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ORGANIZING COMMUNITY

Women & Their Work celebrates 40 years

A CO M M U N I T Y OF ST I C K PEOPL E

Visiting sculptor Patrick Dougherty’s Pease Park art project

N O. 198 | CO M M U N I T Y

Three groups working to foster real civic engagement

MAKING THEIR MARK

17

YEARS


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CONTENTS

FEBRUARY

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Experiencing a hands-on art project in Pease Park The female artists and collaborators behind Women & Their Work

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DEPARTMENTS

Social Hour p. 14

Karen’s Pick p. 78

Kristin’s Column p. 20

Dining Guide p. 80

Community Profile p. 22

A Look Behind p. 84

Parkside celebrates 10 years of downtown dining

Local Love p. 26 Tribeza Talk p. 28 Monica Williams created a go-to guide to philanthropy

ON THE COVER A Tribe Called Brunch founders Michael Henderson and Jared Culp Photograph by Robert Gomez

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Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 30 Music Pick p. 31 Art Pick p. 32 Event Pick p. 34

FEATURES

Organizing Community p. 40 A Community of Stick People p. 48

Wedding Guide p. 36

Refugee is Not My Name p. 56

Style Profile p. 74

Making Their Mark p. 66

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EDITOR'S LETTER

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I’d visited Austin a handful of times, lured by the promise of new music and nightlife. Upon arrival, I quickly learned that there was something beyond Austin’s classic reputation that was special about the city — there was a feeling of friendliness. If I was running around Lady Bird Lake or stopping by a coffee shop, people would wave and say hello. Austin was an incredibly friendly place. As I got more plugged in to the city, through organizations like Leadership Austin, the Young Women’s Alliance, and the Austin Bat Cave, to name a few, I saw that this friendliness wasn’t just about exchanging surface-level pleasantries. It was about considering others as fellow community members. The people I met weren’t just going to work and then going home — they were choosing to spend their free time leading excursions with Explore Austin or mentoring with Big Brothers Big Sisters; they wanted to be part of something bigger than themselves. When I was offered the opportunity to guest-edit Tribeza’s February Community Issue, I was excited to highlight what I think is one of the best parts about Austin. Beyond the hype of being on any “hot city” top 10 list, beyond the flashiness of real estate developments, true communities are built from folks caring about folks. In these pages, we get to hear from Michael Henderson and Jared Culp, the dynamic pair who created A Tribe Called Brunch to lead conversations about big ideas over a shared meal (“Organizing Community”). From Brittany Morrison (Community Profile) we learn how a personal loss can be channeled into a call to give back. And we see how a passion for the arts can develop a long-lasting community in a look at Women & Their Work’s 40 years (“Making Their Mark”). I grew up in El Paso and, like many El Pasoans, feel a sort of innate kinship with Austin. In many ways, it’s the closest place that feels like home. For others, who come to the capital city from more far-flung locales — Tanzania, Iraq, Myanmar — Austin can take some getting used to. In “Refugee Is Not My Name,” Jess Archer and Ashley St. Clair get to know refugees who are finding a new home in Austin. It seems to me that true community-making is about looking and living beyond ourselves and finding ways we can come together. It’s my hope that these stories speak to you, and if you’re jogging around the lake, don’t hesitate to say hello. Yours, Nicole Beckley

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y J E A N A M A R I N O

MOVED TO AUSTIN IN 2009, KNOWING ALMOST NO ONE. AS A WRITER IN SAN FRANCISCO,


LOEWY LAW FIRM


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

17

YEARS

F E B RUA R Y 2 01 8

N O. 1 9 8

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

GUEST EDITOR

DIRECTOR OF SALES

ART DIRECTOR

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Nicole Beckley

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Staley Moore

Elizabeth Arnold Krissy Hearn Errica Williams INTERN

Neal Baker PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Anna Andersen Jess Archer Nicole Beckley Tobin Levy Robyn Ross Brittani Sonnenberg PHOTOGR APHERS

@mollytaylorphotography

Warren Chang Holly Cowart Leonid Furmansky Robert Gomez Julia Kiem Leah Muse Courtney Pierce Ben Porter Danielle Chloe Potts Ashley St. Clair ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


ASHLEY AUSTIN H O M E S

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SOCIAL HOUR DANCING WITH THE STARS AUSTIN The Center for Child Protection’s 11th annual Dancing With the Stars Austin, presented by Lexus of Austin & Lakeway, provided an evening of exhilarating entertainment filled with competition, philanthropy, and a raffle drawing, raising more than $1.6 million for young victims of abuse in Travis County. Dr. Javier Aguirre was the winner of the night, taking home the treasured mirror ball trophy.

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LA ABEJA HERBS HOLIDAY GARDEN PARTY On December 10, La Abeja Herbs hosted its annual holiday garden party at the Sekrit Theater. Guests mingled while sipping on seasonal cocktails by Gem & Bolt and browsing unique gifts by several local shops, including Charm School Vintage and Mother of God Ceramics.

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DANCING WITH THE STARS AUSTIN: 1. Erikka Youngstrom, Lawton Cummings, Heidi Marquez Smith and Elaina Dodd 2. Andrea & Chase Hamilton 3. Carrie Trabue & Mary Anne McMahon 4. Luisa Mauro & Liana Mauro 5. John Arrow & Natalie Yerkovich LA ABEJA HERBS HOLIDAY GARDEN PARTY: 6. Shari Gerstenberger & Sarah Mangum 7. Ben Blanchard & Vanessa Pla 8. Diane Wegge & Michelle Mosher 9. Andrew Wolfley & Mariana Flores 10. Jennan Sliman & Erica Matthews

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SOCIAL HOUR

TRIBEZA DECEMBER ISSUE RELEASE PARTY Tribeza and friends commemorated the release of the December People Issue with a holiday bash on December 12 at Boiler Nine Bar + Grill. Guests noshed on tasty bites from the dynamic restaurant and swilled Ben Milam Whiskey, all while honoring Austin’s 2017 People of the Year.

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NOBLE 31 + HALLIE HAMILTON ART POP UP On December 13, guests gathered at Hotel Ella to celebrate the new clothing collection from Noble 31 and the latest series from Austin artist Hallie Hamilton. The evening, hosted by Lauren Smith Ford, Camille Styles, Kristen Kilpatrick, and Carly Blair, was full of champagne, shopping, and beautiful blooms by House of Margot Blair.

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LIZA BETH & RSK HOLIDAY TRUNK SHOW

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y CO U R T N E Y P I E R C E , H O L LY CO WA R T & DA N I E L L E C H LO E P OT T S

On December 14, Liza Beth Jewelry and local retailer RSK held a holiday trunk show to toast their recent partnership. Guests perused Liza Beth’s latest designs for the holidays while enjoying sips and sweets. RSK is now the exclusive carrier of the Liza Beth Jewelry line, giving shoppers the perfect opportunity to find locally made pieces.


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2018 Share the joy of giving with your family and friends by asking them to donate with you on Amplify Austin Day, March 1 at 6pm - March 2 at 6pm. This is the one day every year we come together to support the local nonprofits that make all the things we love about Central Texas possible. From the outdoor jewels of our city to the arts, to our children and our pets, to caring for our neighbors. It’s not much to ask. Invite a friend to get online and give with you on March 1. It could mean so much good for our community.

MARCH 1 at 6PM - MARCH 2 at 6PM LEARN MORE at AmplifyATX.org


SOCIAL HOUR

CHRISTMAS ON CONGRESS Music and Memories presented Christmas on Congress at the Paramount Theatre on December 15, benefiting Alzheimer’s Texas and Austin Sunshine Camps. Guests came together to show their support and spread holiday cheer while grooving to performances by amazing local artists, including Reed Turner and Jackie Venson.

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ROCK THE BRAZOS NYE 2017

FAMILY BUSINESS BEER CO. PREVIEW PARTY Family Business Beer Co. celebrated its opening with an intimate preview party on January 4. Friends sipped on the starting lineup of beers while enjoying Cajun favorites from Jep’s Southern Roots food trailer and listening to live music by Dan Gentile and Dan Dyer. The 15-acre Hill Country property features a large patio, a kids’ playground, outdoor games, and hammocks strung throughout an abundance of trees.

CHRISTMAS ON CONGRESS: 1. Denise Jackson & Sarah Stanley 2. Chelsea Martin & Tim Sharkey 3. Angela Petrilli & Jenny Pagliaro ROCK THE BRAZOS NYE 2017 : 4. Liam Collopy & Caroline Goodner 5. Heather Page, Kathryn Chandler & Julia Barnett-Tracy 6. Phoenix & Taylor Kitsch FAMILY BUSINESS BEER CO. PREVIEW PARTY: 7. Maddie Fletcher & Vicky Stetekluh 8. Gino & Alyse Graul 9. Jensen Ackles & Danneel Ackles 10. Cheyenne Doerr & Ashlee Huff 11. Rachel Holtin & Robin Emmerich

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On December 31, Austinites rang in the new year at the annual Rock the Brazos celebration. Hosted by Taylor Kitsch, the all-star fundraiser saw performances by the African Children’s Choir, DJ Amy Edwards, mentalist and magician Phoenix, and a special VIP performance by Rob Thomas. The night, benefiting Music for Life, culminated in a champagne toast at midnight.


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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Part of the TEAM By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

F

OR AS MUCH AS I LOVE IT HERE IN

Texas, and like to pretend I am a native, there are times when I know I’m not. There are still things about Texas that mystify me. Like chewing tobacco and dip spit cups. Like the number of gas pumps at Buc-ee’s. Or the obsession with football rivalries. Or deer blinds, weekend camo, and gun safety. Or how I managed to live so long before I knew about queso. I grew up living different places, never more than two years at a stretch. I was always the new kid, always a bit of a nerd. Or a big nerd, if my brother is reading this and fact-checking. I naturally imagined that one day I would have kids that followed in my footsteps of nerddom. I pictured myself cheering at Certamen competitions, wringing my sweaty palms at spelling bees, attending band concerts (I played the flute), and beaming with pride at National Honor Society banquets. My kids turned out much cooler than their mom. They are also very much from Texas, particularly my son. I’m not sure how my scrawny, nerdy genes ever produced an offensive lineman who outweighed me by third grade, who drives a pickup truck and knows how to shoot a gun. If I were to be perfectly honest, I can admit now that I never wanted my son to play football. I never wanted to cut my California summers short to return for Pop Warner practices on August 1, the apex of the summer furnace. I never wanted him

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to have bad knees or concussions. I never wanted him to love something that I didn’t totally understand or appreciate. But it happened. And thank God it did. So right now I’m going on the record to say that I’ve changed my mind about football. We live in cushy, comfy times. Boys don’t take off on horseback at age 15, with their 13-year-old brides in tow, to forge a homestead out on the plains. They aren’t (or at least we aren’t) working the plow, helping with the harvest, and rounding up cattle. Mostly they are hanging out indoors, Favor-ing food, watching other people have adventures on Netflix, and playing Xbox. Somehow, this doesn’t have the same effect in the making of a man. But waking up at 4:30 a.m. to go to practice, staying at school some days until 8 p.m., having

a lift third period, playing games on Fridays, and watching film on Saturdays — this creates an environment typically reserved for boys in the military. They are out sweating and suffering in the extreme heat and humidity, then later in the cold, wind, or rain. They are penalized as a team for anyone’s hangovers, shenanigans, or tardiness by angry coaches who make them run gassers. They don’t complain even when they ache, or are so tired they nod off at the dinner table and go to bed by 7 p.m. They take ice baths and tape sore knees and ankles and get back out there. They don’t want to let their coaches down. They don’t want to let one another down. By the end of senior year, they truly are a team, a brotherhood, a tribe. And I only have an outside perspective. I just cook food for an army, wash reeking practice clothes, rub sore muscles, make appointments at

‘‘

I N E V ER WA N T ED HIM TO H AV E BA D K N EES OR CONCUSSIONS . I N E V ER WA N T ED HIM TO LOV E SOMET HING T H AT I DIDN ’ T TOTA LLY U N DER STA N D OR A PPR ECI AT E .


