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MR. ZILKER BARK

AUSTIN’S HUCK FINN

Teen fishing phenom

THE O C TO G E N A R I A N S OF BA RTON SPR I NG S

Four dedicated swimmers

N O. 188 | O U T D O O R S

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CO N T E N T S | F E AT U R E S

APRIL MR. ZILKER BARK A dog’s best friend

P. 52

THE OCTOGENARIANS OF BARTON SPRINGS Their fountain of youth springs eternal

P. 58

AUSTIN’S HUCK FINN He’d rather be fishing

P. 66

HUMANS OF THE GREENBELT: The definitive guide

ON THE COVER:

Alex Hopes (AKA Zilker Bark) and his dog Sid. Photo by Nicole Mlakar.

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Fishing phenom Grant Langmore and an avian companion in Lady Bird Lake.

P H OTO G R A P H B Y M AT T CO N A N T

P. 72


Photography by Alexandra Valenti

CÉLINE DRIES VAN NOTEN CHLOÉ LEMAIRE LOEWE ROSIE ASSOULIN MARNI SIES MARJAN THE ROW ISABEL MARANT MONIQUE PÉAN SAINT LAURENT CO BALENCIAGA PROTAGONIST NAK ARMSTRONG ZERO + MARIA CORNEJO PROENZA SCHOULER ULLA JOHNSON ACNE STUDIOS BROCK COLLECTION RAQUEL ALLEGRA KHAITE FERNANDO JORGE GOLDEN GOOSE TOME ALEXANDER WANG SIMON MILLER PLUS MANY MORE LAMAR • THE MENS SHOP • SOUTH CONGRESS BYGEORGEAUSTIN.COM


CO N T E N T S | DE PA RT M E N TS

F I N D M O R E AT

TRIBEZA.COM

Life + Style

Social Hour p. 20

S T Y LE PRO FI LE p. 78 S T Y LE PICK p. 82

Community + Culture

INSTAGR A M PICK OF THE MONTH From happy hour to healthy eats, head over to iInstagram to catch our favorite spots throughout Austin.

COLUMN: KRISTIN ARMSTRONG p. 31 LOC AL LOVE p. 34 PROFILE p. 36 TRIBEZ A TALK p. 42

78 Food + Thought K AREN ’S PICK p. 86

CONVERSATION p. 88 DINING GUIDE p. 92

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CUR ATING V IBES

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Arts + Happenings ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT C ALENDARS p. 46

We got the inside music scoop behind the hospitality group that brought us Austin favorites like Josephine House, Clark’s, June’s, and more. Check out our conversation with the creative director of McGuire Moorman Hospitality, Ryan Smith, about what goes into crafting the perfect restaurant atmosphere. Hint: It involves a playlist so good, you may not even notice it.

MUSIC PICK p. 47 ART PICK p. 48 EVENT PICK p. 50

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@ TRIBEZ A

A Look Behind !…! p. 96


EDITOR'S LETTER

The Outdoors in Numbers Compiled by Evan Ross

HEY THERE!

10.7

T

hanks for picking up our annual Outdoors issue, my first one as the magazine’s editor. I’m a relatively new Austinite. I moved here about a year ago from Reykjavik, Iceland, but I’ve been a regular visitor since 2009, when I first briefly lived here—and survived that summer of 68 days over 100 ° F—before taking off for a colder place. Coming to this sunny clime from a windy island in the middle of the North Atlantic, I relish spending tons of time outdoors. And aside from the couple of unbearably hot months every year, I’ve always considered Austin an outdoor enthusiast’s dream. We get an average 60 percent sunny days every year, and there are so many beautiful outdoor spaces in which to go and soak up that Vitamin D. To celebrate some of those idylls—Zilker Park, Barton Springs, and Lady Bird Lake among them—we decided to reach out to their regulars: barflies, if you will, of the park, the pool and the lake. We talked to Alex Hopes—a photographer who can be found chasing dogs around with his camera at Zilker Park on most afternoons. We talked to Nancy Richey, Molly Bean, Frank Cooksey, and Lynn Cooksey—four octogenarians who have been regulars at Barton Springs for decades. And, we talked to Grant Langmore—a teen fishing phenom who spends his free time at Lady Bird Lake and has been known to reel in the odd double-digit fish. Finally, we take you to the Greenbelt, with a highly scientific field guide to the regulars found along that eight-mile trail. Full disclosure: last spring, I was, without a doubt, what the author calls a Spotted Slacker, mooning around the woods between freelance gigs. But times change, and I now count myself as one of the migratory types, a nine-to-fiver whose pale coloring indicates an office habitat, with comparatively rare Greenbelt forays. As you peruse April’s pages, may we suggest an al fresco pairing? Why not sample the articles in the gracious shade of a live oak or on the banks of Barton Creek? ‘Tis the season to get thee outdoors!

anna@tribeza.com

PERCENT OF AUSTIN LAND MAINTAINED BY PARKS AND RECREATION

94.6

MILLION DOLLARS IN THE AUSTIN PARKS AND RECREATION BUDGET (WHICH IS 2.6 PERCENT OF THE CITY’S ANNUAL BUDGET)

