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PEOPLE OF THE YEAR

UP-AND-COMERS

Meet the city’s next wave of ambitious citizens

CLOT HE S E NCOU NT E R S

Brooklyn Decker, Whitney Casey, and the virtual closet

N O. 196 | P EO P L E

The artists, thinkers, builders, and visionaries shaping the future of Austin

16 YEARS


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CONTENTS

DECEMBER 32

Florist Antonio Bond’s coffee table book is a stunning celebration of his bold and unconventional work. Writer and community advocate Maya Smart is one of our people of the year.

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Social Hour p. 16 Kristin’s Column p. 27 Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 30 Artist Spotlight p. 32 Event Pick p. 34 Holiday Gift Guide p. 36 People of The Year p. 44 12 to Watch p. 64 Style Profile p. 84 ON THE COVER Whitney Casey and Brooklyn Decker at the Seaholm Power Plant. Photography by Randal Ford

Karen’s Pick p. 88 Dining Guide p. 92 A Look Behind p. 96


ES

NX F SPORT

RX F SPORT

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PUBLISHER'S LETTER

W

TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

ITH ITS MANY HOLIDAYS AND FESTIVITIES,

16 YEARS

D E C E M B E R 2 017

N O. 1 9 6

December is a special time of year, one that ceaselessly reminds and prods us to celebrate all the joy in our lives. With this issue of Tribeza, we’re imbued with a similar spirit, tipping our

hat to 14 individuals who’ve brought joy to our community in the past year, resurrecting our beloved people of the year and people to watch lists. Austin is brimming with talent, and it’s never easy to pick just a few people to highlight, but we made our best attempt here, and I hope you enjoy the stories. In this issue we profile 14 individuals who have made big contributions to Austin in the areas of art, technology, music, parks, food, and more. We shared a sneak peek of the new Austin Central Library last month, and we were so blown away by Lake Flato’s stunning architecture that we used it as the backdrop for the photo shoot. Many thanks go out to the library staff for making it possible for us to get in so soon after its opening. In addition to the people of note, we also had fun interviews with an energetic group of up-and-comers, photographing them at the ever-popular South Congress Hotel, while also gathering insights about their inspiration, success, and favorite Austin hangouts. I am excited to follow them over the next year to see all that they accomplish. And as accomplished as all these people are, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention how excited we were to have the very accomplished Randal Ford photograph all of the people in our two people stories. He used his special talent to find just the right spot and to make each and every person look great. Personally I think

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER

Staley Moore COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia

Thanks for being a reader and a fan of Tribeza. Please shop with and thank our advertisers for advertising in Tribeza, because we couldn’t do any of this without them. I hope everyone enjoys all of

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Errica Williams INTERN

Annie Doyle PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

WRITERS

Emma Banks Nicole Beckley Eric Webber Parker Yamaski PHOTOGR APHERS

Miguel Angel Holly Cowart Natalie DeLeon Randal Ford Leah Muse Courtney Pierce Chloe Potts Taylor Prinsen Breezy Ritter

ILLUSTR ATOR

the photographs are stunning!

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing

popular Interiors issue, and join us on our annual Interiors Tour on

Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited.

Sunday, January 21.

TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

Sincerely,

S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A

the festivities this month. Come back next month for our always

VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S

George T. Elliman

14 DECEMBER 2017 |

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LOEWY LAW FIRM


SOCIAL HOUR

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IMAGINE A WAY TOUCH THE STARS GALA Imagine A Way’s annual Touch the Stars gala was held on October 12 at the InterContinental Stephen F. Austin hotel. More than 300 guests mingled over cocktails and perused silent-auction and raffle items. The gala raised more than $250,000 to help provide muchneeded funding for early intervention and therapies for children with autism.

Hand to Hold hosted its annual Baby Shower Luncheon on October 20 at the JW Marriott Austin. Guests played unique baby shower games for exciting prizes, while live music was supplied by country artist Randy Rogers. The affair helped raise awareness for the organization, which serves to provide critical support, education, and resources to parents who have babies born prematurely or with health complications.

IMAGINE A WAY TOUCH THE STARS GALA: 1. Ryan & Esmy Prihoda 2. Reed Curtis & Mersaydes Hobdy 3. Becky & Jim Urhausen 4. Stacy Toomey, Jennifer Harris, & Diana Holder 5. Len & Donna Gabbey HAND TO HOLD BABY SHOWER LUNCHEON: 6. Emily Schulz & Jen Russell 7. Kelli Kelley, Melinda Garvey & Kristin Schell 8. Hallie Lynch & Taylor Thomas 9. Melissa & Brandon Carson 10. Rhonda Reed & Tim Wright

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HAND TO HOLD BABY SHOWER LUNCHEON

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SOCIAL HOUR

MEXIC-ARTE MUSEUM LA CATRINA BALL Mexic-Arte Museum’s La Catrina Ball took place on October 21 at the Four Seasons Hotel Austin. The event paid tribute to Frida Kahlo (who would have been 110 this year) and celebrated the museum’s 30-plus years of proudly serving the community and local schools through exhibits, educational programming, and cultural events. Dr. Teresa Lozano Long, a longtime philanthropist and supporter of the arts, was honored with the Patron of the Arts Award.

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AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL FILM & FOOD FUNDRAISING PARTY On October 25, the Austin Film Festival held its highly anticipated Film & Food Fundraising Party at the Driskill Hotel. Guests feasted on delectable dishes from more than 20 of Austin’s most acclaimed chefs, enjoyed craft cocktails, and bidded on extraordinary array of auction items. Proceeds from the party benefitted the AFF’s Young Filmmakers Program, which aims to improve creativity, literacy, and communication skills through the arts of screenwriting and filmmaking.

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MEXIC-ARTE MUSEUM LA CATRINA BALL: 1. Juliet & Dason Whitsett 2. Stacie Gillett & John Pell 3. Julio Martinez & Ashley Card Martinez 4. Alan Karen Ware 5. Rachel Irvin & Katie Fenton AUSTIN FILM FESTIVAL FILM & FOOD FUNDRAISING PARTY: 6. Steven DeBose & Alexandra Mitchell 7. Megan Gibbs & Alex Earle 8. Mike Hanson & Kimberly Lusher 9. Skylar Stephens & Jack Daly

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SOCIAL HOUR

PEASE PARK CONSERVANCY FALL FUNDRAISER On October 26, the Pease Park Conservancy hosted its annual Fall Fundraiser at Hotel Ella. The event was held in support of the organization’s continued efforts to implement the Pease Park Master Plan and featured live music from the Warren Hood Band, a silent auction and wine pull, and the announcement of a $9.7 million grant from Ross Moody of the Moody Foundation to fund the design and construction of Kingsbury Commons in the southern end of the park.

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AUSTIN CENTRAL LIBRARY GRAND OPENING The doors of the breathtaking new Austin Central Library were opened to the public on October 28. The grand-opening event kicked off with a ribbon cutting and festivities before visitors got to explore the library’s interior, enjoying live music and a discussion from internationally renowned artist Christian Moeller. The imaginative communal space is a celebration of art, technology, and Austin’s future generations.

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PEASE PARK CONSERVANCY FALL FUNDRAISER: 1. David Wilson, Ronnie Skloss, Jennifer Skloss & Becky Fuller 2. Shanny Lott & Bill Ikard 3. Kyle Reiley, Andy Gill & Kristen Brown 4. Richard Craig, Dirk Jordan & Ross Moody 5. Chris Mattson, Peter Mullan & Andrea McWilliams AUSTIN CENTRAL LIBRARY GRAND OPENING: 6. Shannon Rivers & Eva Noxon 7. Terry Mitchell, Tim Sarvis & Patricia Mitchell 8. Gretchen Kohler & Katie Marak 9. Patricia & David Smith 10. Alicia Dean & Bryce Bencivengo 11. Teresa Oppedal & Patricia Fraga

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SOCIAL HOUR

CENTER FOR CHILD PROTECTION PLAYBINGO LADIES LUNCHEON

JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION TASTE AMERICA DINNER Austin’s top culinary talent and restaurateurs gathered at the W Hotel on November 3 for the James Beard Foundation’s Taste America dinner. The cocktail reception featured unmatched hors d’oeuvres from Franklin Barbecue, Barley Swine, and many more, while the sensational dinner menu was composed by James Beard Award winners Ludo Lefebvre of Los Angeles’ Trois Mec and Tyson Cole of Uchi.

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB BLUE DOOR GALA The Boys & Girls Clubs of the Austin Area celebrated the final stretch of its 50 Reasons to Believe fundraising campaign and the organization’s 50th birthday with its Blue Door Gala on November 3 at the JW Marriott Austin. Along with a silent auction and cocktail hour, guests were treated to a gourmet dinner and an after party featuring live music and midnight snacks. The gala raised recordbreaking funds, which will help thousands of youths across the community.

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10 CENTER FOR CHILD PROTECTION PLAYBINGO LADIES LUNCHEON: 1. April Miertschin, Chemise McCain & Amanda Morris 2. Leanne Raesener & Cassandra King Polidori 3. Cindy Fegley & Chelsea Freitas 4. Dottie Nash, Julie Braly, Vicki Roberts & Maxine Roberts JAMES BEARD FOUNDATION TASTE AMERICA DINNER: 5. Justin Ermini & Bill Mann 6. Laura & Nick Middleton 7. Victoria Jordan Rodirguez 8. Marilyn Hare & Tyson Cole BOYS & GIRLS CLUB BLUE DOOR GALA: 9. Jessica & Chris Ciabarra 10. Lindsay Duran, Amanda Stewart & Kristin Lee 11. Michael Kentor & Mandy Dealey 12. Robert Hock & Mary Miller

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On October 28, the 14th annual PlayBingo Ladies Luncheon, presented by Lexus of Austin and Lakeway, brought together more than 1,000 Austin women and Center for Child Protection supporters for a common cause — ending the cycle of child abuse — and a common love — bingo. Guests arrived at the Hilton Austin’s Grand Ballroom in exceptional PlayBingo fashion, ready to play, sip Champagne, and bid on more than 180 silent-auction packages.


Julia Hoskins Schlitt, Stacy Wiltshire, Theran Greer, Suellen Young, Anita Howard, Kakky Dyer, Mary Anna Paul F RON T ROW (left to right) Maricruz Acuna, Sheila Paynter, Dru Brown, Marietta Scott, Cindy Goldrick, Amy Rung, Linda Biderman, Stephanie Sachnowitz BACK ROW (left to right)

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SOCIAL HOUR

TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL FIRST EDITION LITERARY GALA On November 3 at the Four Seasons Hotel Austin, the Texas Book Festival kicked off its annual Festival Weekend with the First Edition Literary Gala, which saw presentations from a number of literary luminaries, including New York Times best-selling author Min Jin Lee and awardwinning author, writer, and producer Attica Locke. Funds from the gala go toward keeping the TBF Weekend free and supporting the many literary programs it hosts throughout the year.

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SAFE ALLIANCE A NIGHT IN HAVANA GALA SAFE Alliance hosted A Night in Havana on November 4 at the Hyatt Regency Austin. The event celebrated the children at SAFE’s Austin Children’s Shelter Campus. Guests enjoyed a night of dancing, music, and live auctions, raising $1 million for the shelter.

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TEXAS BOOK FESTIVAL FIRST EDITION LITERARY GALA: 1. Lawton & Craig Cummings 2. Lloyd Doggett, Libby Doggett, Diane Land & Steve Adler 3. Kyra Duffy & Jake Winkelman 4. Lana McGilvray & DJ Stout SAFE ALLIANCE A NIGHT IN HAVANA GALA: 5. Kanishka Abeynayake, Chitra Abeynayke & Anusha Nanayakkara 6. Jim Skelding & Tracy Holland 7. Jennifer Lehmann & Kristie Gonzales 8. Christy Strub & Meghan Tapp 9. Ann Fernandez, Lizzy Llavena & Dane Robson 10. Spencer Holbert & Tori Haltom 11. Melissa Simpson & Nate May

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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Irrevocably Found By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

M Â

Y MOM HAS A FR AME ON HER

kitchen island with a black-andwhite photo of my infant son, Luke, taken when he was just days old. Beneath the photo is a quote by Jane Austen: The very first moment I beheld him, my heart was irrevocably gone. No one does a fair job of explaining the maternal phenomenon of your heart leaving your body. Not when you pee on a stick, or your fertility doctor calls you, or you watch your stomach grow. Not when you buy maternity clothes, set up tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2017

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KRISTIN'S COLUMN

a nursery, have your baby shower, or go to useless Lamaze classes. You give birth and a baby leaves your body, but until you experience it for yourself, you have no idea that your heart goes right along with it. Only Jane sums it up sufficiently. I should know. Eighteen years ago, my heart was irrevocably gone. These past eighteen years feel as though all I’ve ever known is gone in an instant, all at once. I can still feel the weight of baby Luke, staring up at me from the crook of my arm. Rocking in the dim glow of the wee hours in a denim-colored Pottery Barn rocking chair. Those years were stolen wonders, set apart from the rest and rush of life. I would give anything to steal them back, or even reclaim just one day. If I could have one day back, I would not give two shits if the bed got made, if I exercised, if I showered, if we had any groceries, or if I made a single dent in the endless heap of laundry. I would sit all day long and hold him and inhale his baby smell, and never for one second would I think I wasn’t being productive. Looking back, without the haze of fatigue or identity crisis, I would see that those hours were the best time I

ever invested, the clearest my identity would ever be. I was simply, in that moment, Luke’s mom. Fast-forward. First birthday at Chuy’s, beans and rice and chocolate cake smeared on the highchair tray. Preschool drop-off, sticky syrup and “faff les” on a paper plate. Kindergarten. Grade school. All About Me posters. Soccer games, running the wrong way. Flag football mouth-guard smile. Read Alouds. Visiting for lunch and staying for recess. Fifth-grade autonomy, riding your bike to school. Pop Warner football, summer ends early. Middle school. When did you get taller than me? What was the exact day? High school. Your man voice startles me in the kitchen. You and your friends eat all our food. Driving off in your pickup truck. Varsity football games; we live Friday Night Lights. Our house is the landing pad, exactly what I always wanted. Yes, you can Favor Torchy’s. But no, Luke, you can’t grow up. I know that was the goal. I raised you with the full intention that you would leave this nest. I know we’ve discussed this. But I’ve changed my

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IT WA S BECOMING YOU R MOT HER T H AT ST R IPPED ME OF M Y SELFISHN ESS A N D M A DE ME IN TO A LOV E WA R R IOR — FIERCE A N D FOCUSED A N D T RU E .