the physical therapist, try to learn as much about football as I can, and scream on the sidelines until my voice is scratchy, then gone. My kitchen is filled with enormous boy-men who would have scared me not that many years ago. I go to games with their moms; we all wear red jerseys with our sons’ numbers on them and carry giant “fat heads,” oversize photos of our sons’ faces. We are those people. We go to pep rallies and serve at team dinners. We go to coaches’ breakfasts and decorate team buses. We have photo pins and yard signs and car stickers. I never thought I would be a football mom, but here I am — loud and proud. I’ve watched every episode of “Friday Night Lights” (and loved it). Now I live it. And like my son, I have a community. I witnessed his tribe in raw form recently. We had to put our beloved dog, Mercy, down; she was almost 12 years old and could no longer walk. There was never a good time to do this sad deed, but it finally could be put off no longer. I asked our vet to come over early one evening so we could say our goodbyes at home. That afternoon I pulled into our driveway and could barely get to the garage because there were so many pickup trucks parked on the street, on the driveway, and pulled up on the grass. I wondered what was going on. I walked in the house, and it was oddly silent. I found my son, all 265 pounds of him, curled around Mercy on her dog bed in my office. And surrounding him were his teammates, his brotherhood, standing in silence, standing in strength, standing in solidarity, simply bearing witness to his pain. I know 50-year-old men who do not have friendships like these. So, yes, I have changed my mind about football. GO, CHAPS. tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Tragedy and Transcendence HOW BRIT TANY MORRISON FOUND HER WAY THROUGH GRIEF BY GIVING BACK By Brittani Sonnenberg Photographs by Leah Muse

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F YOU HAPPENED TO SIT BESIDE BRITTANY MORRISON ON AN AIR-

plane and exchanged midflight pleasantries — work, kids, hometown, etc. — you’d be forgiven, as she stepped off the jet bridge and waved goodbye, for thinking she was one of those charmed women with a perfect life. Her easy, reassuring smile, striking good looks, and kind demeanor suggest an untroubled biography. But let’s say you took your aisle seat beside Morrison sniffling: You’re on the way to your brother’s funeral, you tell her; his death came out of nowhere. You’re sorry for crying but you just can’t seem to get a grip since you heard the news. At this, Morrison’s warm brown gaze might deepen, and, as the plane tilted skyward, you might hear the story that she’s shared with countless others in her tireless volunteer work with Hospice Austin. You might learn, then, that the warmth of her smile isn’t the untested joy of an easy life but a grace that comes in the afterglow of walking through fire. And suddenly Morrison, a 29-year-old mom and AVP of Commercial Business Development at Austin Title, might also strike you as a very wise and very old soul. Here she shares her story of loss and how she moved from deep personal tragedy to the passionate volunteer work for Hospice Austin that recently earned her I Live Here I Give Here’s 2017 Patsy Woods Martin BIG Giver Award.

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Morrison received the 2017 Patsy Woods Martin BIG Giver Award.


What circumstances originally led you to seek out Hospice Austin? My situation is somewhat unique. My parents married when my mother became pregnant. They were divorced within a year of my birth. Throughout my childhood, my mother struggled with her own demons. My father passed away my senior year of high school from health issues that were much more severe than he’d let on. A few months later, my grandmother died. And then, right before my senior year in college, my aunt passed away. Meanwhile, my mother was struggling with alcoholism. It was so painful to watch, because I knew the kind of person she could be. But she had spent a lot of time in a physically and verbally abusive relationship. She was sober for one and a half years in high school, my freshman and sophomore years. She met someone named Jim when I was 15 — the most wonderful man. When I was in college, they reconnected, and he tried to help her. He was a great support system for me. At the end of college, I saw how sick she was getting. The day after my graduation, I moved in with Jim as my mother began a very rapid decline. I was working part-time at a doctor’s office, and after work one day, Jim sat me down. He had taken her to a doctor, who told her that complications from liver failure meant she had two weeks to live. She stayed at the house with me. She could be stubborn, ornery, and mean sometimes, or purely in denial. It was the most emotional, scary thing I’ve ever endured. Knowing what I know now about the dying process, I would have let go more. But [back] then, coping with Mom was the hardest. I began attending Al-Anon meetings, but it was a little too late. I was so different from everyone else in the room: I had become the caregiver

‘‘

I H A D TO LIT ER A LLY LOSE E V ERY T HING TO FEEL HOW WON DER F U L LIFE C A N BE . I FEEL LIK E I WA S BOR N AGA IN IN TO T HE WOR LD A N D GI V EN GR ACE W HEN I MOST N EEDED IT.

of an alcoholic, not just someone trying to cope with their loved one’s disease. That’s where Hospice Austin came in. They offered an amazing sense of caring and support. On the day of my mother’s death, the nurse somehow intuited that my mother was dying and had the initiative to come back after visiting other patients. So my mother was able to pass without pain or struggling to endure. There’s a real lack of education around palliative care in our culture. We need to learn how to offer a loved one comfort as they die, instead of trying to fix them. You’ve endured so much loss in your life. How did you find the strength to give back after the pain of your own grief? Ever since the experience of my mother’s death, I wanted to help Hospice Austin. They never cherry-pick clients based on their ability to pay. They

operate from the principle that everyone deserves the opportunity to die peacefully, without pain. They also work to reach a younger audience, with initiatives like Camp Brave Heart, a camp for grieving kids and teens. Everything they do runs on volunteer time and donor dollars. Directly after my mom’s death, I went into superwoman mode. Dealing with her house was a huge financial burden. The grief counseling Hospice Austin offered was a huge relief. My entire life I’d had very little control, and fear and stress predominated. One year after the anniversary of her death, I had an emotional breakdown. My then-boyfriend (now husband), Britt, had a grandfather who had lost his wife and gone to grief counseling. You need to talk to someone, he said. I did it for eight months, and it helped so much. One day, I was sitting at home and I realized tribeza.com

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Jo’s on Second Street is Morrison’s favorite place to work.

I was ready to help. I knew I didn’t want to be involved with patients; that was still too traumatic. So I tried to think of how I could be of service. I called Hospice Austin up and told them what I was good at. We decided I could share my story with others in the community. It’s rare for someone my age to share their grief story so publicly. It taught me how to talk to those who are grieving. Even if you’ve been through the gamut yourself, it is challenging to speak to those in the midst of it — because you care so much. But it’s so important. I had to literally lose everything to feel how wonderful life can be. I feel like I was born again into the world and given grace when I most needed

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it. In those moments, we are carried by something much greater than ourselves. Still, there can be times that still feel really hard. Stuff you wouldn’t expect, like looking for a senior [year] photo for an activity at work. For most people, that would simply mean digging through old photos, but for me, that meant going up to the attic and returning to a really traumatic time. And now that I have a baby girl, I wish my mom was here to witness her big moments, like her first birthday. Those joyful moments are tinged with sadness too — full of celebrating and mourning. But now I’m able to enjoy them and feel everything, the good and the bad. I’m no longer consumed by my grief.


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Wa l ly W or km a n G a l l e ry

Malcolm Bucknall 1202 West Si x th Street Aust in, Tex as 78703 wal ly workmangal ler y.com 512.472.7428 Image: Lord Frogmore and Frogdog (detail), oil on canvas


LOC AL LOVE

DAVID KURIO

David Kurio Designs TIP: When choosing your designer and florist, make sure they listen to you and your vision. At the same time, build a trust with them and incorporate their suggestions and years of experience. [This] will maximize your budget and make your vision come to life. To avoid disappointment when planning and choosing the types of flowers you want, be aware that flowers are seasonal and not all varieties are available year-round. If you are set on a certain flower, such as blooming branches and spring flowers, but your wedding is in the winter months, these flowers will not be available.

HOW DO YOU MAKE SURE THAT YOUR BIG DAY GOES OFF SMOOTHLY? WE ASKED SOME E XPERT WEDDING PL ANNERS FOR THEIR FAVORITE TIPS FOR CRE ATING A MEMOR ABLE EVENT.

Compiled By Nicole Beckley

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VICTORIA HENTRICH

Hentrich Creative Consultants TIP: Recessional music is very often

overlooked. Why not recess to an upbeat song such as “When the Saints Go Marching In,” or the Texas fight song, if you are a Longhorns fan. [The Four Seasons’ “December, 1963”] “Oh, What a Night” is also a great song! Something like this adds excitement to what is coming ahead. Keep your guests on their toes.

V I C TO R I A H E N T R I C H P H OTO G R A P H B Y B Y J O D E E D E B E S .

LOCAL LOVE


COURTNEY YOUNG

Caplan Miller Events TIP: Don’t overthink attire!

The mother of the bride and/or groom’s dress doesn’t need to perfectly match your color palette. It’s more important that they feel beautiful that night in a dress of their choosing instead of putting strict parameters on the color they must wear!

JENNY STONE

Jenny Stone Designs TIP: The personalities of your photographer

J E N N Y S TO N E D E S I G N S P H OTO G R A P H B Y K I M F R A N CO I S . B E T H WA L K E R P H OTO B Y J E N D I L L E N D E R P H OTO G R A P H Y.

and wedding planner are crucial, since they will be with you all day on the most important day of your life! If you put together a great team, it will make a huge difference in the mood and flow of the day. No matter what happens, rolling with it and having fun is what you and your guests will remember.

BETH WALKER 36th Street Events

TIP: Be sure to schedule into your timeline time to enjoy the

moments! We always recommend having our couples see the reception space together before we open the doors to guests. We want to make sure they get to see everything put together before the night flies by. One of our favorites is a private last dance. When guests get lined up for the grand exit, the couple stays behind for one final dance! It’s such a great moment to take in everything one last time! tribeza.com

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T R I B E Z A TA L K

ALL the BUZZ

CITY AT PLAY What if a street light did more than just illuminate your path? In the new temporary art installation “Shadowing,” street lights will capture and replay the shadows of passersby. The installation, from artists Jonathan Chomko and Matthew Rosier, is part of Playable City Austin, an initiative to encourage citizens to engage creatively with their environments. Street lights throughout downtown, South Congress Avenue, and areas of East Austin will have the shadowcapture capabilities until March 18.

“People ask, are you co-working? Are you childcare? Are you a coffee shop? And the answer is yes,” Shelly Weiser says. Weiser, who opened The Hive in October 2017, had a vision for a place where parents could find the things they needed all in one spot. Located 14 miles south of downtown in an old house on an acre of land, with cows as neighbors, The Hive has a dedicated coworking space with four desks, a coffee shop, and a child-supervision area, for parents working on the premises. Weiser says she started the space out of necessity. “I’m a graphic designer and work from home and had a one and two-year-

old at the time,” she says. “I talked to other parents and saw how beneficial it would be to everyone, not just myself; felt the need; and decided to do something crazy and fill it.” HIVEAUSTIN.COM

TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

AUSTINTEXAS.GOV/PLAYABLEAUSTIN

“People have been extremely curious and helpful in trying to make Dia’s more than I ever imagined in terms of a community place,” Dia’s Market owner David Hopper says. Since opening in the Crestview neighborhood in 2016, Dia’s Market has become a go-to spot for fresh deli sandwiches, specialty grocery items, and neighborhood activities, like a Wednesday night run club. The community feeling extends to the distributors as well, as Hopper sources jelly and queso from Austin Slow Burn and eggs from Milagro Farms. “I text our salsa guy every two weeks,” Hopper says. DIASMARKET.COM

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D I A’ S P H OTO G R A P H B Y VA N E S S A C E R DAY.

MARKET FRESH


What Comes AROUND

“There’s a lot of different run groups out there, and we hope to bring everybody together and highlight the really strong running culture that’s in Austin,” Pam Hess says. In January, she and her husband, Ryan, held the grand opening of The Loop Running Supply Company, a specialty running store offering clothes, shoes, and technical gear, as well as a locker rental program for regular runners of the trail around Lady Bird Lake. For the Hesses, running is not only a calling, it’s how they met. “We started out just being running buddies,” Pam says. “I was much slower than him, so he must have really liked me, because he was willing to go a much slower pace at the time.” Now, with the opening of The Loop, housed near the former Luke’s Locker space, they want to share their passion. “Where we are located, in the center of the trail, essentially, we have to be community-driven,” Pam says. LOOPRUNNINGSUPPLY.CO

What’s COOKING

E S C P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y P H A I D O N . LO O P P H OTO G R A P H B Y T R AV I S H A L L M A R K .