981

PUBLIC PICNIC TABLES

267

PUBLIC BARBECUE PITS

22

AVERAGE NUMBER OF +100° F DAYS PER YEAR

90

RECORD NUMBER OF +100° F DAYS IN A YEAR, SET IN 2011

112

DEGREES FAHRENHEIT, RECORD HIGH FOR AUSTIN, SET SEPT. 5, 2000

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DEGREES FAHRENHEIT, RECORD LOW FOR AUSTIN, SET JAN. 31, 1949

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PUBLIC DOG PARKS IN AUSTIN

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PUBLIC CRICKET FIELD

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TRIBEZ A AUSTIN CUR ATED

16 YEARS

A P R I L 2 017

N O. 1 8 8

CEO + PUBLISHER

George Elliman

EDITOR

Anna Andersen

ART DIRECTOR

Alexander Wolf

SENIOR EDITOR

Brittani Sonnenberg

ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Anne Bruno

EDITORIAL

COORDINATOR

Hannah Zieschang

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Holly Cowart

COLUMNISTS

Kristin Armstrong Karen Spezia WRITERS

Nicole Beckley Oscar Casares Anna Rachel Rich Erin Russell Derek Van Wagner PHOTOGR APHERS

JAMES ALLEN

Mortgage Loan Officer NMLS ID# 572997

512.657.4343

pncmortgage.com/jamesallen

Miguel Angel Matt Conant Tim Fading Randal Ford Leonid Furmansky Madeline Harper Roger Kisby Knoxy Knox Joe Layton Nicole Mlakar Leah Muse Breezy Ritter Casey Chapman Ross Hayden Spears

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Elizabeth Arnold ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Joanna Steblay

SALES & OPER ATIONS MANAGER

Joe Layton INTERNS

Khortlyn Cole Defne Comlek Henry Davis Andi Lozano Caitlin Moore PRINCIPALS

George Elliman Chuck Sack Vance Sack Michael Torres ILLUSTR ATOR

Heather Sundquist

706A West 34th Street Austin, Texas 78705 ph (512) 474 4711 | fax (512) 474 4715 tribeza.com Founded in March 2001, TRIBEZA is Austin's leading locally-owned arts and culture magazine. Printed by CSI Printing and Mailing Copyright @ 2017 by TRIBEZA. All rights reserved. Reproduction, in whole or in part, without the express written permission of the publisher, is prohibited. TRIBEZA is a proud member of the Austin Chamber of Commerce.

S U B SC R I B E TO TR I B EZ A VISIT TRIB EZ A .COM FOR DE TAIL S


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G O TTES M ANRES ID EN T IAL. C O M / GO T T E SMAN RE S I D EN T I A L R E A L ES TA TE

1603 WESTOVER SOLD

2522 MATTHEWS FOR SALE

12601HETHER Maidenhair Lane 1606 FOR SALE


SOCIAL HOUR YETI FLAGSHIP VIP PARTY YETI opened its doors on February 16 for VIP guests to experience the luxury behind its new flagship store on South Congress. The Austinbased brand settled into its brick-and-mortar shop with live music, a special tour of the space, tasty local BBQ, craft brews and spirits, and a slew of YETI ambassadors and friends.

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STATE OF AYC ANNUAL LUNCHEON

PROJECT BEAUTY AT NEIMAN MARCUS

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On February 18, Neiman Marcus hosted Project Beauty, a runway fashion presentation featuring luxury cosmetic brands and highlighting the season’s must-haves. Ten beauty brands presented their newest products while models showed off the hottest ready-to-wear trends for spring. Vendors included Laura Mercier, Bobbi Brown, Sisley, Dior and more.

YETI FLAGSHIP VIP PARTY: 1. Bennett Ford and Lauren Smith Ford 2 . Monika Seiders & Krystal Thompson 3. Hayden Crider & Mark Seacat STATE OF AYC ANNUAL LUNCHEON: 4 . Gigi Bryant & Benjamin Frederick 5. Kevin Opgenorth, Catalina Berry & Monica Andry 6. Hal Katz & Tricia Katz PROJECT BEAUTY AT NEIMAN MARCUS: 7. Kristen Morado-Garcia & Sonya Evans 8. Carlos Perez, Shahnaaz Islam & Anthony Molin 9. Vivian, Shannon & Ruby Thaver 10. Hira Jethwa & Fatima Puri

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M A D E L I N E H A R P E R A N D J O E L AY TO N

On February 17, Austin Young Chamber (AYC) and its foundation presented the 4th Annual State of AYC Luncheon. The event was planned and produced by young leaders to share a vision for the future of Austin. Featured guests included representatives from University Federal Credit Union, the city’s Small Business Program and Seton.


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SOCIAL HOUR

SITSR X SOCALITY Guests gathered at Handsome in a magically decorated space on February 18 to enjoy dinner and a show, commemorating the launch of the Socality community in Austin. The show was put on by Songs in the Sitting Room, a live music event series, and featured local musicians Thomas Csorba and Lizzy LeBleu.

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TEXAS MEDAL OF ARTS AWARDS On February 22, Texas legends and luminaries including Kenny Rogers, Kris Kristofferson, Renee Elise Goldsberry, Lynn Wyatt, Yolanda Adams, Eloise and John Paul DeJoria, and more were named the 2017 honorees at the Texas Medal of Arts Awards. The Awards were hosted by 2001 honoree and legendary performer Debbie Allen. Special performances and presentations included past honorees The Gatlin Brothers and Ray Benson, GRAMMY © award-winning Conspirare, Dallas Black Dance Theatre, and a once-in-alifetime performance featuring many of the honorees together on stage.

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Donors to ZACH Theatre gathered on March 5 at the home of James Armstrong and Larry Connelly for the annual Great Scotts party. Artistic Director Dave Steakley announced the 85th Anniversary Season which will include “Singin’ in the Rain,” “Sunday in the Park with George” and Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.” The party was sponsored by Kurant Events Catering and Argyle Winery.