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mind. I think it was that first college acceptance letter. Knowing this train was leaving the station, has always been leaving the station. I thought I could do this, but as it turns out, I can’t. Don’t leave me here with your sisters and our collective estrogen stew of moods. We need you. You are our Xanax, our Uber, our Yoda. You are calm and wise and steady, unflappable, honest, and strong. Who is going to change the Culligan bottles? No one else can lift sweet ol’ Mercy when her hips give out. No one else can tell me that everything is going to be okay, and I’ll actually believe it. You might think I raised you, boy. And I certainly did. But you also raised me. When I broke into a thousand pieces so many years ago, it was your three-year-old eyes on me that pulled me back together. It was becoming your mother that stripped me of my selfishness and made me into a love warrior — fierce and focused and true. At mile 21 of a marathon, when I wondered if I could finish, I thought of your resilience and valor and it carried me all the way to 26.2. When I wondered if I should apply for graduate school, you told me I was the smartest Mim around. And it was you who named me Mim, “because there are lots of moms but only one Mim.” When my heart broke all over again and I wondered aloud if I was even marriage material at all, it was you who said, “C’mon, Mim, why would an NBA-caliber player ever just play pickup games in the ’hood?” Knowing, loving, and trusting you has taught me how to really know and love and trust myself. If I ever wonder if my offering in this world is enough, I see your goodness and your giant heart and I am at peace. Yes, Jane, it’s true. On October 12, 1999, my heart was irrevocably gone. But it was also irrevocably found.


2803pearceroad.com

Jennifer Welch, REALTORÂŽ jennifer@gottesmanresidential.com jenniferwelchaustin.com


C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC DEAD & COMPANY

December 2 Frank Erwin Center

GINGER LEIGH’S LOVE. AT THE STATESIDE

December 3 Stateside at the Paramount

SCOTT BRADLEE’S POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

December 3 ACL Live at the Moody Theater LADY GAGA

December 5 Frank Erwin Center 101X INDIE XMAS: COLD WAR KIDS W/ MOBLEY

December 6 Emo’s Austin

THE NEIGHBOURHOOD

December 7 Emo’s Austin

THE WOOD BROTHERS W/ SEAN MCCONNELL

December 7 Paramount Theatre

X AMBASSADORS + GROUP LOVE

December 7 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

CHARLIE BROWN CHRISTMAS

December 9 Paramount Theatre

AN EVENING WITH RANDY NEWMAN

December 10 Paramount Theatre

RONNIE SPECTOR’S BEST CHRISTMAS PARTY EVER

December 11 Paramount Theatre

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AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS HANDEL’S “MESSIAH”

December 12 Hyde Park Baptist Church

ANTONE’S NEW YEAR’S EVE BLOWOUT

W/ DOYLE BRAMHALL II

December 31 Antone’s Nightclub

TOMMY EMMANUEL

December 12 Paramount Theatre SAN HOLO

December 14 Emo’s Austin

GARY NUMAN

December 16 The Mohawk

ROBERT EARL KEEN’S FAM-OLEE BACK TO THE COUNTRY JAMBOREE

December 16 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

JULIEN BAKER W/ HALF WAIF & ADAM TORRES

December 18 Emo’s Austin

STEVE EARLE & THE DUKES

December 19 Paramount Theatre

TEXMEX HOLIDAY FIESTA

December 22 ACL Live at the Moody Theater NEON INDIAN

December 29 The Mohawk

REVEREND HORTON HEAT SOLO

December 29 3TEN ACL Live

WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY NEW YEAR

December 29 – 31 ACL Live at the Moody Theater

FILM DAY WITH(OUT) ART:

ALTERNATE ENDINGS,

RADICAL BEGINNINGS

December 1 The Contemporary Austin - Jones Center

THEATER MISS BENNET: CHRISTMAS AT PEMBERLEY

December 1 – 23 Austin Playhouse

CHRISTMAS BELLES

December 1 – 30 The City Theatre Company MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS

December 3 Paramount Theatre

BALLET AUSTIN’S THE NUTCRACKER

THE MEXICO TRILOGY

December 3 – 23 The Long Center

December 2 AFS Cinema

THE DROWSY CHAPERONE

SILENT FILMS OUT LOUD

December 2 Stateside at the Paramount ELF SCREENING + PUB RUN

December 5 Paramount Theatre AUSTIN ASIAN AMERICAN FILM FESTIVAL

December 7 – 10 AFS Cinema OTHER WORLDS AUSTIN

December 7 – 10 Flix Brewhouse PARAMOUNT HOLIDAY FILMS: WHITE CHRISTMAS

December 13 Paramount Theatre PARAMOUNT HOLIDAY FILMS: IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE

December 17 Paramount Theatre

December 6 – 10 B. Iden Payne Theatre

OF MICE & MUSIC – A JAZZ TAP NUTCRACKER

December 7 – 17 The Long Center

THE KING AND I

December 12 – 17 Bass Concert Hall

WASSAIL 2017: A SOLSTICE CHRISTMAS CELEBRATION

December 17 Austin Scottish Rite Theater A TUNA CHRISTMAS

Through December 25 ZACH Theatre

A CHRISTMAS STORY: THE MUSICAL

December 29 – 31 The Long Center

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

Through December 31 ZACH Theatre


COMEDY A JOHN WATERS CHRISTMAS

December 1 Paramount Theatre

EDDIE B: TEACHERS ONLY COMEDY TOUR

December 2 Bass Concert Hall

ELVIS’ ROCKIN’ NATIVITY

December 2 – 23 ColdTowne Theater

HARI KONDABOLU

December 8 Stateside at the Paramount

CHILDREN HOLIDAY HEROES

December 2 – 9 ZACH Theatre

JUNIE B. JONES IN JINGLE BELLS, BATMAN SMELLS

December 2 – 16 Austin Scottish Rite Theater

SECOND SATURDAYS: GINGERBREAD VILLAS

December 9 The Contemporary Austin – Laguna Gloria JURASSIC QUEST

TRAILER PARK BOYS

December 15 – 17 Austin Convention Center

NATE BARGATZE

DISNEY LIVE! MICKEY AND MINNIE’S DOORWAY TO MAGIC

December 10 Bass Concert Hall

December 13 – 16 Cap City Comedy Club THE COMEDY GET DOWN

December 15 Frank Erwin Center

DOUG LOVES MOVIES

December 18 Cap City Comedy Club

December 23 Frank Erwin Center

STORYTIME: BRRR!

December 28 Bullock Texas State History Museum

OTHER WINTER WONDERLAND AT THE CIRCUIT

December 1 & 2, 8 – 30 Circuit of the Americas HOLLY DAYS

December 1 – 10 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center HOLIDAY SING-ALONG & DOWNTOWN STROLL

December 2 Texas State Capitol

AUSTIN TRAIL OF LIGHTS FUN RUN

December 2 Zilker Park

GERMAN-TEXAN HERITAGE SOCIETY CHRISTMAS MARKET

December 2 German Free School of Austin UP AND VANISHED LIVE

Through December 10 Daniel H. Caswell House THE MOTH

December 14 Paramount Theatre ARMADILLO CHRISTMAS BAZA AR

December 14 – 24 Palmer Events Center

EASTSIDE HOLIDAY MARKET

December 15 REVELRY

AUSTIN’S NEW YEAR

December 31 Auditorium Shores

NEW YEAR’S EVE

December 31 Omni Barton Creek Resort & Spa ICE SKATING ON THE PLAZA

Through January 15 Whole Foods Lamar

December 6 Paramount Theatre

VANESSA GONZALEZ

VICE PRESIDENT JOE BIDEN: AMERICAN PROMISE TOUR

December 19 – 23 Cap City Comedy Club

December 8 Paramount Theatre

RON FUNCHES

BLACK FRET BALL

December 29 & 30 Cap City Comedy Club

CHRISTMAS AT THE CASWELL HOUSE

December 9 Paramount Theatre

HOLIDAY FAMILY DAY

December 9 Blanton Museum of Art

AUSTIN TRAIL OF LIGHTS

December 9 – 23 Zilker Park

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ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

Arts ART FROM THE STREETS SHOW & SALE

December 2 & 3 Trinity Center

BOTANICAL ECLIPSE

December 2 – January 13 Davis Gallery

GROUP SHOW: LIGHT

December 2 – January 23 Wally Workman Gallery MIX ‘N’ MASH

December 8 – January 7 Mexic-Arte Museum

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT

Antonio Bond A CELEBR AT ED LOC A L FLORIST RELE A SES HIS DEBU T BOOK , ‘ T R A NSPL A N T S: ECLEC TIC FLOR A L DESIGN’

NACIMIENTOS: TRADITIONAL MEXICAN NATIVITY SCENES

December 8 – January 7 Mexic-Arte Museum CHERRYWOOD ART FAIR

December 9 & 10 Maplewood Elementary

By Emma Banks

LINE FORM COLOR

Native Austinite Antonio Bond became a florist nearly by accident, after discovering, much to his surprise, a love for floral design and arrangement while working at a local grocery store. Then, he became the go-to florist for the Hotel St. Cecilia, where he caught the eye of many hosts and brides, and his business quickly grew. Many years later, his debut book enters the landscape with much more intention than he had prior, though a common thread exists: Namely, Bond still roams his homeland (and elsewhere) in the same way he did back then, and though his business may have grown and his reputation risen, his commitment to paying homage to the person he is and the place he loves most does not waver. Simply put, “TRANSPLANTS” comes out of Bond’s search to create something lasting, with permanence and longevity as his compass. “For me, I was always jealous that painters and other artists like that get to hold onto what they made, you know? Those things had a lot longer lifespan than a floral arrangement. I wanted to make something that when I’m long gone, at least there’s some type of footprint that I laid down that still exists. That’s what really sparked the fire.” “TRANSPLANTS” seeks to document as well as discover; for fans both old and new of Bond’s work, the book serves equally as a visual library of favorites and never-beforeseen arrangements, bringing fresh inspiration to each page.

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December 9 – March 4 Blanton Museum of Art

FLIGHT & FALL: CHARLES UMLAUF’S DUALITIES

December 12 – March 11 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

YOU III EVERYTHING ELSE

Through December 16 de stijl | PODIUM FOR ART

FALL 2017 YOUNG ARTISTS PORTFOLIO CELEBRATION

December 16 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

BLUE GENIE ART BAZA AR

Through December 24 Blue Genie Art Bazaar CARL BLOCK FACE JUGS

Through December 29 Yard Dog Art Gallery

JOEL SALCIDO: ALIENTO A TEQUILA

Through December 30 Flatbed Press and Gallery RACHEL STUCKEY: GOOD DAYS & BAD DAYS ON THE INTERNET

Through January 11 Women & Their Work

THE OPEN ROAD: PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE AMERICAN ROAD TRIP

Through January 27 Blanton Museum of Art


CLOSING JANUARY 1 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu FREE ADMISSION

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EVENT PICK

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

TEXMEX HOLIDAY FIESTA CEL EBR AT E T HE HOLIDAYS T E X A S-ST Y L E W I T H A SP ECI A L P ER FOR M A NCE AT ACL LI V E By Emma Banks

DECEMBER 22

If you thought Tex-Mex was exclusively a culinary indulgence, think again: Los Texmaniacs, along with ACL Hall of Fame inductee Flaco Jiménez, will be descending on their state’s capital for a fiesta filled with self-proclaimed “spicy” holiday fun. TexMex Holiday Fiesta, at the Moody Theater, will feature the two aforementioned Grammy Award winners, plus Peter Rowan, Rick Trevino, Augie Meyers, Johnny Nicholas, Rosie Flores, and one very special yet-to-be-announced guest. After starting with both group and solo performances, the musicians will share seasonal songs, traditions, and memories and conclude with a holiday sing-along. This isn’t Los Texmaniacs’ first rodeo — far from it. As one of the most revered conjunto bands in the world, the group’s expertise in all things Tex-Mex knows no bounds. Joining forces with fellow award-winning artists is just the cherry on top (or, rather, the jalapeño, if we’re committed to the theme) to what is sure to be an evening for the books. Sold? Us too.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: T-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S., Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DE STIJL | PODIUM FOR ART 1006 W. 31st St. (512) 354 0868 Hours: Tu-Thu, Sa 1-5 destijlaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sat & Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: T-F 10-5 space12.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sat & Su 12-5 massgallery.org

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F10-6 twyla.com/austingallery

OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium

WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com

PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org

WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

T R I BE Z A's

Holiday Gift Guide

VACATIONING THIS HOLIDAY SEASON? You won’t want to forget to pack your Lee Merritt Swimwear with you. Achieve effortless style with their timeless designs, buttery-soft fabrics and eye-catching colors. Each is designed in Austin and made in the USA. LEEMERRITT.COM #LEEMERRITTSWIM

THIS YEAR, THINK OUTSIDE THE BOTTLE AND GIVE A GLASS OF. TEXAS HISTORY. Award-winning Ben Milam Single-Barrel Bourbon is the perfect gift for the discerning whiskey drinker and Texas enthusiast alike. This smooth sipping whiskey won Double Gold at the San Francisco World Spirits Competition and is available in all fine liquor stores. BENMILAMWHISKEY.COM

THE DESPINA CUFF IS THE PERFECT STATEMENT PIECE FOR ANY HOLIDAY PARTY OUTFIT. Featured in brass or sterling silver, these bracelets are beautiful worn together or separately. A timeless addition to any wardrobe. $550-$1,300.

THE ESPEROS SOHO GIFT COLLECTION IS MADE IN NEW YORK CITY WITH LUXURY MATERIALS. Each piece in the gift collection is priced under $100. With each sale, ESPEROS SOHO helps fund a year of education for a woman or child in the developing world.

GOODCOMPANY.SHOP

ESPEROSSOHO.COM | @ESPEROS_SOHO

918 W.12TH STREET | (512) 520-4402

209 W. 2ND STREET | (512)537-3103

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HISTORY REMEMBERS THOSE. WHO ARE A LITTLE BIT DIFFERENT. Inspired by and designed in Austin, DuFrane Watches builds classically styled mechanical timepieces. The Bergstrom pilot watch is available in several configurations. A diver piece, appropriately called the Barton Springs, will be available soon.