CHANGE would do you GOOD With its fifth annual ChangeMaker Awards, the Austin Young Chamber honors some outstanding individuals for their innovative community leadership. This year’s award winners include the executive director of Truth Be Told, Katie Ford; Pediatric Healthcare Connection owner, Laura Maniccia; and songwriter and entrepreneur Casey McPherson. The ceremony, held at the Westin Domain on February 16, is bookended by the inaugural LEAD Summit, featuring speakers and sessions on career development for millennial workers.

Elizabeth Street Café regulars, rejoice. You can now re-create some of your favorite ESC dishes at home. In the recently released “Elizabeth Street Café” cookbook, Tom Moorman and Larry McGuire, with Julia Turshen, serve up 100 French-inspired Vietnamese recipes. From spicy tofu and avocado steamed buns to the restaurant’s celebrated macarons, these delicious treats are now easy to bring to your dining table. MCGUIRE-MOORMAN-HOSPITALITY.MYSHOPIFY.COM

AUSTINYC.ORG/SIGNATURE-EVENTS/CHANGEMAKER-LUNCHEON

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC 93.3 KGSR PRESENTS BØRNS

February 2 Stubb’s BBQ

MARTY STUART & HIS FABULOUS SUPERLATIVES

February 16 Antone’s Nightclub

A ARON WATSON

JOSÉ GONZÁLEZ

February 3 Long Center

February 17 ACL Live at The Moody Theater AJR

AUGUST BURNS RED

February 17 Emo’s Austin

THE AUSTIN MUSIC AWARDS

February 28 ACL Live at The Moody Theater STEVE AOKI W/ DESIIGNER & DIM MAK

February 28 Stubb’s BBQ

FILM

February 4 Emo’s Austin

G-EAZY

TEXAS FOCUS: TRUE CONVICTION

AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS JURASSIC PARK LIVE

February 18 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

February 8 Bullock Texas State History Museum

GRAMATIK

TELL THEM WE ARE RISING: THE STORY OF BLACK COLLEGES

February 9 Long Center

February 22 Emo’s Austin

CARLOS PIÑANA

ST. VINCENT

February 10 Long Center

February 22 & 23 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

DELBERT MCCLINTON

DAN AUERBACH & THE EASY EYE SOUND REVUE

February 10 Paramount Theatre

LETTUCE W/ THE MOTET

February 10 Stubb’s BBQ

February 23 Stubb’s BBQ

DAVE MASON

LANA DEL REY

February 23 & 24 One World Theatre

JIMMIE VAUGHAN

AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS TRIUMPH OVER FATE

February 11 Frank Erwin Center

February 13 Antone’s Nightclub

February 24 Long Center

ERIC JOHNSON

REBELUTION

G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE

FOREIGNER

February 24 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

February 15 Paramount Theatre

February 16 Stubb’s BBQ

NF

LIGHTS

February 25 Stubb’s BBQ

February 16 Emo’s Austin

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February 25 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

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February 15 George Washington Carver Genealogy Center

SHAUN OF THE DEAD PUB RUN & FILM

February 22 Paramount Theatre

PHILIP GLASS ENSEMBLE: KOYA ANISQATSI

February 23 Bass Concert Hall

THE BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR

February 25 & 26 Paramount Theatre

THEATER FRONTERAFEST 2018

Through February 17 Hyde Park Theatre

AUSTIN SHAKESPEARE PRESENTS THE SEAGULL

February 7 – 25 Long Center

GOLDEN DRAGON ACROBATS

February 11 Long Center

SCHOOL OF ROCK

February 13 – 18 Bass Concert Hall

CIRQUE DU SOLEIL: CRYSTAL

February 14 – 18 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park A DELICATE SHIP

February 15 – 25 The Santa Cruz Theatre STEPHEN MILLS PRESENTS MASTERS OF DANCE

February 16 – 18 Long Center NOISES OFF

February 16 – March 10 The City Theatre Company DANCING WITH THE STARS: LIVE!

February 21 Bass Concert Hall ENRON

February 21 – March 4 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

COMEDY BIG JAY OAKERSON

February 1 – 3 Cap City Comedy Club

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

TREVOR NOAH

Through March 4 ZACH Theatre

February 2 & 3 Bass Concert Hall

WEST SIDE STORY

HEFFERNAN & LEMME LIVE!

February 1 – 4, 8 – 11 MacTheatre

February 8 – 10 Cap City Comedy Club


WELLRED COMEDY TOUR: FROM DIXIE WITH LOVE

February 9 Paramount Theatre

11TH ANNUAL PUPPY BOWL

February 3 Austin Humane Society

GABRIEL IGLESIAS

PETE SOUZA: OBAMA: AN INTIMATE PORTRAIT

BRIAN POSEHN

BRUNCH + FLOW YOGA

ROB HAZE

CARNAVAL BRASILEIRO

February 16 Frank Erwin Center

February 22 – 24 Cap City Comedy Club

February 23 & 24 The Velveeta Room

CHILDREN LAS AVENTURAS DE ENOUGHIE: UN CUENTO DE KINDNESS

Through February 25 ZACH Theatre

THE WAZIR OF OZ

February 3 – 25 Austin Scottish Rite Theater WINTER FAERIE TEA PARTIES

February 4 & 18 Zilker Botanical Garden BLACK HISTORY MONTH KIDS DAY

February 17 George Washington Carver Genealogy Center DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD LIVE!: KING FOR A DAY!

February 24 Bass Concert Hall

OTHER MICHAEL POLLAN: ONE WRITER’S TRIP

February 2 Long Center

February 3 Paramount Theatre

February 4 – 25 backYARD at Waller Creek

February 10 Palmer Events Center

THE ILLUSIONISTS PRESENT ADAM TRENT

February 11 ACL Live at The Moody Theater AUSTIN BLUES REVUE

February 12 Antone’s Nightclub

OUTSIDER FESTIVAL

February 14 – 18 Various Locations

AUSTIN MARATHON & HALF MARATHON

February 18 Downtown Austin

UFC FIGHT NIGHT

February 18 Frank Erwin Center

TASTE OF BLACK AUSTIN: FROM FIELD TO TABLE

February 20 Peached Social House

INFUSIONS COCKTAIL WORKSHOP

February 23 REVELRY

AUSTIN OYSTER FESTIVAL

February 24 Seaholm Lawn

MUSIC PICK

ST. VINCENT By Neal Baker

ACL Live at The Moody Theater FEBRUARY 22 & 23, 8 P.M.

Annie Clark, known onstage as St. Vincent, isn’t a rule breaker in the traditional sense. And she’d be the first to appreciate the irony of that statement. Her anarchic brand of creativity doesn’t have her actively looking for rules to break or boundaries to push. Instead, it is simply assertive of the fact that the laws, traditions, and schools of thought in the world of art and expression have no mandate unless we allow them to. This attitude is at the center of what are now, with the release of “Masseduction,” five wildly colorful records, featuring dazzling musical arrangements and some truly quirky and innovative guitar playing that confounds purists on the internet. On “Masseduction,” Clark and her music take on a persona she’s described as “sexy, but very arch, and very, very absurd too.” Her guitar licks lie just below the surface of synth-y orchestrations, waiting for a chance to come out bearing fangs and rattling tails. It’s lots of show and a little madness, not without a sense of real vulnerability. Clark’s individualism shines more than ever on this new album and tour; she’s performing personal art-rock pieces while wielding a guitar that she designed from the ground up. And while in the past she was backed by a band, she spends most of her time these days playing a one-woman show, where she exhibits a latex wardrobe and Martian musicianship. St. Vincent will be playing two nights at ACL Live at The Moody Theater on February 22 and 23. Expect her to take it by storm. tribeza.com

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts ZOË SHULMAN: THE ALLEGORY OF GOOD & BAD GOVERNMENT

FORM INTO SPIRIT: ELLSWORTH KELLY’S AUSTIN

PRINTAUSTIN

GAIL CHOVAN: NO TRACE OF NOW WILL REMAIN

Through February 10 CAMBIAart Gallery

Through February 15 Various Locations KARINA NOEL HEAN

Through February 17 Gallery Shoal Creek

Through March 1 Women & Their Work

IN DEPTH: A GROUP SHOW

REFIGURED: RADICAL REALISM By Neal Baker

Dougherty Arts Center FEBRUARY 10 – MARCH 10

For many years, the modern art landscape has been dominated by conceptual and abstract works. Meanwhile, the realist tradition has seemed sidelined. Now, thanks to the Austin Figurative Gallery, realism gets its due with a new exhibition at the Dougherty Arts Center. Running February 10 through March 10, the exhibition, “Refigured: Radical Realism,” showcases Austin artists involved in a modern revival of this style of figurative art. In addition to the contrast with conceptual art, the resurgence of realism, a style that highlights deeply observed details, is particularly notable because of its history. The way we depict people has always spoken to what we find important — classical sculpture suggested that in the body there lies potential toward a godly ideal, and the studied detail of Renaissance painting paralleled the preoccupation with knowledge and enlightenment of the time. Realism sprang from an era of social change, beginning after the French Revolution of 1848, and was used by many as a contrast to Romanticism. Now that this kind of art is finding a foothold again, it brings with it uniquely honest messages about how people see themselves. And, amid a difficult social and political climate, art concerned with people and their reality presents an opportunity to think about identity and truth. Wander in any day you like or come to one of the scheduled events. The opening reception takes place February 16 from 6 to 8 p.m., and on February 21, there will be a “date night” from 7 to 9 p.m., where couples of any kind are invited to be taught by Austin artists how to paint and be painted. tribeza.com

Through February 24 Davis Gallery

REJINA THOMAS: STATE OF ASCENSION

Through February 28 George Washington Carver Genealogy Center RODNEY MCMILLIAN

February 1 – August 26 The Contemporary Austin SUN CITY PRO SIG SHOW

February 2 – 28 Old Bakery & Emporium JONAS CRISCOE

February 2 – April 22 OLA Gallery SALVADOR DALÍ: THE ARGILLET COLLECTION

February 3 Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery MALCOLM BUCKNALL: SOLO SHOW

February 3 – March 3 Wally Workman Gallery RADICAL REALISM

February 10 – March 10 Dougherty Arts Center

“ F E Y, ” PA I N T I N G B Y D E N I S E M . F U LTO N

ART PICK

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February 18 – April 29 Blanton Museum of Art


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A DV E R T I S I N G @ T R I B E Z A .CO M

S U B S C R I B E T O T R I B E Z A AT T R I B E Z A .C O M


Art SPACES BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

MASTERS OF DANCE By Neal Baker

The Long Center FEBRUARY 16 & 17, 8 P.M. & FEBRUARY 18, 3 P.M.