SITSR X SOCALITY: 1. Noelle D’Arrigo & Rachel Grimes 2 . Atlas Defay & Jared Malik Royal 3. Celine Muire & Talon Skibsrud TEXAS MEDAL OF ARTS AWARDS: 4. Jane Boone Pelley & Scott Pelley 5. Christine and Louis Messina 6. The Gatlin Brothers 7. Kenny Rogers, Jack Ingram, Jennifer Ransom Rice, Kris Kristofferson, Charlie Sexton & Ray Benson GREAT SCOTTS PARTY PRESENTED BY ZACH THEATRE: 8. Nan Harrington & ZACH Trustee Bruce McCann 9. Dave Steakley & Abe Reynold 10. Mindy Elmer & Eric Cooper

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y M A D E L I N E H A R P E R , M I G U E L A N G E L A N D B R E E Z Y R I T T E R

GREAT SCOTTS PARTY PRESENTED BY ZACH THEATRE


SOCIAL HOUR

CELEBRATION OF LIFE LUNCHEON The 19th Celebration of Life luncheon benefiting the Seton Breast Care Center was hosted by the Zeta Tau Alpha Foundation on March 7. Drawing 650 attendees, the event garnered $300,000 to support comprehensive care for breast health services. Highlights from the luncheon included generous donations from Kendra Scott, as well as “The Art of Fashion,” a presentation by Neiman Marcus.

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ART ON THE EDGE

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FILSON POP-UP AT KITTY COHEN’S On March 11, Filson set up at Kitty Cohen’s for a one day only pop-up shop for SXSW. Guests shopped Filson’s Unfailing Goods and twill and tin cloth bags, part of Filson’s one-of-a-kind Restoration Department bag line.

CELEBRATION OF LIFE LUNCHEON: 1. Sydney Brady & Lauren Barton 2. Sheila Schreiber, Sandra Spalding & Jessica Barnard 3. Kirstin Ross & Stephanie O’Neill ART ON THE EDGE: 4. Zoe Dawkins & Russell Robertson 5. Svitlana and Muso Ato 6. Bowen Wilder & Lucy White FILSON POP-UP AT KITTY COHEN’S: 7. Christian Hall 8. Marjorie Reedholm & Laleh Honar 9. Mindy Gunter & Jeremy Ballard

24 APRIL 2017 |

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y L E A H M U S E , M I G U E L A N G E L A N D B R E E Z Y R I T T E R

Local tastemakers, young professionals, creatives, art-lovers and community leaders gathered on March 11 for the Blanton Museum of Art’s Art on the Edge fundraising event, sponsored by Tribeza and hosted by committee chair A.J. Bingham. Guests previewed the new exhibition, Nina Katchadourian: Curiouser, and sipped signature cocktails. Memphis Train Revue provided tunes for dancing in a glamorous setting created by Mandarin Design Lab and Premiere Events.


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SOCIAL HOUR

GIORGIO ARMANI FILMS OF CITY FRAMES AT SXSW On March 11, the third edition of Films of City Frames was presented at South by Southwest. Films of City Frames was hosted by Roberta Armani and this year’s mentor, Dev Patel. The private screening of five short films was followed by a discussion moderated by fashion critic and curator Angelo Flaccavento. An exclusive cocktail reception hosted by Roberta Armani and Dev Patel followed the event.

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“WHY YOU’RE HERE” WITH 9 BANDED WHISKEY

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“Why You’re Here: A Tribute To Austin’s Music History,” an event sponsored by 9 Banded Whiskey, Omnigon, E360, Qcue, Loop & Tie, Majesty Media, Lonestar, Maudie’s and more took place on March 11. The party was held at Arlyn Studios and featured amazing performances by Playing for Change, I-taweh, Marcia Ball and Billy Joe Shaver, demonstrating why Austin is the live music capital of the world.

35TH ANNUAL AUSTIN MUSIC AWARDS

GIORGIO ARMANI FILMS OF CITY FRAMES AT SXSW: 1. Roberta Armani & Angelo Flaccavento 2. Dev Patel 3. Dana Brunetti “WHY YOU’RE HERE” WITH 9 BANDED WHISKEY: 4. Bertrand Sosa & Ashley Thompson 5. Stephanie Webb & Ophelia Talley 6. Allison Del-Papa & Alexandra Malkin 35TH ANNUAL AUSTIN MUSIC AWARDS: 7. Karen and Joe Draker & Suzanne Court 8. Luren Diamond & Summer Majors 9. Jodi White & J.D. Pendiey

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P H OTO G R A P H S B Y R O G E R K I S B Y A N D L E O N I D F U R M A N S K Y

The Austin Chronicle and SXSW presented the 35th Annual Austin Music Awards on March 12 at ACL Live in partnership with Stratus Properties. This year’s sets included the New Generation Children’s Choir, a Femmes for SIMS set featuring Austin women in music, Fab Freddy 5, Grupo Fantasma, Brownout, Jai Malano, a Texas songwriters set and more. This year’s sponsors were KUTX, Easton Park, Planet K Texas and Arts+Labor. Event proceeds benefitted the SIMS Foundation.


Under a Texas Sky We Invite You to Celebrate Food, Wine and Art

UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum | April 27, 2017

FEATURING

Alcomar • Boiler Nine Bar + Grill • Bullfight • Cannon + Belle • Fara Coffee Fluff Meringues • GoodPop • Juliet Ristorante • Kome Sushi Kitchen Kuneho Lenoir • Maudie’s Tex-Mex • Max’s Wine Dive • Moonshine Bar & Grill • North Italia • Old Thousand • Olive and June • P.F. Chang’s • Rebel Pizza Bar • Roaring Fork • TRACE Truluck’s Seafood, Steak & Crab IN KIND SPONSORS

Austin Catering • Balcones Resources • Exposed by Light Photography • Ilios Lighting • My Event is the Bomb • Texas Disposal Company • Waldo Photos • Westbank Flower Market • Whim Rentals

