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A SPRING REV IVAL

A conversation about fashion’s future in Austin

AUSTIN GOES WEST

Sunroom sets Malibu aglow

N O. 200 | S P R I N G S T Y L E

Fresh looks for the season

FASHION FORWARD

17

YEARS


Smartlipo

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Al Glass United States

Jason Guidry United States

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Lars Wendelbo Denmark

Dondoli & Pocci Italy

1 Elements multifunction

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2 Y-Not bed by Carsten Rickers

of Germany for Mercatus. Easy care leather look textile with strong steel accents. Available as king $1674 or queen $1574.

3 Surface sofa/chaise by Lars

Wendelbo of Denmark for Wendelbo Møbel. Quality construction and detailed tailoring at a responsible price. Right or left chaise. $2864.

4 Saint Tropez by Dondoli and Pocci

2

for Calligaris, Italy. Stackable polycarbonate shell with steel base. Several colors. Please call for your Copenhagen price.

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I AM ART is the magnificent 40th anniversary bash for Women & Their Work. Spend an evening as artist and muse at a hidden idyll in Central Austin.

SATURDAY, APRIL 14TH Suggested attire: REFLECTION - mirrors and metallic to honor the radiant past and gleaming future of Women & Their Work For more information and to purchase tickets:

WOMENANDTHEIRWORK.ORG Women & Their Work is a non-profit art organization that serves as a catalyst for contemporary art created by women living and working in Texas and beyond. Visit our gallery at 1710 Lavaca St, Austin, TX 78701

Guests will enjoy an art auction; art market; performance art by Katelena Hernandez Cowles; a Jai Malano cameo; a dance piece choreographed by Jennifer Sherburn; DJ GirlFriend ATX; a Yayoi Kusama-inspired mirror room; body art; photo booth shot by Valerie Fremin Photography; extravagant costumes & more‌ Decadent eats by El Locavore Catering, pastries by Le Politique Austin, cocktails galore, and a birthday cake with forty candles. with thanks to


CONTENTS

APRIL Windsor McKenna’s stylish Austin bungalow.

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Alta Alexander’s boutique, Altatudes.

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DEPARTMENTS

Fresh looks for the season.

ON THE COVER Spring fashion photographed by Wynn Myers and styled by Britt Towns on location at the Commodore Perry Estate.

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Social Hour p. 26

Style Profile p. 84

Kristin’s Column p. 34

Style Pick p. 88

Community Profile p. 36

Karen’s Pick p. 90

Tribeza Talk p. 40

Dining Guide p. 92

Arts & Entertainment Calendars p. 42

A Look Behind p. 96

Music Pick p. 43

FEATURES

Art Pick p. 44

Spring Revival p. 52

Event Pick p. 46

Fashion Forward p. 64

Style & Beauty Guide p. 50

House Music p. 78

Austin Goes West p. 72


THE WOMENS SHOP THE MENS SHOP 524 NORTH LAMAR 512 472 5951 SOUTH CONGRESS 140 0 S O U T H C O N G R E S S 512 441 8600 BY G E O R G E A U S T I N . C O M

BA L E N C I AG A D R I E S VA N N OT E N

B OT T E G A V E N E TA GOLDEN GOOSE

PROENZA SCHOULER

CA LV I N K L E I N 2 05 W 3 9 N YC I SA B E L M A R A N T

SA I N T L AU R E N T

KHAITE

S I E S M A RJA N

CÉLINE LEMAIRE

C H LO É LO E W E

S T E L L A M C CA R T N E Y

COMMON PROJECTS MARNI

T H E R OW

NAK ARMSTRONG ULLA JOHNSON


EDITOR'S LETTER

M

As Austinites, we are well into celebration mode, taking full advantage of every umbrella-filled patio and dog-packed trail this city has to offer. Spring is truly my favorite. Trees are in full bloom, temperatures are mostly perfect, and rosé is now a completely justified beverage of choice. Reveling aside, this is the perfect time of year to shake the dust off and get your wardrobe ready for the warm (hot) months ahead. Yes, online browsing is fun, but for a real treat, visit your local boutique, where experts like Brandon Mahler (“Sharp Dressed Man”) can curate all of your spring musthaves. Need more? We’ve got you covered with our spring fashion spread (“Spring Revival”), shot on location at the perfectly frozen-in-time Commodore Perry Estate. Jumpsuited and sundressed inspiration is around every glamorous corner. While famous for our laid-back style, Austin’s fashion industry is ever-evolving and forging ahead. We were thrilled to host a conversation between Alta Alexander and Nina Means (“Fashion Forward”), as both women have great confidence in Austin’s ability to be a fashion destination. Lucy Jolis of Sunroom (“Austin Goes West”) is certainly an example of Austin style expanding far beyond the local scene. With the opening last August of her Sunroom Malibu store, she has made the transition from local to national seamlessly. I can’t wait for you to see the beautiful space and her take on what it means, stylistically speaking, to embrace the Austin or Malibu vibe. This spring season, more than anything, is really a state of mind. Windsor McKenna’s home (“House Music”) — filled with color, personality, and art — is the perfect example of how to bring your own personal style to life throughout your house. I hope you enjoy our take on the season ahead! Maybe we will even bump into one another at the Waller Creek Pop-Up Picnic, benefitting the Waller Creek Conservancy, one of my favorite nights of the year. Margaret Williams

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P H OTO G R A P H B Y M A D E L E I N E L A N D R Y

ARCH 20 MADE IT OFFICIAL — SPRING IS HERE!


LOEWY LAW FIRM


TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

17

YEARS

A P R I L 2 01 8

N O. 2 0 0

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Magaret Williams

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

DIGITAL MEDIA MANAGER

Hannah Morrow

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Elizabeth Arnold

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Krissy Hearn Errica Williams INTERN

Ginny Griffin PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Neal Baker Nicole Beckley Anne Bruno Hannah Morrow PHOTOGR APHERS

Miguel Angel Warren Chang Danielle Chloe Holly Cowart Deborah Farnault Jonathan Garza Charles Knight Leah Muse Wynn Myers Jessica Pages Taylor Prinsen Tyler Sharp Kate Zimmerman Turpin @mollytaylorphotography

ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2018 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce. S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


SOCIAL HOUR

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VALENTINE SHMALENTINE BASH On February 14, Austinites gathered on Lamar Union’s Sky Deck to celebrate being single with a stress-free Valentine’s Day. While enjoying live music from Taméca Jones, guests indulged in tenant offers, including a Kiki Nass pop-up shop, a European Wax Center brow bar, mini-desserts from Shake Shack, photos with baby goats from GOGA, and much more.

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ANY BABY CAN’S ROCKIN’ ROUND UP 2018

Any Baby Can’s Rockin’ Round Up kicked off at ACL Live at The Moody Theater on February 15. The night featured a special presentation, a live auction, and an amazing performance by St. Paul & The Broken Bones, while recognizing award honorees for their outstanding leadership in helping children throughout Central Texas. An incredible $360,000 was raised for the thousands of families served by Any Baby Can.

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“PRESENT PRIMITIVE” BY ALEXANDRA VALENTI

VALENTINE SHMALENTINE BASH: 1. Tyeschea West & Arielle Austin 2. Kristina Erickson & Scott Perry 3. Jonathan & Mallory Taylor ANY BABY CAN’S ROCKIN’ ROUND UP 2018: 4. Janet Schroeder & Leslie Scott 5. Matt Burns & Bobby Jenkins 6. Veronda Durden, Jay Lamy & Marjorie Clifton “PRESENT PRIMITIVE” BY ALEXANDRA VALENTI: 7. Ryan Hicks, Sydney Thomas, Sierra Juarez & Maria Priebe 8. Kim Dickens & Leisha Hailey 9. Meegan Moore & Suzannah Haddad 10. Alexandra Valenti 11. Robert Ellis & Michael Purcel

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M I G U E L A N G E L A N D TAY LO R P R I N S E N

On February 17, an opening reception was held at the Preacher Gallery for Alexandra Valenti’s latest exhibition, “Present Primitive.” Visitors toasted with Gem & Bolt to the extraordinary body of work, which plays on abstract imagery to represent both natural spaces and the unnatural ancient structures built upon them.


Someone hurt this sweet girl? This is Zooey. If anyone thought she was abused, they’d report it. Austin’s such a pet-friendly community, folks would step up and do what’s right. They’d call the authorities. They’d make sure Zooey didn’t suffer one more day. But what if Zooey was the child?

1 in 10 Austin kids are abused. Learn the signs. Suspect abuse? Call the hotline (1.800.252.5400).

#putourkidsfirst


SOCIAL HOUR

THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF AUSTIN’S AUSTIN ENTERTAINS

The Human Rights Campaign’s 2018 Gala Dinner took place on January 27, when more than 700 guests gathered at the JW Marriott Austin to celebrate love and equality. Along with a cocktail reception, an exciting silent auction, and an elegant black-tie dinner, the night featured live music and inspiring guest speakers, including actress Clea DuVall, who received the HRC Visibility Award.

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BIG HAIR COUNTRY FAIR

Big Hair Country Fair, a massive carnival celebration, took place on February 24 at Fair Market and benefited Creative Action, whose mission is to support the academic, social, and emotional development of Austin youths. Partygoers reveled in big-hair styling, carnival treats, swag bags, live performances, an exhilarating auction, and more.

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GARDEN CITY MEGA CITY

On February 28, art and nature lovers alike celebrated the opening of “Garden City Mega City” at the Austin Central Library with a fun happy hour. Created by Singapore-based architectural firm WOHA, the exhibition presented 16 built and unbuilt projects currently embodying the rethinking of how urban environments sustainably evolve in the 21st century.

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7 6 THE JUNIOR LEAGUE OF AUSTIN’S AUSTIN ENTERTAINS: 1. Allison Edwards, Allison Reyna & Connie Hayer 2. Jordan & Amanda Spearman 3. Sarah McIntosh & Chloe Kennedy BIG HAIR COUNTRY FAIR: 4. Troy Madres, Karen LaShelle, Carly Christopher & Jim McDermott 5. Isaiah Harris & Thedencia Horne 6. Valerie Pheasant & Brendan Pheasant 7. Bradley & Emily Goldsmith 8. Chris & Amy Price GARDEN CITY MEGA CITY: 9. Bernardo De Alba & Allison Del Papa 10. Danielle Caron, Aaron Ashmore & Shelley Hardeman 11. Adham el-Effendi & Travis Huse

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y WA R R E N C H A N G , DA N I E L L E C H LO E , A N D J O N AT H A N G A R Z A

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CHRIS LONG BROKER ASSOCIATE / ELITE 25

2522 MATTHEWS DRIVE

CHRISLONGAUSTIN.COM 512.289.6300 | CHRIS@GOTTESMANRESIDENTIAL.COM gottesman residential real estate | gottesmanresidential.com


SOCIAL HOUR

9TH ANNUAL FLASHBACK BENEFIT

Real estate boutique STRÜB Residential held its ninth annual FLASHBACK, an over-the-top retro dance party benefiting Explore Austin, on March 2. The event, hosted by Jason and Deb of the 101X morning show, was set at The Parish, where guests donned their wildest costumes. The evening helped to benefit underserved youth, encouraging them to make positive life choices through mentoring and outdoor adventure.