AN ELEGANT GIFT TO GIVE. Monique Péan has created this exquisite drop necklace featuring a conflictfree hexagonal diamond slice framed in white diamond pavé. Hung from a rolo chain of 18 carat recycled white gold and finished with an "S" hook clasp. $5,480.

DUFRANEWATCHES.COM

BYGEORGEAUSTIN.COM BYGEORGEAUSTIN

PARTY OF THREE HOLIDAY GIFT SET. From the start of the season to New Year's Eve, this limited edition set has your holiday looks covered. Full size Lip Pop in New York City, Nail Polish in Goldie, and Lip Pop in Nashville, packaged in a gift box and perfect for giving or getting! $47 ($60 value).

524 N. LAMAR | (512) 472-5951

ELEVECOSMETICS.COM

JANET ST. PAUL STUDIO FOR HAIR AND BEAUTY This downtown luxury hair salon makes an indulgent gift for someone looking to transform or update their look. Complement a salon service gift certificate with products from their exclusive PHYTO Paris plant-based haircare, LIERAC Paris skincare, candles, jewelry and other unique selections. JANETSTPAUL.COM 110 SAN ANTONIO ST. SUITE 130, AUSTIN | (512) 474-5000

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

THE MOST PEACEFUL PLACE ON EARTH, GIFT WRAPPED Treat that special person in your life or yourself to the ultimate holiday escape to Lake Austin Spa Resort. Nestled on 19 lakefront acres in Central Texas’ legendary Hill Country, this award-winning destination offers the luxury of a world-class spa and the warmth of a best friend’s lake house. Overnight stays or day spa certificates should be at the top of everyone’s list. GIFT CERTIFICATES Gift certificates to the LakeHouse Spa or Lake Austin Spa Resort make a great gift for anyone who could use some time to relax and rejuvenate. We also offer easy at home printing or you can have a beautiful gift certificate sent to the recipient’s door! To purchase gift certificates for overnight stays or day spa by phone, call 800-847-5637. You can also visit our website: HTTPS://STORE.LAKEAUSTIN.COM/GIFT-CERTIFICATES/

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BATH & BODY PRODUCTS Bring home a special part of our spa experience with the LakeHouse™ line of body care products, available in Lavender Fields and Gifts of the Garden fragrances. Find these online at: HTTPS://STORE.LAKEAUSTIN.COM/BATH-BODY-PRODUCTS/

Gift certificates and products can also be purchased at our Spa location: 12611 Riverbend Road - Austin, Texas, 78732.


COLTON COLLECTION Decades of experience in fashion, interior design and life swirl together in a new burst of inspiration. A collection with style, heart and soul from award winning Interior Designer Robin Colton. Every pillow features inspired design, beautiful fabrics, intricate details. Every piece makes a statement. Every style evokes a mood.

LIZA BETH JEWELRY UNIQUELY BALANCES EDGE WITH DELICACY. The timeless designs feature diamonds set in oxidized sterling silver or white, yellow and rose gold, with designs including necklaces, bracelets, earrings, and rings. This vintage-inspired white and champagne diamond encrusted bangle is sure to make this holiday season sparkle. White & Champagne Diamond Encrusted Bangle, $2,415

COLTONCOLLECTION.COM

LIZABETHJEWELRY.COM | (512) 694-9136 EXCLUSIVELY AT RSK DESIGN | KERBEY LANE VILLAGE 1515 W 35TH STREET

ROLF SPECTACLES PRODUCES HANDMADE, LIGHTWEIGHT WOODEN FRAMES THAT HAVE ARTFULLY DESIGNED CHEESE + CHARCUTERIE BOARDS AND GIFT BOXES HAND-DELIVERED TO YOUR DOOR . Spread & Co. creates the perfect gift for your favorite host or friend, or the easiest way to cater your next event. Each one features house-made jams, pickles, crackers and artisan cheeses, plus cured meats sourced here in the U.S. $45 -$300+ SPREADANDCO.COM | @SPREADANDCO

WON MORE THAN 40 INTERNATIONAL AWARDS. With loving attention to detail and bold use of innovative techniques, ROLF makes each frame a unique, one-of-a-kind piece of eyewear created without any metal parts or screws. Sapphire, $1295 OPTIQUEAUSTIN.COM | (512) 472-3937 DOWNTOWN: 211 WALTER SEAHOLM DR. #140 SOUTH: 1100 S. LAMAR BLVD. #1145

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

There's no better gift for you and your family than a beautiful home upgrade! Whatever your project, TreeHouse has you covered. From kitchen and bath remodels, to a solar energy system or smart home upgrade, the experienced and friendly staff at TreeHouse can handle everything from idea to installation. Look to TreeHouse as your headquarters for beautiful, sustainable and healthy home projects! WWW.TREE.HOUSE TREEHOUSE AUSTIN WESTGATE SHOPPING CENTER (NEXT TO CENTRAL MARKET) 4477 SOUTH LAMAR #600 | (512) 861-0712

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GIFT THE CRÈME DE LA CRUELTY-FREE, THE PERFECT GIFT FOR BEAUTY DEVOTEES WITH A CONSCIENCE. Add luxury to their beauty shelf with a subscription to Petit Vour's beauty box. Each month, they'll receive four products ($45–$60 value) of non-toxic and plant-based beauty for as low as $15 per box. PETITVOUR.COM

THE SALT LICK'S PREMIUM TRIO OF SAUCE AND RUB MAKE A DELICIOUS GIFT FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST Original Recipe Salt Lick Bar-B-Que

Sauce, Spicy Recipe Bar-B-Que Sauce and Original Dry Rub are the perfect way to share some of Texas' best tastes with friends and family, wherever they live! SALTLICKBBQ.COM | (512) 829-5295

LAUREL CORRINNE HAS CREATED SUNLESS BODY BLEND, A NEW TECHNIQUE IN SUNLESS TANNING THAT IS THE MOST NATURAL AND FLAWLESS CUSTOM TAN. The Studio offers expert body contouring with FDA-approved CoolSculpting, a noninvasive fat freezing treatment. Weddings, pre-vacation, photo shoots, special events or just because ... feel confident and look naturally beautiful. The perfect gift! LAURELCORRINNESTUDIO.COM 1107 S. 8TH STREET | (512) 799-1729

THE MUSEUM SHOP AT THE BLANTON Shop here for delightful surprises like the Chirpy Top, a wine pourer that “chirps” as your favorite wine is served. From distinctive housewares to elegant handcrafted jewelry to clever and engaging toys, the Blanton’s Museum Shop is a treasure chest of the artful and the unexpected. $25. BLANTONMUSEUM.ORG MUSEUM SHOP AT THE BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK JR. BLVD. | (512) 471-7324

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LIGHT group show

WWG

Wally Wor km a n G a l l e ry

1 2 0 2 West Si x t h St reet A u st i n , Te x a s 7 8 7 0 3 wal l y workmanga l ler y.co m 512.472.7428

Image: Lindsy Halleckson, Silent Search #82 (detail), acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36 inches


People of The Year Meet the visionary Austinites who are leaving their imprint on the city PHOTOGRAPHS BY

RANDAL FORD LOCATION: CENTRAL LIBRARY

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Maya Payne Smart WRITER & LITERACY ADVOCATE

A year of “hardcore volunteering” brought her up close and personal with the Austin community BY NICOLE BECKLEY

W

HEN IT COMES TO COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT,

Maya Payne Smart is in deep. Since moving to Austin in the spring of 2015, when her husband, Shaka, became the men’s basketball coach at UT, she’s joined the boards of the Library Foundation, the Texas Book Festival, Montessori For All, and St. David’s Foundation; chaired the UT Libraries Advisory Council; and served on the advisory council for the Fearless Leadership Institute, a mentoring program for undergraduate women of color at UT. Not to mention her other volunteer commitments, like working with toddlers at the YMCA’s early-learning readiness program or being an in-school reading tutor. “I’m sure it’s more than 40 hours; if I look at my calendar, I see everything. I don’t want to go through that exercise,” she says with a laugh. In the two and a half years since her family relocated from Virginia, Smart has made community work a priority. “I’ve always been a really active volunteer in whatever community I’ve been in,” Smart says. “Volunteering is a great way to get to know a community because all of the nonprofits that exist to serve some particular community need, so when you volunteer you get up close and personal with whatever that place’s issues are.” For Smart, her heart belongs to words and books. A!er earning a B.A. in social studies from Harvard, she went on to get her master’s in journalism from Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism and create a career writing about education and entrepreneurship for outlets like Edutopia and CNNmoney.com. Since finding a home in Austin, Smart’s focused on her love for literacy. Earlier this year she interviewed English novelist Zadie Smith in front of a

live audience for the release of her latest book“Swing Time,” and she contributes reviews and author interviews to “Kirkus Reviews.” “I do a lot of homework,” Smart says. The self-imposed homework is born from a love of reading, something Smart gets to share with the kids involved in the Texas Book Festival’s Reading Rock Stars program and with her six-year-old daughter, Zora. “She likes to make her own books,” Smart says. “Now it’s kind of flipped from me reading to her to her reading to me.” As for personal reading, Smart cites Jesmyn Ward’s “Sing, Unburied, Sing” as the best book of the year. “It’s just incredible on so many levels; she’s an excellent writer, but she tackles some ambitious themes and does a great job of painting textured portraits of characters who you don’t o!en see in literature,” Smart says. While 2017 has been a year of “hard-core volunteering,” Smart does have plans to put her own pen to paper, working on a children’s book and a nonfiction book aimed at parents to inspire a love of reading. “For me, 2017 has been about digging in and figuring out what my power is as an individual to impact my community and the world more broadly,” Smart says. “I think as individuals, when we focus our efforts in a specific area and approach things as curious learners and people who are open and curious and aware, then we can find a place to contribute, and over time all of those experiences add up to something that can matter.” While Smart has carved her niche in the reading and writing realms, she credits her education about Austin to groups like Impact Austin, the women’s philanthropy network, and programs like Leadership Austin’s Experience Austin. “I would encourage people to go out of their way to learn about part of the city that they’re not familiar with and find out what the community needs and how they might be able to help,” Smart says. “Dig in and be curious.” tribeza.com

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Ben Bufkin PRINCIPAL, ENDEAVOR

Meet the guy who helped dramatically grow Austin’s retail scene BY ERIC WEBBER

B

LAME IT ON SPAIN. THAT’S WHERE 39-YEAR-OLD COM-

mercial real estate developer Ben Bu#in decided how much he loved Austin. He was a University of Texas student spending a summer semester in Granada and traveling through Europe. “That experience clued me in that there was a whole new way to think about living and lifestyle,” remembers Bu#in, who grew up in Dallas. What struck him most was seeing so many places where people were passionate about their city and their local culture. And he recognized that Austin had that same passion. “When I came back, I was committed to staying,” Bu#in says. With a freshly printed economics degree, Bu#in interviewed with Andy Pastor, co-founder of Endeavor Real Estate Group, the largest full-service commercial real estate company in South and Central Texas. “I knew right then this was what I wanted to do,” Bu#in says. “Everyone at Endeavor loved what they did, being part of and even helping create the fabric of this community.” Unfortunately it was a dream deferred. It was 2001 and the bursting tech bubble splattered Austin real estate. Bu#in passed the Endeavor chemistry check, but the company didn’t have a position for him. So he headed back to Dallas and a job with HFF, a national commercial developer. Bu#in honed his skills and bided his time, knowing that this stretch away from Austin would be temporary. The call came in 2004. An email actually, from Endeavor, who remembered the young man who shared the firm’s enthusiasm and vision for the future of Austin. This time there was a job for him. Bu#in’s first project was Southpark Meadows, a sprawling shopping complex on I-35 near Onion Creek. There he learned not just about retail development, but also the o!en unique approach Austin has to large-scale projects. Austin has a history of being inclusive, opinionated, free-spirited. People speak their minds about anything and everything. O!en loudly. Go to a Planning Commission meeting and you’ll see. It’s an openness that has frustrated many developers. But where some see contention, Bufkin sees opportunity. “There are a lot of stakeholders —

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individuals and groups with an interest in every side of any given project, and everyone is in on the conversation,” he says. “That means the process takes longer, but in the end it leads to more-thoughtful decisions.” Bu#in and Endeavor took that way of thinking north for their next venture, The Domain, the 300-acre high-end retail, office, and residential center at MoPac and Braker Lane. And then north again, to Endeavor’s latest effort, Domain NORTHSIDE. Domain Northside offers 43 acres of retail, restaurants, bars, and the Alo! and Archer hotels. Among the dozens of shops and restaurants, many are well-known brands but new to the Austin market, like Suitsupply, Guideboat Co., and Diptyque. But you’ll also see many familiar home-grown favorites, such as Stag, Eliza Page, and Birds Barbershop. That combination was crucial. While Endeavor wanted to bring in names and experiences new to Austin, there also had to be a strong local connection. That’s important in this town, and Bu#in and Endeavor knew that to be successful they would have to create something with which Austin would be “comfortable,” a word Bu#in uses o!en. Most of all, they didn’t want Domain Northside to be just a place where people would blow in to shop or eat and then leave; they wanted a vibrant community where you’d see people doing the same things you’d see in any other dynamic neighborhood: early-morning yoga, a stop at a coffee shop, work, lunch, business meetings, shopping, happy hour, dinner. There’s even Rock Rose for the late crowd, a collection of shops, bars, and restaurants — many of them locally owned — that aims to re-create the vibe of areas like South Congress Avenue. Even with another notch in his belt, Bu#in isn’t taking a break, except to spend more time with his wife, Susan, and their three boys, George, William, and Luke. Instead, he’d rather look ahead. And in that regard he thinks the city is just getting started in terms of its potential. He’s excited about the future but doesn’t stay awake at night worrying about what’s next. “In fact,” he says, “I love my work and this city so much I still pinch myself to make sure I’m not dreaming that I get to live here.”