SPONSORS

ABC Bank • Austin Portfolio Real Estate • Bailey GARDEN PARTY CHAIR Elliott Construction • Carla Umlauf • Frontier Allyson Maxey Bank • Norton Rose Fulbright • Austin Title Garrison Brothers • Heritage Title TICKETS ON SALE Independence Title • Laura & Ricky umlaufsculpture.org/garden-party Matz • Plains Capital Bank • Tito’s Handmade Vodka • Tru Source Labs PROCEEDS USI Insurance • Becky Beaver Charlotte Boyle • Efficient Air Benefiting the UMLAUF Sculpture Garden & Museum Conditioning & Electric education programs and master plan projects Highland Residential Mortgage •Russell Martin


COMMUNITY + CULTURE CULTURAL DISPATCHES FROM AUSTIN’S CREATIVE COMMUNITY

The Pool Barn at Lake Austin Spa Resort. PHOTOGRAPH PROVIDED BY LAKE AUSTIN SPA RESORT

K R I S T I N ' S CO L U M N

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LO C A L LOV E

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PROFILE

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T R I B E Z A TA Ltribeza.com K 42 | APRIL 2017

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Anna M. Lee

REALTORÂŽ, Elite 25sm, Top Producer Austin Office

512.968.6419 cell | anna@moreland.com AnnaMorrisonLee.com 2709 Greenlee Drive

4501MantleDrive.com

3211 Cherry Lane

7024 Cielo Azul Pass


K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Embracing the Rocking Chair Theory By Kristin Armstrong Illustration by Heather Sundquist

M

Y FRIEND TERRA IS THE FEMALE VER-

sion of the Dos Equis man. Seriously, she can do anything. She trekked into California’s backcountry, alone with her infant and toddler, to camp for a week because she felt restless. She can ride mountain bikes and motorcycles as well as any dude. She stopped, mid-hike, to take my kids down a natural waterslide created by a rock crevice, plunging them into a freezing pool below. She sea kayaks (I don’t even want to kayak in a stream). She can make a bonfire and pitch a tent with twinkle lights with her bare hands. She has perfectly sun-streaked blond hair without paying for it. She makes a minivan look like pure sex. She ran the Grand Canyon—rim to rim to rim to rim—in the throes of grief right after her mother died. tribeza.com

| APRIL 2017

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K R I S T I N ' S C O L U M N | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Her garage has more gear than an REI store, and she knows how to use all of it. She once body slammed me out of the path of a coiled rattlesnake when we were trail running, calmly stating that she refused to carry my dying ass down the mountain—but added that she could, if she had to, and I believed her. I’m not really sure why she chooses to be my friend, but I guess I must make her laugh. We run, hike, and drink wine together any chance we get. On one particular run, along a bluff overlooking the Santa Barbara coastline, she shared a theory that changed my life. She calls it the Rocking Chair Theory. Basically, the theory states that we should consider any decision through the lens of being an old lady rocking in a rocking chair on a front porch and think, ‘What story would I want to tell? What path did I take? What adventure did I have? How did I conduct myself when no one was looking? What choice contributes to the most awesome narrative of a lifetime? And even if I chose wrong and totally face planted, what choice can I make next to turn the plot around?’ I love thinking this way, applying little decisions to the big picture. Terra has been talking about embarking on this one adventure ever since I’ve known her— running the Tour du Mont Blanc, roughly 100 miles around the base of Mount Blanc in France, Italy, and Switzerland. About a month or so ago, she decided to follow her dream. Terra was planning to create a serious rocking chair tale. She was making reservations, and she wanted to know who was in. I sat on the fence long enough to get splinters until I finally said yes. So this July, I am running more than 100 miles in six days, at altitude and over rugged terrain. I pictured us with sherpas carrying our luggage from one charming hotel to another.

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I AM EXCITED AND AFRAID, IN EQUAL MEASURE...I’M EXCITED TO SEE WHAT I’M MADE OF, BUT AFRAID OF PUSHING MY LIMITS. I’M AFRAID OF GETTING LOST, BUT EXCITED TO FIND MYSELF.

Alas, no. We are the sherpas, running with our backpacks, staying in huts and hostels along the route. There have been emails flying between our group members talking about all kinds of things I know nothing about—gear lists and training programs for multiday endurance efforts. Someone mentioned practicing running with poles, to help on steep descents. I responded, “In Texas, poles are for fishermen and strippers. Please advise.” I’m sure they wonder about the girl from Austin, and why exactly Terra invited her. I’m going to dust off my French skills in hopes of having something to offer the group besides snarky humor and body odor. I am excited and afraid, in equal measure. I’m afraid of being too slow and getting separated from the group and ending up on an episode of I Shouldn’t Be Alive—or worse, not being on an episode. I am excited to see what I’m made of, but afraid of pushing my limits. I am afraid of getting lost, but excited to find myself. Most of all, I am excited to be off the fence and declare myself all in. When I’m old and rocking on my front porch, I hope to have an amazing story to tell my grandkids about my epic European trek around the mountain. And hopefully I will be 100 miles closer to becoming my own version of a Dos Equis woman.


furrowstudio LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE w w w. f u r r o w s t u d i o . c o m 512.584.8893


L O C A L L OV E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

LOCAL LOVE

SPRINGTIME ME ANS LONGER DAYS AND (MOSTLY ) MODER ATE TEMPER ATURES, MAKING IT THE PERFECT TIME TO GET OUTDOORS AND FLE X YOUR MUSCLES. HERE WE HIGHLIGHT SOME WAYS TO GET YOUR HE ART PUMPING.