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RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY SALVADOR DALÍ PREVIEW PARTY

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On March 2, the Russell Collection Fine Art Gallery threw a private VIP preview party for its latest exhibition, “Salvador Dalí: The Argillet Collection.” The exposition presented a rare opportunity for visitors to meet Madame Christine Argillet, the daughter of Dalí’s legendary publisher and confidant Pierre Argillet, as well as view the breathtaking work of one of the world’s greatest artists.

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LONG CENTER 10TH ANNIVERSARY The Long Center celebrated its first decade on March 3 with an electric show from The Avett Brothers and Texas swing legends Asleep at the Wheel. The 10th-anniversary bash also included a preshow gala dinner and a festive, late-night after party following the concert, where guests delighted in a hosted bar and beats by DJ Nixx.

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10 9TH ANNUAL FLASHBACK BENEFIT: 1. Ashley Davis & Hannah Reed 2. Shannon Messer & Anne Lee 3. Carissa Pascal, Alex Tapp & Sam Payton RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART GALLERY SALVADOR DALÍ PREVIEW PARTY: 4. Erwin & Ash Almonte 5. Mary Mandel & Lesley Becker 6. Laura Jaramillo, Madame Christine Argillett & Rick Jaramillo 7. Kitty Beebe & Seetha Kulandaisamy LONG CENTER 10TH ANNIVERSARY: 8. Marley & Brody Friesenhahn 9. Rachel Watkins & Morgan Love 10. Diana Greenburg & Susan Murphy 11. Rhonda Erwin, Moe Benson & Wendy Lloyd

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y J O N AT H A N G A R Z A , M I G U E L A N G E L , A N D WA R R E N C H A N G

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A A REMARKABLE REMARKABLE PLACE PLACE TO TO BECOME BECOME A A REGULAR REGULAR

When you come to the Long When When you you come come to to the the Long Long Center, you’re part of an entire Center, you’re part of an entire Center, you’re part of an entire community of celebration. community community of of celebration. celebration. Whether you’re holding hands Whether you’re holding Whether you’re holding hands hands with the one that brought with the one that brought with the one that brought you, rubbing elbows with new you, you, rubbing rubbing elbows elbows with with new new friends, or offering a round of friends, or offering a round friends, or offering a round of of applause, you’ll find that being applause, you’ll find that being applause, you’ll find that being at the Long Center inspires at at the the Long Long Center Center inspires inspires new discoveries, connections, new discoveries, connections, new discoveries, connections, and encores. and and encores. encores.

THELONGCENTER.ORG THELONGCENTER.ORG THELONGCENTER.ORG


SOCIAL HOUR

ESBY FEST 2018

From March 4 – 6, esby apparel launched its first annual Esby Fest, a three-day interactive fashion affair celebrating the release of its 10th collection. Along with a cocktail hour, a phenomenal private dinner, and an exclusive sample sale, attendees got a look at esby’s first fashion show, at The Austin Winery, taking home chic swag bags and major style inspiration.

TRIBEZA RELEASE & BIRTHDAY PARTY

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Tribeza and friends came together at Antone’s Nightclub on March 5 to celebrate the release of the March Music + Film Issue and Tribeza’s 17th birthday. Guests savored delicious bites provided by Fareground and craft cocktails with Nine Banded Whiskey, Dulce Vida Tequila, and Waterloo Sparkling Water, before commemorating the night at the Oh Happy Day photo booth.

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MARIA SHRIVER BOOK SIGNING

The Austin-based production company Women Rising hosted a private book signing with Maria Shriver on March 8, at the home of Gay Gaddis, the founder and CEO of T3. The invitation-only event brought together more than 100 women and men to celebrate International Women’s Day and Shriver’s new best-selling book, “I’ve Been Thinking ...”

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ESBY FEST 2018: 1. Courtney DiSabato & Katherine Squier 2. Stephanie Beard 3. Lindsey Schlandt, Shelle Martinez & Deb Wiley TRIBEZA RELEASE & BIRTHDAY PARTY: 4. Andrew Bennett, Dorothy Bennett, Mariclaire Glaeser & Kyle Glaeser 5. Natasha Masterson, Taylor Cargile & Defne Comlek 6. Kendall Antonelli, Errica Williams & Christine Andrews MARIA SHRIVER BOOK SIGNING: 7. Elizabeth Danze, Mark Ashby & John Blood 8. Maria Shriver, Gay Gaddis & Sara Hirsh Bordo 9. Kathy Terry & Lynn Meredith 10. Rebecca Gaddis, Desiree Gutierrez & Aimee Walden 11. Fifi Osborne & Erin Dempsey

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Saturday, APRIL 7, 2018 at the Long Center

Register today, form a team and donate to be part of Ruthless Good, benefiting United Way of Greater Austin! On Saturday, April 7th, you and your team will work and play together in solving clues to find unique Austin locations, capture photos and answer trivia questions. With the streets of Austin as the game board, you’ll have two hours to complete as many activities as possible, earning points - and ultimately prizes - along the way.

REGISTER TODAY at RUTHLESSGOOD.ORG APRIL 7, 2018


KRISTIN'S COLUMN

Lashing Out By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

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ET ME FIRST OUT MYSELF. I CAN BE

vain at times, in rather odd ways. I’ll just say up front: I am a middle-aged-formerly-relatively-attractive woman who is handling the aging process semi-okay. Sometimes I do ridiculous things to make myself feel pretty. One such unfortunate sidetrack involved fake eyelashes. Have you noticed how many women suddenly have such thick, sweeping lash extensions that they create a breeze whenever they blink? I started to obsess over lashes, thinking that the longer and darker they were, the less noticeable my crow’s-feet would become. Soon Latisse was not enough. I lusted for more. Lust is a sin (probably worse when combined with vanity), but I just had to go there anyway. I went to an eyelash salon. Can you believe there are eyelash salons? What will be next? Elbow exfoliators? Chin-hair stylists? Bunion bars? Bellybutton vacuuming? Bikini-line landscape architects? You could choose from the following options: Gorgeous, Sexy, Natural, or Cute. How can you

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possibly go wrong? I chose Gorgeous. Or was it Sexy? I definitely skipped Natural and Cute. Why be Mary Ann when you can be Ginger? I loved them, at least at first. When I woke up in the morning, I looked more awake — like I already had makeup on. I could swipe on some lip gloss and be out the door. I felt like coyly winking at everyone I saw, from the tattooed checker at Whole Foods to random drivers at four-way stops. My flirty alter ego was fabulous. Or so I thought. Never mind the fact that you have to sit there for more than two hours, with your eyes taped shut as though you’d been abducted by a serial killer, all while pop music blasts into your torture chamber and someone pokes at your lashes with a tweezer. Beauty has a price, right, ladies? Looking back, I should have known something wasn’t right when I parked at the opposite end of the shopping center so that no one would see my car outside. After a few months, my lustful lash affair started turning into a regular old relationship. I started to see flaws and get bored. My lashes were falling out faster, leaving gaping holes between the dreaded two-hour appointments. The glue started to feel heavy. I could feel the wind lifting my lash line, and it did not feel good. The random rogue extra-long lash (they don’t all grow out at the same rate) would brush up against the lenses of my glasses, annoying me to no end. I started to feel ridiculous when I went running, like I was all glammed-up to hit the town — in shorts at 7 a.m. Meow. If sweat or allergies irritated my eyes, I couldn’t even rub them anymore. I noticed the lashes when I slept, trying to get comfortable on my pillow with broken lash remnants. I would wake up and look

"I JUST WANTED MY MONEY, MY DIGNITY, AND MY NATURAL LASHES BACK."

in my ultra-magnifying makeup mirror and see scraggly, uneven lashes tangled up like bed-head hair. I tried to comb them (always a good use of time), and they would fall out on the little brush. My young daughters, who have far better eyesight than I do, would say, “Oooh, Mom, you need to get your lashes done soon.” “But I just got them done!” I’d say. The bloom was officially off the rose. I went in to get them fixed, and the lash girl told me my natural lashes were in such bad condition that I couldn’t get another set for at least several weeks. She would have to take the stragglers off instead. She taped my eyes shut, painted my lashes with an acidic adhesive remover, and painfully plucked away at the remains of my Gorgeous. Thirty minutes later, I looked in the mirror and barely recognized the sad, old woman with bloodshot eyes with nary a fringe of lash line. I couldn’t tell if I was weeping because of the stinging, the shock, or the shame. I finally really saw myself. It wasn’t pretty.

This had to end. It’s over, honey. Over. Done. Finished. We both knew this could never last. This was never right. I want my old life and my old lashes back. They were actually lovely, and I totally took them for granted. I need to make this right. I hope it’s not too late. I repented for my lust, my vanity, and my wasteful use of finances. There are starving people in the world, and I was taping my eyes shut to all of them. I put my sunglasses on my raw, nubby eyes and slinked out to the front desk to cancel my membership. Yes, I had a freaking membership. I know, don’t even say it. “Okay, you’re all good,” the lash girl said. “Come back if you change your mind!” She winked her Gorgeous at me and smiled a perfect, pearly-white smile. A year, and a shit-ton of Latisse, later, I got a message from the lash dealers, to let me know I had credits to use. Credits? What are you talking about? At first I feared they would not refund my money for the untouched glue and lash fibers that I thought I was done paying for. I flipped out. I thought to myself, To hell with embarrassment, I’m speaking out. I’m calling the Better Business Bureau. I’m getting on social media, finally, damn it. I’m going to figure out how to make a review on Yelp and use all of my writing skills to inflict an eye for an eye(lash). I’m calling John Grisham. Julia Roberts will play me. I just wanted my money, my dignity, and my natural lashes back. The manager eventually nicely refunded my money. No more lashing out. Wink. tribeza.com

| APRIL 2018

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COMMUNITY PROFILE

Arts & CRAFTS HOW GLOBETROT TER K ATRINA JANE PERRY WE AVES AN AUTHENTIC ST YLE By Margaret Williams

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has been producing since her days of studying photography at the University of Texas, about the community of strong women she was raised by, and especially about the artisan families she works with to create her clothing and home line, August Etta. Perry describes her collection, anchored by its traditionally woven caftans and rugs, as the embodiment of “me as an artist and the tradition of craft.” Art and craft are something the artist and maker talks about often, describing the intricate process of weaving on a standing loom as requiring both in equal measure. Born and raised in Fredericksburg, Perry has most recently split her time between Austin and Oaxaca, Mexico, where all of the August Etta pieces are sourced and made. Perry currently lives in Reykjavik, Iceland, where she is working on completing a master’s in fine arts program at the Iceland Academy of the Arts. While Perry’s work and design for August Etta are based on centuries-old techniques, the artist, who describes Anni Albers’ “On Designing” as her bible, is now happily studying digital weaving when she’s not

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P O R T R A I T B Y R AG N H E I Ð U R G U Ð M U N D S D ÓT T I R