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Dr. Carlos Brown

CHIEF OF ACUTE SURGERY, DELL MEDICAL SCHOOL

He’s shaping the future of saving lives at Dell Seton Medical Center BY NICOLE BECKLEY

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DON’T FEEL LIKE MY JOB IS VERY STRESS FUL AT

all. I love what I do.” A statement like this might seem fairly innocuous, but it’s more surprising when your job is trauma surgery. As the chief of the Acute Care Surgery division at Dell Medical School, Dr. Carlos Brown oversees trauma, emergency general surgery, surgery critical care, and the new burn program and instructs medical students as a professor of surgery. “I love taking care of patients, love teaching, love doing research,” Brown says. Love for this type of work came to Brown at a very early age. “I wanted to be a physician my whole life and probably a surgeon my whole life, but the only real event that I could see that sparked that was watching ‘M.A.S.H.’ as a kid,” Brown says. Spending most of his formative years in Austin, Brown graduated from Westlake High School and then the University of Texas, followed by the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston for medical school. Receiving a scholarship from the Navy, Brown started his career at the Naval Medical Center San Diego and the LAC-USC Medical Center, where, as the deputy director of the Naval Trauma Training Center, he prepared Navy personnel for deployments in Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2006 Brown himself went to Ramadi, Iraq, spending seven months performing trauma surgery in one of the most dangerous places in the country. Part of his experience was covered in a lengthy Texas Monthly article — “Carlos Brown Is a Hero (No Matter What He Says)” — in 2007. “That was by far the single greatest professional experience of my life,” Brown says of his time in Ramadi. “The opportunity and privilege and honor of taking care of our troops who were wounded in combat was like nothing I’d done before. The volume and acuity of trauma cases

that I took care of there just made me hone my skills as a surgeon exponentially from what they were before that.” A!er his time in Iraq, Brown took over the trauma unit at Brackenridge, establishing a trauma research program, starting the general surgery residency program, and helping to make Brackenridge a Level I trauma center. “I miss the military tremendously,” Brown says. “I decided to get out to come back here to help build this program, but I look back on those days fondly and realize it was a critical part of my growth as a person and as a surgeon.” In the past year, the Dell Seton Medical Center at the University of Texas (Brackenridge Hospital became Dell Seton) has opened, and the first class of medical students has started rotations. Two specialized programs are being built out as well, a geriatric trauma program and a burn program, serving Central Texans who previously had to seek care in Houston, Dallas, or other cities. “Trauma is always unknown,” Brown says. “People are coming in severely injured with life-threatening problems, but you don’t know what they are when they walk in the door. You have to figure that out. So making really difficult decisions with limited information and high stakes, it’s a really invigorating part of the job. Elective surgery — you know what you’re going to take care of, you know what you’re going to operate on. In trauma, you just know someone’s really badly hurt, and you have to figure out what’s wrong with them and what to do to fix it.” While Brown’s work is demanding, his off-hours are devoted to his family: his wife, Debbie, and his kids, Madison and Tyler, who attend Westlake, and Trevor, a sophomore golfer at TCU,. “If I’m not at work, I’m trying to hang out with my family more than anything else,” Brown says. “That keeps me grounded, and if there is stress, it’s a great way to decompress.” tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2017

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Will & Noël Bridges PARTNERS, ANTONE’S, ARLYN STUDIOS, CISCO’S, DEEP EDDY CABARET, LAMBERT’S, POOL BURGER

The king and queen of cool preserve Austin’s past while building a better future BY ERIC WEBBER

T

HEY MAY SEEM YOUNG TO HAVE THEIR NAMES ATTACHED

to some of Austin’s most storied and beloved establishments. Will and Noël Bridges, both in their early 30s, are putting their mark on the Austin landscape by not letting things die, whether that’s a building, a business, or even an idea. It’s part business and part calling. They’re both Austin natives, with a deep love for the city. On top of that, they feel their generation has a responsibility to preserve Austin’s culture and heritage. “We’ve been handed a torch,” Will says. It started with Will partnering with McGuire Moorman Hospitality in 2006 to open Lamberts in a historic building downtown. Five years later he became a partner at Arlyn Studios, the legendary music house that has attracted musicians from Ray Charles to Lorde. Next, he and Noël, along with his father, Robert, took over Deep Eddy Cabaret, the venerable beer joint on Lake Austin Boulevard that opened when Truman was president. Last year they became part of the group that revived Antone’s, arguably Austin’s most noted music club, and this year it’s Cisco’s, the migas mecca on East 6th Street that opened in 1946. And while they’re at it, they’ve launched a brand-new place, Pool Burger, which if you didn’t know it, you’d think had been around just as long. It was while on their honeymoon in Hawaii that they learned they had closed the deal on Deep Eddy. That trip also proved the inspiration for Pool Burger — a combination burger trailer and tiki bar that sits below and behind Deep Eddy. The couple share a fondness for dive bars and found one near where they were staying on Kauai. They fell in love with its tiki theme. When they returned to Deep Eddy they discovered something interesting. A tiki-like carving on one of the tables, similar pictures in the women’s restroom, even a palm tree growing outside, none of which they’d noticed before. The Bridgeses couldn’t ignore the connection. That’s how you get an authentic tiki bar, which feels as though it’s been around forever, next to a bar that has. Both places highlight two things that come naturally to both Will and Noël: a strict attention to detail and a desire not to change things too much.

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Changes had to be made to Deep Eddy to bring it up to code. Not that anyone noticed. The couple meticulously photographed and documented everything in the bar so they could get it back near exactly the way it was. “Not changing things is even harder than changing things,” says Will. “But so worth the effort.” That’s why you’ll see very little visible difference at Cisco’s except the addition of a liquor license and evening hours. The same goes for Antone’s, which has had many homes since it was founded in 1975. “A symbolization of the resilience of the Austin music scene,” as Will puts it, which he’d like to see remain true to the legacy of founder Clifford Antone. The idea of preservation goes beyond their business interests. Noël is deeply involved in the “Save Muny” movement — the effort to preserve Lion’s Municipal, the UT-owned, city-leased golf course just down the street from Depp Eddy. Noël, who doesn’t even play golf, sees the effort to save the course as similar to the other preservation efforts she and Will have embraced. “The impact goes far beyond golfers,” she says. “It is a civil-rights landmark and an important urban green space.” Noël is exploring ways for Muny to serve an even broader community purpose. That notion of inclusivity is common with the Bridgeses. They see Austin as a town full of “…places where people of all kinds are hanging out together,” according to Will. Inclusive also applies to their work styles. Many of their partners are family or longtime friends. Conventional wisdom says that friends and family don’t make good business bedfellows. But then the Bridgeses don’t see themselves as conventional. Austin isn’t their sole focus; they like to travel and seek out inspiration in places that are kindred spirits to Austin. Hawaii proved to be one, and they both cite New Orleans as a spot where respect for the city’s legacies and traditions seems inherent in its residents. But when it comes to new deals, they aren’t looking outside of town. While they worry about growing too fast, they feel like there are plenty of local opportunities right in their wheelhouse. “It’s exciting to us that we get to have a hand in what the future of Austin looks like,” says Noël. And at least where the Bridgeses are involved, it’s a safe bet that Austin’s future won’t look very different from its past.


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Simone Wicha DIRECTOR, BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART

The dynamic arts patron is elevating Austin to a true destination for the visual arts BY EMMA BANKS

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IMONE WICHA IS A NATIVE TEXAN, BUT SHE WAS NEVER

one who had specific intentions to return. Growing up in Mexico City, attending high school and university in Texas, and departing a!erwards for a career in New York City, Wicha’s agenda did not necessarily include a trip back down south. Rather, being recruited by the museum that she now calls home, coupled with excellent personal timing family-wise, brought her back. That was more than a decade ago. Since her arrival at the Blanton, Wicha has been promoted from director of development, to deputy director, to museum director outright, assembled what she believes is a world-class team, produced arguably the most ambitious exhibitions the museum has ever housed, and cemented the museum’s place as a pillar of both the university and the city’s art community as a whole. If it wasn’t already obvious, this is one unexpected return that quickly proved invaluable in amplifying Austin’s arts reputation tenfold. “It was a really important moment in my mind for Austin, because while I was at school at UT, it was a city where the arts were not really part of the fabric of the community,” Wicha says. “So I thought, ‘This is a moment to be a part of this. How many opportunities do you have to really make an impact on a city that’s growing like this, and hopefully have an impact?’ It’s huge.” Wicha is only the fi!h director in the Blanton’s 54-year history, and she’s arguably its most determined, insofar as her ambition for the museum — and its potential cultural influence — knows no bounds. Directing a museum that already greets upwards of 20,000 visitors from UT’s campus alone (one of the highest percentage-wise in the country), Wicha has set her sights equally on the Blanton’s position within the city’s larger arts landscape, looking far beyond the building’s physical location on campus to the hearts and minds of every Austinite she can think of. No stone gets le! unturned in this director’s pursuit of greater awareness and significance for her institution. “We want to serve the university campus, obviously, but our intention is to be open to the community,” she says. “So that’s always a balance. To me it’s awareness. I want everyone to feel like, ‘This is my museum,’ and I want all of those people to be impacted with where they need to be with where they’re at in their life. I want all of them to feel really proud of their community and

what we’ve got here at the Blanton.” Wicha’s ambition is matched by her unwavering excitement — for both her museum’s potential and the city’s future as a whole. For her, it’s an exhilarating time to be in Austin — and the Blanton’s visitors undoubtably would agree. Proof of the institution’s (and, by default, Wicha’s) ability to live up to this potential can be seen in exhibitions from recent years past — from “Warhol: By The Book”, the first exhibit in the US to analyze that specific body of work, to, most recently, “Epic Tales From Ancient India”, which was on view from the San Diego Museum of Art. For Wicha, fulfilling the potential she so clearly sees is, at this point, all but second nature. “I want to provide the city with the museum it deserves,” she says. “And I want more people to feel like the arts add value to their life and can be a place that they can find joy and learn and thrive as much as the other art forms in this city. I believe that it’s already happening, and I believe that it’s going to happen even more so.” Practically speaking, Wicha’s most recent labor of love, and what has specifically memorialized the year 2017, is what she calls a monumental Ellsworth Kelly project, appropriately titled “Austin”, that’s set to open in February, potentially having national and international implications for the museum and its search for greater influence. “Austin” is the only freestanding building that Kelly has ever designed. A 2,175-square-foot building with colored glass windows and 14 marble panels, it was created with the intention of bringing joy and contemplation to its visitors, and will become a cornerstone of the Blanton’s permanent collection. “I think the opening of the Kelly project makes Austin a true destination for the visual arts,” she says. “So if you care about the arts anywhere in the world, there is a reason, a real reason, for you to make the trip to Austin. I feel proud of what we’ve done on campus and in our community, and I think marking the city and marking the museum with the honor that we were given to be able to realize this project at the Blanton starts to change the dynamic and make us a world-class destination.” Wicha may have a lot of the aforementioned ambition resting on the upcoming Kelly project, but one thing’s certain: this is one director who’s already made her mark. Here’s hoping she’s here to stay. tribeza.com

| DECEMBER 2017

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Tatsu Aikawa & Takuya “Tako” Matsumoto CO-OWNERS KEMURI TATSU-YA

How a Texas meets Japanese eatery became the talk of the town BY PARKER YAMASAKI

O

N THE DAY THAT TATSU AIKAWA

and Takuya “Tako” Matsumoto opened Ramen Tatsu-Ya in September 2012, the temperature would reach 100 degrees. And yet despite the scorching conditions, the nascent restaurant was already showing signs of a cult following: Customers queued up in long lines, with wait times that sometimes stretched upward of an hour, all to slurp their way to the bottom of steaming bowls of decadently rich pork broth and fresh noodles. In mid-2015, with the restaurant’s iconic status in Austin’s dining scene firmly secure, Tatsu got a call about a building on East Second Street — the former home of Live Oak Barbecue, in fact — that was on the market. Tatsu and Tako quickly realized that the space would be perfect for an idea that they’d been simmering on for a couple of years: Texas BBQ meets Japanese pub. In January 2017, that idea became a reality with the opening of Kemuri Tatsu-Ya. Inside the eatery, it’s Japanese bathhouse (dark wood paneling, a large neon kanji sign) meets Texas kitsch (Lone Star beer sign sits over the front window, a Sapporo Dra! flag hangs by the entrance to the bar). Festive tunes from Busdriver and Anderson .Paak pulse through the speakers. And the essence of smoke (from burbling beef bones and slow-roasting pork and charring shishito peppers, all fueled by the embers of wood) diffuses through every nook and cranny: It’s embedded in the walls, it stretches to the curb, and before you leave the place, it will have taken to the fibers of your shirt and the strands of your hair. On the menu are clever renditions of Texan-Japanese food (or Japanese-Texan food), but be forewarned: If you walk in expecting to find a “sushirrito” among them, you will be shamed. If you walk in mentioning “fusion,” you’ll be met with a compliant eye-roll. Mention “traditional,” and you’ll be redirected to Ramen Tatsu-Ya. Here, Tatsu and Tako are

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working with tastes and experiences that they grew up with, and that authenticity permeates the menu the same way the smoke permeates the building. “Our ultimate pleasure is for customers to walk in without knowing anything about Kemuri Tatsu-Ya and ‘get’ the whole idea of what we’re trying to do here,” Tatsu says. “It’s not a concept that’s been made out of thin air, you know what I’m saying? This is more experiences. This is more our life as Japanese immigrants and growing up in Texas.” Take the sticky rice tamales. “Growing up, we ate a lot of sticky rice on the weekends,” Tatsu says. “So naturally our tamales are made of sticky rice, wrapped in bamboo instead of corn husks, but steamed the same as tamales.” Naturally. “It’s really a lot of home cooking. That’s like the number one trigger of memory — eating something that resembles home cooking,” Tatsu says. He just happens to have grown up in a pretty unique home. “We had a smoker in the backyard, but my mom would bring home fish instead of meat. Stuff like that. I mean, we’re immigrants, you know? [At Kemuri] we’re not just creating something just to create it. I have a flavor in my mind, which has built over the years of living in Texas and cooking Japanese food.” The menu at Kemuri is divided into five loose categories: “Munchies,” “Smoked,” “Skewers,” “Rice Stuff,” and “Ramen.” While each section boasts some plates that may sound more like the deep cuts (Dank Tofu, Toro Brisket, Chili Cheese Takoyaki), all make room for some lovably spun classics, like crispy nigiri, classic karaage chicken, and “Texas” ramen. To be a “person of the year” in Austin requires an authenticity almost to the point of indulgence. It means that you are doing something so authentic it feels inevitable. For Tats and Tako, that inevitability is the mingling of Texas and Japanese culture within them, expressed through food, served with a side of chili cheese and an extra ajitama egg.