As Ballet Austin’s Artistic Director, Stephen Mills beautifully tells age-old stories onstage and builds fantasies from light and color. Dance is the medium, and through its expression we’ve come to know concepts and characters, like Hamlet, Beauty and the Beast, and Romeo and Juliet, in an entirely new way. “Masters of Dance,” coming to the Long Center February 16 through 18, is a departure from this tradition. The title here is broad, but contains all you need to know. For this work, Mills is accompanied by the extraordinary New York choreographers Justin Peck and Pam Tanowitz in presenting three pieces of modern dance wherein no subject is necessary. This is dance about dance — art for its own sake. And the accompanying music couldn’t be more fitting. Philip Glass piano music performed live. John Cage’s rambling percussion. It’s music that is minimal yet offers much, and for which the inspiration is simply the music that came before it. This show is a rare and brief opportunity to see the work of some of the country’s best choreographers together as part of one program. Shows are Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m., with a 3 p.m. matinee on Sunday.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: T-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

P H OTO G R A P H B Y TO N Y S P I E L B E R G

MUSEUMS


GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S., Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DE STIJL | PODIUM FOR ART 1006 W. 31st St. (512) 354 0868 Hours: Tu-Thu, Sa 1-5 destijlaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sat & Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: T-F 10-5 space12.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sat & Su 12-5 massgallery.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F10-6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Wedding Guide

Bella Bridesmaids is the premier shopping experience for bridesmaid apparel in Central Texas. They offer modern, wearable dresses and personal service in an upscale and consultative environment. With 51 individually owned and operated showrooms nationwide, representing more than 30 bridesmaid dress designers, you’ll be amazed by the possibilities. BELLABRIDESMAIDS.COM | AUSTIN@BELLABRIDESMAIDS.COM | 512-542-3377 CO RY A N D JAC K I E PHOTOG R A PHY

Austin has become a coveted wedding destination with endless options for your big day! Whether your nuptials are set against the historic Capitol building and downtown skyline or nestled within the bucolic Hill Country, we’ve compiled your go-to list for Austin’s premier wedding vendors.

VIC BONVICINI PHOTOG R A PHY LINDSEY MUELLER PHOTOG R A PHY

Since 1978, The Menagerie has been one of the most trusted names in jewelry in central Texas. With Vickie Roan as its founder, The Menagerie has grown into a well-established jewelry store and gift retailer that generations of families rely on for their expertise and personalized service. In addition to custom jewelry

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design and repairs, The Menagerie specializes in bridal registry of fine china, crystal and sterling silver. Their mission of trust, knowledge and value delivered with attentive services, will allow you to celebrate the most special time in your life in the very best way. THEMENAGERIE.COM | 512-453-4644


The Dowry offers a beautifully curated selection of jewelry for your nuptials. This Austin brand specializes in pieces that are delicate, precious and luxe, while their online wedding shop provides options and ideas for custom ring designs. A selection of their stunning bands can be found exclusively at ByGeorge. DOWRY.COM

There’s nothing more romantic than a helicopter flight over Austin. Surprise your sweetheart with a gift certificate or book the perfect Valentine’s date today! Pricing starts under $100 per person for a stunning downtown tour with HELO Austin or call for custom tour prices. HELOAUSTIN.COM | 512-350-5102

PHOTOG R A PH BY CASEY DUNN

This modern event space located in Dripping Springs has won several major design awards since opening its doors in 2015. Organized as a simple series of minimal white spaces set within 20 acres of Hill Country prairie, Prospect House offers a striking architectural backdrop for design-minded couples. PROSPECTHOUSETX.COM

Laurel Corrinne has created Sunless Body Blend, a new technique in sunless tanning that delivers the most natural and flawless results. The studio also offers expert body contouring with FDA-approved CoolSculpting, a noninvasive fat freezing treatment. Wedding, honeymoon, photo shoots or just because, feel confident and look naturally beautiful. Treatments for the bride and groom! LAURELCORRINNESTUDIO.COM 512-799-1729

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

7Co is a brand new full-service event venue (with outdoor space!) located in the heart of East Austin at 7th and Comal. The unique private event space is perfect for weddings, rehearsal dinners and other special occasions. The property spans an entire city block boasting high end interior finishes, a stunning 15,000 sq. ft. outdoor ceremony or reception space and a 1000 sq. ft. terrace with its own fountain. This new venue allows for a fully customized event lending itself to many different styles and budgets. 7Co is sure to leave a lasting impression with all of your guests! 7COEVENTS.COM | INFO@7COEVENTS.COM

800 Congress is Austin’s premier downtown event venue located on historic Congress Avenue. The space features sweeping views of the Capitol building with an open warehouse that is both industrial and polished with exposed brick, a covered street-level terrace, and state of the art A/V system. 800 Congress is your urban wedding destination! 800CONGRESSEVENTS.COM | INFO@800CONGRESSEVENTS.COM

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Lavish Beauty ATX, owned by locals Dash Harris and Jen Dirlam, offers on-site makeup and hair services in the Austin area. Their awardwinning team of expert stylists is fully equipped to bring glamour, ease and style to your big day. Contact Lavish Beauty to schedule a stress-free beauty experience for your next special event. LAVISHBEAUTYATX.COM

Melody’s Joy helps party throwers and event planners create a magical experience for their guests by curating beautiful, creative and elegant dessert tables for intimate celebrations. This Austin-based company offers dessert display rentals, installations and tablescape styling. Melody’s Joy will help make your event memorable for years to come.

HELLO@LAVISHBEAUTYATX.COM

MELODYSJOY.COM

ELKK PHOTOG R A PHY

The Salt Lick BBQ has been serving mouthwatering barbeque to the Hill Country and Austin area for generations. Their unique flavor dates back to 1967 when Thurman Roberts and his sons built the legendary BBQ pit, which still stands in their Driftwood Restaurant today. Since then, they have hosted and catered events both large and small across the country. The Salt Lick has onsite event facilities, private dining rooms and off-premises catering options making this Austin original perfect for your next special event! CATERING@SALTLICKBBQ.COM | 512-894-3117

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ORGANIZING THESE THREE GROUPS ARE GOING BEYOND THE “LIKE” BUTTON TO FOSTER REAL CIVIC ENGAGEMENT BY

ANNA ANDERSEN

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

ROBERT GOMEZ

COMMUNITY Austin is a city full of social entrepreneurs. It’s a city with philanthropic passion and the nonprofit organizations to prove it. With more than 6,000 registered nonprofits, according to a 2015 report by Mission Capital, Central Texas has more nonprofits per capita than anywhere else in the Southwest. At the same time, it can o!en feel easy to ignore what’s happening around us or to express interest in supporting pressing issues facing our community with little to no commitment. Joining Facebook groups, liking posts, and adding temporary profile photos might seem like ways to show our friends we care, but do these actions constitute real community building and civic engagement? Fortunately, for our community’s sake, we have people like those behind A Tribe Called Brunch, GivingCity Austin, and Glasshouse Policy — social entrepreneurs who not only care about what’s happening around us, but are working to help the rest of us care too.

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Henderson and Culp, co-creators of A Tribe Called Brunch.

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WE’RE NOT SAYING, THIS IS RIGHT OR THIS IS WRONG. IT’S MORE LIKE, THIS IS MY PERSPECTIVE, THIS IS HOW I LIVE MY LIFE, LET’S ALL CELEBRATE TOGETHER AND MOVE FORWARD. 42 FEBRUARY 2018 |

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Michael Henderson and Jared Culp Michael Henderson and Jared Culp started A Tribe Called Brunch to get people together to discuss pressing issues facing our community while sharing a delicious meal. It’s been just over a year since more than 50,000 people gathered downtown for the Women’s March on Austin, the largest march in Texas history, which motivated Michael Henderson and Jared Culp to start A Tribe Called Brunch. Henderson and Culp met during their undergraduate studies at Howard University and moved independently to Austin, where Henderson now works as a project manager at the City of Austin Innovation Office and Culp is a senior experience designer at McKinsey & Company. When they bumped into each other at the Women’s March, they had been following each other on Instagram for a year, admiring each other’s dinner parties. Culp’s were loose social gatherings, focused on getting creative people into the same room to enjoy good food and conversation, and Henderson’s were more structured, policy-oriented dinners with a goal of galvanizing volunteers. “I think we were looking for heaviness and lightness together,” Culp says of their decision to join forces. “We thought, how can we make a bigger event, elevate the conversation, and have more fun?” A month later, they hosted their first brunch, titled “Feminism: Which Way Forward?” “As we happened to run into each other the day of the Women’s March, that became an easy theme,” Culp explains. “We thought, people will still be looking for ways to connect with the community as the momentum dies down and the issue is not as omnipresent.” “And then we thought about it. We’re two black guys,” Henderson laughs. “We had to check ourselves. We were like, this is someone else’s issue. We need to make sure that we’re going to the right people, that we have a diverse group of women. I feel like everyone walked away impressed; we had feminists say, ‘You really nailed it.’” For the first event, inside a space on Tillery Street, over 30 people gathered for a few hours of conversation, cuisine, and mimosas. Speakers included Haven founder Liz Deering, Women Who Code Austin’s Sara Ines Calderon, and UT Austin Community Engagement Center Director Virginia Cumberbatch. Since then, they’ve hosted three more brunches, including “Hallelujah,” an interfaith discussion held in the wake of President Trump’s travel ban; “Bigger Than Me: The Next Wave of Philanthropy,” on reimagining ways to give; and “Cranes in the Sky,” the official kickoff event of Austin Design Week, addressing the changing face of East Austin. Most of their brunches, attended by 40 to 70 people, have been held at venues in East Austin, where Henderson and Culp live. They take great care to find the right speakers, who step up every 30 minutes to give five-minute speeches that end with action items, such as how to get involved or where to contribute, and a positive toast.

“One definition of a toast is a prayer amongst friends,” Henderson offers. “So we are bringing everyone together. We’re not saying, this is right or this is wrong. It’s more like, this is my perspective, this is how I live my life, let’s all celebrate together and move forward.” Culp echoes that sentiment: “I think it’s important to bring people together and have a conversation so that they’re inspired to do the things that are important to them. It’s not necessarily to copy what the speakers have done, because that’s what works for them, but to start thinking about the community and ways to get involved in the issues that matter to them.” With topics like religion and gentrification, they admit that brunch can get heated, but nobody is throwing potato croquettes or smoked salmon canapés around the room. Between speeches, the discussion o!en continues in a more informal manner, though Henderson and Culp have no control over that part. “People continue to talk about the themes,” Culp says, “but I think it’s also great that people are like, ‘Oh my god, you went to Copenhagen, I went to Copenhagen.’ People are meeting new people and making new friends. More than ever, at the last one, people walked away saying, ‘What’s your Instagram? What’s your number? Let’s hang out and grab coffee.’” Henderson agrees: “That’s beautiful, that’s community building.” A winning combo: motivated individuals, big ideas, and brunch.

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Monica Williams Monica Williams champions everyday philanthropy through her media company, GivingCity Austin, ensuring that people are informed about how to support the causes they care about. With the Mando Rayo + Collective, Williams is also behind The New Philanthropists, working to make the boards of nonprofits more diverse and representative of the communities they serve. Ten years ago, Monica Williams started GivingCity Austin as a personal blog called GoodCause. A year later, she recruited a designer and turned it into a magazine about people doing good things in the community. Initially, the magazine was a way for them to showcase editorial skills to potential clients. To their surprise, when Williams and her designer, both of whom had full-time jobs and kids, announced that the side project was shutting down, people protested. Little did Williams know, she had been supporting a community around her content. Today the site, Givingcityaustin.com, is the city’s go-to guide to philanthropy. “If you want to start a business in Austin, if you want to lose weight, if you want to start a garden or raise honeybees, you can Google it and somebody has undoubtedly posted instructions,” Williams says. “But if you want to take your giving from transactional giving, or reactive giving, every time there’s a hurricane to ‘OK, now I want this to have an impact. What do I really care about?’ there’s no playbook telling you how to do that.” It’s not surprising then that most of the traffic to Givingcityaustin.com is organic, the result of internet searches for answers that are difficult to find elsewhere. Williams also gets plenty of direct inquiries, which she says result in a lot of the site’s content. “I get random phone calls all the time,” Williams says. “A woman will call me and say, ‘My office was going to make gingerbread houses. Now we’re not going to do that, so we have all this candy. Who do we give it to?’ Someone will say, ‘I have a sofa I want to give away.’ Or ‘I’m making my end-of-year gi!, and I care about this cause, but I’m not sure which organization does the most work in that, so can you help me?’” Williams is thorough and thoughtful. If she

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doesn’t know the answer off the top of her head, she does the research and identifies the pathway to giving. “We once wrote a story about a man who wanted to give his house away. He didn’t want to deal with realtors, he just wanted to gi! it to charity,” recalls Williams, who identified an organization that made it happen in three months. “He said it was life-changing. He’d never given a gi! that big.” It’s a good week, Williams says, if she can write about something obscure that educates even people within the nonprofit sector. However, the top three posts are always the same every year: a list of school supply drives posted in June, a list of Thanksgiving volunteering opportunities posted in October, and a list of holiday toy drives and other giving opportunities posted in November. “We try to show people pathways to giving,” Williams says, “but we also try to explain how the nonprofit sector works, providing all of that instructional stuff you get for anything else you want to do in your life.” Williams also directs a lot of her energy to one organization in particular, The New Philanthropists, which works to increase diversity on the boards of nonprofits. “Nonprofits are the stewards of community money, community trust, and community hopes and dreams,” she says. “We believe, even in the for-profit world, that a homogenous board is not as creative, not as effective, and not as innovative.” With a biweekly segment on Fox 7’s “Good Day Austin” and, more recently, a regular Sunday column in the Austin American-Statesman, Williams is growing her reach. “The mission is not to increase traffic or drive revenue,” she says. “We just want more people to have the tools to get involved.”