ATRINA JANE PERRY FEELS DEEPLY — ABOUT THE ART SHE


ABOVE: Emiliano

Mendez, patriarch of the family that hand-looms all of August Etta’s cotton textiles, in Oaxaca. LEFT: Perry’s designs shown in various states of production.

circumnavigating the island to photographically record the commoditization of a once wild land. No matter the medium, Perry connects with, and is motivated by, the people and natural environment that surrounds her. The caftans that Perry designs seasonally for August Etta are inspired by the huipil, a tunic-like garment worn by women throughout Central America. “[I] felt a generosity … and beautiful when I first put one on,” she says. The garment had an ease of movement that she wanted to adapt and share. But it wasn’t until 2015, after meeting a local family of weavers in Oaxaca through Fundación En Vía, an organization focused on female-driven microfinance loans and education, that Perry thought her idea to adapt the huipil could be turned into a sustainable business model. Now she works directly with a handful of families who specialize in the cotton- and wool-weaving style emblematic of the region. Perry’s caftans — with simple lines and a laser focus on detail — celebrate these master weavers and their artistry. H&M August Etta is not. Perry has had offers for large, rushed orders, but she stands firm in her commitment to sustainability and honoring tribeza.com

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PERRY CONNECTS WITH, AND IS MOTIVATED BY, THE PEOPLE AND NATUR AL ENVIRONMENT THAT SURROUND HER .

the handmade. She knows that to split one apart from the other would inherently change the designs she has worked so hard, in collaboration with the makers, to achieve. The mission of August Etta — one of “timeless authenticity” — is furthered by the brand’s commitment to return 5 percent of all profits to Fundación En Vía. While some brands, understandably, might find these ambitions unattainable, Perry credits her great-grandmother, grandmother, and own mom with setting a high bar by the way they have run their own family elder-care business, Knopp Healthcare. “These strong and independent women have impressed upon me a life and work philosophy embedded in August Etta and my art practice. They are my role models.” As with so many things, August Etta’s newest adventure began through a conversation. Kirsten Dickerson, founder and CEO of Raven + Lily, came upon the collection at a trunk show in Fredericksburg and was almost immediately interested in discussing a collaboration. This month their collaboration, the “Emilia” caftan, will be available exclusively through Raven + Lily’s web shop. Perry named the caftan after Emiliano Mendez, the patriarch of the family who hand-looms and sews all of August Etta’s cotton textiles. Working with the ethical fashion brand has been natural for Perry, and the company has been incredibly supportive of her vision, as have many others. Perry’s appreciation of this support is evident as she begins rattling off names. Tim Johnson and Caitlin Murray of Marfa Book Company were some of August Etta’s first champions, and they now have their own robe design in the works. Perry is thrilled by this growth, as she knows it will continue to expand August Etta’s reach — one of artistry, tradition, and generosity.

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ABOVE: August

Etta’s “Emilia” caftan designed exclusively for Raven + Lily. LEFT: Detail of one of Perry’s designs.

P R E V I O U S PAG E S : K AT R I N A J A N E P E R R Y P O R T R A I T B Y R AG N H E I Ð U R G U Ð M U N D S D ÓT T I R . A L L OT H E R P H OTO G R A P H S B Y K AT R I N A J A N E P E R RY. T H I S PAG E : R AV E N + L I LY C A F TA N P H OTO G R A P H B Y M E L I N DA D I M A U R O . FA B R I C D E TA I L P H OTO G R A P H B Y K AT R I N A J A N E P E R RY

COMMUNITY PROFILE


TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO WHAT’S BUZ ZING AROUND AUSTIN By Nicole Beckley

Stretching into NEW Territory Lifestyle design maven Katie Kime is bringing her bold patterns to the yoga studio. Kime recently added yoga leggings to her brand, which already includes items like wallpaper, pillows, and pajamas. Take your workout style up a notch with the higherwaisted, polyester-spandexblended pants, specifically designed to endure stretching. Supercharge your downward dog in the yellow-accented Joyous pattern or relax into Savasana in the rose-pink Magnolia Sunset. KATIEKIME.COM

Well-HEELED

“I’m a shoe designer full-time, so I was working from home and I was getting really sick of being at home all day,” Selena McCartney explains. To alleviate her cabin fever, McCartney got creative, finding a space on South First Street that could serve as both a design studio and a shoe boutique. In February McCartney opened The Art of Shoes. The back serves as her work space, and the front functions as a shop in two sections: one boasting vintage and “pre-loved” shoes; the other, new shoes, displayed in an art gallery-like setup. When McCartney’s not at her desk working — she’s the design director for Katy Perry footwear and consults for Teysha shoes and other brands — she loves having women come into the space. “They’ll come in with their girlfriends and laugh and try shoes on, and it’s just the sweetest thing to watch them get so excited about it.” THEARTOFSHOESAUSTIN.COM

Buzz-Worthy Baubles In 2012, Anna Gieselman took her beekeeping hobby in a new direction, launching Bee Amour, a robust jewelry line inspired by honeycomb shapes. More than just the shapes, many of the line’s necklaces, earrings, and rings contain sections of actual honeycomb, cast in bronze and sterling silver. Other unique items include resin-coated honeycomb bolo ties and pendants memorializing real bees in resin. BEEAMOUR.COM

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POWER Up “Everyone has personal power. It’s inside you,” Gay Gaddis says. “I truly believe that’s the kind of power that we really all want.” As the founder and CEO of the advertising agency T3, Gaddis knows a thing or two about tapping into personal power, and she shares her collected wisdom in her book, “Cowgirl Power,” released in January. Gaddis uses the stories of real cowgirls as entry points into her own story, highlighting the grit and drive of Wild West performers like Bessie Herberg and Annie Oakley. “A few of my historic cowgirls are what I would call real fashionistas in their own way,” Gaddis says. “They wore amazing costumes, and it was part of their style, part of their personality.” When it comes to her personal style, Gaddis admits a love for

shoes and combining high and low brands as a form of self-expression. “I always tell people, ‘If you splurge on anything, splurge on a handbag, because they say a lot about you.’” GAYGADDIS.COM/COWGIRL-POWER

HUNT and Gather When it comes to spring style, Megan Clifton likes to keep it simple. “I’m all about a black T-shirt and jeans and a really bold, fun necklace,” Clifton says. Her interest in jewelry was handed down from her grandmothers — one gravitated toward Native American squash blossoms; the other was fond of gemstones — and inspired her line, Gather Goods, launched in November. To create her necklaces, Clifton, who spent four years in product development at Fossil, scours gem shows, antique malls, and estate sales, on the hunt for unique beads. “I’m a one-man show, so each piece is totally different than another,” she says. “You’re really not going to find a double of anything exactly the same.” GATHERGOODSATX.COM

Lighting the Fuse With nearly a decade and a half under its belt, the Fusebox Festival remains one of the city’s most reliable events for artistically interesting experiences. Running April 18 through 22, the wide-ranging festival includes animation, visual art, music, dance, and live theater performances at a variety of venues. Keep an eye out for

“The Cold Record,” a one-man show from the Rude Mechs’ Kirk Lynn, and “Abandoned Playground,” a dynamic dance performance highlighting the athleticism of nine unique dancers. Reservations are needed, but all events are free. FUSEBOXFESTIVAL.COM

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C ALENDARS

Entertainment MUSIC MIGUEL

April 20 – 22 Auditorium Shores

HAIM W/ LIZZO

April 6 Stubb’s BBQ

April 24 Stubb’s BBQ

HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS - IN CONCERT

April 7 & 8 Bass Concert Hall

BRAD MEHLDAU TRIO

April 12 Paramount Theatre DIXIE CHICKS

April 12 ACL Live at The Moody Theater MATT AND KIM

April 12 Stubb’s BBQ

LEVITATION FEST

April 26 – 29 Downtown Austin JOEY BADA$$

April 29 Emo’s Austin

THEATER DANCE REPERTORY THEATRE PRESENTS TRANSCENDENCE

Through April 8 B. Iden Payne Theatre

SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE

Through April 22 Austin Playhouse

BALLET AUSTIN PRESENTS EXIT WOUNDS

TONY BENNETT

April 29 ACL Live at The Moody Theater MARIAN HILL W/ MICHI

April 30 Emo’s Austin

April 6 – 8 Long Center

HUBBARD STREET DANCE

April 11 Bass Concert Hall

THE BOOK OF MORMON

JACK INGRAM & FRIENDS FT. PATTY GRIFFIN

April 13 ACL Live at The Moody Theater AUSTIN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS BEETHOVEN’S FIFTH

April 13 & 14 Long Center

FILM LEANING INTO THE WIND – ANDY GOLDSWORTHY

Through April 5 AFS Cinema

MOVIES IN THE PARK: THE LION KING

April 5 North West District Park

CHROMEO

April 17 Stubb’s BBQ

AUSTIN UNDER THE STARS FILM FESTIVAL

OLD SETTLER’S MUSIC FESTIVAL

April 19 – 22 Dale, TX

THE REVIVALISTS

April 20 Stubb’s BBQ

WILLIE NELSON & FAMILY W/ ROBERT EARL KEEN

April 20 & 21 Whitewater Amphitheater

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April 7 Lone Star Court

VIVA CINEMA: FECHA DE CADUCIDAD

April 7 Bullock Texas State History Museum FIVE SEASONS WITH PIET OUDOLF

April 25 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center

April 17 – 22 Bass Concert Hall

TRAILER PARK BOYS

April 13 Bass Concert Hall

JIM JEFFERIES

April 14 Paramount Theatre MOONTOWER COMEDY & ODDITY FESTIVAL

April 18 – 21 Various Locations

MIRANDA SINGS

April 22 Paramount Theatre LEWIS BLACK

April 27 ACL Live at The Moody Theater

CHILDREN SPROUTS

APRIL FOOLS!