HEY PADDLE Want to take paddle boarding to the next level? Head out to Lady Bird Lake for Hey Paddle’s on-the-water classes focused on conditioning, stability, and resistance training. $24 single classes. First class free. HEYPADDLE.COM

By Nicole Beckley

SWIMMING AT PURE AUSTIN Whether you’re training for a triathlon or just want to get some laps in, Pure Austin’s Quarry Lake location offers regular masters’ swimming workouts or day passes to swim on your own in the heated outdoor pool. If you want to make a splash in the lake, sign up for one of the open water races happening this spring. $25 gym day passes. PUREAUSTIN.COM

FULL MOON YOGA Once a month tune up your yoga practice under the full moon. Instructor Charles MacInerney leads the class, which begins as the sun sets, around 7pm. Locations vary. Classes are free and all-ages. YOGATEACHER.COM/YOGA/FULL-MOON-YOGA

FITNESS ON THE PLAZA Head up to the rooftop plaza at Whole Foods on Lamar for free classes from area studios. Yoga and body conditioning classes are offered a few days a week—a great way to try something new. WHOLEFOODSMARKET.COM

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SOCIAL CYCLING Get in gear and hit the streets with a couple hundred other cycling enthusiasts each week during the Thursday night social ride. Cyclists meet at Festival Beach and depart around 8pm, wrapping at an eating or drinking spot. Other free social rides happen throughout the week. SOCIALCYCLINGAUSTIN.ORG/SOCIALRIDES

YOGA AT INFINITE MONKEY THEOREM Need a full body stretch after work? Follow your Savasana with a free glass of wine at Infinite Monkey Theorem. The winery hosts hour-long yoga classes Tuesday and Thursdays at 6:30pm. $15 per class. AUSTIN.THEINFINITEMONKEYTHEOREM.COM

AUSTIN BEER RUN CLUB

TENNIS WORKOUTS AT CASWELL TENNIS CENTER Ace your lunchtime workout with cardio tennis at Caswell Tennis Center. Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from noon to 1pm break a sweat with fun tennis drills. $15 per class. Advanced sign ups recommended. CASWELLTENNISATX.COM

Run a few miles and then knock back a cold one with the Austin Beer Run Club. Every Wednesday night the group leaves from Uncle Billy’s at 6:30pm for a run (about three miles) and then returns for some well-earned food and drinks. AUSTINBEERRUN.CLUB

DANE’S BODY SHOP COMMUNITY WORKOUTS Jump, squat, and flex through your Sunday morning with a free community workout at Dane’s Body Shop. The 9:30am classes combine strength and cardio and meet the first Sunday of the month at the Hyde Park location and the third Sunday at the Manor location. DANESBODYSHOP.COM/SCHEDULE

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

Let it All in

JENNIFER SHERBURN’S CHOREOGR APHY OF R ADICAL RECEPTIVIT Y By Brittani Sonnenberg Photographs by Leah Muse

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T

HE SKY IS BROODING AND OVER-

cast when I sit down for coffee with choreographer Jennifer Sherburn and her producer and creative soul mate, Natalie George. The two twist to the clouds and check phones for weather updates. Sherburn’s latest dance piece in a series of eleven, “Hopfen und Waltz,” opens in three days, in a grove of live oak trees. Sherburn shrugs as a couple of light drops land on her arm. If you’re a choreographer working in unconventional spaces, you adapt to shifting weather patterns with your fingers crossed and a farmer’s chagrin. Sherburn, in fact, spent her very early childhood on a small farm tucked into Fort Worth. “I was constantly outside,” she says. A proud tomboy, Sherburn and her best friend, Antonio, loved nothing more than playing in the dirt. Sherburn’s pockets were always full of worms, which would inevitably find their way onto Antonio’s grandmother’s pristine shag carpet. “I had two brothers, and we loved playing tug of war and roughhousing,” says Sherburn. “Barbies were props for the haunted houses we created.” Dance didn’t capture Sherburn’s imagination until she took a class in high school. For the final choreography project, she stole a smoothie recipe card from her mother’s collection. “The recipe was full of movement instructions: blend, stir, chop. I

applied them to dance and we practiced and performed it in the schoolyard closest to my house.” Over the years, Sherburn has honed this approach—allowing herself to be inspired by whatever object or environment snags her attention, devoting her focus to it, and offering an interpretation full of both play and reverence—to create thrilling, moving, and unconventional work. She revels in unexpected locales and cleverly weaves them into her choreography. Take “Arena,” Sherburn’s first major collaboration with George as a producer. The two knew they wanted to set something on Fair Oaks Farm, a 33-acre ranch in Dripping Springs, but it wasn’t until they met one of the owners, Nancy Fair, a champion dressage rider, that the idea of incorporating a riding arena, and dressage, into the dance struck Sherburn. “Natalie and I were blown away by the Fairs’ dedication to form and practices, and how much they cared for the land everyday,” says Sherburn. “It was dreamy,” adds George. “They welcomed us in; they were incredibly helpful and supportive. Learning about them changed the piece drastically.” Nancy’s husband, Bud, initially treated the project with polite skepticism, says George. “He ate dinner quickly with us, then went to watch TV. But as the work developed, he grew more enthusiastic, bringing extension cords and raking tribeza.com

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

INVITING HOSPITALITY TO BE A DRIVING ETHOS LENDS A HUMILITY AND KINDNESS TO SHERBURN’S DANCE PIECES, WITHOUT COMPROMISING HER SHARP VISION.