Williams gives readers of her website the tools to get involved in the community.


P H OTO G R A P H B Y

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Francisco Enriquez and Thomas Visco Through Glasshouse Policy, Francisco Enriquez and Thomas Visco are encouraging regular citizens to care about the public policies that affect their daily lives, engaging them in creative ways that sometimes involve Legos and often involve beer. As new college graduates in 2013, Francisco Enriquez and Thomas Visco found themselves working for the Public Interest Research Group (PIRG), a nonprofit organization focused on driving policy change. While Enriquez worked at a national office in Boston, Visco served in a state office in Texas. When they met, at a shared training session, they realized they were unhappy for the same reason: public-interest groups — like the ones they were working for — were coming up with ideas in-house and then selling those ideas to the public. How was the authentic public voice being represented? And, more importantly, how do you get people to care about big-picture policy ideas? “In this city, there’s a panel conversation every night of the week about any topic under the sun, and they always kind of have the same format, with experts onstage talking about an issue and people asking questions,” Enriquez says. “We thought, well, maybe there’s a better, more interactive way to do that.” Enriquez and Visco wanted to figure out a better way to make dry ideas like city budgeting and transportation planning feel accessible and, well, fun. Six months a!er leaving the PIRG, they were working on a business plan for Glasshouse Policy, a nonprofit policy organization that strives to bridge the gap between policymakers and the public. “We’re not here to try to sell an idea or some tailored solution that we hope people buy into,” Enriquez explains. “Instead, we are trying to bring people together, the idea being that through this transparent process, one in which the community is involved, we can arrive at solutions.”

In addition to piloting online forums, which enable people to weigh in on issues from the comfort of their home, Enriquez and Visco have been organizing game nights in partnership with the Austin Monitor to reinvigorate the in-person town hall and panel formats. By putting people in the shoes of a policymaker tasked with creating the municipal budget or rewriting Austin’s Land Development Code, Enriquez and Visco believe people come to better understand the intricacies and limitations of policy, which in turn makes them more engaged, civically active citizens. “The problem with the panel conversation is that people show up and it’s like, OK, here are four perspectives, and then they leave,” Visco says. “With game nights, we’re trying to give the public a better understanding of what policymakers actually do. We’re putting beer in five people’s hands and having them sit around a Lego board and say, ‘OK, what do we want this to look like?’ and they have to talk themselves through that.” So far, the game nights have been a hit. Everyone from the 68-year-old property owner in West Austin to new, younger constituents are attending. Enriquez and Visco are pleased. “I’ve been to a lot of town halls, where the average attendee is 70 years old. That’s never happened at one of our game nights,” Visco says, estimating that the average age of attendees is mid- to late 30s. Glasshouse, true to its transparency, also wants the public to feel like it can affect policy issues. “When it comes to fire codes,” Visco says, “we know what the sprinkler lobbyist has to say, we know what the oil and gas lobby has to say, we know what fire marshals have to say, but what does the normal person think about this issue? Frankly, we’re just trying to be an honest broker amongst stakeholders, reminding people that the public should have a seat at the table.” Have they been successful? “If our goal is to bridge the gap between citizens and policymakers,” Enriquez says, “and members of the public are reporting that they feel more educated and more able to affect an issue, then we have achieved some level of change.”

Glasshouse Policy’s game nights help make public policy ideas feel fun. tribeza.com

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A COMMUNITY

Visiting sculptor PATRICK DOUGHERTY creates much more than art in Pease Park

OF STICK PEOPLE


ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY LEONID FURMANSKY BY

O

N JANUARY 10, 2018, I ARRIVE AT PEASE PARK AT 7:45 A.M.,

relieved that it’s not as cold as it had been the previous week. This is a place I know well, and a!er decades of walking its paths, I’ve come to feel about the park as one does an old friend; time and life change you both, but the desire to remain connected doesn’t fade. All the usuals, though fewer than I typically see on my a!ernoon visits, are here: walkers, runners, bike riders, and dogs. While the park is peaceful this early in the morning, it’s not exactly quiet, and I see why as I get closer to the area called Custer’s Meadow, just south of 24th Street. A small group of people wearing green bandannas mills around an unfamiliar site in this normally wide-open part of the park. Enormous piles of Ligustrum lie on the ground near a portable chain-link fence whose sections have been arranged into a rough oval about 50 by 100 feet across. Against the fence lean bundles of a particularly aggressive kind of shrub whose multiple nicknames all sound gloomy — depression weed, poverty weed, and false willow. Both the Ligustrum and the weedy shrub are unwelcome residents of Central Texas. Surely no one at South Austin Park or the ranch in Stonewall where they were cut down and carted away by the truckload the day before was sorry to see them go.

Opposite, left to right, Sam Dougherty, sculptor Patrick Dougherty and volunteers Rick, Rhonda, Michelle and Catherine, in front of the stickwork sculpture. tribeza.com

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Aside from Dougherty’s pruning shears, the only equipment used is an auger, which digs starter holes for the largest sticks that will anchor the structures. Volunteers prepare materials for the threeweek installation.

Standing in the middle of the group is a tall, white-haired man with glasses the Pease Park Conservancy (PPC). The nonprofit, which raised the funds to and a baseball cap. If I didn’t know better, by the way he gestures as he talks, bring Dougherty and his art to Austin, was launched in 2008 by a group of I’d assume he was a coach of some kind and the eight people listening were neighbors then known as Trees for Pease. It’s grown to a staff of three, plus members of a team who’d honed their skills working together, over time, un- volunteers from across Austin, who help maintain and improve the park for der his leadership. But from his book, “Stickwork,” and “Bending Sticks,” the the benefit of today’s residents, as well as future generations. documentary film about him, I recognize the man as sculptor Patrick DoughMy conversation with Bob, which moves quickly from surface pleasantries erty. From this point in January he’s to be at Pease Park for the following to deeper topics like the parallels between Dougherty’s work and spiritual three weeks to create an as-yet-untitled work of art with the help of hundreds concepts such as impermanence, takes place as our hands are in constant moof local volunteers, myself included. tion. We’re stripping the leaves from the Ligustrum and readying the stalks to An Oklahoma native raised in North Carolina, Dougherty is world-re- move from one pile outside the fence to a staging area inside it. Someone a pile nowned for his more than 275 large-scale sculptures dotting the globe, each over notes how the bare stalks look as though they’ve been processed in some made entirely of saplings, sticks, and twigs. The group surrounding him com- way, and we all laugh, realizing that we are, in fact, the processors. prises a random mix of Austinites, all of whom Dougherty has just met and Five to eight volunteers work four-hour shi!s, one group in the morning most of whom have never met one another. and another in the a!ernoon. Dougherty, whose son Sam o!en works with Dougherty’s work, as mesmerizing for its intricate detail as it is majestic in him, gives each group guidance and plenty of friendly encouragement along scope and breadth of imagination, is completely organic and locally site-spe- the way, all while answering questions and explaining the various stages of cific in more ways than one: His materials come from whatever species (o!en the project. A few hardy folks spend the entire day at the park, and some even undesirable) grow in the area where he’s commissioned to work; the under- arrive with their own work gloves. taking is dependent on local volunteer help; the design, a result of the artist’s A!er my first day, I returned and over the course of my shi!s, I meet a few reaction to the local surroundings, evolves throughout the project; and the people who were born in Austin; more who moved here 25 or 30 years ago finished product follows what Dougherty describes as a natural cycle of life. from places like Michigan, Wisconsin, Washington, D.C., or elsewhere in TexThis work of art is meant to be outside, in the conditions from which its ma- as; a woman who’s been here exactly one year; and a man who says his family terials originated, and later — a!er, as he puts it, is loving their sixth Austin winter (he hails from “a few good years, depending on the weather” — it Chicago). The age range runs the gamut from a UT will return to the earth. senior named Austin, whose ability to do some But there’s another kind of life inherent in heavy li!ing without losing his enthusiasm proves Dougherty’s stick work and that’s the sense of extremely valuable, to Ernst and SueJo, a couple community conjured in the making of the art. who moved from Houston to Pflugerville a!er reFrom the beginning, When I ask him about it, he answers in his typitirement. I also meet David, sometimes known as this nontraditional, cally understated manner. “Yes, it’s a really nice “Ace,” a self-described “former happy hippie poteveryone-contributes art by-product. It’s for the community and by the ter” and an early employee of Clarksville Pottery project, happening in community,” he says. “I like that,” he smiles. who retired a!er a long career with the Austin It’s the non-permanent and welcoming aspect Fire Department. a spot known as a of Dougherty’s work that appeals to Bob, one of About 10 minutes into working on an especially true urban people’s park, the first volunteers I work alongside a!er receivleafy tree, something happens. Ace and I realize feels perfectly ing our instructions from Dougherty. For several we have mutual friends in his next-door neighat home in Austin. years, Bob and his wife have been involved with bors. A similar discovery happens with Rebecca,

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Center image: Dougherty’s design is sketched and laid out in cardboard in his notebook. A picnic table in the park serves as both his desk and volunteer headquarters.

who used to work in Victoria. Such connections among total strangers are teased out of conversation several times each day: “I used to work there,” “Our kids must have gone to the same school one year apart,” or “I love that band. I’m sure I’ve seen you play!” Comments pop up among the group about how o!en Austin still feels like a small town. The reasons for volunteering vary. Topher is an artist working in virtual reality and 3D, and Donya and her friend, Cricket, who drove in from San Marcos, are basket weavers. All three find Dougherty’s art inspiring and relevant to their own work. Donya calls the chance to work alongside an artist like Dougherty “absolutely irresistible.” Faith, a hospice physician originally from Canada, lives on several acres west of Austin. She explains that working outdoors is a nice balance to the many hours she spends dealing with death. Wearing her own gloves and broken-in work pants, she looks a little more comfortable with the task at hand than some of us, so I ask if she’s ever done anything like this before. “Oh no, not exactly,” she answers, although further conversation reveals that she’s created some “homemade art” out of sticks found on her property, along with cedar trunks that were there when she moved in. I’ve known Faith for a total of six hours, yet I’d be willing to bet that anything this woman makes with her hands is quite lovely. For Bruce, who says he’s a “process guy,” the opportunity to see something like this actually come together is amazing and well worth a few vacation days away from his work as a magazine designer. Another volunteer, Walt, jokingly says he signed up “for the bragging rights,” adding, “Really, this is a pretty big deal, and I want to say I was part of it.” Others, like Blair, have been following Dougherty’s career for years. She guesses she was one of the first, of more than 300, volunteers to sign up. Blair, along with Jenn and Meredith, both of whom live near the park, pull one long tree a!er another out of the pile, all the while covering topics such as raising kids and the best strategies for dealing with Austin allergies. A!er three days in the park, I begin to recognize some of its visitors — human and canine — who come on a daily basis. Several stop to chat and ask us what we’re doing. An Australian shepherd named Cubby runs here every day. His owner, on a bike, explains matter-of-factly, “We’re here for the squirrels.” From the beginning, this nontraditional, everyone-contributes art project, happening in a spot known as a true urban people’s park, feels perfectly at home in Austin. The bulk of the money raised for the project came from individuals in donations from ten to tens of thousands of dollars, along with

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STICKWORKS AROUND THE WORLD Austin’s Pease Park joins locations across the globe — including spaces in Hawaii, Japan, and South Korea, to name a few — in hosting Dougherty’s majestic creations. The intentionally impermanent structures are meant to be experienced for several years. As they weather the elements, the creations decompose naturally, and become mulch for the parks.