April 26 – May 6 Long Center

April 4 – 27 Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center

TEXAS BURLESQUE FESTIVAL

PANCHO RABBIT AND THE COYOTE

April 27 & 28 Paramount Theatre

April 7 – 29 Austin Scottish Rite Theatre

AUSTIN OPERA PRESENTS LA TRAVIATA

FAMILY DAY

April 28 – May 6 Long Center

COMEDY SHANE TORRES

April 4 – 7 Cap City Comedy Club NICK SWARDSON

April 13 Paramount Theatre

April 8 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum TEEN EVENT: DESTINATION LAGUNA

April 13 The Contemporary Austin Laguna Gloria

DISNEY ON ICE PRESENTS REACH FOR THE STARS

April 25 – 29 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park


OTHER SHERWOOD FOREST FAIRE

Through April 22 Sherwood Forest

AUSTIN FASHION WEEK

March 31 – April 7 Various Locations

TRIBEZA SUPPER CLUB

April 4 Gusto Italian Kitchen + Wine Bar LONESTAR ROUND UP

April 6 & 7 Travis County Expo Center CECILE RICHARDS BOOK TOUR

April 7 Paramount Theatre

TX GERMAIN BIER & BREZEL FEST

April 7 & 8 Austin Saengerrunde & Scholz Garten BRAVE FEST

April 8 Spiderhouse Cafe & Ballroom CAPITOL 10K

April 8 Congress Avenue to Auditorium Shores

P H OTO G R A P H B Y DAV I D M CC L I S T E R

NOLA, TEXAS FOOD & MUSIC FEST

April 8 H-E-B Center at Cedar Park HUMANS OF NEW YORK’S BRANDON STANTON

April 11 Paramount Theatre

APRIL WINE WALK

April 12 Hill Country Galleria

MACK, JACK & MCCONAUGHEY

April 12 & 13 Various Locations

WALLER CREEK POP-UP PICNIC

April 14 Palm Park

EAST AUSTIN URBAN FARM TOUR

April 15 Various Locations

FUSEBOX FESTIVAL

April 18 – 22 Various Locations

MOTOGP GRAND PRIX OF THE AMERICAS

April 20 – 22 Circuit of the Americas

LONESTAR CRAWFISH FESTIVAL

April 21 Stubb’s BBQ

WEIRD HOMES TOUR

April 21 Various Locations

MONSTER JAM

April 21 & 22 Frank Erwin Center AUSTIN FOOD + WINE FESTIVAL

April 27 – 29 Auditorium Shores & Republic Square Park RED POPPY FESTIVAL

April 27 – 29 Georgetown, TX

EEYORE’S BIRTHDAY PARTY

April 28 Pease Park

SPRINGFEST

April 28 Hill Country Galleria

MUSIC PICK

Willie Nelson & Family With Robert Earl Keen By Neal Baker

WHITEWATER AMPHITHEATER APRIL 20 & 21

Austinites seem to universally adore our country music legend-in-residence, the great Willie Nelson. The feeling is mutual; the city has him to thank for his cultural impact, including kicking off “Austin City Limits,” while he has the city to thank for the hippie vibes that fueled some of his most loved albums. His latest release, “Last Man Standing,” gives a taste of his upcoming album by the same name, due April 27. On this track Nelson plays to us as he always has — with heart, cleverness, and an unmistakable crackle in his voice. Entertaining a dark sense of humor, the 84-year-old Nelson melodizes about the life and loss of some of his fellow country greats — the likes of Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard. “It’s gettin’ hard to watch my pals check out,” he sings, but when his guitar talks, it clearly has nothing to lament. Fortunately for us all, Nelson has some new friends. On April 20 & 21, he and his band will share the Whitewater Amphitheater in New Braunfels with Robert Earl Keen. A veritable Austin icon himself, Keen has remained loyal to the city since he started playing the Cactus Cafe in the ’80s. Now decades later, it’s hard to imagine a pairing more representative of the music of Austin. Get your tickets on Whitewater’s website, and in the words of Nelson himself, “Stay all night, stay a little longer.” tribeza.com

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ARTS C ALENDAR

Arts THE RELATIONSHIP OF THINGS

Through April 14 Davis Gallery

JULIE LIBERSAT

Through April 19 Women & Their Work SPENCER FIDLER: VASCULUM

Through April 28 Flatbed Press

FORM INTO SPIRIT: ELLSWORTH KELLY’S AUSTIN

Through April 29 Blanton Museum of Art AUSTIN INTERNATIONAL POETRY FESTIVAL

ART PICK

April 5 – 8 Various Locations

The Pink Bow Project

FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK, APRIL 13 – MAY 15

Karen Hawkins’ work has, in an oblique manner, often dealt with stories. Not in telling them, but in hiding them within the folds and creases of her various repurposings of books. By Hawkins turning the pages into such shapes as totems, jelly rolls, and many iterations and developments upon these forms, their printed meaning yields to a purely visual experience. With her latest work, Hawkins is flipping the script — she wants stories to be told, and hers is one of them. “My name is Karen, I was 10 years old.” It’s not quite comparable to the volumes of description contained within her past work, and yet we already know everything we need to. Hawkins spares us the details, because she knows that her experience isn’t important on account of how it stands out — it’s important because it doesn’t. The difficult truth is that as a survivor of childhood sexual abuse, Hawkins is one of many, and her “Pink Bow Project” is an opportunity for the viewer to come face-to-face with this truth in the form of staggering numbers and staggering size. From April 13 to May 15 at Gallery Shoal Creek, her work involves tens of thousands of pink bows climbing upward on panels of fabric, one for every case like hers. More importantly, one for every deeply complicated struggle. To accompany them are the voices of the people who lived these tales, telling you just who they are and when the abuse happened. The fact is that all the books in the world couldn’t contain their stories, but Hawkins knows from experience that to be seen and to be heard are the first steps toward a happy ending.

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April 6 Various Locations WILL KLEMM: SOLO SHOW

April 7 – 28 Wally Workman Gallery

April 13 – 15 Palmer Events Center

RACHEL KALISKY

April 20 – May 12 CAMBIAart Gallery

VISITING CERAMIC ARTIST BETH CAVENER: PUBLIC TALK

April 21 The Contemporary Austin Jones Center OUTSIDE THE INDOORS: SANDRA LANGSTON

April 21 – June 2 Davis Gallery

GET IN THE GAME: THE FIGHT FOR EQUALITY IN SPORTS

April 21 – January 13 LBJ Presidential Library KRISTA STEINKE: GOOD LUCK WITH THE SUN

April 28 – June 7 Women & Their Work

PERFORMANCE: RAGNAR KJARTANSSON: S.S. HANGOVER

April 7 – May 6 The Contemporary Austin Laguna Gloria SHERRY OWENS & ART SHIRER

April 12 – August 12 UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum

KAREN HAWKINS: THE PINK BOW PROJECT

April 13 – May 15 Gallery Shoal Creek

P O R T R A I T B Y K E R R I LO H M E I E R

By Neal Baker

ART CITY AUSTIN: FINE ART FESTIVAL 2018


Will Klemm show opens april 7th

wallyworkmangallery.com 512.472.7428 ~ 1202 West 6th

WWG

Wally W or k m an Gal l e ry

Fine Art Canvas Prints by Eli Halpin


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES MUSEUMS BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN –JONES CENTER 700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org

EVENT PICK

Waller Creek Pop-Up Picnic By Neal Baker

PALM PARK, APRIL 14

Benefiting the Waller Creek Conservancy, the sixth annual Waller Creek Pop-Up Picnic is an Austin outdoor tradition not to be missed. Picnic goers from across the city will stream into Palm Park on April 14 (6:30 p.m.) for a fun night of al fresco dining with specially created picnic baskets from some of Austin’s most sought-after restaurants – Franklin Barbecue, Uchi, and Lenoir, to name a few. The picnic is located in the heart of downtown and is a preview of what we all have to look forward to in a transformed Waller Creek. Take the chance to sit under the twinkly lights and catch up with new and old friends.

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THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sat 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave. Hours: Tu-F 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: Tu-F 10-4, Sat-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org


N OW S E L L I N G U R B A N C A B I N S & L I V E / WO R K S TO R E F R O N T S

PRIVATE YARDS

WILDFLOWER PRAIRIE

WOOD-BURNING FIREPLACES

OFF-LEASH DOG PARK

Stake Your Claim 512.442.8439 settlersoco.com

Information is subject to change. Marketing By Brandon Miller Group

Furniture Ÿ Rugs Jewelry Ÿ Lighting Art Ÿ Accessories

2714 South Lamar Blvd. 512-953-5615

@sparrowinteriors


A R T S PAC E S

Art SPACES GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress Ave. (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 1310 RR 620 S. Ste C4 (512) 243 7429 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By appointment only austingalleries.com BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Hours: Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org

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CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd., Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 721 Congress Ave. (512) 300 8217 By event and appointment only co-labprojects.org DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 Hours: S 12–5 dimensiongallery.org DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12–5 grayduckgallery.com JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa & Su 11-4 linkpinart.com

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 Hours: Tu-F 10-5 space12.org

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com

STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com

MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa & Su 12-5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd., #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu–Sa 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu–Sa 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: Tu–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 Hours: Sa 12–5 pumpproject.org ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1009 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

FREDERICKSBURG ARTISANS — A TEXAS GALLERY 234 W. Main St. (830) 990-8160 artisanstexas.com CATE ZANE GALLERY 107 N. Llano St. (830) 992-2044 catezane.com

STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn St. (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 405 E. Main St. (830) 990-2707 fbgartgallery.com

THE TWYLA GALLERY 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com

FREDERICKSBURG ART GUILD 308 E. Austin St. (830) 997-4949 fredericksburgartguild.org

VISUAL ARTS CENTER 209 W. 9th St. (800) 928 9997 Hours: M-F 10-6 twyla.com/austingallery WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12-6 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997-9920 insightgallery.com KOCH GALLERY 406 W. Main St. (830) 992-3124 bertkoch.com LARRY JACKSON ART & ANTIQUES 201 E. San Antonio St. (830) 997-0073 larryjacksonantiques.com RIVER RUSTIC GALLERY 222 W. Main St. (830) 997-6585 riverrustic.com RS HANNA GALLERY 244 W. Main St. and 208 S. Llano St. (830) 307-3071 rshannagallery.com URBANHERBAL ART GALLERY 407 Whitney St. (830) 456-9667 urbanherbal.com


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SPRI NG

Guide

With spring’s arrival come new discoveries for shopping and beauty! Check out these longtime favorites and recent additions to Austin’s ever-growing style scene.

US Cryotherapy Austin offers sub-zero, cold therapy services, most notably Whole Body Cryotherapy and CryoFacial Rejuvenation. Using -22°F air blown directly onto the face, CryoFacial Rejuvenation is an advanced treatment which stimulates collagen & elastin production. The process helps tighten skin as well as reduce wrinkles and redness without skin irritation. Let the experts at US Cryotherapy Austin find just the right treatment for you. USCRYOTHERAPY.COM | 3027 NORTH LAMAR BOULEVARD, SUITE 202 | 512-975-CRYO

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THEMENAGERIE.COM | 512-453-4644

T H E M E N AG E R I E P H OTO G R A P H B Y H O L LY CO WA R T

STYLE & BEAUTY

Marking their 40th anniversary, The Menagerie has been one of the most trusted names in jewelry in Central Texas. With Vickie Roan as its founder, The Menagerie has become a destination for timeless pieces that generations of families rely on for style, attention to detail and personalized service. In addition to custom jewelry design and repairs, the shop specializes in fine china, crystal, and sterling silver. They carry an enticing variety of gifts for life’s special occasions. The Menagerie’s mission of trust, knowledge and value delivered with attentive service allows the seasoned collector and jewelry novice alike to feel comfortable in finding the perfect bauble!


Olivia Shoppe is a lifestyle boutique featuring unique gifts for every occasion, designer children’s clothing, and personalization services. Sisters Kathy De La Paz and Maria Girling purchased what was originally 3 Threads/Scott-Wynne and have recently completed a remodel and rebranding of their Westlake location. The owners’ desire is to create a shopping experience where you can

find something special for everyone on your list. Olivia Shoppe carries luxury children’s clothing in sizes ranging from newborn to six years. With a selection of brands including Velveteen, Tocoto Vintage, Babe & Tess, Blue Comme Gris, BonTon, Loredana, Louis Louise, Moon Paris and Petit Bateau, Olivia Shoppe is a must-visit. OLIVIASHOPPE.COM | 512-419-7667

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sr

PRING

EVIVAL

FRESH LOOKS FOR THE SEASON WYNN MYERS STYLED BY BRITT TOWNS

PHTOGRAPHS BY

REJINA PYO dress, $688, Kick Pleat. GRAY MATTERS shoes, $538, Kick Pleat.

