun and unique,” Eddings says. “My clients are a laid-back family with a great aesthetic that leaned a little boho, so I wanted to pay homage to that with the colors and finishes while maintaining a timeless space that they would not tire of quickly. They also love to entertain and cook, so the kitchen had to be very functional and spacious.” Eddings incorporated two paint colors and two countertops (Carrera marble and butcher block) for an unexpected yet cohesive combination. The designer is an expert in sourcing antique Turkish Oushaks and found one just right for the kitchen. The white fan-shape tile backsplash was found at Clay Imports, and the knobs and kitchen pendants are from Schoolhouse Electric. To see more of Eddings’ work, visit shannoneddings.com.

P H OTO G R A P H BY M O L LY W I N T E R S

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DESIGNER: Shannon Eddings; ARCHITECT: Stuart Sampley


Loft-Like in Clarksville This renovated home in Clarksville was modeled a!er a lo! that the English homeowner, Sharon Miller, once lived in in London, with the idea that she could cook, entertain, and have fires in one room. Richard Hughes of Element 5 Architecture helped bring her vision to life. In the kitchen, maple and stainless-steel cabinet fronts and custom-made floating shelves are lit up with LED lighting that Miller saw used at a cozy bar in New York City’s Gramercy Park neighborhood. The industrial look Miller and Hughes were a!er was solidified with the exposed brick wall, which is ironically called English Pub. Hughes worked to maintain the small scale found throughout Clarksville while making the home more convenient by adding a second-floor work studio and an attic guest room. Miller says: “I love the open beamthat really create a sense of warmth and sturdiness. The Edwardian cast-iron fireplace surround was found in a London salvage yard and shipped over... It makes me feel connected to home. It’s wonderful to work in the studio surrounded by trees even though I’m in the heart of Austin.” To see more of Element 5 Architecture’s work, visit element5architecture.com.

ARCHITECT: Element 5 Architecture

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P H OTO G R A P H BY A N D R E A C A LO


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Camille Styles’

New Digs A 100-year-old bungalow gets a much-needed face-li!, courtesy of one design-savvy Austinite. BY EMMA

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BANKS

PHOTOGR A PHS BY

MOLLY WINTERS


“The original fireplace was one of our favorite elements of the bungalow,” Styles says. “We love to fire it up and work next to it on chilly days.”


Styles stuck to a neutral palette throughout the bungalow to keep the space versatile for photo shoots.


t

here’s an old adage that Austin blogger and lifestyle luminary Camille Styles knows all too well: Good things come to those who wait. In the case of her newly renovated office studio, two years of searching proved to be a winning timeline, plus one more year of head-to-toe gut renovations to boot. Clearly, Styles was committed to her mission of transforming a neglected home into one full of life, no matter the investment. And now, three years a!er her initial aha moment, the bungalow is ready for business. “When I walked in the front door, I knew that this house was something special,” she says. “On the surface, there was a lot going against it: zero updates in

The large windows throughout the bungalow let in natural light, creating a studio-like environment.

its 100-year history and the kitchen was basically nonexistent. But even though my friends probably thought I’d lost it, it really was love at first sight.” Happily nestled in the heart of downtown Austin, the Camille Styles Bungalow is now home to a bustling crew of bloggers, producers, and content creators who make up the team behind the Camille Styles blog, an uber popular entertaining and lifestyle website with thousands of fans across the globe (with Styles herself at the helm, of course). Wrapped in a fresh coat of bright-white paint, with a sage-green door as garnish, it’s impossible to miss. Inside, the theme of refreshing minimalism continues (an aesthetic the team tribeza.com

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I want everyone who walks into our bungalow doors to feel welcome and comfortable — like they can kick off their shoes and stay awhile.

dubbed “beachy Scandinavian” from the beginning of their design process), and neutral-toned furniture and accessories accent each space with a light, lived-in character that both invites and inspires. Undoubtedly, the bungalow has come a long way since Styles first signed on the dotted line. And if transforming a 100-year-old home that had no renovations prior sounds like a daunting task, that’s because it was. The foundation was in need of repairs, and the roof, plumbing, and electrical all needed an overhaul. But Styles and her team were nothing if not committed, and with a stacked roster of architects like Ryan Bollom and builders like Monte Goertz on board. “Everyone will tell you that it’s going to take longer and be more expen-