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Ross Moody

CEO, NATIONAL WESTERN LIFE GROUP AND TRUSTEE, MOODY FOUNDATION

Thoroughly engaged in the city he loves, impact means everything BY ANNE BRUNO

V

ISIT WITH ROSS MOODY AND IT’S QUICKLY APPARENT

that the man sitting across the table, casually dressed in a gray down jacket that matches his silver hair, is quite a busy guy. Not because he’s checking his phone or giving off the vibe of needing to be somewhere else (he does neither), but because even a brief conversation covers a lot of terrain, past, present, and future. To wit: his first years in Austin as a student at UT; his father, kids, and extended family; his business (he’s chairman of the board, president, and CEO of Austin’s fourth-largest publicly held company, National Western Life Group); the state of Austin’s economy and arts scene; local nonprofits, from small, under-the-radar groups to well-established outfits; his zeal for the outdoors and history with marathons (he’s run 35 and completed three Ironman triathlons), and the most effective way to go about dispensing millions of dollars each year to benefit the city and state he loves. Yes, Moody is a busy guy, but a more apt description is to call him thoroughly engaged. “In the last few years, the Moody Foundation has grown incredibly,” he explains, “and what we’ve been able to do as a result is so exciting.” Moody’s enthusiasm is evident as he uses the words “pure joy” to describe the feeling of seeing a need and being able to do something about it. A!er graduating from UT in 1984, Moody worked for four years (two in New York City) before attending Harvard for an MBA. Austin has been home ever since, and his commitment to the city runs as deep as his family’s Texas roots. Alongside his sister, Francie Moody-Dahlberg, of Dallas and his daughter, Elle Moody, of New York, Moody serves as trustee for the Moody Foundation, which started in Galveston in 1942. Arts, education, the environment, health, and social services are the foundation’s focus, and since its inception, it has funded grants across Texas worth more than $1.3 billion. The foundation also has three hallmark initiatives of its own, each of which brings Texans opportunities for education, as well as inspiration and nourishment for body and soul. The Capital Area Food Bank, AIDS Services of Austin, Candlelight Ranch,

Jeremiah Program, the Contemporary Austin, and the Blanton Museum of Art are just a few Austin beneficiaries. In 2013, the announcement of a $50 million donation to establish the Moody College of Communication at UT Austin marked the largest endowment for the study of communication at any public university in the nation. “They’re doing amazing things,” Moody remarks. “Everything from 3-D filmmaking to innovative ways of teaching kids with speech and learning difficulties. These are things that can change people’s lives and their future; I’m blown away by what goes on there.” As with many grants, things o!en start slowly, with one or two small requests, and gain momentum as conversations deepen and the potential is envisioned. Such was the case with the Moody Foundation’s recently announced $9.7 million grant to the Pease Park Conservancy. “This is a true grassroots organization,” he says. “Knowing that the city can only do so much, a group of neighbors just got together and started planting trees, doing their best to take care of a place that’s at the heart of Austin’s character.” Moody explains that the first requests were small, but then discussions grew. “Pease is such a ‘people’s park’ beloved by folks all over town. I’m thrilled we’re able to help them get going on something that’ll have a big impact,” says Moody. “That’s what it’s all about.” Moody sees an impact just as strong with the foundation’s other major gi! to the city’s green space this year, a $15 million grant to the Waller Creek Conservancy. The funds will create an amphitheater and a great lawn in a revitalized Waterloo Park, part of the conservancy’s initiative to connect a chain of downtown parks running along Waller Creek. In discussing the plan’s vision, Moody says he loves the connectivity and inclusiveness at the heart of the public-private effort: “They have a bold vision for all of it — the design, the architecture, and the cultural enhancement. Each piece brings economic as well as social benefits to everyone. “Every day,” he says, “I thank my lucky stars I get to live here and do what I do. When we support an organization, from then on we’re their unofficial cheerleaders. What a wonderful role to be able to play.” tribeza.com

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Margaret Jabour & David Jabour CO-OWNERS, TWIN LIQUORS

An 80-year legacy of heart and soul keeps Twin Liquors at the forefront of Austin BY ANNE BRUNO

W

HILE IT’S HARD TO IMAGINE IN TODAY’S AUSTIN

of online everything and delivery everywhere, our booming city was once a small town. From its start, Austin was the kind of place that drew risk takers and hardworking newcomers seeking every opportunity to better their lives. The burgeoning businesses were o!en family affairs, meaning every member, young and old alike, took part in the labor and long hours. In the late 1800s, one such family was the Jabours, whose patriarch started with a peddler’s cart and went on to open a mercantile store in the heart of Austin at Congress Avenue and Pecan (now Sixth) Street. In 1937, not long a!er prohibition had ended, the Jabour family ventured into the fiercely competitive liquor business. (Austin had no fewer than 26 liquor stores within a two-mile area at the time.) “Trading” with people you knew and trusted was a way of life, and Jabour’s Package Store — a liquor store, drug store, and soda fountain under one roof — thrived, eventually expanding to three stores and a tavern, which sold only beer. When the second generation of the family retired a!er more than 40 years in the business, the next one picked up the baton and opened the first Twin Liquors, a modest 700-square-foot retail space at the corner of Seventh and Red River. Third-generation Austin natives and siblings Margaret Jabour and David Jabour are co-owners of Twin Liquors and serve as the company’s executive vice president and president, respectively. Like their father and his twin brother for whom the store is named, Margaret and David have worked side by side in the family business, off and on, since childhood. While each has pursued other interests (Margaret sold car stereos as a teen and studied fashion, and David spent 15 years in banking), the Jabours share a genuine enthusiasm for taking their company into the future while maintaining the heart and soul of its past. For instance, the Jabours are intent on balancing the use of technology with providing services like alcohol delivery in a safe and sensitive way they can feel good about.

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“When you grow up working in a family business like we did, you learn what it means to do things the right way,” explains Margaret. “Everything you do has to come from the heart first. Of course, a good business should make money, but if that’s all you’re about and don’t listen to your customers to learn their needs and wants, I don’t see how you could get up and go to work every day. What would be the point?” The question is rhetorical, yet it’s abundantly clear that Margaret and David have given it much thought over the years. The answers — for them, as well as their team of employees at the more than 80 Twin Liquors stores across Central Texas — come from a strongly held desire to continue a legacy of building relationships that goes far beyond selling. David illustrates that point by sharing a story. “I was at an event, seated next to a highly accomplished physician,” he says. “As soon as he recognized my last name, he asked if my dad worked at the liquor store at Seventh and Red River back in the day. I told him, ‘Yes, that’s our store and Dad was there most of the time.’ He went on to tell me, ‘You probably don’t believe this, but your father is partially responsible for what I’m doing today.’ Apparently the young man was particularly discouraged by his studies one day when he went into the store, and he told Dad he was thinking about dropping out. So they talked a while, Dad listening to his frustrations. He told me that without Dad’s advice and encouragement that day, he likely would’ve gone ahead and le! school. That’s just the kind of relationship Dad had with his customers.” In addition to industry accolades, the Jabours have received numerous community awards and recognition for their leadership and support of local nonprofits. Margaret ties their work in the community to the family’s core values of responsibility and trust: “It’s about always being of service and doing whatever you can in the most responsible way you can. Our customers are our neighbors, our friends; what matters to them matters to us. Figuring out more ways to serve is our passion, and it just keeps growing.”


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Delfo Trombetta PARTNER, NEW WATERLOO

From La Condesa to the South Congress Hotel, he’s behind some of Austin’s hippest spots, and shows no sign of slowing down BY NICOLE BECKLEY

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T’S EARLY ON A FRIDAY MORNING, AND DELFO TROMBETTA IS

is walking through the lobby of the South Congress Hotel, nodding to friends and staff members, on his way to get a cup of coffee at Mañana. “We have a two-year-old, so he’s up like clockwork every day,” Trombetta says. “[My wife and I] went to an event last night and saw some friends and stayed out late and he doesn’t care. He’s up at the same time.” A lot has happened for Trombetta in the past two years. In 2015, his hospitality management group, Violet Crown, merged to form New Waterloo, where Trombetta is now a partner with Patrick Jeffers, Bill Stapleton, Stuart McManus, and Bart Knaggs. “We went from two restaurants with a handful of employees to two restaurants, two hotels, five more restaurants, and a management company that grew very quickly from five to 20; that wasn’t easy,” Trombetta says of the group that manages some of Austin’s most popular hot spots, including Sway, Otoko, Hotel Ella, and the South Congress Hotel. While the growth happened rapidly, Trombetta had paved the way for success starting with the opening of La Condesa in 2009. He’d been living in New York and developing projects in Dallas and Atlantic City, but with La Condesa’s debut, he decided to make a permanent move. “I think the mystique of Austin was, it was really quiet, everybody rode their bikes around, nothing was too crowded, but there was energy — there were fun places to go at night and good activity,” Trombetta says. “Now you still have that energy, you just have a lot more people.” Born in Catania, Italy, Trombetta lived in Sicily, with a two-year stint in Phoenix when his father’s work was transferred, until high school, when his family moved to the Boston suburb of Lexington. Trombetta went to George-

town, in Washington, D.C., for college, and a!erward he worked at a record label, which led to a job in Florida booking DJs for two large nightclubs. “It was fun, but I was also the director of operations for those clubs, so that was where I found my true calling,” he says. His upbringing in Italy also factored heavily into determining his career. “That’s why I’m in the hospitality business,” Trombetta says. “Every single Saturday growing up we were at my mother’s parents’ house with all our uncles, aunts, cousins. It was one long meal and just a whole a!ernoon hanging out. And every Sunday we did the same with my father’s family. Food is community; that’s, I think, what I enjoy the most about our business and our industry.” It’s certainly kept Trombetta busy. In September, New Waterloo opened French brasserie Le Politique downtown, and the firm has four more openings on the horizon, including two East Side Italian eateries — La Matta, a sandwich shop, and Il Brutto that will serve classic Italian dishes — and two new outposts for modern Thai favorite Sway, in Westlake and in the Domain’s Rock Rose. The growth further motivates Trombetta, and he cites the offering of health plans and 401(k) options as benefits they couldn’t have provided with just one restaurant. Today the group employs around 600. “Growth for me and my partners goes hand in hand with growth for our people , whose shoulders we stand on. It really is the most motivating of things for me personally.” Trombetta also looks to his father to inspire his work ethic. “To have the fortitude to uproot his life, my mom’s life, and give my sister and I this great new opportunity in the United States; he always worked so hard,” Trombetta says. “The harder you work, the harder the people around you will work. I just keep my head down and keep doing that, and it ends up working out.” tribeza.com

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Whitney Casey & Brooklyn Decker CO-FOUNDERS, FINERY

The dynamic friendship that formed a fashion-focused tech company BY NICOLE BECKLEY

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HAT’S IT TAKE TO START A TECH COMPANY IN 2017?

That question’s certainly been on the minds of Whitney Casey and Brooklyn Decker. In March, the high-profile pair — Casey, a former CNN anchor, and Decker, a model and actress currently starring in Nexflix’s “Grace and Frankie” — launched the fashion-focused Finery, a sort of personalized digital closet described as a “wardrobe operating system.” But the road to creating a new tech platform hasn’t been a totally smooth one. When we meet, on the ground floor of the new Central Public Library, Casey and Decker are still clad in the outfits from their photo shoot, Decker in a longsleeved white Isabel Marant Etoile dress and Casey in a bold floral Raey dress from Matchesfashion.com, joking that they’d been “styled by Vogue.” The night before, Casey had asked Vogue Australia fashion director Christine Centenera, an early adopter of Finery, for advice on what the duo should wear (taking into account Decker’s being eight and a half months pregnant with her second child). “When we’re together, we try to match the level of appropriateness. It’s less about the look and more about how dressy are you going,” Decker says. Casey and Decker met in 2015 on a trip to Palm Springs, California, organized by a mutual friend from Austin who wanted to connect the interesting women she knew. “You think about six or seven strangers coming together from different areas, it could be awkward, so Whitney of course comes in with costumes and games and ideas just to break the ice,” Decker says. “She is a human icebreaker.” “The people at Lucy in Disguise know me,” Casey says. “They’ll be like, ‘What’s happening this weekend, Whitney?’ I should have an account there.” Armed with desert-themed costumes — a cactus, tequila bottle, margarita salt — Casey and Decker hit it off. “It was a really great group of women, and Whitney and I just connected,” Decker says. “Also ’cause we were [based] in Austin, it really helped us build our relationship here.” A!er that initial meeting, Casey and Decker started talking about possible

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ways to collaborate and build something together. “[We] thought of a lot of really terrible ideas, and Finery was Whitney’s brainchild,” Decker says. “She was basically saying, ‘We have all these tools to expedite these processes in our lives that make it run smoothly, run easier. Why is there nothing for our wardrobe?’” Citing finance-management tools like Mint and travel-planning tools like TripIt, Casey and Decker started the build-out for Finery, which uses machine learning to read receipts captured in your email inbox from online purchases and fill your digital closet. In-store purchases can be added in manually. From there users can create outfits from what they already own, make wishlists for future purchases, and shop for new items. The team released the desktop version, and since launching, they’ve passed 100,000 users and harnessed some star power for the site. You can check out, and purchase items from, the wardrobes of Camille Styles, Rachel Zoe, and Margherita Missoni, among others. But when it came to raising funds, the two found it incredibly challenging to convey the power of their idea. “Someone told us, you’re going to have to prove to VCs that this isn’t a hobby,” Casey says. “I was [already] about eight months pregnant, and Whitney was working on her birthday, and we were in this meeting trying to talk about our company, and we’re like, ‘I don’t know how much more seriously one can take this,’” Decker says. A!er a whirlwind of pitch meetings in Silicon Valley, Los Angeles, and New York, the pair found the right investor, and they’ve all but cashed the check on their first round of funding. “Trying to tell men why this is valuable to women was a challenge,” Decker says. But they’re excited for what 2018 will bring. Asked if they have a personal mantra that keeps them going, Decker pulls out her phone and scrolls for a quote from Confucius she’d recently found that reminded her of Casey. “‘A lion chased me up a tree, and I greatly enjoyed the view from the top,’” Decker says. “That’s good,” Casey responds. “I’m going to change it to a tiger.” “It’s her spirit animal,” Decker says. Go ahead, let them hear you roar.