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DRIES VAN NOTEN jacket, $1507, By George. CALVIN KLEIN top, $290, By George. BILLY REID pants, $145, Billy Reid. Â


ON HER: RACHEL COMEY

jumpsuit, $625, Kick Pleat. ACB earrings, $270, Kick Pleat. GOLDEN GOOSE shoes, $480, By George. ON HIM: BILLY REID top, $195, Billy Reid. HUGO BOSS jacket, $645, Neiman Marcus. HUGO BOSS shorts, $275, Neiman Marcus. CONVERSE shoes (model’s own.)

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MARC JACOBS top, $350, Neiman Marcus. MARC JACOBS skirt, $350, Neiman Marcus. ROCHAS coat, $1920, Kick Pleat. ALUMNAE shoes, $425, Kick Pleat. tribeza.com

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ALICE AND OLIVIA pants, $295, Neiman Marcus. FIGUE top, $1995, Neiman Marcus. CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN shoes, $795, Neiman Marcus. tribeza.com

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ISABEL MARANT shorts, $490, By George. ISABEL MARANT jacket, $925, By George. SOPHIE BUHAI necklace, $790, Kick Pleat.

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ROSIE ASSOULIN dress, $1795, By George. GOLDEN GOOSE shoes, $480, By George. Â

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ON HER: GRAY

MATTERS shoes, $538, Kick Pleat. ODEEH skirt, $628, Good Company. ROSIE ASSOULIN top, $1395, By George. KENDRA SCOTT earrings, $95, Neiman Marcus. ON HIM:

ENGINEERED GARMENTS top, $252, By George. BILLY REID pants, $145, Billy Reid. LOEWE shoes, $750, By George.

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ULLA JOHNSON dress, $565, By George. REJINA PYO heels, $735, Kick Pleat. ARIANA BOUSSARDREIFEL earrings, $295, Good Company. Hair and Makeup: Katherine Crenshaw. Models: Brock Knighten (Page Parkes Agency), Gabrielle McTopy (Page Parkes Agency). Shot on Location at the Commodore Perry Estate. tribeza.com

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BY

ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY

FASHION

JESSICA PAGES

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FORWARD A conversation about Austin’s next big industry with the director of ACC’s Fashion Incubator Nina Means and boutique owner, Alta Alexander

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Henderson and Culp, co-creators of A Tribe Called Brunch.

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W

hile Austin has always enjoyed a reputation for cultivating its own style, it would be a stretch to call the city home to a serious fashion industry. But according to those in the know, that’s about to change. As happened with music, film, and technology, Austin’s creative culture is charting a new path, and the fashion sphere is witnessing some game-changing moves. We sat down for a chat with two people in the midst of it all. Alta Alexander, the founder of Altatudes, Austin’s first African-American-owned upscale boutique, displays both the energy and enthusiasm entrepreneurs are known for. Living in Austin for most of her life, Alexander, a graduate of Huston-Tillotson University, started in retail, then spent much of her early career in public relations and state government. In September 2017, she realized a life-long dream of owning her own boutique, where she curates a collection of high-end clothing and luxury goods offered with personalized service. Nearly two years ago, Nina Means moved to Austin from New York City, and in February she was named the director of Austin Community College’s Fashion Incubator. Means, whose foray into design came a"er she had already received a master’s degree in public health, took a leap of faith and followed her heart to Italy and New York to study fashion. She went on to found her eponymous label, designing elegantly minimal women’s clothing. Means finds Austin a fresh contrast to the way the fashion business operates on the East and West coasts.

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RIGHT: Nina Means

and Alta Alexander in conversation at Flower Child’s Domain NORTHSIDE location.

WHAT ABOUT AUSTIN MAKES IT THE RIGHT PLACE TO BECOME THE COUNTRY’S NEXT FASHION INDUSTRY HUB? ALTA ALEXANDER: Austin is unique, and it’s

coming into its own in a fashion sense. Style has always been part of Austin, but not like it is now; the city’s stepping up and putting itself out there, making fashion important. We do everything in our own way here, and that’s a good thing — it’s authentic. And people gravitate to that. NINA MEANS: I think Austin is poised to do things differently in the fashion business. Houston and Dallas have tended to follow more of a traditional mold, but in Austin, everything is done true to the city’s personality. I like the stubbornness in that; it’s nice to see how sure we are about doing things in a way that fits Austin’s culture. Plus, there are so many designers here, more than most people realize. There’s a real opportunity to cultivate connections and community and build our own fashion ecoculture in an Austin way. New York kind of forces you into a certain mold — how many hours you work, how intense the interactions are. Here, it’s more collaborative. There’s a supportive and nurturing spirit. HOW HAVE YOU SEEN AUSTIN’S SPIRIT OF COLLABORATION AND SUPPORT MANIFEST ITSELF? AA: I believe women are feeling more empowered

to do our own thing, and when others see it, they surround and support you. NM: That’s so true. I feel like when you’re where you’re supposed to be, you get enveloped in that space. In Austin, I quickly found a community that was very supportive of what I was doing. AA: Nina is a natural connector, and I’m someone who loves bringing people together. She connected me with Black Women Design, which is


a group started by Jennifer Hopkins of Jennifer Lovena Textiles. I was honored to host the group’s first meeting at Altatudes. We’re sharing the different experiences we’ve learned from, talking about benchmarks, asking each other questions. NM: This is when you see how powerful women coming together can be. MAKING CONNECTIONS SOUNDS IMPORTANT TO BOTH OF YOU. HOW DID YOU MEET EACH OTHER? AA: From the beginning, I wanted my boutique to

be diverse, and I wanted to be sure I had an

African-American designer that spoke to my aesthetic. I was at market in Dallas and happened upon Nina by chance, working in the showroom at Fashion Industry Gallery. I asked her if she knew any African-American designers. NM: I said, “Yes, actually, I do!” I had already moved to Austin, but having entered the business as a designer in New York, I didn’t have the sales experience, so I was working in the showroom to see that side of it firsthand. We started talking; Alta said she was in Austin, and I said I was in Austin. It was incredible how

quickly things lined up and we connected. It really was meant to be. TELL US HOW YOU SEE WHAT WE WEAR AFFECTING THE WAY WE FEEL. NM: Fashion is emotional. I believe women need

to feel a certain way when they get dressed in the morning, like they own themselves and are authentic in the way they’re putting themselves out there. One of the tenets of my design brand is women empowering women, so whatever I can do to give women that feeling of confidence, like a tribeza.com

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superior fit, is my goal. A great fit can be challenging, because we all come in so many different shapes and sizes, but as a designer who’s committed to women, it’s my job to take that on. AA: When I do styling and personal shopping, I can go into someone’s closet and pull out what works and what doesn’t with ease. But doing it for myself is the most challenging thing ever, and it’s because of those emotional connections. I’m really passionate about people understanding themselves, and then once they do, the doors are wide-open. Fashion is all about emotion. What I wear depends on how I feel that day and what’s on my schedule, but I’m always going to extend my personality through my clothing. We’re all chameleons. I love that about fashion. IN ADDITION TO CURATING AND DESIGNING BEAUTIFUL CLOTHING, WHAT GIVES YOU SATISFACTION IN YOUR WORK? AA: Believe me, it’s not just the sale. Seeing the

transformation when someone goes into the dressing room, puts something on, and then steps out feeling beautiful is the best part! You can see it in her face, how she walks. When something in my boutique makes a woman feel great about herself, it brings me great joy. And whatever I do has to have a deeper meaning behind it, not just for myself but also for my community. Like having Altatudes in East Austin on 12th Street and contributing to the revitalization of this historic corridor, and giving back through our first annual Hearts and Handbags event with women helping young girls embrace their own self-worth.

Alexander’s boutique, Altatudes, on East 12th Street.

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Alta Alexander, founbder of Austin’s first AfricanAmerican owned upscale boutique.

NM: I especially love working with women-owned

businesses. For so long, women business owners were overlooked or assumed to be not as good as their male counterparts, or they’ve simply had to unduly prove themselves. I take every opportunity to support women photographers, filmmakers, and those who are developing the industry. I also serve on the board of Conscious Couture, an organization based in Dallas that combines fashion and philanthropy to support the fight against human trafficking. When I was approached to participate, I knew immediately that I wanted to get involved. WHAT’S YOUR RESPONSE TO THOSE WHO THINK OF FASHION AS NICE BUT NOT NECESSARY? AA: Whenever I hear someone say fashion is just

“WE’RE ALL CHAMELEONS. I LOVE THAT ABOUT FASHION.”

fluff or it doesn’t lend itself to important things, I explain how every facet of STEM [science, technology, engineering, and math] is a part of fashion. I believe it’s especially important for young people considering a career in fashion to understand this. As a business owner, you have to think about the whole picture — there’s a lot to balance. The fashion world has so many arms, and regardless of what part of it you’re working in, there are multiple business components you have to pay attention to. NM: That’s absolutely true. When people say they don’t care about fashion, I’m reminded of the scene in “The Devil Wears Prada” where Miranda explains how everyone participates in fashion, they’re just not always cognizant of it. It’s a multibillion-dollar industry that requires many disciplines to take a piece of clothing from concept to the rack. We think of the artistic skills, but you have to be adept in managing costs as well. You might assume 90 percent of a designer’s day is sketching, sewing, and draping, but that may only be 15 or 20 percent, because tribeza.com

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“THERE’S A REAL OPPORTUNITY ... TO BUILD OUR OWN FASHION ECO-CULTURE IN AN AUSTIN WAY.”

LEFT: Nina

most of what I’m doing is negotiating, costbidding, traveling, and sourcing materials. HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO SEE THE FUTURE OF AUSTIN’S FASHION INDUSTRY EVOLVE? NM: I want to see a complete fashion industry

ecosystem here: buyers able to buy, designers ready to go to market, greater workforce development with new technology so we’re teaching people how to have viable, sustainable jobs and gainful employment. I’d like Austin to be able to scale businesses and support

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S K E TC H E S P H OTO G R A P H CO U R T E S Y O F N I N A M E A N S

Means at Austin Community College’s Fashion Incubator ABOVE: A sketch from Means’ eponymous brand.


additional manufacturers so we can locally meet the demands of stores like Altatudes. Designers should be able to stay and work here rather than going to New York. We have the opportunity to build a fashion industry we’re proud of with sustainable features near and dear to Austin’s heart. That’s my goal with the Fashion Incubator. It can have a far-reaching impact and serve a larger community need. At the end of the day, all you want to do through your cra" is have an impact on the world for the better and make a difference.