the arena with a tractor before the dressage and the dance began.” Sherburn was so taken by the 81-year-old’s expert raking that she incorporated it into the performance, and Fair turned out to be quite the showman, throwing in a couple of extra spins for the audience. While some artists try to forget about the audience while they’re composing, Sherburn and George treat such considerations as a joyful part of the process, meditating on how to heighten audience engagement from the moment they pull into the parking lot. The two women’s respective work experience outside the dance community— Sherburn has spent 20 years in the food industry, initially as a fine dining waitress and later as a training manager at places like Perla’s and Clark’s, while George served as the producing director of Fusebox Festival—has sharpened this expertise. Inviting hospitality to be a driving ethos lends a humility and kindness to Sherburn’s dance pieces, without compromising her sharp vision. For if her integrative philosophy is in part inspired by her early days at a beloved chef ’s restaurant in Hawaii—where regulars, dishwashers, and front and back of house all gathered for blind tastings of the new seasonal menu—her choreography is also influenced by cutting-edge artists like Noémie Lafrance and Ann Hamilton (whose “ONEEVERYONE” is currently on display at

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Dell Medical School). “I love Hamilton’s epic projects, and how they’re never in conventional spaces,” says Sherburn. “Their scale ranges from enormous to the inside of a mouth.” She cites Lafrance’s “Melt” as a favorite dance piece. “Lafrance suspended dancers underneath Brooklyn Bridge at the hottest time of the year, put them in costumes made of honeycomb, and viewers watched them melt in the sun. She turns to spaces for what’s already there.” In her 11:11 series this year, in which Sherburn partners with a different choreographer each month, she encourages her collaborators to stay flexible, and to avoid planning too much before they see the space. How does she find comfort in this uncertainty? “I don’t know if I’m comfortable with anything yet,” she says. “But I know that magical things happen when you don’t try to fit something in.”

O

n a Saturday night, I drive out to Live Oak Brewery, a stone’s throw from the airport, to witness the fifth installation of 11:11. It’s pouring. The audience gathers in the taproom, shaking their heads at the weather and ordering frosty glasses of beer. The idea to partner with Live Oak Brewery emerged from Sherburn’s own romantic partnership with Colin Ferguson, the brewery’s

sales manager. Drinking beer one night in the taproom, Sherburn says she realized the enormous windows facing the brewery would be perfect for staging a dance performance. And that’s how the night begins, as “On Mass,” a fierce, urgent dance piece by Errin Delperdang, is staged in the immense panes. An excerpt from “Together and Apart,” a startlingly intimate and wrenching work by Silva Laukkanen and Tanya Winters, follows outside. The rain heightens the piece’s pathos, as one dancer, in a wheelchair, flies down and swoops around the slick surface of the sidewalk, and her partner drapes the two of them in drenched ochre silk, in alternate gestures of devotion and cruelty reminiscent Pina Bausch’s “Rite of Spring.” Magically, the skies clear for Sherburn’s “Hopfen und Waltz.” The crowd moves to the grove of live oak trees, perfumed with wet wood chips and rainy night air. I take a seat on a blanket in the front, and dancers in summery floral and flirty polka dot and plaid emerge. The next half hour is a heady blend of revelry, Midsummer Night’s Dream, joyful German beer garden, dreamy solo flights on rope swings, and scrambles up, and winged leaps from, wet picnic tables. It is the abandon of children at play, the grace of grown men and women fully embodied, and the shock of humans becoming tornados and clouds, their own weather. Midway through the


“I know that magical things happen when you don’t try to fit something in.” tribeza.com

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P R O F I L E | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E Scenes from “Together and Apart” by Silvia Laukkanen and Tanya Winters and “Hopfen und Walz” by Jennifer Sherburn.

piece, the dancers sit at picnic tables facing the audience, grab two cans of beer, open them, offer one to the audience member directly across from them and clink cans. It’s a subtle, funny surprise, but it also speaks to the essence of Sherburn’s approach, yanking the audience in with a friendly, teasing grin, reminding you that the dance in front of you is not simply other bodies spinning, but your body and soul being coaxed into something gentler, wilder, and freer than how you usually walk around. Catherine Davis’s throbbing original score, the occasional roar of a plane overhead, and the choreography’s lovely, aching tonal swings from solitary flight to partnered grace urge a wellspring of emotions that are as shifting and dramatic as the week’s forecast has been. I am tearing up, then smiling, then sighing, then breathing in deeply, as if I could inhale what all good art also promises you can release: that which we are told to keep tightly wound—hold your tongue, cross your legs, smile for the camera. Sherburn’s tender, comprehensive approach to creating “Hopfen und Waltz”—from consulting with local arborists They Might Be Monkeys on how to take care of the live oaks during the dance, to discussing memories of travel, flight and departure with the dancers, as she created the piece—results in a stunningly and enveloping

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experience that reminds me of similarly generous, insightful works in other mediums: Linklater’s “Boyhood,” Jens Lekman’s playful indie rock, photographer Robert Frank’s “The Americans.” Lucky for Austin, Sherburn will stage six more dances over the next six months, several of which will also take place outside, like May’s performance at Sertodo Copper, and September’s performance at Carson Creek Ranch. A few days after Saturday’s deluge, Sherburn reflects on how the weather influenced “Hopfen und Waltz.” There were the logistical challenges: rearranging audience seating, minimalizing the lighting scheme that George had so carefully designed, adjusting the table-stunt choreography, moving equipment. But the most crucial change, she says, was a group mental preparation, for both the dancers and the audience members. “Everyone adjusted beautifully,” she says. Flexibility is, of course, a fundamental demand of dance as an art form. But the way that Sherburn brings a supple response to each aspect of her choreography, subtly allowing herself to be influenced and inspired by what surrounds her, from airplanes overhead, to the history of German beermaking, to a simple cloak of falling rain, means her work leaps into a territory that makes you feel, for the length of the performance, equally unbound.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCES 11:11:06 April 5–8 @ 8pm Choreographers: Dawn Stoppiello and Jennifer Sherburn