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12 BY TRIBEZA STAFF PHOTOGRAPHS BY

RANDAL FORD

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TO

WATCH THEY ARE YOUNG, BURSTING WITH ENERGY, AND FULL OF IDEAS FOR THE CITY THEY LOVE MOST


KRISTEN KILPATRICK PHOTOGRAPHER

The Fort Worth native takes memorable photos from her travels around the world, for national clients like Bumble and Camille Styles, and at weddings around the state and beyond. Her photos have a special, ethereal look because many of them are shot on a film camera.

WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR CAREER HIGHLIGHTS SO FAR?

Traveling has been one of the biggest career highlights for me. From Italy to camping on the Zabezi River in Africa, this past year has been the most traveled year of my career yet. The experiences and friendships made through each shoot have been such a huge highlight. WHY AUSTIN?

Austin is all-encompassing. Even though it’s a big city, it still feels small. I am continuously in awe of the design of the city. The creative community is strong here and feels like family. tribeza.com

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People are compassionate and truly gracious. Another major love I have for Austin is the nature that surrounds the city. I love that you can take a 30-minute drive and be completely surrounded by tall trees, brushy meadows, and the clearest watering holes. Nature and light are such a huge component to my work, so I constantly find myself gravitating to places like these. WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOME-

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

There is nothing more relaxing to me than spending time in Hico with my horses — unplugged and surrounded by nature. The occasional massage is nice too! WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E BLOCKS?

Immerse yourself around other creatives and you will be a stranger to creative blocks.

ONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

No matter how much planning and hard work goes into something, it might not work out. It might crumble miserably and leave you feeling depleted, unwilling to continue. What I wish I knew is that these failures are what shapes us into what we are meant to be. Remaining true to your efforts and surrounding yourself with positivity will lead you to soar higher than ever imaginable. Failure can be beautiful, so when it happens, don’t waste any time letting it destroy you. We will undoubtably all fail, and perfection does not exist. The only thing you will ever have true control over is yourself, so operate with this in mind. WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

Much of my inspiration comes from art, fashion, and nature. The biggest of them of all is nature. Light-play and the environment fuel my creativity. I love the fusion that these two natural elements create, and there is no better tool than light. There is something magical about the effects light creates when twinkling through the trees, or kissing the land moments before sunset or sunrise. HOW DO YOU GET IT ALL DONE?

Endless coffee, Spotify, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and lots of living on a prayer. But mostly the key to getting things done is to only take on the type of work that excites me. That’s the real push to making deadlines and getting tasks completed. My clients are all so incredible, which in turn makes me want to deliver something above and beyond for them.

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WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS IN AUSTIN?

Josephine House — I could live there — Grizzelda’s, and Tiny Boxwoods. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPOT TO GET AWAY TO?

Red Bud Isle Park with my pup. WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

I am opening a print shop from my wild-horse series. For more information on Kilpatrick, visit kristenkilpatrick.com.

We will undoubtably all fail, and perfection does not exist. The only thing you will ever have true control over is yourself, so operate with this in mind.


Run your own race. A friend told me this recently, and it’s really true. You’re going to produce your best work and get better if you don’t spend all of your time comparing yourself to others. Especially in creative fields. Your internal self-critic is a real asshole, and you’ve got to ignore that. WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU? 

JOE HOLM DESIGN DIRECTOR, CLAYTON & LITTLE

Interior designer Joe Holm, who hails from northern Wisconsin, got his start at McGuire Moorman Hospitality, where he helped design local restaurants like Elizabeth Street Café and Jeffrey’s. A!er moving to London for a few years, where his husband, Mike Hondorp, was working for Instagram corporate, they returned to Austin, and Holm joined Clayton & Little, where one of his recently completed designs is the French brasserie Le Politique. It’s impossible for him to pick a favorite project of the bunch. “Is it ok to say everything is a highlight, because I have an unnatural enthusiasm about restaurants? I truly love every project I do,” he says. WHY AUSTIN?

WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

I live in Austin for a lot of reasons: the people, the food, good friends, and definitely the sunshine. It’s always been my lucky place, the place where I came and everything — love, friends, career — just seemed to fall into place. I grew up in Wisconsin, which means I’m used to “Midwestern nice.” I feel like Austin has the same high levels of nice but with better weather than northern Wisconsin. It’s just all-around pleasant.

Creative: Ilse Crawford, Cara Woodhouse, Ford Huniford, Kay Kollar, Martin Brudnizki, India Mahdavi, Commune Design, and Arent & Pyke.  Style: Iris Apfel, Joan Rivers, Michelle Obama, Amy Sedaris, and Delta Burke, circa “Designing Women.” WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOMEONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO? 

I know it’s cheesy, but it’s my true and heartfelt desire to make Austin a great place. The city is changing — and that’s inevitable — but if a city has a great restaurant and hotel scene, and that is driven by a supertalented creative class, it’ll keep being a great city.  HOW DO YOU RELAX? 

I grew up around lakes, so water is a big thing. Hiking, running, swimming, or getting the hell out of town are very important. I have a wonderful husband, who is a cheerleader for frequent travel, which is really helpful on the relaxation and inspiration front. WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS IN AUSTIN?

Three is just unfair. Lenoir. Pitchfork Pretty. Justine’s. Bufalina. Fukumoto. Elizabeth Street — my first project in Austin. Kemuri Tatsuya. Dai Due. Sazón. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BUILDING? 

I’ve always had a crush on the Brown Building, but if it’s a place to go visit, I’d say the LBJ Library. St. Martin’s Lutheran Church on 15th has always knocked my socks off, as has the current McGarrah Jessee building. tribeza.com

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ANNIE-LAURIE GRABIEL & ARTHUR FURMAN ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN TEAM, SIDE ANGLE SIDE

Native Austinite Arthur Furman met Annie-Laurie Grabiel in architecture school at the Rhode Island School of Design. Together they lived and worked in Miami for six years before returning to Austin, where Grabiel worked for Clayton & Little and Furman for his dad’s firm, Furman + Keil Architects. They decided to join forces in June 2016 in their own firm, Side Angle Side. Now there are a number of exciting projects on the boards, like a concept with the Brew & Brew guys called Little Brother Coffee and Cold Ones and a remodel of Sweetish Hill Bakery, a place particularly special to Furman, since he grew up snacking on bear claws there as a kid. He says: “The beauty of working together is, now we can take the projects that inspire us, rather than those that are given to us.”

beginning a project with a strong design thesis is instrumental to efficiency throughout the process. HOW DO YOU RELAX?

Furman: Playing piano and surfing. Grabiel: Listening to loud music while flipping through books. WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E BLOCKS?

Talking it through out loud with someone usually helps to bring clarity. Also, finding ways to see the problem from a new perspective, standing on our heads if we have to. WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS

WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR CAREER HIGH-

WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOMEONE

IN AUSTIN?

LIGHTS SO FAR?

WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

Furman: Finding the courage and clarity and blind ambition to strike out on our own.

Grabiel: Never try to fit into any mold, work-wise or societal. Furman: Make mistakes!

Actually four: Justine’s, Sazón, Kemuri Tatsuya, and Olamaie.

WHY AUSTIN?

In Austin we find ourselves surrounded by people who share our values and our creative interests and yet have completely different expressions of individuality.

FOR A DRINK? WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

The act of reinventing ourselves; in doing so, we’re confronted with the unknown and the possibility of failure, which is the strongest driving force we can imagine.

WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

Furman: David Byrne, Marcello Mastroianni, Los Carpinteros. Grabiel: Eileen Gray, Franca Sozzani, Ana Mendieta.

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO

Hotel San José, the Continental Club, and Irene’s. WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

Our creative interests go beyond architecture. We intend to pursue many different avenues. Stay tuned!

HOW DO YOU GET IT ALL DONE?

Balancing a family (two young daughters) and a new business requires hyperfocus. We’ve found that

For more information on Grabriel and Furman, visit sideangleside.co. tribeza.com

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WHY AUSTIN?

I was born and raised in the greatest city in the world: Austin, Texas! I moved away during and after college, but eventually the city, the people, the queso, and my family all brought me back. Even though Austin is growing, its roots are still smalltown. I love raising my two children here. WHO ARE YOUR CREATIVE ICONS?

My creative icons are all of my yoga teachers who have dedicated their life’s work to this ancient practice. I wouldn’t be where I am today without them. The journey I am on — the lessons, my entire path — is because of them.

ASHLEY SPENCE FOUNDER, WANDERLUST YOGA AUSTIN

A!er suffering a brutal sexual assault in college, Ashley Spence felt lost for several years, until she discovered her yoga practice. “Yoga was the saving grace of my life,” Spence says. “It brought me from the dark back into the light, and I truly do not know if I would be here without it.” In 2012, she opened Wanderlust Yoga Austin, a popular studio downtown. A!er publicly sharing her survival story in a powerful video you can see on YouTube, Spence now travels around the country to share her story. “I hope to help others find their voice and spread a positive message of recovery and healing through yoga,” she says.

WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOMEONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

The best decisions aren’t always the easy ones. To lead with integrity, at times you have to make decisions that are incredibly difficult.

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

affordable drinks and karaoke!

Besides yoga, on outdoor patios with a margarita on the rocks, queso, and live music.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPOT TO GET

WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

Making an impact on others. Yoga has helped me find a pathway of healing that I never thought was possible. I want others to find that spark, that light for themselves. Life can be really unexplainable and hard, and yoga has given me clarity, calmness, and the strength to cope and get through. HOW DO YOU GET IT ALL DONE?

With a village of incredible people — both at home, to help me raise my children, and at Wanderlust, to help take care of my yoga family. I would not be here without every single one of them.

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AWAY TO? WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E BLOCKS?

Meditation and journaling. There is so much clearing that happens through both of those processes.

My favorite outdoor spot is a bench overlooking the water along the trail around Lady Bird Lake. I jog or walk with my children, and at the end we always stop at a bench to pause, reflect, and take in the beauty of this city and the present moment.

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS IN AUSTIN?

WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

Mi Madre’s, Grizzelda’s, Perla’s.

Another Wanderlust location! I am also working on co-creating my first inspirational women’s yoga retreat with some amazing and powerful people, as well as programs of healing through yoga for my fellow survivors. Stay tuned!

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO FOR A DRINK?

Hotel San José, Ah Sing Den, Ego’s. I’m a sucker for


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for fundraising to support the efforts of the SUDC Foundation, from grief support to genetic testing. I am driven to find answers so that one day no other family will have to experience this pain. HOW DO YOU GET IT ALL DONE?

JESSICA & J. PIERATT FOUNDERS, MOSS PIERATT FOUNDATION

I don’t. Each day starts with a new checklist, and I rarely accomplish everything I hope to at the end of the day. I have to be prepared that grief can surprise you at any day or time, and taking time to be sad and remember Moss is more important than most other tasks.

Tragedy struck the high school sweethearts turned parents three years ago, when they lost their son, Moss, to Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood (SUDC), when he was 15 months old. As a way to honor their son, they started MossFest, a children’s concert held before the ABC Kite Fest each year. “When first deciding what kind of fund-raising event we wanted to plan, it was important to us to come up with an event that Moss would have enjoyed attending,” Jessica says. “He loved music as a baby and a toddler, and as I watched the kids smiling, singing, and dancing at MossFest two years ago, it felt like he would be proud of how we are choosing to honor his life.” J. works as an attorney and served as the Moss Pieratt Foundation’s president, as well as on the board of Generation Waller and other local groups, while Jessica is active in the community and a mother to their two daughters, the late Moss’ two younger sisters. Their devotion to each other and to honoring their son’s memory is an inspiration to all. For more information on their foundation, visit mosspierattfoundation.org.

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

WHY AUSTIN?

ONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS

We grew up here and started dating while at Austin High. It is special and nostalgic to watch our kids enjoy the same things we did growing up, like riding the Zilker Zephyr, eating at Maudie’s, and walking through the Trail of Lights. Even though Austin has grown so much, it has still maintained a little bit of the small-town, friendly feel.

Life is full of phases. We have experienced so many highs and lows in the last five years. While we carry heavy hearts, we also have a deeper appreciation for the joys in life.

IN AUSTIN?

WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

The people of Austin! This town welcomes every style, and I love stealing and compiling style ideas from watching other Austinites. My favorite thing about Austin is the casual atmosphere. I love that you can wear jeans or shorts into the nicest restaurant in town. WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOME-

Every Friday night J. brings home a pizza. We try a new place each time — Austin has the best pizza — and we enjoy it with a bottle of wine a!er we put our daughters to bed. I look forward to this moment all week long. WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E BLOCKS?

I ask for help! I am lucky to be surrounded by creative and successful friends and family members. I like to gather many different opinions before making any decision.

Perla’s, 34th Street Cafe, and Emmer & Rye. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPOT TO GET AWAY TO?

WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

We joined a community of bereaved parents through the SUDC Foundation, which is full of families across the world who have lost children in ways similar to us. We are all le! without an understanding of why our child died. Last May we attended the first SUDC medical conference in New York City, where we met many of these families and listened to presentations by many medical professionals dedicated to learning more about these deaths. This trip validated my passion

The lakes in and around Austin. There is nothing more peaceful than being out on the water and looking out to the Texas Hill Country in the distance. WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

We are so excited to move MossFest to take place on the Great Lawn during the ABC Kite Fest at Zilker Park. We can’t think of a better family-friendly atmosphere and are eager to share some of our new ideas while maintaining the wholesome feel and traditions of the oldest festival in Austin. tribeza.com

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WHY AUSTIN?

I was born in Houston, but I was musically birthed in Austin. Because my music career started in Austin, it will always hold a special place in my heart. A!er graduating from UT, I moved to Los Angeles and then Atlanta, but I chose to relocate to Austin because I realized that I loved the community, culture, vibe, and weather. Plus, like they say at my alma mater, “What starts here changes the world.”