AA: That’s totally on point. I always want to make

a difference in whatever I’m doing. And I’ll just add that I’d love to see more local designers who are able to stay and produce here in Austin, because I’d love to carry them! I’m curating from around the globe, but it would be wonderful to make available right here in East Austin more completely Austin-created pieces. We say “Keep Austin Weird,” but I think it’s about keeping Austin real. I’m proud of our authenticity and individuality. I want people to experience everything Austin has to offer.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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Lucy Jolis at her Sunroom boutique in Malibu, California.

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HANNAH MORROW DEBORAH FARNAULT

BY PHOTOGRAPHS BY

AUSTIN GOES WEST Lucy Jolis Sets Malibu Aglow With Sunroom’s Second Location

NO DOUBT THE DIGITAL REVOLUTION AND ASCENT OF SOCIAL MEDIA

have aggrandized the use and meaning of “aesthetic.” Where style for some simply dictates how they dress in the morning, personal brands and their subsequent aesthetic are as relevant as ever. For Lucy Jolis, owner of the South Congress boutique Sunroom, that’s a tough thing to grapple with, as the store frequently gets labeled as strictly bohemian or beachy. “Some people say [that] Sunroom is a beach or resort shop,” Jolis says. “Yes, we carry swimwear and ca"ans year-round and there’s a beachy feel.” But for Jolis, “laid-back” is applicable to both the boutique’s merchandise and its mission as a locale. “It’s about finding lines that you’re not going to see in every other store, and it’s about the familiarity and environment we try to create,” Jolis says. “We want both stores to be fun and a space that’s easy for people to be in.” tribeza.com

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CARON CALLAHAN Krisana Jumpsuit in Khaki, $398. NO.6 Coco Crossfront Platform Sandal in Pink Sand, $325. WAIWAI Marcella Bag in Brown, $610.

Lucy styles looks for Austin and Malibu

CHIMALA Selvedge Denim Used Ankle Cut in Vintage Light, $540. SOYER Piper Knit Cami in Khaki, $485. NO.6 Frida Clog in Pink Sand, $285. LAUREN MANOOGIAN Barcelona Bag in Tan, $790. KATE YOUNG FOR TURA Amber Sunglasses in Tortoise, $350.

ON AUSTIN, LEFT:

KALITA Aphrodite Cloud Day Dress in Peachskin, $550. CARRIE FORBES Mimi Sandal in Black, $275. WAIWAI Alfaia Preta Bag in Black, $780. KATE YOUNG FOR TURA Cecillia Sunglasses in Black, $350.

KALITA Gemini Tunic Dress in Vanilla, $495. K.JACQUES Zanobie Sandals in Natural, $308. WAIWAI Marcella Bag in Green, $610.

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“There’s a certain ease and relaxed element about dressing in Austin, where looking nice doesn’t necessarily equal getting fancy. I think all of these looks would work for any daytime event and most evening outings too.”

APIECE APART Stella Shirred Tiers Dress in Kasbah, $525. K.JACQUES Ellada Sandals in Taupe, $312. LAUREN MANOOGIAN Barcelona Bag in Black, $790.

ON MALIBU, RIGHT:

“In terms of temperature, Malibu doesn’t get quite as hot as Austin. The days usually start and end on the cooler side, so having a jacket to throw on is always good. But again the same idea applies - you can be casual and still look nice, and a simple dress or jumpsuit can get you through the whole day. And we’ll always love boyfriend jeans whether we’re in Malibu or Austin! I like them slouchier and slouchier by the day.”

RACHEL COMEY Buxton Jumpsuit in Dirty White, $395. MASSCOB Long Light Jacket in Cocoa, $490. NO.6 Frida Clog in Pink Sand, $285. KATE YOUNG FOR TURA June Sunglasses in Blush, $350.


" IT’S ABOUT FI N DI NG L I N E S T H AT YO U ’ R E N OT G O I N G TO S E E I N E V E R Y OT H E R S TO R E , AN D IT’S ABOUT T H E FA M I L I A R I T Y A N D ENVIRONMENT W E T R Y TO C R E AT E . "

It’s that distinctly Austin attitude that agrees with the affable 36-year-old. Jolis found our capital city a"er oscillating between the coasts. She grew up in Virginia and Massachusetts before moving at 18 with her family to California, where she worked at a boutique in Laguna Beach, planting the seed for Sunroom. A"er attending college on the West Coast, she moved back East, to New York City, where she worked as an executive assistant for the CEO of Morgans Hotel Group. A relationship brought her to Austin, where the new beginning blossomed into the boutique. Sunroom was born in May 2013. “When it first opened, I couldn’t really believe people were even coming in and shopping,” Jolis says. She loved the street and the space, originally on South Lamar. She had no intention of moving, but in 2015 New Waterloo approached her about moving into a space in the soon-to-open South Congress Hotel. They asked if she’d want to curate their lobby shop, ideally a rotating retail pop-up of sorts. And then they asked if she wanted a 585-square-foot

space in the center of the hotel’s ground level. If it’s not broken, the adage nudged her, why fix it? But with more thought, she decided to take the offer, moving Sunroom to its current location in October 2015. “It was probably the smartest thing I’ve ever done,” she says with a laugh now. Two years later, in August 2017, Jolis opened Sunroom at the Malibu Country Mart, a sunny boutique mall not far off the Pacific Coast Highway. Despite years living on the West Coast, she says California was never the go-to for Sunroom’s second location. However, a friend of a friend from Malibu had visited Sunroom in Austin and insisted the move was the right one. “I remember my mom saying, ‘Have you really thought this through? I don’t know if people are going to respond to what you’re doing there,’” she recalls. “‘It’s working in Austin because you’re bringing that California feel to Texas. But if you’re bringing California to California, are people going to care?’” tribeza.com

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Jolis in Malibu, outside Sunroom, whose first location is in the South Congress Hotel.

She hoped the approach she took in Austin — friendly service and a showcase for should-know items like Brother Vellies shoes and Yuliya Magdych apparel — would pay off. In Austin, local-first allegiance also makes the city fertile ground for start-ups and baby brands like Sunroom. “It was such a good environment to open up a store. Starting from scratch would’ve been so hard,” she says. “It was the right climate with the right people who are down to rally and support small and independent stores.” Jolis says Malibu has the same sense of community, a place where folks are far less than six degrees from separated and there’s a small-town feel despite the proximity to Los Angeles. And though both locations of Sunroom get foot traffic from tourists, Jolis maintains that it’s natives who remain her focus and drive the business forward. “Every day [in the Austin location] there is an instance where friends are running into each other in the store, and I love that,” Jolis says. “I cannot wait for that to happen in Malibu." tribeza.com

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house music

AN AUSTIN BUNGALOW WITH ITS OWN STYLISH BEAT BY

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MARGARET WILLIAMS

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

KATE ZIMMERMAN TURPIN


“The six Josef Albers prints in our living room came from Austin’s aunt Mary Jane. She was working at an auction house in Connecticut and bought the whole set, already framed, for $30 and gave them to us.”

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INDSOR MCKENNA HAS A STYLE ALL HER OWN, AND

OPPOSITE : “MY DAD KEPT [THE JUKEBOX]

FILLED WITH MOSTLY MOTOWN AND CAROLINA BEACH MUSIC. When my parents downsized a few years ago, they offered it to me. Austin flew to Charlotte, rented a Penske, and drove it to Austin with my dad. We switch out the records often, even filling it with old Christmas music during the holidays. It has brought us so much fun and enjoyment. I can’t imagine our home without it!”

and the home she shares with her husband, Austin, and two daughters, Jane and Mary Austin, immediately reflects her distinct point of view. A space that works equally well for both entertaining and family, the 1917 Deep Eddy bungalow is warm and bursting with a wide-ranging art collection, family heirlooms, and even a vintage jukebox. McKenna, a freelance graphic designer [The Windsor McKenna], and Austin, who works in advertising, bought the home seven years ago a"er moving from New York. At the time, they both had hectic work schedules and Jane was only a year old, so when Austin was offered a job in Austin at McGarrah Jessee, the young family packed up and moved to Texas. McKenna immediately fell in love with the century-old Cra"sman, and the whole family enjoys living in the Deep Eddy neighborhood. “We can walk to the trail, and the girls can take the bus home from school. We walked to dinner at Fabi + Rosi last night.” A native North Carolinian, McKenna grew up visiting flea markets, especially the Metrolina Tradeshow Expo, outside Charlotte. She credits those visits and her mom’s own vibrant style as a big influence. “Over the years, I have gladly taken pieces from my mom and grandmothers and had them reupholstered or painted. My style is a bit more colorful or eclectic, but comfort is also so important to me … I love being surrounded by beautiful things, but no part of the house is off-limits to kids or guests.” The couple was delighted to have found a home they not only loved but also one that didn’t involve a huge construction project, thanks to the “thoughtful updates” made by the previous owners. “We have really only made aesthetic changes, mostly with paint and hardware. We did have the wall of bookshelves built in the living room to house books and Austin’s very large record collection.” And that same wall frames the family’s beloved jukebox, originally in McKenna’s parents’ house. A staple of her childhood — “My friends and I would dance to it,” she says — the jukebox captures McKenna’s vintage and o%eat style perfectly. It’s a happy addition to a home that is as fun as its owner. tribeza.com

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“MY MOM USED TO OWN AN ACCESSORIES STORE in Charlotte, and she sold a lot of turquoise — and kept a lot for herself. My collection started back then with a few special pieces designed by her favorite artist, Federico Jimenez … I found my very favorite pair of earrings just a few years ago at an art dealer’s booth in Round Top … I always look for pieces that are signed by the artist, and I definitely have a shade of turquoise I’m most drawn to.”

“I LOVE SITTING ON THE FRONT PORCH while the girls are swinging from the tree swing. A good front porch was an absolute prerequisite when we were house-hunting.”

OPPOSITE : “WE LOVE SOUTHERN OUTSIDER ART

and have collected a few pieces by Mose Tolliver, R.A. Miller, Jimmy Lee Sudduth, and Howard Finster. We also love collecting folk art from wherever we travel and pieces made by our friends. We have painting, drawings, silk screens, and photography by Andrew Paynter, Harrison Haynes, Buster Black, Ashley Woodson Bailey, Dave Eggers, and Hunter Kennedy.”

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“WE REALLY LOVE ART. There is barely a blank wall space in the whole house. One of our favorite artists is Steve Keene, a friend from Brooklyn … He even painted more than 300 custom paintings for our wedding favors. We especially love the ‘Eat In or Take Out’ chinoiserie-inspired triptych he did for our dining room.”

“WHEN WE GOT HERE, I found I really enjoyed being home with Jane, so I started doing a little freelance graphic design work at home. Each year, as the girls have gotten older, I’ve worked more and grown my business. Most of my clients have their own small businesses, and I help them with branding, website design, print and product design, and interior renderings. I work from my office at home while my girls are at school. Many of my clients are moms working the same way, so our schedules usually match up nicely.” 