11:11:09 July 5–8 @ 8pm Choreographers: Lisa Anne Kobdish and Jennifer Sherburn

11:11:07

11:11:10

May 10–13 @ 8pm Choreographers: Amy Myers and Jennifer Sherburn

August 9–12 @ 8pm Choreographers: Kelly Hasandras and Jennifer Sherburn

11:11:08 June 7–10 @ 8pm Choreographers: BLiPSWiTCH and Jennifer Sherburn

11:11:11 September 6–9 @ 8pm Choreographers: Rosalyn Nasky and Jennifer Sherburn


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T R I B E Z A TA L K | C O M M U N I T Y + C U LT U R E

TRIBEZ A

TALK

AN INSIDER’S GUIDE TO AUSTIN’S HIDDEN GEMS By Nicole Beckley

Light the Fuse

IN THE TREES In the summer of 2010 Greg McEvilly found himself on the ground floor of a new project, and also, quite literally on the ground. After his brother introduced him to hammock camping, McEvilly took a camping trip with his wife. “Some tree straps that I was using to hang the hammock stretched so much that my hammock was on the ground when I woke up,” McEvilly says. He set about building a better hammock—teaching himself to sew, creating prototypes, and ultimately launching his brand on Kickstarter in 2011. “What started out as a fun experience, really became the catalyst for the big vision of Kammok,” McEvilly says. Focused on creating innovative outdoor gear, in 2016 Kammok opened an office on the east side, featuring a colorful mural of Big Bend’s Santa Elena Canyon, and started partnering with Explore Austin to give back locally. A full retail store is expected this year. KAMMOK.COM

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Where can you expect to see a Latina motorcycle gang making sonic sensations in a parking garage, a high-wattage neon installation, and an opera about Pancho Villa? Now in its 13th year, the Fusebox Festival brings together choreographers, musicians, filmmakers, and visual artists for five days of unique art and experiences. While the festival runs April 12–16, aim to catch one of the performances of “Pancho Villa From a Safe Distance.” Composed by Graham Reynolds and with soaring vocals from tenor Paul Sanchez, it’s an epic musical experience. FUSEBOXFESTIVAL.COM

INNER PEACE In our harried, digital-driven world it can seem hard to carve out the time and space for peace and quiet. Here it helps to think small. That’s what Stacy Thrash did when she opened PeaceBox, a mobile meditation space built out of a shipping container. The 20-foot by eight-foot space holds eight people inside, and the doors can open to accommodate more on sunny days. PeaceBox offers multiple classes each week, and for those looking to dip their toe in the contemplative waters, Thrash recommends Peace 101, a 45-minute guided meditation. PEACEBOX.COM


DRESSING THE PART When it comes to fashion, it might be most personal if you create it yourself. In March Austin designer Mallary Carroll opened Good Company, a boutique featuring her SBJ Austin clothing line. The line’s embrace of natural fibers, like cotton, silk, and cashmere, and its focus on ethical sourcing have made it a hit at shops like By George, and now it gets a space of its own. INSTAGRAM.COM/GOODCOMPANY.SHOP

LAKE AUSTIN SPA AFTER DARK Take a respite from the daily hustle and bustle and slip away for some lakeside tranquility. Lake Austin Spa Resort whisks guests away by water taxi, with pickup points at Walsh Landing and the 360 Bridge. Hotel guests can try out LakeFit classes during their stay. The general public can get a taste of the awardwinning resort at the Aster After Dark events, featuring health and wellness talks. LAKEAUSTIN.COM

Wild Life

“I grew up in northern Michigan and was in nature a lot,” filmmaker Micah Robert Barber explains. “So we were thinking we could tell a story that is set in nature and is an alternative to really technological stories or kids inside and on devices.” That concept transformed into the film “Into the Who Knows!”—an imaginative kids movie that embraces the outdoors. Encouraged by the film producer Elizabeth Avellan to base the production in Austin, Barber’s film shot in area locations, including a Girl Scout Camp on Lake Travis. “We saw so much wildlife there,” Barber says, “Turtles and foxes and eagles and just about everything you could imagine.” Barber, who did his MFA at UT Austin and currently teaches production there, takes “Into the Who Knows!” to the Dallas International Film Festival for its world premiere this month. INTOTHEWHOKNOWS.COM

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ARTS + HAPPENINGS WHERE TO GO AND WHAT TO DO

The Paramount Theatre plays host to the sixth annual Moontower Comedy & Oddity Festival this month. PHOTOGRAPH BY MANDY LEA PHOTO

A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T C A L E N DA R

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ARTS PICK

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C A L E N DA R S | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Entertainment MUSIC RUTHIE FOSTER April 1 Paramount Theatre AUSTIN URBAN MUSIC FESTIVAL April 1 Auditorium Shores BRANDON RHYDER April 1 Brass Hall PANIC! AT THE DISCO April 2 Frank Erwin Center GENERATIONALS April 5 Empire Control Room & Garage PASSENGER April 6 Stubb’s BBQ 2017 EUPHORIA MUSIC FESTIVAL April 7–9 Carson Creek Ranch PATTY GRIFFIN April 8 ACL Live

THE 1975 April 17 & 18 ACL Live

SAVAGE GOLD April 10 Austin Film Society

A FINE AFFAIR April 25 ColdTowne Theater

CHRIS BOTTI April 19 The Long Center

AUSTIN COMEDY SHORT FILM FESTIVAL 2017 April 10 Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline

LA TRAVIATA April 28 The Long Center

BAYSIDE W/ SAY ANYTHING April 19 Emo’s Austin MIRANDA LAMBERT April 20 ACL Live COHEED & CAMBRIA April 25 Stubb’s BBQ PIERCE THE VEIL & SUM 41 April 25 ACL Live TECH N9NE April 26 Emo’s Austin PETER CETERA April 27 Paramount Theatre