SAUL PAUL MUSICIAN

Saul Paul calls himself a musician with a message, and he has brought his upli!ing work for social good to the Kennedy Center and TED Talks. This year, he was named the Austinite of the Year at the Austin Under 40 Awards and shares big plans for 2018.

WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

Growing up, my grandmother was the most stylish person I knew. My cousin was the coolest and most creative. Over time, the people who influenced me changed, but the principles remained the same. I’m attracted to and inspired by individuals who ignore tradition and convention and take pride in what makes them unique. I’m also moved by those who let their personality bleed through their style and art. I love when people are not afraid to be bold and push the limits. For me, it’s all about having confidence and valuing your originality! WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOMEONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

Dream even bigger.

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPOT TO GET

Hang with the wifey. Netflix and chill. Literally. I like movies.

AWAY TO?

W H AT H ELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATI V E

WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

BLOCKS?

I’m an artist and entrepreneur. As an artist, I’m excited to release more music, win more awards, go on more tours, and impact more lives. As an entrepreneur, I am the president and co-founder of my record label. We have an experiential marketing division that I oversee. As the leader of this division, I cultivate unique and lucrative business opportunities for brands, bands, and strategic partners. I’m currently curating tour partners for brand experiences for our spring and summer events. In 2018, I am excited to be doing more of that!

I always have a lot going on. If I hit a wall on something, I’ll switch it up and start doing something else. When I stop, I tell myself that I’ll go back to it later when I’m fresh. I find that when I do that it usually works. I don’t force creativity. I like to let it flow.

WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

I love seeing people do what they were born to do. To me that is awe-inspiring. And it inspires me to do the same.

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS

HOW DO YOU GET IT ALL DONE?

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO

Prioritization is key. Avoid majoring in the minors. Work strategically, not just hard.

FOR A DRINK?

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IN AUSTIN?

Rudy’s barbecue, Fogo de Chão, and Eddie V’s.

Hotel Van Zandt, Boiler Nine, and Cover 3.

Mount Bonnell.

For more information, visit saulpaul.com.


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YOU CREATE ALL THE PERFECT PL AYLISTS FOR MMH RESTAURANTS AND BY GEORGE. WHAT ARE YOU LISTENING TO RIGHT NOW?

RYAN SMITH CREATIVE DIRECTOR,

MCGUIRE MOORMAN HOSPITALITY

The vibrant floral patterns of the Elizabeth Street Café uniforms, the red wagon Jeffrey’s martini cart that’s become the highlight of the annual Waller Creek Pop-Up picnic, or the unforgettable playlist that comes from June’s All Day’s beautiful juke box — these whimsical creative displays are all the mastermind of the impossibly stylish and imaginative Ryan Smith, the creative director for the McGuire Moorman Hospitality group. When he’s not coaching baseball for his son’s team (he has three children) or with his talented artist wife, Kelti, Smith enjoys “concepts for dream projects and figuring out how to make them happen.”

I love the new Mount Kimble (Love What Survives) and King Krule (The Ooz) records. It’s Clash punk meets jazzy guitar and dub step beats. YOU HAVE THE BEST INSPIR ATION BOARDS AND SEEM TO FIND INSPIRATION EVERYWHERE. WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY FEELING INSPIRED BY?

I’ve been really into 80’s graphic art and video like Max Hedroom Pepsi commercials and the original Blade Runner. The Yale School of Architecture Symposium posters are also super cool. WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E BLOCKS?

A long run with a brand-new album I’m excited to hear for the first time! WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO WHAT HAVE BEEN SOME OF YOUR CAREER HIGHLIGHTS SO FAR?

Designing my position as creative director in the hospitality business — which hadn’t been done before, to my knowledge at least. Being part of a company that has broken through from just restaurants to include retail and hotel projects to in-house creative and design work for others. It’s all been fun!

relentlessly working on projects in a city that encourages growth in the best way possible.

FOR A DRINK?

Pool Burger, the Aristocrat Lounge, upstairs at Lamberts.

WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

Ricky Henderson, my dad, Wes Anderson.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPOT TO GET AWAY TO?

WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOME-

Colorado Bend State Park.

ONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

Don’t accept anything. Spend your life chasing all of your dreams.

WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

For more information on MMH, visit mcguiremoorman.com.

Dang, I don’t know yet, but I sure like surprises!

WHY AUSTIN?

Austin is the perfect playground for ideas. I’m surrounded by extremely talented individuals

Newness.

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JACKIE VENSON

WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

I think Prince and David Bowie are rad when it comes to their wacky, colorful style. I love how Bowie constantly reinvented himself. He was such an incredible businessman who managed to perfectly tie in his musical and creative side without one being crushed by the other.

MUSICIAN

It’s been a busy few years for blues musician Jackie Venson, the youngest of nine children, who studied classical piano at the Berklee College of Music. In 2014, she won the Belk Modern Southern Music competition, which led to other exciting opportunities, like being invited to sit in with Jon Batiste on a taping of “The Late Show With Stephen Colbert” and then opening 10 shows for Gary Clark Jr. Venson says: “The live-music scene is nearly unmatched, with very few cities that can compete. I love how there’s always a gig somewhere to be had.”

WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOMEONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

Just chill and be happy, work hard, and be grateful for the fact that you can play music all the time. WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

The fear of being bored. HOW DO YOU GET IT ALL DONE?

I just do it. I sit down and I do it. It really is that simple.

consider every idea. Something always springs up from that. I just gotta be patient and grateful. WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

IN AUSTIN?

I like to write and practice the guitar, but I also like to play video games. I just recently bought myself a PS4, and now I have been geeking-out on “Fallout 4.”

Thundercloud, El Secreto de la Abuela — “Grandma’s Secret”; the name cracks me up, but the food is delicious — and Salty Sow.

DOOR SPOT TO GET AWAY TO?

I just love chillin’ in my backyard or out at my dad’s place in Lago Vista. Yay, privacy. Every now and then I will take my dog to the Zilker Park field with the big tree in the middle and throw the ball for him until the cops tell me he has to have a leash on. Yet another reason why I usually just hang at my family’s property.

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO

WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E

FOR A DRINK?

BLOCKS?

Prohibition Creamery, Geraldine’s, One-2-One Bar.

More music, more videos, more shows, more tours, same good vibes.

I can’t remember the last time I had one. I just keep all of my senses open, and I examine and

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE BUILDING OR AN OUT-

For more information, visit jackievenson.com.

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MATT WILLIAMS VICE PRESIDENT OF EDUCATION, GOODWILL OF CENTRAL TEXAS

While living in New York City, Matt Williams, a Stanford grad, helped start a charter school in the South Bronx, where he served as principal for three years before moving to Austin to be the vice-president of education at Goodwill Central Texas. The organization’s Goodwill Excel Center is the only school in Texas that offers a high school diploma to someone over the age of 25. With Williams at the helm, the adult high school grew to more than 500 students and opened a location in the Lockhart Correctional Facility for incarcerated women to earn a high school diploma.

through messy diagrams and arrows. It takes a brilliant team at Goodwill to help me translate them for mass consumption. WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS IN AUSTIN?

Justine’s is perfect every time. The bar at Jeffery’s is one of my favorite rooms in Austin. Maudie’s — it would be weird if I didn’t say this, because I end up there once a week, and it’s definitely my kids’ favorite restaurant. WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO FOR A DRINK?

Clark’s for happy hour. Nickel City — it’s like they read my diary. Doc’s on 38th — everyone needs a sports bar close to their house. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE OUTDOOR SPOT TO GET AWAY TO?

WHY AUSTIN?

WHAT INSPIRES OR DRIVES YOU?

I live in Austin because my wife is from here. I am from a small town in Ohio. When we le! NYC, it was an easy decision. I love that Austin is still unique — it works hard to hold onto its own local culture and unique character, which is disappearing everywhere else.

Designing social innovations. We focus too much time fixing our current systems, which even if perfected will not solve our deepest problems. So how do we build wide, failure-adaptive systems that allow people to empower themselves no matter where they are in life? I like finding plans for the people that society does not have a plan for.

WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOMEONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E

Know who you are and what you are great at. Once you are comfortable with that, you can effectively suppress your ego, bring in thought partners, and make a lot of really great things happen.

BLOCKS?

Graph paper and Uni-ball Vision Elite pens. I sketch my favorite Donald Judd print series until I figure out what to do. Most of my ideas arrive

Big Bend. It’s isolated and far enough away that you cannot carry stress there. It is magic. What should we expect from you in 2018? WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

Expanding Goodwill’s high school and career certification programs to as many people as we can. I am also getting more involved in making sure we have pathways and plans for incarcerated individuals before they are released to try and decrease recidivism. There is a lot of work to do there, but a lot of opportunity to partner with other experts and make real change happen. For more information, visit goodwillcentraltexas.org. tribeza.com

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WHY AUSTIN?

CAMERON CAMPBELL

Austin is filled with energetic people, many of whom are involved in creative endeavors. I loved this city when I first moved here my freshman year in college because it was on the pulse creatively, and I find that it still is! I love how the art scene here has grown; it’s a scene I’m currently working on breaking into, as a matter of fact. WHO ARE YOUR STYLE AND CREATIVE ICONS?

These days I am finding much inspiration from the minimalist art movement of the 1960s and ’70s. Artists such as Frank Stella, Donald Judd, and Michael Heizer have taught me how simple ideas can have great impact when executed flawlessly. The exploratory process and rigor these artists applied to their work resonates with me. WHAT’S ONE PIECE OF ADVICE YOU WISH SOME-

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT,

CAMPBELL LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

Before starting his own landscape architecture firm, San Antonio native Cameron Campbell trained with some of the greats in the field, starting with Peter Walker of PWP Landscape Architecture out of Berkeley, California. While with PWP, Campbell worked on a number of notable projects, including the National September 11 Memorial in New York City and the Transbay Terminal in San Francisco. When Campbell and his wife, Anne, returned to Austin, he joined Ten Eyck Landscape Architects. “Christy Ten Eyck is a truly talented individual dedicated to improving our natural environment and a thought leader in our field of work,” Campbell says. When Campbell isn’t designing stunning modern landscapes for his own company, Campbell Landscape Architecture, that he recently started several months ago, he enjoys painting and going on adventures around the city with Anne and their three children.

ONE WOULD HAVE GIVEN YOU FIVE YEARS AGO?

Be true to yourself and take risks! I’ve heard that quite a bit along the way, and I’m finally listening to that advice. It feels good!

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE RESTAURANTS IN AUSTIN?

HOW DO YOU RELAX?

Yard work, constructing things, and my artwork all help me relax.

Pool Burger is hands down my new favorite — the burgers, the tiki drinks, the Bob Marley playing loudly. If I squint, I can almost believe I’m in the Florida Keys.

WH AT HELPS YOU G ET THROUG H CRE ATIV E BLOCKS?

WHAT ARE YOUR THREE FAVORITE PLACES TO GO

It sounds cliché, but a run around the block can o!en open the creative floodgates!

FOR A DRINK?

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Does my home count? When I’m not working or

spending time with my family, you’ll probably find me chilling at home a!er hours with a nightcap. WHAT SHOULD WE EXPECT FROM YOU IN 2018?

Besides taking on more interesting work, I hope to have a freshly revamped website and maybe even the business Instagram account my wife keeps bugging me about! For more information, visit campbellla.com.


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STYLE PROFILE

Blackberry Farm THE SERENE AND LUXURIOUS RETRE AT IN THE MOUNTAINS LIVES UP TO ALL THE HYPE

L

OOKING OUT THE WINDOW ONTO THE WINDING ROAD

ough the Smoky Mountains of eastern Tennessee leading to Blackberry Farm, the views seems to be getting more green by the minute over the 200 mile drive from Nashville. After less than 24 hours in Music City , where our fleeting time was spent exploring the charming Country Music Hall of Fame (Elvis’ solid-gold piano and Dolly Parton’s coat of many colors? Yes, please!), sipping a local whiskey in the fully stocked vintage music room at the delightfully over-the-top Urban Cowboy B&B, brunching at the delicious outpost of the Charleston-based Husk, and bowling well into the night at the happening Pinewood Social, a bar-meets-swimming-poolmeets-boccie court -and-bowling alley (it works, I promise), we were ready for the peace and quiet of farm life. I became fascinated with Blackberry Farm after reading about Mary Celeste Beall in a New York Times profile (August 9, 2016). A striking mother of five, she had just taken over running the grand property, a hotel and culinary destination, in the Smokys right after her husband, Sam Beall, died in a skiing accident. Soon after we’d arrived at the farm, it was clear that Sam’s spirit, a charismatic foodie with a true zest for life, was ever present in the place he helped create with his parents, who bought the property in 1976 as the family’s private retreat and then turned it into a six-room guest inn, and then into the 68room masterpiece, and arguably one of the best hotels in the country, that it is today. We checked in and were seamlessly whisked away to our Holly Glade Cottage. It was a spacious suite with a sitting area, wood-burning fireplace, and a plush king-size bed that looked out to a vast hardwood forest. Interiors were polished yet warm. There are many accommodation options, including multi-bedroom homes. Our first order of business was getting

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the lay of the land. While many of the guests opt for renting a golf cart ($80 a day) to better explore the sprawling 4,200 acres, we set out by foot. Everything was picturesque—the rolling hills that led to hiking trails, the farm’s beloved and fully stocked garden, a pond with a wooden boathouse that looked set for a location in a Nicholas Sparks movie. There are more than nine miles of trails for hiking, and it might have been the highlight of my husband’s trip when we bumped into Dallas Cowboys star tight end Jason Witten and his vacationing family on one of the trails . Celebrity sightings are a norm at the farm—Kelly Clarkson rented it out for her wedding in 2016 and visits yearly; Kacey Musgraves just had a concert at its on-site music venue, Bramble Hall; and chef Eric Ripert will be cooking for a wine-and-food event at the hotel this month. After our hike, we shared a delicious craft beer made by Blackberry’s Brewery on the porch of our cottage. It was a perfect pairing with our welcome gift of house-made crackers and pimento cheese (served in a mason jar, of course). We didn’t find a single detail that wasn’t thought of during our stay. Then it was time to dress for dinner (literally). Jackets are required for men. We were chauffeured across the property to the 200-year-old Barn, a James Beard Award-winning restaurant, for a multicourse feast that delivered with every bite. Think grilled Peking duck breast, brown butter snapper, and the most delicious marinated watermelon served with coriander, shallots, and pecans. We opted for a half-moon booth on the outside of the

The red turn of the century bank-style barn is at the center of the Farm and provides a stunning backdrop for the James Beard Award-winning food that is served over multi-course dinners.