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‘‘

A window nook was enhanced with this built-in bench that creates a cozy spot for a work break.

sive than you thought possible — and they’re usually right,” she says. “But the process of being able to take a space and really make it your own is so worth it. It does take a strong vision to be able to see past the initial eyesores, but so o!en, those cosmetic changes are actually the easiest to change. Call me crazy, but I actually wanted to find something that needed a ton of work so that my team and I could put our personal stamp on the space and create something truly unique.” Styles’ penchant for crisp, clean design is evenly matched by the home’s insistence on being just that — homey. Thus, with features like a cozy fireplace, a spacious front porch, an expansive kitchen, and dividing archways, the bungalow masters both modern and minimalist sentiment alike. The result?


This credenza Styles scored at Target was one of our favorite affordable finds. Above it, they displayed photos from their team trip to Italy last summer.


Architect: Ryan Bollom, Low Design Studio Builder: Monte Goertz Company Shades: The Shade Store Tile: Ann Sacks Kitchen cabinets & Island: LAVISH Shelving & organization: California Closets Countertops: Caesarstone Art: Twyla

All the shiplap was original to the bungalow. Styles says: “We love the texture and character it adds to our main work space.” Carmen Collins (left) and Jennifer Rose Smith (right) are at work in the team’s shared office space.


Styles’ first employee, executive producer Chanel Dror, who has worked with her for seven years, was an integral part of the design process.

Styles worked with LAVISH to design the custom cabinetry and open shelving to display their favorite props.

A space that genuinely welcomes its visitors no matter their perspective or preference. Whether you’re sitting on the porch swing, walking through the front door, cooking up a storm in the kitchen, or lounging in the living space, it’s clear from the get-go: This home is meant to be lived in just as much as it’s meant to be worked in. “I want everyone who walks into our bungalow doors to feel welcome and comfortable — like they can kick off their shoes and stay a while,” Styles says. “My dream for the space is that it’s an environment that inspires all kinds of beautiful, innovative work and that the simple design is a breath of fresh air that allows us to think creatively and take a new approach to everything we do.” Practically speaking, the Camille Styles Bungalow has its work cut out for it. Now that renovations are complete, Styles and her team have set up shop,

and almost every project that comes to fruition on the blog finds its origin inside these walls. And with work comes play; the blogger also plans to host many a party before the year’s end. If nothing else, the bungalow has taught Styles and her team one thing for certain: patience. Add to that hard work, impeccable design, and a flawless aesthetic, and you’ve got a recipe for success. Simply put, Styles had a vision that enabled her to see past imperfection and onto an ideal space that will, here’s hoping, serve as a creative meeting place for years to come. “My hope is that the bungalow can be a gathering place for the creative community in Austin to collaborate and form new friendships,” she says. “For me, the most beautiful interiors are the ones that are filled with good conversation, lots of laughter, and truly meaningful connections.” tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE

McCray & Co. PARTNERS IN WORK AND LIFE, CHRIS MCCR AY AND GR ACE HALL HELP DEFINE THE AUSTIN ST YLE VERNACUL AR WITH THEIR IMAGINATIVE AND INSPIRING DESIGNS

Why is it good to be a designer in Austin? Austin is such a creative, open-minded, connected town. More than any other place we’ve been, people here are so independent and open to crazy, out-of-the-box ideas for their spaces. And we love being able to collaborate with so many talented artists and makers here to create spaces that are super-unique and interesting.