“... it’s for the community and by the community. I like that.”

Boogie Woogie (2014) Hermann Park, Houston, TX.

Birthday Palace (2014) National Tropical Botanical Garden, Kauai, HI.

several grants from the city and a few foundations. One, called Harlon’s Fund, exclusively supports efforts that inspire healing through the power of nature. Another donation, in terms of serious manpower and heavy equipment during the harvesting phase, came in the form of an expanded long-term partnership between PPC and Keith Brown, the owner of Austin Tree Experts. By the end of my last shi!, mountains of Ligustrums have been stripped, the ground we’ve been standing on is a glossy carpet of green leaves, we’ve filled 83 holes inside the fenced area with the stabilizing trunks that will support the base of the work, and we’ve erected two-story scaffolding so Patrick and Sam, along with the next shi! of volunteers, can work on the tops. We leave our gloves in the pile on the picnic table but hang onto our green PPC bandannas, the white squirrel logo in the center of mine not quite as clean as when I started. Nice-to-meet-you and see-you-around-town handshakes and hugs are exchanged. We thank Dougherty and let him know he’s welcome in our park anytime. By the time you read this, the Pease Park Stickwork Project will be complete and available to see in person. To learn more about the public opening scheduled for February 10, visit peasepark.org.

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F R O M L E F T, P H OTO G R A P H S B Y PA U L KO DA M A , J A R E D K U DA B E C K A N D CO U R T E S Y N T B G

Na Hale ‘Eo Waiawi (2003) Contemporary Art Museum, Honolulu, HI.

As volunteers work together preparing the materials for the stickwork sculpture, strangers quickly become friends.


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Refugee Is Not My Name

Texas resettles a massive number of refugees each year, second only to California. But who are these individuals? A photographer and a writer set out to meet some of their new refugee neighbors and introduce them to you.

I

BY

JESS ARCHER

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

ASHLEY ST. CLAIR

T WAS JUNE 2016. THE CICADAS WERE CRANKING UP THE

volume, the humidity also creeping up. Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton were five months away from the presidential election. Everywhere, both in our city and throughout the rest of the nation, change was coming. With that political backdrop, I sat with an old friend, an Austin native and photographer, Ashley St. Clair, over beers at Radio Coffee & Beer. She and I had recently learned that Texas resettles more refugees than any other state, save for California, according to the Pew Research Center. If that was true, why didn’t we know any refugees? Who were the faces of the refugee story in Austin? We’d both lived in Austin long enough to know what’s great about it, besides adventurous food trucks and our beloved Barton Springs. Our city leans toward social activism. For the most part, Austinites are forward thinking, receptive to new ideas and people, and energized by the notion that their way is not the only way. With that spirit as the underpinning of our city, we imagined an effort to meet and get to know some of our city’s recently resettled refugees. With the help of Interfaith Action of Central Texas (iACT), an Austin-based nonprofit, we were introduced to refugees in their ESL classes. From there we began to learn their names, their countries of origin, their distinctive personalities, and their hopes for their new lives in Austin.

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Starting in January 2017, with the newly elected president’s travel ban looming, more than two dozen refugees allowed us to interview and photograph them. We were honored, considering how fearful they had become of their futures in America. The result of those interviews and photographs became “Refugee Is Not My Name,” a photo and story series slated for exhibition at the Gallery at Lewis Carnegie on March 22, 2018. What follows is a selection from this project, which grew out of a politically charged year in America. But ultimately, it isn’t about politics or Washington. It’s a profile of your neighbors, maybe the man in line next to you at H-E-B. It’s a window into the lives of some members of our Austin community and their triumphs, fears, and hopes for a new life in America. The people you will meet are unique; they ask to be seen as individuals, not as a collective, global crisis. Many have survived the unimaginable, but all will tell you that isn’t their whole story. They share the label “refugee” but not necessarily the same religion, language, or culture. They are from all over the world. One is 18, one 71, the rest in between. One is a musician, the other a statistician. Their kids go to your kids’ schools. They are memorizing the CapMetro bus routes. They are timidly dipping their toes in the Colorado River or quietly sitting under the shade of a mesquite tree at Zilker Park. And they each have a name. Meet some of your newest neighbors. I N T E R I O R P H OTO G R A P H S BY B U F F S T R I C K L A N D ; P O R T R A I T BY L EO N I D F U R M A N S K Y

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LAMBERT. 18 YEARS OLD. TANZANIA.

Lambert looks like a typical American teenager, always on his phone. He streams music, one earbud in almost constantly. But Lambert has lived in America for only a year and nine months. His parents are refugees from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and Lambert was born and raised in a refugee camp in Tanzania. It was in the camp that Lambert taught himself to play the piano every week after church service ended. “Something in me just pushed me to learn to play the music from church,” Lambert says. His resting face is a big grin. “When I’m walking down the streets in Austin, I feel like the owner of this place. It is not hard to make friends when you’re nice.” “I want to be a musician. But also maybe a doctor. Yes, a musician and doctor,” he says, and then smiles.

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JONATHAN. 38 YEARS OLD. MYANMAR.

While living as a refugee in Malaysia, Pastor Jonathan and his wife, Grace, noticed that many refugee children were not getting an education. So they did something about it: They started a boarding school. At one point in his 10 years as a refugee in Asia, Jonathan and Grace were taking care of 67 children, ages four to 18. They called him “headmaster.” It’s a title that still sticks, even with his own sons. “I try to get my boys to call me ‘Papa,’ but they still call me ‘saya gyi,’ head teacher in Burmese,” Jonathan says. “Mostly, my skills are that I love the children. Community service is what I know.” “On the airplane coming to Texas, we were scared by so much turbulence, but so hopeful. So excited. We have a Burmese saying, ‘Before I go to heaven, I must go to America.’” Now in Austin, Jonathan leads a small Burmese Christian church. He also sings and plays keyboard for the worship service. “Sometimes I think about my mother’s and father’s voices back in Myanmar, encouraging me, telling me I can do it. It fills my heart to remember their kindness, their faith in me.” “I want to introduce the people of Myanmar to the people of Austin,” he says. “We are different, but we are one.”

Jonathan and his children, photographed at MT Supermarket in North Austin, where they shop for ingredients to make recipes from home.

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HONEYEH. 25 YEARS OLD. AFGHANISTAN.

Life has already been taxing for Honeyeh, who was born in Afghanistan and raised under prejudice in Iran. “Afghanistan doesn’t accept me because I was raised in Iran. Iran doesn’t accept me because I am from Afghanistan,” Honeyeh says. Then came an incident that added insult to injury. “In Iran they issued me an ID card with the name Zayneb, but it was not for me,” she says. “It was meant for another girl. But they said, ‘This card is OK. It’s good enough for you.’ Zayneb is not my name; I like my real name, Honeyeh.” As a refugee, Honeyeh is allowed to come to

Honeyeh, photographed at I Luv Video on Airport Boulevard.

America for some new opportunities. “I want to get a college education. I want to manage a shipbuilding company. I love ships; I love the water.” Though Honeyeh can be in America under current laws, her Iranian husband cannot. “It’s terrible to be here in such an important place as Austin and have the most important person in my life be in another place.” “When I feel stressed about the future, I like to carefully remove the polish color on my nails and redo it,” Honeyeh says, “It relaxes me. It helps me take my mind off my worries.” tribeza.com

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Paula, photographed at the Broken Spoke in South Austin.

PAULA. 60 YEARS OLD. CUBA.

“I only know how to fix teeth. In Cuba I spent my entire adult life doing dentistry for $20 a day. Castro took away our chances to learn English. But when my daughter said, at seven years old, that she wanted to be a doctor, I secretly found an American medical professional who taught her English. “My daughter came to America in 2005 to study medicine. I went six years without seeing her, and I never want to be apart from her that long again.

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I don’t want to leave America. But the Cuban government will take away my house in two years. Nothing is truly yours in Cuba. “I am having my second youth in Austin — I love to go country western dancing. I’d like a real pair of cowboy boots. “When I see the young girls in their dresses and boots, I think, ‘Wow, what would it have been like to be young in Austin?’ I arrived late, but my daughter arrived right on time. I made sure of that.”


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BAUDOUIN. 32 YEARS OLD. DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO.

“I am the third born in our family of eight. In 1998, after the war with Rwanda began, my family and I fled the Congo. We walked for nearly seven months, till we arrived at the border of Zambia. The great tragedy is that we got separated from my brother and sister during our walk, and we never could find them. “I am a teacher. Once in the Zambian refugee camp, I taught high school history, music, science, and sociology. It felt very special when I was given the chance to resettle in America. I believe God was with me, to give

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me the chance to come to America. Now in Austin, I have a good job as an assistant land surveyor. It would feel like home if my parents could come here. It doesn’t have to be Texas, it just has to be in the United States. It is very difficult to be alone. “People need to know, who is a refugee? And why is he a refugee and what has qualified him for resettlement? Being called a ‘refugee’ [can be] a kind of disease. You can’t feel happy to be called one. And people don’t want to approach you because of this word. Sometimes a refugee gets treated like someone who can’t even hold a pencil.”

Baudouin, photographed in the bedroom he shares with his roommate assigned to him by the resettlement agency.


BASIM. 55 YEARS OLD. IRAQ.

A man deplanes in Austin with a head full of musical dreams and only the instruments on his back. It’s a common scene at Austin’s airport. Less typical is that this man is a refugee from war-weary Iraq. “Something in me could not compose in Iraq when my family was not safe,” Basim says. “This is the matter that brought me to America. I needed to find peace.” A violinist for 19 years in the Iraqi National Symphony Orchestra and a seasoned film score composer, Basim wants two things from his new life in Austin: “First, I want to find friends, and second, I must find fellow musicians. I cannot practice music in my mind. I must practice it with others.” Basim has lived in Austin for one year. “I have yet to go out and hear the music and see all that Austin has to offer,” he says. “People tell me Austin is going to be a very good place for me. Music walks with me everywhere I go. It is like water and air to me.”

Basim, photographed at the University of Texas at Austin Butler School of Music. tribeza.com

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NABEEL. 71 YEARS OLD. IRAQ.

A highly qualified specialist in aviation engineering, Nabeel has lived in Austin for three years now. He and his wife of 40 years, Inam, recently moved into a duplex. “We did not suffer the tragedies that most refugees experience,” Nabeel says. “We left full, successful lives in Iraq. When we left Iraq for America, my son drove us to the airport in Baghdad in my own car.” But common to all refugees, Nabeel and Inam were made to feel unsafe in their country. “It is the matter of peace that we came here for,” he says. “When we landed in Austin, I felt like a bird released from a cage.” The only impasse to that peace? The grandchildren they left behind. “We have three now ... two we’ve never even met.” INAM. 70 YEARS OLD. IRAQ.

“You are welcome to my home” is Inam’s most fluid, frequently used English sentence. Once a statistician, and a mother of four grown sons, Inam has always been committed to making her home a refuge. Back in Iraq she redesigned her house, making an apartment for each son and his family so they could have independence but still be close. Just one of her sons came to America with her and her husband, Nabeel. “Austin is organized, safe,” she says. “Not like my country. We are making a new life here.” Her eagerness to host friends and family in her home is nothing new.

Nabeel and Inam, photographed in the front yard of their recently purchased North Austin home.

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REFUGEE CARE: Interfaith Action of Central Texas (iACT)

Simone Flowers, photographed at the iACT offices in East Austin.