From Hill Cottages to Farmstead Cottages, Blackberry Farm offers a variety of rooms, each beautifully decorated by their in house design team.

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STYLE PROFILE

BLACKBERRY FOR FAMILIES Before we had children and thanks to my work as a style and travel writer, we were lucky to experience many unforgettable hotels: We took in the mountain and ocean views at the breathtaking Post Ranch Inn in Big Sur, California; trekked through the canyons of southern Utah around the Amangiri, which felt like the stunning end of the earth; and watched the stars around a campfire with interesting new friends from around the world at the serene and stylish mountain retreat near Telluride, Colorado, Dunton Hot Springs. I wanted to scope out Blackberry Farm to see if it was a place that would be fun and comfortable for kids too. My answer is a resounding yes! Here’s why: • Summer is the best time to bring children to the farm. Those who are four and older can sign up for Camp Blackberry, where counselors create tailor-made adventures in culinary pursuits, fine arts, and more. The Youth Discovery program is for kids 10 and older and runs to acrylic-painting lessons, ceramics 101, and even stream ecology. • There are custom activities for families to do together as well. Just one example is a 90-minute session called “A Working Farm,” in which you’ll tour the farmstead; meet sheep, chickens, pigs, and the like; gather eggs; and learn more about the farm’s production of artisanal cheeses and meats. • On-site babysitting services are available if, say, you want an adults-only dinner at The Barn, but children are welcome for all meals at the light-filled 1930s farmhouse

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Left: Blackberry Farm’s expansive garden that supplies the restaurants is cared for by an on staff master gardener. Below: Blackberry Farm makes their own craft beer (and cheese) among other delicious and high quality products.

dining room for people-watching into the candlelit dining room. A tour of the jaw-dropping wine cellar on the floor below The Barn, which has more than 9,000 bottles on display, was worth the visit. From wake surfing and cycling to archery and horseback riding, days at Blackberry Farm can be filled in many ways. My husband chose fly-fishing on the bubbling Hesse Creek, which runs through the property. Like everything else at Blackberry Farm, even the small fly-fishing headquarters is utterly charming. A ramshackle reclaimed-wood cabin (Orvis-endorsed), it comes stocked with gear and handsome plaid accents. I headed to the Wellhouse Spa, which carries products from my favorite au naturel line, Tata Harper, who lives on a pastoral farm of her own in Vermont. The swimming pool lies just outside the doors of the spa and is elevated to give views over the land, providing the ultimate setting for a day of leisure. It was easy to fall into the peaceful rhythm of farm life, so packing up to leave such a thoughtfully curated retreat in the majestic Smoky Mountains wasn’t easy. The staff’s attention to detail carried through even after we drove out of the farm’s well-appointed gates. Since we’d left before lunch was served, the valet had put two picnic lunches into our car, which we decided to enjoy by one of the gorgeous rivers in the neighboring national park. The hype of this special place is real, and it took one weekend to know that what the Bealls have created at Blackberry Farm is pure magic. tribeza.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Mother-daughter duo Amanda Bates and Kit Seay started Tiny Pies in 2011 and have gained many fans (like Oprah) along the way.

Tiny Pies SOULFUL TRE ATS BAKED BY A DYNAMIC MOTHER-DAUGHTER TE AM AT T WO AUSTIN LOCATIONS By Karen Spezia Photographs by Leah Muse

I

NOMINATE AMANDA BATES FOR BEST MOM EVER. WHEN HER YOUNG

son requested a slice of pie in his lunchbox, she not only agreed, she created a recipe for a single-serving portable version. The hand-sized pie was a hit with her kid — and sparked an idea that became a booming Austin business and Instagram sensation. Tiny Pies started modestly enough. It was 2011 when Bates solicited the help of her mom, Kit Seay, to assist with her son’s portable-pie challenge. Both women were lifelong amateur bakers who’d spent hours together in the kitchen whipping up tasty confections. But they were also savvy businesswomen, with Bates running a real estate service and Seay working for the state government. After satisfying the youngster’s wish for a lunch-pail pie, they sensed they were on to something. So they baked 75 miniature pies, peddled them at a local farmers market, and sold them all. Soon one farmers market turned into five, which led to an online shop and catering opportunities. They expanded their offerings to sweet and savory flavors in large and

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small portions. In time, they opened a brick-and-mortar store — and then another. Oprah came calling, as did the Cooking Channel, The Huffington Post, and CNN’s Headline News. In six short years, Tiny Pies has become a very big deal. The reason is simple: The pies are delicious. Using old family recipes and made from scratch daily, Tiny Pies aren’t your typical grocery store dessert. These pies have the soul of a loving mom and grandma. The also have balance, from the perfectly flaky crust to the farm-fresh filling. Flavors include traditional favorites like apple, cherry, key lime, and pecan. There’s also seasonal specialties like pumpkin-cheesecake, pear-cranberry, and sweet potato. Not a fruit-pie fan? How about chocolate cream, coconut cream, or the signature Texas Two Step, a decadent combination of chocolate brownie and gooey pecan pie. For savory tastes, there’s the Texas Pete, filled with vegetarian chili and cornbread, and my all-time favorite, the seasonal Farmers Market Veggie Pot Pie, brimming with hearty veggies like roasted


Delectable savory and sweet treats are available at their two locations on Burnet and South Lamar.

leeks, wild mushrooms, butternut squash, rainbow carrots, and Yukon Gold potatoes. Pair it with a green salad and a glass of wine and you’ve got a meal made in heaven. In addition to the original hand-held pies, Tiny Pies now offers larger five-inch and nine-inch Not So Tiny pies, perfect for sharing or families, and one-bite Teeny Tinies, ideal for parties. They’ve also added savory empanadas and bake-at-home pies packaged in adorable mason jars. Their products contain no preservatives and, whenever possible, use ingredients from local farms like Johnson’s Backyard Garden, Oak Hill Farms, Hi-Fi Mycology, GT Kindle Farms, East Texas Blueberry Co-Op, Twin Cedars Farm, and the Oliver Pecan Company. Pies are sold fresh at their two Austin stores for dine-in or takeout. The company also delivers locally and ships throughout the U.S. There’s a popular catering service for events like weddings and parties. And if you’re looking for that unique Austin-made holiday or corporate gift, look no further.

Bates and Seay still keep their hands in the dough, but as Tiny Pies has grown, they’ve expanded their team to include kitchen manager William Ankeney, a graduate of the prestigious Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, and a specialist in French cookery. I don’t know about you, but when I was a kid, the sweets in my lunchbox were a Chips Ahoy cookie or the occasional Twinkie. But never a custom-made pie — especially not one that inspired a blockbuster business. So if that doesn’t make Amanda Bates the Best Mom Ever, I don’t know what does. NORTH: 5035 BURNET RD., (512) 916-0184 SOUTH: 2032 S. LAMAR BLVD., (512) 460-9697 TINYPIES.COM

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Photo by Diana Walker; Liberty, Gijs Bakker. Pin photography by John Bigelow Taylor: American Flag, Ann Hand; Serpent, Designer Unknown; Cowgirl Hat, Ultra Craft.

LBJ Presidential Library | Now open through January 21, 2018 Step inside the fascinating, bold, and distinctive world of former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright in the exhibition Read My Pins: The Madeleine Albright Collection. Experience the jewelry and stories related to more than 200 pins and brooches Albright wore as diplomatic, social, and political tools. Only at the LBJ Library-see a display of jewelry worn by Lady Bird and Lyndon Johnson.

WHAT READERS ARE SAYING... WHAT READERS ARE SAYING...

LBJ Library exhibition sponsored by Lexus of Austin and Lakeway. Exhibition made possible by Museum of Arts & Design and Bren Simon, and for the exhibition catalog by St. John Knits. Read My Pins will be accompanied by a book, Read My Pins: Stories from a Diplomat’s Jewel Box, published by HarperCollins. LBJ Library Exhibition Sponsor:

www.LBJLIBRARY.org

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24 DINER

BARLEY SWINE

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encour-

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

ages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the f lavors

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley

of her culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t

burgers, all-day breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on

forget the chimichurri sauce! Follow up your meal with

fried chicken.

Argentina’s famous dessert, alfajores — shortbread cook-

34TH STREET CAFE

ies filled with dulce de leche and rolled in coconut f lakes.

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

BULLFIGHT

soups, salads, pizzas and pastas — but don’t miss the chicken

3663 Bee Caves Rd.

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for weeknight

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of

dinners and weekend indulgences.

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy hour to share

Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamón

a bottle of your favorite wine and a charcuterie board.

Serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some

ALCOMAR

sangria and enjoy the bites.

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161 Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of

CAFÉ JOSIE

the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226

by for lunch, happy hour, dinner, weekend brunch, and

Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a prix

start your visit with a blood-orange margarita and the

fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la carte

crab and guacamole.

menu is also available, featuring classics such as smoked

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR

meatloaf and redfish tacos.

319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884

CAFÉ NO SÉ

Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting;

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061

perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic decor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218 The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dish-

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

es along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

This Holiday season, give them a gift of DELICIOUS

2nd Street: 238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463

with Fonda San Miguel’s latest edition Cookbook.

Domain: 11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463

Create our authentic Interior Mexican Cuisine recipes

CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect compli-

at home for your next dinner party, or even just for

ment to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

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yourself! Beautiful photographs in the book show the food, art, and spectacular atmosphere of Austin’s most notable destination restaurant.

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine-preservation system with temperature control ensures optimal taste and appreciation. Toast to Summer at CRU.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

EASY TIGER

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides

both drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop

modern spins on American classics. Dig into a fried

upstairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some

mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with cranberry

local brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your

thyme cocktail.

snack with beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

GRIZZELDA’S

EL ALMA

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with un-

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes,

matched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. happy hour!

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 Upscale casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas, in-

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

credible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino),

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Viet-

and locally sourced, seasonally inspired chalkboard

namese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and

specials. Full bar with craft cocktails, local beers on tap,

sweet treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio

and boutique wines from around the world.

bring comfort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite. Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

EPICERIE 2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840 A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in here for a bite on Sundays.

FREEDMEN’S 2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953 Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to the desserts and even the cocktail offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue on a charming outdoor patio.

GERALDINE’S

each fused with a range of different f lavors and styles. The attention to detail in each dish shines, from dark mole served over chicken brined for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

HILLSIDE FARMACY 1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168 Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored 1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the East Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

HOME SLICE PIZZA 1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s

HOPFIELDS

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 101

creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative

3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

cocktails, shareable plates, and scenic views of Lady Bird

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beauti-

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy

ful patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and

locally sourced food with an international twist at reason-

executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

bar manager Caitlyn Jackson.

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites. tribeza.com

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ITALIC

L’OCA D’ORO

OLAMAIE

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

Located in the Mueller development, chef Fiore Tedesco

Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the

creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling

from pastry chef Mary Katherine Curren.

classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy impressive

with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culi-

cocktails, wine, and a great craft beer selection.

nary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE 3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808

LENOIR

Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience, Jacoby’s Restau-

1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778

rant and Mercantile transports you from East Austin to a rustic

A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix-fixe

Southern home nestled in the countryside. The menu features

meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes local-

the best dishes southern cooking has to offer, including beef

ly-sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal

from Adam Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin, TX.

specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy

JEFFREY’S

hour and enjoy bottles from the top wine-producing regions in

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

the world.

pie or a more trendy goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits.

PIEOUS 12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041 Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer, Pieous brings together the unlikely, yet perfect combination of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciut-

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

to and arugula, the Rocket is a crowd favorite and a

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

must-try.

the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an Austin staple.

RED ASH ITALIA

JOSEPHINE HOUSE

Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between

303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906

1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584

high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in

Rustic continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local, and

downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steak-

organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s,

house is led by an all-star team including Executive

Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New

Chef John Carver. Sit back, relax and enjoy an excep-

Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and

tional evening.

indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

LA BARBECUE 3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant

MANUEL'S

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555

SALTY SOW 1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337 Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, includ-

10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

ing a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu,

ticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made with

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-

heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for

fresh ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas.

quality regional Mexican food, fresh pressed

late-night noshing.

LA BARBECUE

cocktails, margaritas and tequilas. Try the Chile

and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a sophis-

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue

Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s

joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer,

famous mole. Located downtown at the corner of 3rd

which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up

and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on Jolly-

classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

ville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.

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SWAY 1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999 The culinary masterminds behind La Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor area, complete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an unforgettable experience.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options.

UCHIKO 4200 N. Lamar Blvd., Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808 The sensational sister creation of Uchi and former home of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley and Nicholas Yanes, Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki.

TRUE FOOD KITCHEN 222 West Ave. | (512) 777 2430 Inspired by Dr. Andrew Weil’s anti-inflammatory diet, True Food Kitchen combines decadent favorites with health-conscious eating, striking the perfect balance. The restaurant, located in downtown’s chicest new entertainment district, offers a full range of vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options.

VINAIGRETTE 2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791 This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting ambience, the salads are fresh, creative, bold, and most importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to choose from.

WINEBELLY 6705 Hwy 290, # 503 | (512) 584 808 3016 Guadalupe St., Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193 Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro maintains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors. WU CHOW 500 W. 5th St., #168 | (512) 476 2469 From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss the weekend dim sum menu.


A L O O K B E H I N D 8‌8

Farm Life We fell in love with the flock of East Friesian sheep that hail from northern Germany and Holland that roam the majestic Blackberry Farm in Walland, Tennessee. Our pick for the gift for the person who has everything? A trip to the Farm that will be filled with nature, calm, and delicious Southern cuisine. Read all about it in the Style Profile on page 84. Happy Holidays!

96 DECEMBER 2017 |

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LONDON GREY RUGS

3001 PALM WAY STE. B | AUSTIN, TEXAS 78758 | DOMAIN NORTHSIDE 512-839-8999 | LONDONGREYRUGS.COM


TRIBEZA December 2017  
TRIBEZA December 2017  

The People Issue No. 196