By Staley Moore Photograph by Bill Sallans

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HRIS MCCRAY AND GRACE HALL OF MCCRAY & CO. ARE

the masterful design minds behind some of Austin’s most memorable spaces: the magical and whimsical French eatery Lenoir; the funky, cool Stiles Switch BBQ; and the Texas-meets-Japanese (and always buzzing) Kemuri Tatsu-Ya. We sat down with the design duo to find out more about their inspiration and why it’s good to be a designer in Austin. How did you get into design? [McCray] Ever since I can remember, I’ve enjoyed drawing objects and spaces — I just feel like I never stopped. [Hall] I’d always make these weird collages when I was in high school, and it just led me to this aha moment, when I realized I could make a career out of art. We both attended Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond [at different times], and we’ve been practicing as designers ever since. What’s your first step in the process when creating a new space? Our first step is to meet the client — preferably at the space — and listen. We often say that listening is our best tool in design. The goal is to hear what our client is really needing and wanting and see how they’re going to use the space. That way, we can work with them to design a space that both functions really well and aesthetically feels like them.

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What are some of your favorite and most memorable design moments at some of your commercial Austin projects? We like to say that our favorite design moments are the ones we’re working on next! We really try to work in a layered and highly detailed way, so the spaces are always revealing something new to people as they experience them. Here are a few things that come to mind as favorites in some of the existing spaces we’ve done—the custom light fixture we designed for Picnik that holds plants that trail down from it, the huge collection of Texan and Japanese ephemera in Kemuri Tatsu-Ya, the reveal of the graffiti in the restrooms at Ramen Tatsu-Ya, the “serape wall” at Taco Flats, and the woven panels and the 3-D neon “OPEN” sign in the storefront at MaryJae Smoke Culture What are the best things about working together?  We’re constantly inspired by everything around us. The fact that we’re always together means that there’s this seamless flow between work and life. And we’re pretty good at supporting one another and giving each other permission to do the things we each love, which helps us grow in both our personal and professional lives.

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W E R E A LLY T RY TO WOR K IN A L AY ER ED A N D HIGHLY DETA ILED WAY, SO T HE SPACES A R E A LWAYS R E V E A LING SOMET HING N EW TO PEOPLE A S T HE Y EX PER IENCE T HEM A N D FOCUSED A N D T RU E .

What upcoming projects are you excited about? Oh, there are so many! We’re finishing up a couple of residential projects that are supercool and that we can’t wait to share. A few of our restaurant clients — not naming any names! — are expanding into new concepts and new towns, and those projects are really exciting. One name we can name: In the new year, we’re starting the build-out on the new Nine Banded Whiskey tasting room in Dripping Springs, which is going to be awesome.


Grace Hall and Chris McCray started collaborating on projects after they first met 12 years ago. They were married in 2010 and started McCray & Co. in 2011. Hall says: The fact that we’re always together means that there’s this seamless flow between work and life.”


STYLE PROFILE 5

INSPIRATION BOARD MCCR AY AND HALL GIVE US A BEHIND THE SCENES LOOK AT THEIR CRE ATIVE PROCESS 9 1

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1. TOPO CHICO:

8. SCORPION BELT BUCKLE:

We love Topo Chico. Like, LOVE Topo Chico. Neither our home nor office fridge is ever not fully stocked. It’s become a joke among clients: When folks come into our studio for a meeting, we offer water or Topo Chico and that’s it.

Scorpion Belt Buckle: [McCray] This is my all-time favorite personal find while out antiquing. The dealer wanted $15, but I managed to talk him down to $10 for it.

2. SER APE:

We find lots of textiles as we’re out searching for antiques, and this is one that we picked up with a project in mind and haven’t been able to let go of. It’s always in a prominent place in our home. 3. DISH WITH ROCKS:

[Hall] Chris always picks up interesting little natural artifacts for me when he’s traveling or just outside walking around. This is a collection that I keep on my desk at home.