When Simone Flowers began working for Interfaith Action of Central Texas (iACT) 12 years ago, she called it “a match made in heaven.” Her values aligned beautifully with iACT’s: to cultivate peace and respect through interfaith dialogue, service, and celebration. Now the group’s Executive Director, Flowers oversees several programs around Central Texas, including one that provides free English as a Second Language (ESL) classes to refugees. Through ESL classes, iACT serves refugees from around the world, whom Flowers describes as “individuals who have experienced the worst in life and have fled for their lives. Each refugee is unique and has a voice.” For those who want to get involved in helping refugees in Austin, Flowers says, “Refugee care is ongoing. It’s about building relationships with individuals — sharing your resources, your time, and your expertise. Refugees need a network of locals in order for them to thrive in their new home.” To learn more about iACT and refugees in Austin, visit interfaithtexas.org

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Making Theirark M

Women & Their Work celebrates 40 years of empowering female artists, from the early days of temporary exhibitions in makeshift spaces to today’s fully formed gallery shows TOBIN LEVY PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROBERT GOMEZ BY

IN 1978, A DETERMINED YOUNG WOMAN COULD BE SEEN RIDING AROUND AUSTIN ON A

Chris Cowden, Connie Arismendi, Sherry Smith and Katelena Cowles, outside the gallery on Lavaca Street.

bicycle, her bookish glasses secured by the oncoming wind, fiery red mane flowing, and an occasional file folder containing the beginnings of an alternative arts organization flying out of her basket. The organization, Women & Their Work (W&TW), turns 40 this year. Rita Starpattern, the feminist activist on the bicycle, co-founded the visual and performing art organization, along with Deanna Stevenson, a singer and poet, and Carol Taylor, a video artist, dedicated to female artists. Its mission: to show quality contemporary work that, until then, hadn’t been seen because the artists were women and women weren’t being allotted space on gallery walls. “I think the fundamental orientation was that if the rules don’t allow us in the game, then we’ll create our own,” says Chris Cowden, who, since 1986, has been the gallery’s Executive Director. “We focus on women, but it’s always been with open arms as opposed to a defiant fist. It’s been much more about inclusion, about including men in a vision in which women are creating work.” It was an abstract concept for H.W. Janson, author of the reigning art history book “History of Art.” Until 1986, if you studied art, that’s what you read and there was not a single woman in it. “He wrote about artists from the cave dwellers on! That’s a lot of territory — throughout all time, throughout all nations, and not a single woman!” says Cowden. When Janson died and his son was charged with creating a new edition, he added all of eight female artists. (The most recent edition features a whopping 27.) Nullautadance veles deste Women & Their Work supports artists in all media, presenting visual art exhibitions, music, dollabor sitatium ut and theater events, literary readings, film festivals, and educational workshops. In the earlyaditibus years, maiost, when tem tribeza.com

voluptatquia culpa plab

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Artist Connie Arismendi has been involved with W&TW since the 1980s.

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Sherry Smith has served as a W&TW board member.

Katelena Cowles builds her art collection through discovering new artists.

THE PREVAILING SENSE AND SENSIBILITY AT W&TW IS THAT FEMALE ARTISTS ARE INVALUABLE BECAUSE Art Is Invaluable W&TW didn’t have a permanent exhibition space, it created temporary ones throughout the city. When W&TW eventually secured a space, it was dubbed Two Rooms and a Hall, for self-evident reasons. “Even though it was so small, we had hundreds of applications because there was just so little opportunity,” says Cowden. The space, which was downtown next to the Children’s Museum, was eventually acquired by its neighbor and turned into a closet. A!er a couple more addresses, W&TW landed at its current location on Lavaca Street in 1995. Back then, W&TW operated on a shoestring budget, yet it still managed to garner attention on a national level. It was the first organization in Texas to receive a grant in visual art from the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA). Linda Shearer, who was on the NEA panel that reviewed the applications, still remembers the submission. “It stood out and [has] stayed with me, even a!er 40 years,” she says. “There was this great sense of discovery.”

While alternative spaces were bourgeoning across the country, quality was o!en sacrificed for cause. “Women & Their Work’s mission was so clear and relevant, but first and foremost it was about the art, about showing really interesting work. It’s held to its mission, which is even more poignant today given the spotlight on gender inequality,” says Shearer, the former Executive Director of Houston’s Project Row Houses. “They are leaders in staying true to what it means to be valued as a woman and as a woman artist.” The current social and political climate spurred a closer look at the state of gender gaps in the art world. On a national level, in the 1990s and early 2000s there was a lull in advocacy for women in all areas of the arts. Xandra Eden, the Executive Director and Chief Curator at DiverseWorks in Houston, worked at W&TW in the mid ’90s and remembers the hopefulness she felt. “It wasn’t just that there were women artists being represented, but that they were women of color or women from diverse backgrounds,” says Eden. The alternative tribeza.com

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I FEEL LIKE I’M CATCHING YOUNG UP-AND-COMING ARTISTS AT THIS AMAZING PLACE, SO I’M INVESTING IN THAT WAY BUT I’M ALSO Investing In my Own Community.

movement of the ’70s and ’80s imbued a sense of progress. “It took a while for a lot of us to realize things hadn’t changed as much as we thought that they had. It’s why we need organizations like Women & Their Work.”

Statistics tell the tale. Work by female artists makes up only 3 to 5 percent of major permanent collections in the U.S. Of 590 major exhibitions by nearly 70 institutions in the U.S. from 2007 to 2013, only 27 percent were devoted to female artists. Though women earn half of the MFAs granted in the U.S., only 30 percent of artists represented by commercial galleries are women. Women lag behind men in directorships held at museums with budgets over $15 million, holding 30 percent of art museum director positions.

While statistics are certainly a motivating factor, they do not define W&TW’s exhibitions or environment. “It’s not like there’s some feminist juggernaut that’s just driving everything,” says artist Connie Arismendi, who’s wonderfully spirited and candid and served on the W&TW board for nine years. “These artists are unique, they have incredible talent and multiple points of view, and that’s

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what fascinates me and keeps me going back. Is there gender inequality? Yes. Is the work always about gender inequality? No.” The prevailing sense and sensibility at W&TW is that female artists are invaluable because art is invaluable. Cowden is as passionate about current and past exhibitions as she is about helping people experience the joy of looking at art. “One of the things I’ve always tried to do is give art the credibility they give things like football, because no one is born knowing things about football,” she says. It’s an unexpected parallel and, once she expounds a bit, a salient point. There are a lot of people who go to UT football games who don’t know a thing about the sport but nonetheless have fun tailgating or wearing burnt orange in a sea of excitable fans wearing foam fingers. Children’s educational programming at the gallery encourages kids to have fun and call out the things they love and don’t love about a piece of work. Casual viewers are offered exhibition catalogs if they want context and reminded that esoteric doesn’t have to mean inaccessible. Cowden is a paradigm of optimism and enthusiasm, with the wide grin of someone who loves her life’s work. W&TW is responsible for enhancing art collections across the city. “The biggest source of my collection is Red Dot,” says Katelena Cowles, an artist and former W&TW board member. Red Dot Art Spree is the annual fall fundraiser where more than 150 original works by an array of artists are


Chris Cowden has been a driving force, securing grants from the Andy Warhol and Ford Foundations.

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Women & Their Work’s current exhibition, “No Trace of Now Will Remain,” features work by artist Gail Chovan. Working with fabric and found materials, Chovan captures themes of memory and mourning. The exhibition runs until March 1.

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A few of the objects making an appearance in “No Trace of Now Will Remain.”

available for $750 or less. “I feel like I’m catching young up-and-coming artists at this amazing place, so I’m investing in that way but I’m also investing in my own community. There’s nothing that supports the arts community as a whole as much as buying art.” In conversation, Cowles, one of many devotees, jumps back and forth between her art collection and other facets of W&TW that keep her going back. She points to the submission process and exhibition parameters. The submission process is an open one, and panels comprised of artists and people working in the art industry select the artists. Each exhibition is a solo show featuring new work created specifically for the event but not necessarily in the same medium as the work submitted for review. The artists are compensated for their participation, and the work is for sale while the show is up. “No one else selects an artist on the strength of their current work then supplements new work in any media. The artists can attempt something they’ve never done before, and most of the bigger institutions can’t do that. You might make a new set of paintings if you’re a painter, but they’re not going to fund your film.” To date, Women & Their Work has actively developed the careers of more than 1,900 female artists in 311 visual art exhibitions; 154 dance, theater, and music performances; 16 film festivals; 28 literary performances; 115 publications; and 620 educational workshops. Each year, through educational programming, W&TW reaches more than 650 underserved kids in the Austin area. Remarkably, it has done this with an average of three full-time staff members. Cowden has been the constant variable. She’s responsible for securing grants from the Andy Warhol Foundation, The Robert Rauschenberg

Foundation, and, most recently, the Ford Foundation. Keeping a small nonprofit alive for 40 years is no small feat. Despite her accomplishments, Cowden deflects and defers credit. She is an unassuming force whose attributes mirror those of her predecessor. “Rita [Starpattern] was so!-spoken, but also the kind of person who got the ball rolling,” remembers Kay Turner, one of Starpattern’s close friends, and an adjunct professor at New York University. “She could capture the imagination of people and make things happen.” (Starpattern passed away in 1996.) Though Starpattern’s Austin was different — 600,000 people different — than the Austin of today, W&TW has maintained some of that celebrated ethos. “There’s an informality and approachability that I think is a really strong part of [W&TW’s] identity. It’s an openness with a whole lot of savviness,” says Judith Sims, who worked with W&TW in its nascent years. Sims, newly retired, was the longtime director of education at the Art School at Laguna Gloria. “It’s woven itself into the fabric of the arts community, and I can’t imagine the arts community without it.” Women & Their Work is not going anywhere anytime soon, though it is facing the same challenges that most small arts spaces in the city do. The Lavaca Street building where it’s been since 1995 has been sold, so it’ll be moving to a yet to be determined space in 2020. Though the space will be different, the mission is a permanent one. Women & Their Work’s Spring Fundraiser and 40th Birthday Celebration, themed I AM ART, will take place Saturday, April 14. For more information or to buy tickets, visit womenandtheirwork.org tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE

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Foster, standing in front of the Kelly-designed building, Austin.

A Closer Look HOW THE BL ANTON MUSEUM’S CARTER FOSTER IS SHARING THE WORK OF ELLSWORTH KELLY By Robyn Ross Photographs by Warren Chang

W

HEN CARTER FOSTER WAS GROWING UP IN ATLANTA,

he had a close friend with artistic parents: an architect father and a mother who directed the education programs at the city’s High Museum of Art. The two boys occasionally tagged along to the museum, where they explored interactive children’s exhibits about shapes and space. One day his friend’s mother showed him a drawing by Alexander Calder. Foster squinted at it, confused. The drawing looked simple. What made it art? The woman pointed to a section of the page. “See that shape right there?” she asked. “That’s actually a seal with a ball on its nose.” Foster remembers the instant sense of clarity that followed. “It was like a lightbulb went off, and I thought, ‘Oh, that’s what you can do when you’re an artist,’” he says. “It was something that shifted in my perception, and I’ve never forgotten it.” Looking closely and nudging others toward a shift in perception have become life’s work for Foster, the Blanton Museum’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and Curator of Prints and Drawings. This month marks the opening of the Foster-curated exhibition Form Into Spirit: Ellsworth Kelly’s Austin, as well as Austin, the only freestanding building Kelly designed, located next to the Blanton. The affable Foster’s expansive curiosity imbues a conversation about art with a sense of shared discovery as he tinkers with ideas, often interrupting himself mid-sentence to rephrase a thought. Foster came to the Blanton after 11 years at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, where he served as Curator of Drawing. The exhibitions he organized there included the first major museum exhibition of drawings by Edward Hopper, an artist whose wide appeal Foster attributes to the air of mystery Hopper’s work evokes.