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STYLE PROFILE

A Simple SOLE

HOW PAUL HEDRICK IS REDEFINING BOOT-BUYING By Hannah Morrow Photographs by Tyler Sharp

P

AUL HEDRICK NEVER DREAMED OF BEING A FASHION

designer. This is best illustrated by the fact that the Harvard graduate used Microsoft Paint for his designs. “I realized I had the opportunity to become [a designer], and no one was telling me I couldn’t,” the 30-year-old Texas native says with a laugh. “You do what you have to do to get the job done.” What Hedrick did know was that he wanted to run his own company and create a product that he knew from the consumer angle. One day in early 2015, he sat down to brainstorm ideas. He was working in Greenwich, Connecticut, and living in New York City. Despite daily submersion in East Coast style, Hedrick was wearing a pair of pricey ostrich boots. When he looked down and saw them, the light bulb flickered. “It was pretty simple: Nice, high-quality boots are hard to find,” he says. “And when you do find them, they’re expensive.” From this principle, Hedrick launched Tecovas with a simple mission: “create handmade, high-quality boots that don’t break the bank.” Founded in October 2015, Tecovas now offers 10 styles for men and five for women, plus belts and a leather duffel bag, which just launched earlier this March. But starting a business is no simple task, nor is designing footwear or building a brand. Hedrick understood business, from his work in consulting and investing, and he understood cowboy boots as a Southerner’s closet staple, since he was born in Houston and raised in Dallas. The combination made the most sense with cowboy boots, because they had low “fashion risk,” as he had learned in consumer retail investing. In

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Paul Hedrick, founder and owner of Tecovas.


Tecovas boots being handcrafted in the company’s Mexico factory.

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STYLE PROFILE

Custom shoe lasts, below, are formed to be true to size and are available in two widths.

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The Weekender Duffle, their first venture into leather bags, was released in March.

other words, they weren’t going out of style. This is particularly true with Tecovas, as each boot in the collection is undeniably classic, with little if any embellishment besides the hand-stitched edging and buttery leather. The boots are made in León, Guanajuato, the boot-making and leather capital of Mexico. There are 200 steps that artisans take in making each boot, from the hand-laid shaft cording to the lemonwood pegs in the midsole. Hedrick visits the production facility every six weeks to check in, as he continues to work as the head of design and product development for the company. The short trip to León and a thriving western market were chief reasons for returning to Texas to start Tecovas. Though he had spent little time there in Austin, he chose the city because its innovative reputation and lack of pre-established big brand boot companies. He and his team of 17 work from an office in East Austin. The boots are primarily sold online, enabling Tecovas to sell to customers at wholesale prices. The company had a showroom on East Cesar Chavez for most of last year but closed its doors recently to focus on growing the brand and expanding the product line.

“I like Austin for Tecovas, because we’re the new one, the tech-savvy one, the ‘cool’ one. And people think of Austin that way,” Hedrick says. “I moved here and I definitely felt like this was the right place. People here are so supportive of brands that are local.” Still, while brick-and-mortar stores may be in Tecovas’ future, Hedrick wants to keep things simple. “The cowboy boot-buying experience is still pretty cool. We won’t ever just have a grocery store aisle worth of options,” Hedrick says. “The goal was to have it all —appeal to the distinguished western-wearer who has been wearing boots for years and has several pairs but also appeal to the 24-yearold in New York who doesn’t want to get made fun of.” As for Microsoft Paint, well, those days may be behind him. Hedrick intends to stay the head of product development but will let someone else handle the nitty-gritty design sketches from here on out. “Product will always be a big, if not the biggest, focus for me,” he says. “When we start releasing things that I have less business designing, someone with more skills and training will do it. But we’ll always keep things as simple as possible.” tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK

1

B AG , P O R T R A I T, S W E AT S H I R T, S W I M T R U N K S A N D S H I R T P H OTO G R A P H S C H A R L E S K N I G H T B Y

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SHARP DRESSED MAN BYGEORGE’S BR ANDON MAHLER SHARES 10 MUST-HAVES FOR LIVING HIS BEST LIFE Brandon Mahler is originally from Houston and loves his hometown, but when he moved to Austin three years ago and started with ByGeorge, it felt completely natural, since he already spent most weekends in town playing shows with his band, Dress Code. The former graphic design student spent five years working for Gucci in Houston, and now you can find him at ByGeorge’s The Men’s Shop, where he is manager and assistant buyer. An art enthusiast, and artist himself, Mahler makes sure to find the nearest James Turrell installation whenever he travels for work. We couldn’t resist asking this man-about-town for all of his seasonal must-haves and forever favorites. Austin men (and women), take note. —BY MARGARET WILLIAMS 88 APRIL 2018 |

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1. PIONEER DJ HEADPHONES HDJ-X7: Music

is a big part of my life. I use these headphones when I play and tour with Dress Code. They are perfect for DJing, because they are comfortable, noise-canceling, and adjustable. I DJ at Pool Burger every other Friday and have a variety show on LoFi Radio, where I interview musicians and shoppers and play my favorite jams. 2. BALENCIAGA MARKET BAG AT LAMAR

AND SOUTH CONGRESS BYGEORGE: I always

need a tote to carry my camera, headphones, and computer for when I go on buying trips. I chose this bag because it’s big enough to fit everything, stands out, and didn’t look too much like a woman’s purse. Cameron, our ByGeorge VP, has the same one. 3. VIETNAMESE ICED COFFEE FROM J A M E S T U R R E L L P H OTO G R A P H B Y E D S C H I P U L

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ: Elizabeth Street

has my go-to coffee in Austin because it’s kind of sweet and gives me the extra energy I need in

the morning. Sometimes I’ll add an everything croissant to my order or grab the new five-spice morning bun if I want an extra treat. 4. VINTAGE CHAMPION SWEATSHIRT:

I have eight different gray ones from different eras. They are the best-fitting sweatshirt. I bought my most recent one from Lo-Fi [vintage shop]. I tend to wear them with a good pair of denim and sneakers, and every now and then with a nice tailored trouser. A lot of designers base their sweaters off this style. 5. DRIES VAN NOTEN SWIM TRUNKS AT THE

MEN’S SHOP: I’m most excited for these to come

into the store for spring and summer because the designer uses a multipattern throughout the collection, which makes it easy to tie into a complete outfit after the pool. It’s a great piece for men who want to take a risk this summer, yet still feel comfortable.

5

7

LEFT: Brandon

6. JAMES TURRELL: THE COLOR INSIDE:

This is the perfect place for me to unwind and decompress after a long day or week on the road. Go when it’s raining, lie on the floor — but maybe not at the same time. I always try to visit one of his installations whenever I need an outlet. 7. LOEWE MULTI-FABRIC STRIPED SHIRT AT THE MEN’S SHOP: It’s hard to feel comfortable

or unique in button-downs, but I really like this one, because it’s different enough so as not to blend in with all the others. The shirt shows style with blue and white asymmetric stripes in each direction, and it’s light and breezy — ideal for Austin summers. 8. CONTAX T2 POINT-AND-SHOOT

CAMERA: When I was in school, using my

camera and developing the film was my creative outlet. I always carry this camera in my bag. I take photos of my friends, behind-the-scenes styling shoots at ByGeorge, and foreign sites while I’m on tour. 9. 1977 TUDOR BIG ROSE WATCH: I bought

Mahler, manager of ByGeorge’s The Men’s Shop. BELOW: James Turrell’s “The Light Inside” at The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

this vintage watch from ByGeorge’s collector, who has trunk shows at the store throughout the year. This one stuck out to me immediately because there is a big rose where the number 12 rests. The body is stainless, and the face is white. It’s the classic everyday watch I was looking for. 10. NIKE COMMES DES GARÇONS 180 PINK

6

8

SNEAKERS: I was initially attracted to COMMES des GARÇONS when I was younger. It’s the first designer brand I paid attention to. Seeing these shoes launch made me as excited as I was when I first got into fashion and clothing. Naturally, I bought two pairs. They have a retro silhouette … Nike hadn’t remade the 180 model in a while. tribeza.com

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KAREN'S PICK

Grizzelda’s HE AD E AST DOWN CESAR CHAVE Z FOR A COLORFUL TAKE ON ME XICAN FL AVORS By Karen Spezia Photographs by Leah Muse

I

F YOU H AV EN ’ T TA KEN A LONG , S LOW

drive along East Cesar Chavez lately, you’re in for a surprise. In just a few short years, it’s been transformed from a sleepy residential road into a street of dreams. Now a microcosm of All Things Austin, it’s lined with funky shops, art galleries, wellness studios, co-working spaces, indie businesses, luxury apartments, renovated bungalows, and a boutique hotel. It’s also become the most exciting culinary stretch in town. Within two miles, there’s everything an Austin foodie could want — with more to come. New places seem to sprout up overnight like toadstools. You’ll find excellent restaurants like seafood-centric Mongers, fine-dining Juniper, Texas-proud Jacoby’s, and Cajun-inspired Sawyer & Co., plus newcomers Pitchfork Pretty and Intero Italian. Neapolitan pizza joints like Bufalina and Southside Flying Pizza. Barbecue at Kerlin’s mobile truck and la Barbecue’s new brick-and-

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mortar home. Tex-Mex institutions Juan in a Million and Veracruz All Natural, plus a handful of old-school taquerias. There are healthfood favorites JuiceLand, Mr. Natural, Counter Culture, and Bento Picnic, plus The Vegan Nom taco trailer and Capital City vegan bakery. Coffee shops Cenote and Flat Track provide caffeine, while Craftsman, Weather Up, Stay Gold, and EastSide Tavern supply the booze. There’s even a brewery called Blue Owl. What more could you want? Keep going. As you near the end of the road, there’s one more place to discover: Grizzelda’s. This relatively new Tex-Mex player embodies the fascinating dichotomy of the area: new glitz and old funk, fancy drinks and draft beer, traditional dishes and updated classics. Located across the street from Jacoby’s, its ranch-inspired sister restaurant, Grizzelda’s is the second project from married-couple Adam Jacoby and Kris Swift. Jacoby

The outdoor patio along with a selection of their handcrafted cocktails.


The bar and a selection of Grizzelda’s Mexican dishes.

GRIZZELDA’S 105 TILLERY STREET (512) 366-5908 GRIZZELDAS.COM

fans the culinary flames while Swift sparks the design sizzle. Jacoby comes from a Texas ranching family who also runs a café and mercantile in his small hometown, and Grizzelda’s is named after the café’s influential Mexican cook. Opened in late 2016, Grizzelda’s offers a more tropical vibe than its rustic sibling across the street. The breezy ambiance reflects the menu’s coastal leanings, with pops of sunny color and lush floral accents among the chic décor, a quirky mash-up of velvet upholstery, metal chairs, marble countertops, and wooden tables. While the dining room buzzes with energy and pulsing music, the covered patio feels like a hidden oasis. The clientele is equally diverse: couples on date nights, singles on the prowl, and techies networking over margaritas. The menu also mixes things up, with a spotlight on coastal Mexican dishes plus a nod to interior Mexican and Tex-Mex cuisine. Seafood options include shrimp and fish ceviche and ahi tuna tostadas. Meats, including beef, lamb, pork, and goat, come from the Jacoby family ranch and are excellent. The picadillo tacos are loaded with juicy roasted peppers and served with tasty homemade corn tortillas. Our favorite dish was the bistec a la parrilla, a simply grilled ribeye steak, tender, flavorful, and fresh from the family ranch. Be sure to start with a bowl of the Grizzy Guacamole, studded with bacon and accompanied by a toothsome roasted salsa. Wash it all down with a frosty-cold Victoria lager or a dangerously potent Bad Girl Ri Ri. It’s all good fun and flavors at Grizzelda’s — and well worth the journey to the end of the road. tribeza.com

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24 DINER

BARLEY SWINE

BLUE DAHLIA BISTRO

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400

6555 Burnet Road, Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150

1115 E. 11th St. | (512) 542 9542

Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious

James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encour-

3663 Bee Caves Rd. | (512) 306 1668

plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favor-

ages sharing with small plates made from locally sourced

A cozy French bistro serving up breakfast, lunch, and

ites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken,

ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley

dinner in a casual setting. Pop in for the happy

burgers, all-day breakfast, and decadent milkshakes.

croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on

hour to share a bottle of your favorite wine and a

fried chicken.

charcuterie board.