9. STERLING-SILVER CUFF:

[Hall] I’m a minimalist when it comes to most things, including jewelry. I love this cuff, and it’s one of the few pieces of jewelry that I wear almost every day. 10. PITCHER:

[McCray] I’ve been collecting water pitchers from the 1940s and 1950s for many years now. I love the range and diversity in the design of these objects that used to have such a big presence in everyday life but now have essentially become obsolete. 11. 3 SNAKE PIECE:

4. “FOR SALE” SIGN:

We’re suckers for hand-painted signs. We picked this up at a flea market long ago. 5. DEER SKULL:

[Hall] I found this at the Austin Antique Mall awhile back. It just called out to me, and I couldn’t say no. I love it. 6. “MARKET FINDS” NOTEBOOK:

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We’re always searching for interesting things for clients at antique stores, flea markets, and places like Round Top or Canton Trade Days. We used to have an antique booth, where we sold items that we hadn’t found a home for yet. This was one of the ledgers where we used to record our finds. 7. DONALD JUDD BOOK:

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[McCray] The Judd Foundation recently came out with this book, which documents Judd’s furniture designs. I really appreciate the honesty of materials he used in his work, as well as the utilitarian nature and beauty of the furniture.

[McCray] This is an art piece that I purchased in the mid-’90s from a small gallery in Charlottesville, Virginia. The artist is Michael Finster, the grandson of the late folk artist Howard Finster. If you don’t know him, look him up. He was a real badass. 12. PLANT:

We picked the mother of this plant up when we moved back to Austin in 2011. It’s grown up big now, and we’ve repotted the pups and stationed them all over our house. We love them. 13. DISH WITH SWITCHBLADE AND RING:

This dish is one our favorite things from our friends at Era Ceramics. We keep our little doodads in it when we’re not using them, like Chris’ switchblade or Grace’s engagement ring. [P.S.: The engagement ring is all metal, and Chris designed it.] 14. JITTERBUG PERFUME BOOK:

[Hall] This book just makes me happy. There’s something about the physical size, weight, and design of it that’s really satisfying, and the story is so fun and rich and beautiful. I go back and read it at least once a year. tribeza.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Pitchfork Pretty A UNIQUE TAKE ON FRIED CHICKEN, A TAST Y BEEF JERK Y SNACK, AND THE MOST DELICIOUS PICKLED QUAIL EGG THERE EVER WAS — BOOK A TABLE AT THIS GEM OF A RESTAUR ANT IN E AST AUSTIN By Karen Spezia Photographs by Leah Muse

O

ALL THE THINGS I’VE TASTED LATELY, MY FAVORITE WAS

at Pitchfork Pretty. Its delight was unexpected, since I’d wryly viewed it as a gastronomical gimmick: a pickled quail egg perched atop a “nest” of crispy leeks. Cute, right? But oh my, it was good! That first morsel quickly dashed my skepticism. What I’d dismissively assumed was just another hipster, East Side, farm-to-table, reclaimed-wood, blah, blah, blah restaurant proved to be something much more. Pitchfork Pretty had my full attention. Who’s behind this new charmer? No one I’d ever heard of, perhaps because the key players came from elsewhere: owner Seth Baas from San Diego, executive chef Max Snyder from San Francisco, and beverage director Ryan Nolan from Chicago. Only general manager Alexander Dubey had done recent time in Austin. But now they’re all here, and they’re all on my radar. If Baas is on the floor when you dine, you’re in for a treat. His genuine enthusiasm for his restaurant and its offerings is contagious, as he roams the room encouraging diners to sample his favorite new dishes or beloved mainstays. That’s how I tried the magical quail egg: I resisted, but Baas insisted. This clever dish isn’t listed as an appetizer or entrée but instead is under “snacks,” intended as a wee amuse-bouche to prime the appetite. A tender pickled egg rests atop a small bed of crunchy shredded leeks dusted with spices. Gobbled down in one bite, the silky egg melds with the crispy leeks for a sensory sensation. After just one, I was hailing my server to bring another. Undoubtedly, this will become a signature dish. The rest of the menu is just as full of delights and surprises. Described as “Hill Country-inspired,” the food is modern yet deeply rooted in comfort

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Left: The dim lights and modern interiors make this an inviting spot; Below: Selections from the flavorful “Hill Country-inspired menu.