STYLE PROFILE

“His pieces are about mood and atmosphere,” Foster says. “He gives you information, but he doesn’t complete the thought. He leaves things just ambiguous enough that you want to complete what he’s presenting — like, ‘OK, this is a woman standing in a room. What’s she thinking?’ People say his work was about loneliness, but he said, ‘The loneliness thing is overdone.’ I think they’re more about solitude than loneliness.” In contrast to the Whitney’s sharp focus on modern and contemporary American art, the Blanton’s collection is broader, including American, Latin American and European art and — of particular interest to Foster — an encyclopedic collection of prints and drawings. At Foster’s first museum job, an internship at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, he focused on works on paper, which immediately attracted him with their intimate scale and unmediated nature. The size of most drawings makes it possible to pick them up, hold them to the light and see the exact texture of the graphite or chalk. When a student examines a drawing closely, she can see where the artist’s hand trembled or

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pressed more firmly. “You’re much closer to the artist,” Foster says, “and you can almost feel their presence.” And because artists often use drawing to work out ideas — for paintings, sculptures, buildings —museumgoers can trace the history of an artist’s creative process through his or her drawings. Foster has been helping solidify the Blanton’s exhibition schedule and developing future exhibitions, including the concept for a possible show about deception that compares sleight-of-hand magic with trompe l’oeil painting. But most of his energy recently has focused on the Kelly exhibition. Foster met Kelly in the late 1990s, and the two maintained a friendship until Kelly’s death, in 2015. Foster also has the distinction of having the only tattoo Kelly ever designed, at Foster’s request: a series of four colored rectilinear shapes spaced along the inside of his right forearm. It’s Foster’s only tattoo. “I will never get another one, because I can’t top this,” he says. While not religious himself, Kelly developed a lifelong interest in religious art and architecture that began during World War II, when he was briefly


Left, a model of the layout for Austin. Below, Foster’s forearm tattoo, the only tattoo Kelly ever designed.

‘‘

I think that’s what art does: helps you figure out your place in the universe.

stationed outside Paris with the U.S. Army. After the war, he returned to France and spent nearly seven years studying the art and architecture of Romanesque and Gothic churches. Those experiences informed his later work, including the design of Austin. Over the course of his career, Kelly developed four formal concepts that are motifs in Austin: color grid, spectrum, black and white, and totem. Although based on religious elements, those motifs appealed to Kelly on an aesthetic rather than a religious level. Kelly was emphatic that Austin not be associated with any particular religion or practice (“It’s a chapel in form, not function,” Foster explains). But, Foster says, Kelly “creates a setting that is very much about slowing down and resting your mind and your body and contemplating where your place is in the universe. I would say that’s a spiritual thing — and I think that’s what art does: helps you figure out your place in the universe.” Since moving to Austin in August 2016, Foster has had a chance to slow down and contemplate in a way that he couldn’t in New York. After living in a studio for years, he’s moved into a house. He finally has the space to unpack his 3,000 books. He has more time to think. Austin, the building, is suited to that thoughtful pace Foster has discovered in Austin, the city. The mood of the space will change as the intensity of the sun varies with the weather and seasons. “It’s a building that’s going to reveal itself to us slowly, over the course of the year, because we’re going to start to understand how the light plays out,” Foster says. He adds that it’s appropriate that the chapel would be so closely connected to the natural elements, because Kelly was deeply moved by nature; he drew plants and watched birds his whole life. “He was a very close observer of the world, and so that was his religion, in a way,” Foster says. “All his work comes out of perception, out of looking. He just happened to look more closely than most people.” tribeza.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Parkside CHEF SHAWN CIRKIEL’S SIGNATURE RESTAUR ANT CELEBR ATES 10 YE ARS ON SIX TH STREET By Karen Spezia Photographs by Leah Muse

T

ALK ABOUT YOUR CRAZY IDEAS.

Ten years ago, chef Shawn Cirkiel dared to open an upscale restaurant on Dirty Sixth, wedged among the shot bars, nightclubs, tattoo parlors, and hot dog carts. Skeptics scoffed, saying that mature diners would never travel to the core of Austin’s rowdiest party scene. But they did. And a decade later, Parkside is still going strong. Cirkiel’s chutzpah is even more remarkable considering that in 2008 Austin was a very different city. There were fewer reasons for people to venture — or live — downtown. Sleek high-rises like the Austonian, 360 Condos, JW Marriott, Westin, and W Hotel didn’t exist. Rainey Street was a quiet residential road, and Second Street was full of vacancies. ACL Live at The Moody Theater had yet to break ground. What a difference a decade makes. Oh sure, Dirty Sixth is still cheesy, but its fringes have grown up nicely. And through it all, Parkside has remained relevant, beating the odds to become a Sixth Street mainstay. Obviously, it’s doing something right. Housed in a two-story landmark building, the eatery oozes charm and personality, with exposed brick walls, pressed-tin ceilings, vintage lighting, leather booths, and a stainless-steel bar. While dining in the 140-year-old structure feels

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Though the building may be 140 years old, the food and drinks inside are decidedly modern.


as though you’ve stepped back in time, the food and drinks are thoroughly modern. Downstairs, the bar offers sophisticated gastropub fare and the dining room features an American farm-totable menu. Upstairs, there’s an outdoor terrace overlooking bustling Sixth Street and a space for private events. Open only in the evenings, Parkside hosts a wildly popular happy hour. And for good reason. The bar is where it’s at. Not only does it have a great vibe and service, it has some great deals. On weeknights from 5 to 6:30 p.m., bar food, beer, and cocktails are half-off. That included my artfully crafted Grey Goose martini served in high-quality stemware. Bar food ranges from tasty nibbles like crispy calamari and classic ceviche to heartier fare like steak and fries and a terrific cheeseburger. Known for its raw bar, Parkside’s generous oyster platter is also discounted. And on Wednesdays, oysters and champagne are half-off all night long. If a full meal is what you’re after, step into the adjacent dining room. For starters, there are bistro classics like roasted marrowbones, steak tartare, and a charcuterie board. Don’t miss the homemade pappardelle, tender ribbons of pasta tossed with salumi butter and crunchy cauliflower bits, then brightened with Meyer lemon zest.

Delicious oysters are part of a terrific bar menu.

It paired beautifully with a glass of white Italian Pecorino wine. For entrées, there are meat and seafood options like scallops with mushrooms, roasted chicken, and a pork flat iron steak. And desserts like a Pear Oat Tartin and Chocolate Graham Tart will satisfy a sweet tooth. Named after the Bronx public housing project where his father was raised, Parkside was the first in Cirkiel’s burgeoning restaurant empire. His Parkside Projects company now includes Backspace, Olive & June, Bullfight, Jugo, and the 800 Congress event space. Following Parkside’s

lead in 2008, more upscale options have moved into the area, including craft-cocktail bars like Midnight Cowboy and Small Victory and creative restaurants like Easy Tiger and Russian House. Was Cirkiel crazy — or a visionary? Regardless, he’s getting the last laugh. Congrats on 10 tasty years! PARKSIDE 301 E. 6TH STREET (512) 474-9898 PARKSIDE-AUSTIN.COM

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24 DINER

BARLEY SWINE

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encour-

3663 Bee Caves Rd.

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

ages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

burgers, all-day breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

fried chicken.

charcuterie board.

34TH STREET CAFE 1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the chicken

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for weeknight

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the

dinners and weekend indulgences.

f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

ALCOMAR

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert,

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161

alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche

Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of

and rolled in coconut f lakes.

the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner, weekend brunch, and

BULLFIGHT

start your visit with a blood-orange margarita and the

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

crab and guacamole.

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamón

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR 319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884 Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting; perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218 The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

Serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com We have been bringing people together for more than 4 decades, to celebrate occasions big

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

CAFÉ JOSIE 1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226 Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

and small, with the Interior Cuisine and art of

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

Mexico. From all of us here at Fonda San Miguel,

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

to our patrons old and new, we wish you all the best in the new year ahead. Salud!

BAR CHI SUSHI

some sangria and enjoy the bites.

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061 South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends.

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

variety of sushi rolls under $10.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

GRIZZELDA’S

2nd Street: 238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

serving unique dishes. Chefs/owners Sarah Heard and

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes,

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with

each fused with a range of different f lavors and styles.

an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on

The attention to detail in each dish shines, from dark

ation.

Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

mole served over chicken brined for 48 hours down to the

EASY TIGER

FREEDMEN’S

Domain: 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect compliment to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine-preservation system with temperature control ensures optimal taste and appreci-

tortillas made in-house daily.

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs

the f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the bar-

and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew

becue, to the desserts and even the cocktail offerings.

and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer

Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

best barbecue on a charming outdoor patio.

EL ALMA 1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923 This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ 1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881 Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnam-

GERALDINE’S

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 Upscale casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas, incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino), and locally sourced, seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails, local beers on tap, and boutique wines from around the world.

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

HILLSIDE FARMACY

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Ger-

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

aldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by combining

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

creative

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East

cocktails, shareable plates, and scenic views of Lady

Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner specials

Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as

are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

you enjoy executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar manager Caitlyn Jackson.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

ese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and sweet

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry

EPICERIE

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

thyme cocktail.

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

HOPFIELDS

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beauti-

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

ful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

here for a bite on Sundays.

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites. tribeza.com

| FEBRUARY 2018

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ITALIC

L’OCA D’ORO

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

Located in the Mueller development, chef Fiore Tedesco

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the

from pastry chef Mary Katherine Curren.

classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy impressive

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE

cocktails, wine, and a great craft beer selection.

3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808

LENOIR

Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience, Jacoby’s Restau-

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

rant and Mercantile transports you from East Austin to a rustic

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix-fixe

Southern home nestled in the countryside. The menu features

meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes local-

the best dishes southern cooking has to offer, including beef

ly-sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal

from Adam Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin, TX.

specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy

JEFFREY’S

hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

the world.

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

SALTY SOW 1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337 Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-night noshing.

Rustic continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local, and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophis-

MANUEL'S

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

ticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-

fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

quality regional Mexican food, fresh pressed

LA BARBECUE

cocktails, margaritas and tequilas. Try the Chile

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

famous mole. Located downtown at the corner of 3rd

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up

and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on Jolly-

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

ville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.

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PIEOUS 12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041 Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer, Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combination of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket is a crowd favorite and a must-try. RED ASH ITALIA 303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team including Executive Chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an exceptional evening.

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

LAS PALOMAS

OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

SWAY 1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999 The culinary masterminds behind La Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor area, complete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an unforgettable experience. THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

THE YARD AT WALLER CREEK 701 E. 11th St. | (512) 478 1111 The YARD is not your typical hotel dining experience. Led by Executive Chef Lonny Huot, enjoy savory American cuisine with Texas f lavors like the Beer Braised Short Rib and the Chorizo & Pepper Jack Grits Cakes Benedict. TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

WINEBELLY 6705 Hwy 290, # 503 | (512) 584 808 3016 Guadalupe St., Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193 Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro maintains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors. WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.


A L O O K B E H I N D 6…6

In October 1985, a breakfast fundraiser was held, along with the exhibition “Scopes and Scales of Design.” Then State Treasurer Ann Richards was the featured speaker, pictured here talking with Rita Starpattern, one of the founders of W&TW.

A FEW SELECT MOMENTS FROM WOMEN & THEIR WORK’S 40 YEARS IN AUSTIN With W&TW’s mission to turn a spotlight on female artists in different media, in 1985, performance artist Kathy Rose presented “Primitive Movers,” a hybrid of choreography and animation.

In 1979, “WomanIn-Sight: New Art in Texas” was the first statewide juried exhibition of female artists in Texas. The show was juried by Marcia Tucker, the founder of the New Museum in New York.

“Organizations like Women & Their Work are still important because young women artists coming up need a place that recognizes them and encourages their work. It’s critical to every artist’s career, especially in the early stages, that somebody says, ‘I noticed and I find something engaging about what it is you’re doing.’” — Anne Tucker, founding curator of the department of photography, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston

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LIVE ATX We all have passion. And passion springs from inspiration, which begins with your surroundings. That’s what home is. Family. Friends. A sense of place. An amazing view. It’s what makes a space a home – because your home is where you truly LIVE.

5 Austin-Area Locations See More at KuperRealty.com

TRIBEZA February 2018  

The Community Issue No. 198

TRIBEZA February 2018  

The Community Issue No. 198