34TH STREET CAFE 1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 371 3400

BUENOS AIRES CAFÉ

This cozy neighborhood spot in North Campus serves up

1201 E. 6th St. | (512) 382 1189

soups, salads, pizzas, and pastas — but don’t miss the

13500 Galleria Circle | (512) 441 9000

chicken piccata. The low-key setting makes it great for

Chef and Argentine native Reina Morris wraps the

weeknight dinners and weekend indulgences.

f lavors of her culture into authentic and crispy empanadas. Don’t forget the chimichurri sauce!

ALCOMAR

Follow up your meal with Argentina’s famous dessert,

1816 S. 1st St. | (512) 401 3161

alfajores — shortbread cookies filled with dulce de leche

Chefs Alma Alcocer and Jeff Martinez serve up some of

and rolled in coconut f lakes.

the city’s best Latin American-inspired seafood. Stop by for lunch, happy hour, dinner, weekend brunch, and

BULLFIGHT

start your visit with a blood-orange margarita and the

4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029

crab and guacamole.

Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamón

ANNIE’S CAFÉ & BAR 319 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 1884 Locally minded American offerings in a charming setting; perfect spot for a decadent downtown brunch.

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218 The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey-and-goat-cheese panna cotta.

BAR CHI SUSHI 206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557 A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

Serrano. The white-brick patio invites you to sip on

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 fondasanmiguel.com Experience Mexico in Austin. From your first step through the doors at Fonda San Miguel, it’s

some sangria and enjoy the bites.

CAFÉ JOSIE 1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 322 9226 Executive chef Todd Havers creates “The Experience” menu every night at Café Josie, which offers guests a prix fixe all-you-can-eat dining experience. The à la

a feast for all your senses. Distinctive Mexican

carte menu is also available, featuring classics such as

cuisine and fine art.

smoked meatloaf and redfish tacos.

CAFÉ NO SÉ 1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 2061 South Congress Hotel’s Café No Sé balances rustic décor and a range of seasonal foods to make it the best

sushi and bar hot spot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends.

place for weekend brunching. The restaurant’s spin on

Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a

the classic avocado toast is a must-try.

variety of sushi rolls under $10.

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V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CRU FOOD & WINE BAR

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

GRIZZELDA’S

238 W. 2nd St. | (512)472 9463

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 1010

105 Tillery St. | (512) 366 5908

Small neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

This charming East Austin spot lies somewhere between

serving unique dishes. Chefs-owners Sarah Heard and

traditional Tex-Mex and regional Mexican recipes, each fused

Nathan Lemley serve thoughtful, locally sourced food with

with a range of f lavors and styles. The attention to detail in

an international twist at reasonable prices. Go early on

each dish shines, from dark mole served over chicken brined

and appreciation.

Tuesdays for $1 oysters.

for 48 hours down to the tortillas made in-house daily.

EASY TIGER

FREEDMEN’S

11410 Century Oaks | (512) 339 9463 CRU’s wildly popular ahi tartare is the perfect complement to any of over 300 selections, 80 premium wines by the glass, or 15 wine f lights. A state-of-the-art wine-preservation system with temperature control ensures optimal taste

709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop upstairs

the f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from

and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local brew

the barbecue to the desserts and even the cocktail

and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with beer

offerings. Pitmaster and chef Evan LeRoy

cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

platessome of the city’s best barbecue on a charming

EL ALMA 1025 Barton Springs Rd. | (512) 609 8923 This chef-driven, authentic Mexican restaurant with unmatched outdoor patio dining stands out as an Austin dining gem. The chic yet relaxed setting is perfect for enjoying delicious specialized drinks outside for the everyday 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. happy hour!

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ 1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881 Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mi, and sweet

outdoor patio.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN

4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100 This upscale-casual Italian spot in the heart of the Rosedale neighborhood serves fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas and incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel budino) alongside locally sourced and seasonally inspired chalkboard specials. Gusto also offers a full bar with craft cocktails, local beer on tap and boutique wines from around the world.

GERALDINE’S

HILLSIDE FARMACY

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt,

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

Geraldine’s creates a unique, fun experience by

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the

combining creative cocktails, shareable plates, and

East Side. Oysters, cheese plates, and nightly dinner

scenic views of Lady Bird Lake. Enjoy live bands

specials are whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

every night of the week as you enjoy executive chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar

HOME SLICE PIZZA

manager Caitlyn Jackson.

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437 For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring com-

GOODALL’S KITCHEN AND BAR

fort and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

1900 Rio Grande St. | (512) 495 1800

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

Housed in the beautiful Hotel Ella, Goodall’s provides modern spins on American classics. Dig into a

EPICERIE

fried-mortadella egg sandwich and pair it a with

2307 Hancock Dr. | (512) 371 6840

cranberry-thyme cocktail.

Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hopping convenience and stocked with classics like the Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam, topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

HOPFIELDS 3110 Guadalupe St. | (512) 537 0467

A café and grocery with both Louisiana and French

A gastropub with French inclinations, offering a beautiful

sensibilities by Thomas Keller–trained chef Sarah

patio and unique cocktails. The beer, wine, and

McIntosh. Lovers of brunch are encouraged to stop in

cocktail options are plentiful and the perfect pairing for

here for a bite on Sundays.

the restaurant’s famed steak frites and moules frites. tribeza.com

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ITALIC

LAS PALOMAS

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

3201 Bee Caves Rd., #122 | (512) 327 9889 |

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger

laspalomasrestaurant.com

presents simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique restaurant

miss the sweet delicacies from pastry chef Mary

and bar offers authentic interior Mexican cuisine in a

Katherine Curren.

sophisticated yet relaxed setting. Enjoy family recipes made

JACOBY’S RESTAURANT & MERCANTILE 3235 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 366 5808 Rooted in a ranch-to-table dining experience, Jacoby’s Restaurant & Mercantile transports you from East Austin to a rustic Southern home nestled in the countryside. The menu features the best dishes Southern cooking has to offer, including beef from Adam Jacoby’s own family brand based in Melvin.

JEFFREY’S 1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584 Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained the execution, top-notch service, and luxurious but welcoming atmosphere that makes it an Austin staple.

JOSEPHINE HOUSE 1601 Waterston Ave. | (512) 477 5584 Rustic Continental fare with an emphasis on fresh, local, and organic ingredients. Like its sister restaurant, Jeffrey’s, Josephine House is another one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in America.” Find a shady spot on the patio and indulge in fresh baked pastries and a coffee.

LENOIR 1807 S. 1st St. | (512) 215 9778 A gorgeous spot to enjoy a luxurious French-inspired prix fixe meal. Almost every ingredient served at Lenoir comes locally sourced from Central Texas, making the unique, seasonal specialties even more enjoyable. Sit in the wine garden for happy hour and enjoy bottles from the top wineproducing regions in the world.

L’OCA D’ORO 1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876 Located in the Mueller development, chef Fiore Tedesco delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy impressive cocktails, wine, and a great craft beer selection.

MANUEL'S 310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042 A local Austin favorite with a reputation for high-quality regional Mexican food, fresh-pressed cocktails, margaritas, and tequilas. Try the Chile Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf shrimp, day boat scallops, and jumbo lump blue crab, or Manuel’s famous mole. Located downtown at the corner of 3rd and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum on Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour deals in town.

LA BARBECUE 1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, serves up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

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OLAMAIE 1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796 Food+Wine magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts. The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy goat chees— caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and order the biscuits. THE PEACHED TORTILLA 5520 Burnet Rd., #100 | (512) 330 4439 This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with friendly staff, fun food, and a playful atmosphere. Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary influences from around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and Southern options. PIEOUS 12005 U.S. 290 West | (512) 394 7041 Unequivocally some of the best pizza Austin has to offer, Pieous brings together the unlikely yet perfect combination of Neapolitan pizza and pastrami, with all dishes made from scratch. Decked out in prosciutto and arugula, the Rocket is a crowd favorite and a must-try. RED ASH ITALIA 303 Colorado St. | (512) 379 2906 Red Ash Italia strikes the perfect balance between high-quality food and enticing ambiance. Located in downtown’s sleek Colorado Tower, this Italian steakhouse is led by an all-star team, including executive chef John Carver. Sit back, relax, and enjoy an exceptional evening. SALTY SOW 1917 Manor Rd. | (512) 391 2337 Salty Sow serves up creative signature drinks, including a Blueberry-Lemon Thyme Smash. The food menu, heavy with sophisticated gastropub fare, is perfect for late-night noshing. SWAY 1417 S. 1st St. | (512) 326 1999 The culinary masterminds behind La Condesa cook up Thai cuisine with a modern twist. An intimate outdoor area, complete with a Thai spirit house, makes for an unforgettable experience.


A L O O K B E H I N D 7…7

A PEEK INTO THE PAST OF THE COMMODORE PERRY ESTATE

1928 marks the year “Commodore” Edgar Perry and his wife, Lutie, moved into their new 10,800-square-foot Mediterranean Revival-style mansion. Designed by renowned Texas architect Henry Bowers Thomson, the mansion was set on nearly 10 acres of lush grounds along Waller Creek in what was then Austin’s northern edge. Having made his fortune as a cotton broker in Europe before World War I, Perry brought his Dallas-born bride to Austin and built the estate with the stated intention of making Austin “a nicer place to live.” In 2001 the estate was entered on the National Register of Historic Places. Over the years, it has served as home to at least seven private schools and hosted countless civic and social events. The estate, now owned by Auberge Resorts Collection, is currently being reenvisioned as an intimate urban oasis, with a commitment to staying true to the property’s heritage as one of Austin's architectural landmarks.

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H I S TO R I C I M AG E S CO U R T E S Y O F T H E CO M M O D O R E P E R R Y E S TAT E

THE SET TING FOR THIS MONTH'S FASHION SHOOT, CIRCA 1928


LONDON GREY RUGS


LIVE ATX We all have passion. And passion springs from inspiration, which begins with your surroundings. That’s what home is. Family. Friends. A sense of place. An amazing view. It’s what makes a space a home – because your home is where you truly LIVE.

5 Austin-Area Locations See More at KuperRealty.com

TRIBEZA April 2018  

The Spring Style Issue No. 200

TRIBEZA April 2018  

The Spring Style Issue No. 200