food. The beef jerky is another amusing “snack.” Instead of tough, chewy strips, this jerky consists of medallions of moist and tender beef crowned with crushed peanuts and habanero jelly. The delicious buckwheat cornbread also upends tradition; rather than the familiar yellow grainy version, Pitchfork’s is dark brown and crunchy, its rustic appearance offset by an elegant disc of honey-miso butter adorned with fresh herbs, spices, and edible flowers. It’s a delight to behold — and eat. The fried chicken is unlike any other in town. Brined in habanero vinegar, the moist meat has an undeniable tang. Family-style grilled meats like sausage, ribs, and the very popular beef tongue are served barbecue-style with a side of white bread, pickles, onions, and sauce. More-nuanced dishes include potato gnocchi with leek fondue and broiled flounder with bone marrow, sauerkraut, and potato. For dessert, there’s lemon ice box pie and a towering coconut crepe cake. Open for breakfast — but not lunch — Pitchfork Pretty is a serene place to start your day with delicious sandwiches like The Pitchfork, a soft potato roll stuffed with scrambled eggs, melted provolone, ham, potatoes, and spicy sambal sauce, or The Pretty, a homemade everything bagel slathered with pimento cheese, sprouts, slivered onions, and pickles. Classic options include muffins, scones, and cereal. Without overwhelming, the drink list has something for everyone. We enjoyed a seasonal cocktail brimming with wintery spices and an interesting glass of Sonoma Chardonnay and Italian Nebbiolo. There’s also a nice beer list, rife with local brews. The rustic A-frame building is as inviting as the staff and cuisine. Lantern chandeliers dangle from the vaulted ceiling, illuminating the open kitchen, long bar, dining room, semicircular booths, communal table, and small patio. Full of charm and creativity, Pitchfork Pretty is still a young restaurant trying to find its way. Not all the dishes succeeded, and service was sometimes spotty, albeit cheerful. But its premise is simple: Make good food, hire nice people, create a pleasant space. I liked being there, and obviously, I’m not the only one. Most nights, it’s packed with one of the most eclectic crowds to be found in our famously eclectic city. Pitchfork Pretty, it seems, is always full of surprises. PITCHFORK PRETTY 2708 E. CESAR CHAVEZ (512) 494-4593 PITCHFORKPRETTY.COM

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24 DINER

BARLEY SWINE

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encour-

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

ages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the f lavors

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley

of her culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t

burgers, all-day breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on

forget the chimichurri sauce! Follow up your meal with

fried chicken.

Argentina’s famous dessert, alfajores — shortbread cook-

34TH STREET CAFE

ies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

BULLFIGHT

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the chicken

3663 Bee Caves Rd.

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for weeknight

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of

dinners and weekend indulgences.

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share

Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamón

a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

Serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some

ALCOMAR

sangria and enjoy the bites.

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161 Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of

CAFÉ JOSIE

the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

by for lunch, happy hour, dinner, weekend brunch, and

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a prix

start your visit with a blood-orange margarita and the

fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la carte

crab and guacamole.

menu is also available, featuring classics such as smoked

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR

meatloaf and redfish tacos.

319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884

CAFÉ NO SÉ

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting;

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

ASTI TRATTORIA

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

BAR CHI SUSHI

We have been bringing people together for more than

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect compli-

4 decades, to celebrate occasions big and small, with

ment to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines

A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

the Interior Cuisine and art of Mexico. From all of us

by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art

sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends.

here at Fonda San Miguel, to our patrons old and new,

wine-preservation system with temperature control

Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a

we wish you all the best in the new year ahead. Salud!

variety of sushi rolls under $10.

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2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

2nd Street: 238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463 Domain: 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463

ensures optimal taste and appreciation. Toast to Summer at CRU.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

EASY TIGER

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides

both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop

modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried

upstairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some

mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry

local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your

thyme cocktail.

snack with beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

GRIZZELDA’S

EL ALMA

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes,

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 Upscale casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas, in-

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

credible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino),

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Viet-

and locally sourced, seasonally inspired chalkboard

namese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and

specials. Full bar with craft cocktails, local beers on tap,

sweet treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio

and boutique wines from around the world.

bring comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

EPICERIE 2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840 A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

FREEDMEN’S 2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953 Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to the desserts and even the cocktail offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue on a charming outdoor patio.

GERALDINE’S

each fused with a range of different f lavors and styles. The attention to detail in each dish shines, from dark mole served over chicken brined for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168 Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s

HOPFIELDS

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area serving

cocktails, shareable plates, and scenic views of Lady Bird

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beauti-

unique dishes. Chefs/owners Sarah Heard and Nathan Lemley

Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy

ful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and

serves thoughtful, locally sourced food with an international

executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

twist at reasonable prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

bar manager Caitlyn Jackson.

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites. tribeza.com

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ITALIC

L’OCA D’ORO

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

Located in the Mueller development, chef Fiore Tedesco

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the

from pastry chef Mary Katherine Curren.

classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy impressive

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE

cocktails, wine, and a great craft beer selection.

3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808

LENOIR

Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience, Jacoby’s Restau-

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

rant and Mercantile transports you from East Austin to a rustic

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix-fixe

Southern home nestled in the countryside. The menu features

meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes local-

the best dishes southern cooking has to offer, including beef

ly-sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal

from Adam Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin, TX.

specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy

JEFFREY’S

hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

the world.

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

SALTY SOW 1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337 Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-night noshing.

Rustic continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local, and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophis-

MANUEL'S

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

ticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-

fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

quality regional Mexican food, fresh pressed

LA BARBECUE

cocktails, margaritas and tequilas. Try the Chile

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

famous mole. Located downtown at the corner of 3rd

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up

and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on Jolly-

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

ville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.

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PIEOUS 12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041 Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer, Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combination of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket is a crowd favorite and a must-try. RED ASH ITALIA 303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team including Executive Chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

LAS PALOMAS

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

SWAY 1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999 The culinary masterminds behind La Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor area, complete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an unforgettable experience. THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

THE YARD AT WALLER CREEK 701 E. 11th St. | (512) 478 1111 The YARD is not your typical hotel dining experience. Led by Executive Chef Lonny Huot, enjoy savory American cuisine with Texas f lavors like the Beer Braised Short Rib and the Chorizo & Pepper Jack Grits Cakes Benedict. TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambience, the salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

WINEBELLY 6705 Hwy 290, # 503 | (512) 584 808 3016 Guadalupe St., Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193 Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro maintains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors. WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.


A L O O K B E H I N D 6…6

HOLIDAY CHECKLIST GET RE ADY FOR NE X T YE AR WITH THESE TIPS FOR MA XIMIZING CHEER AND MINIMIZING STRESS DURING THE HOLIDAY SE ASON

• Iconic Austin brand ABC Home & Commercial Services started hanging Christmas lights a decade ago, and the company’s speedy crews come bearing LED lights, extension cords, timers, fuses, and custom-cut light strands the first year you become a customer. Then, you own the high-quality lights (and a trusty storage bag to keep them in), which you can reinstall each year. Wreaths and garlands can also be added to front doors and windows. Plus, giving back to the community has always been part of ABC’s mission; ABC sponsors events like the Kite Festival and the Winnie the Pooh corner at the Trail of Lights. This is of special significance to ABC owner Bobby Jenkins, who honors his late grandson, Moss Pieratt, with the display. “The Trail of Lights is an iconic Austin event and one of the best family events in the city,” Jenkins says. It is a great gathering for people of all ages to come together to kick off the holiday season.” ABC can also get you ready for the new year with power washing or a backyard lighting installation. Twinkly lights make everything better. ABChomeandcommercial.com • Austin- and Nashville-based Gracious Garlands sources fresh greenery from the mountains of North Carolina and shapes them into stunning wreaths and festive garlands that are available through preorder or at one of the company’s pop-up shops. GraciousGarlands.com • Up your gingerbread house-making party by getting Santa himself to make an appearance (TexasSantas.com), or head to the Caswell House for the Austin Junior Forum’s annual Milk & Cookies With Santa party. AustinJuniorForum.org

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LONDON GREY RUGS

3001 PALM WAY STE. B | AUSTIN, TEXAS 78758 | DOMAIN NORTHSIDE 512-839-8999 | LONDONGREYRUGS.COM


TRIBEZA January 2018  
TRIBEZA January 2018  

The Interiors Issue No. 197