FILM

JOJO April 12 Mohawk Austin DIAMANDA GALÁS April 14 Paramount Theatre

PAGNOL—THE MARSEILLES TRILOGY April 2–16 Alamo Drafthouse Ritz

PORTUGAL. THE MAN April 14 ACL Live

MOVIES IN THE PARK: BATMAN RETURNS April 6 Pease Park

CHAIRLIFT April 15 Mohawk Austin

ATTIC FILM FESTIVAL April 7 & 8 Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar

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THE AUSTIN FLY FISHING FILM TOUR April 13 Paramount Theatre MOVIES IN THE PARK: FERNGULLY April 20 Palm Park INDIE MEME FILM FESTIVAL April 20–23 Regal Cinemas Arbor 8

THEATER LISTEN—WITH EARS WIDE OPEN April 1–2, April 6–9 The Long Center GREATER TUNA April 15 The Long Center MOMIX: OPUS CACTUS April 18 The Long Center THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA April 19–21 Bass Concert Hall LUNA April 20–22 Oscar G. Brockett Theatre

MADAME BUTTERFLY April 29 The Long Center

COMEDY ONE WOMAN SEX & THE CITY April 4 Stateside at the Paramount SAM MORRIL April 5–8 Cap City Comedy Club THE 20TH CENTURY & STAY TUNED April 11 ColdTowne Theater SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO: WHY WOULD YOU DO THAT TOUR April 15 Paramount Theatre MOONTOWER COMEDY & ODDITY FESTIVAL April 19–April 22 Various Locations   DUAL REALITY April 21 The Hideout Theatre TOSH.SHOW ON CAMPUS April 29 Frank Erwin Center JIMMY PARDO April 29 The Velveeta Room


CHILDREN PRESCHOOL ART HOUR April 4 Austin Public Library STARRY NIGHTS April 6 Girlstart STEM Center LOVE THAT DOG April 9 Paramount Theatre ASH DASH 5K BUNNY RUN & EASTER EGG HUNT April 15 Hyde Park ELEPHANT AND PIGGIE: WE ARE IN A PLAY Through April 30 ZACH Theatre

OTHER THE WILLIE RUN April 1 Austin American–Statesman TEXAS VEGFEST April 1 Fiesta Gardens 28TH ANNUAL BANDANA BALL April 1 Wild Onion Ranch 16TH ANNUAL LONESTAR ROUND UP April 7 & 8 Travis County Expo Center AUSTIN REGGAE FEST April 14–16 Auditorium Shores YOGA IN THE GALLERIES April 20 Blanton Museum of Art

MOTOGP GRAND PRIX OF THE AMERICAS April 21–23 Circuit of the Americas EARTH DAY ATX April 22 Huston-Tillotson University WEIRD HOMES TOUR April 22 Various Locations MONSTER JAM April 22–23 Frank Erwin Center CAPITOL 10K April 23 Congress Avenue GREYT GATSBY GALA & FUNDRAISER April 27 Waller Ballroom ALTON BROWN LIVE: EAT YOUR SCIENCE April 28 ACL Live AUSTIN FOOD + WINE FESTIVAL April 28–30 Auditorium Shores & Republic Square Park THE COLOR RUN DREAM TOUR April 29 Travis County Exposition Center 54TH ANNUAL EEYORE’S BIRTHDAY PARTY April 29 Pease Park

MUSIC PICK

STANLEY CLARKE BAND By Derek Van Wagner

One World Theatre APRIL 14, EARLY SHOW: 7PM; L ATE SHOW: 9PM

Does the name Stanley Clarke ring any bells? If not, how about Horace Silver, Art Blakey, Dave Brubeck, Chick Corea, Gil Evans, Stan Getz, George Duke, Ronnie Wood or Stewart Copeland? Well Mr. Clarke has played bass with all of them. Unfortunately for most bass players, they typically stand just shy of the spotlight. However Stanley Clarke is an absolute legend. His techniques, phrasing and playing style have been instrumental in the modern sound of the bass (both acoustic and electric) and many notable bassists will admit they lifted something from the Clarke playbook. Aside from Clarke influencing countless bass players over the course of his lifetime, the man still makes quality music. In 2011 he won a Grammy for best contemporary jazz album and continues to add to the 40+ album catalogue he has amassed over the past 50 years. Clarke can do it all, from his solo funk release “School Days” to his modern work with “Return to Forever,” he can weave through any genre as a true master of his craft. For any lover of jazz... or bass frequencies in general, seeing the Stanley Clarke Band within the intimate chambers of the One World Theatre will be something you will never forget. tribeza.com

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A R T S P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Arts

101 SEMESTERS BEYOND THE STUDIO By Erin Russell

Exhibition MARCH 27 – APRIL 27, MEBANE GALLERY IN GOLDSMITH HALL , UNIVERSIT Y OF TEX A S AT AUSTIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

Lecture by Sinclair Black APRIL 24, GOLDSMITH HALL 3.120

ART PICK

Sinclair Black is not simply an architect. A professor at the University of Texas for more than 50 years (101 semesters, if you will), Black has been a visionary in urban planning, an advocate for preservation and a designer of pleasant, liveable streetscapes. Black’s work is often described as “quiet” due to his use of natural materials and respect for an area’s heritage. He has won numerous awards (including the Texas Society of Architects’ Medal of Lifetime Achievement) for his unique foresight and vision, which can be seen in his 1984 campaign to preserve the currently booming Seaholm Power Plant area and his more recent campaign to bury the I-35, tearing down the barrier between East and West Austin. Prior to his architecture firm Black + Vernooy taking up residence on 4th Street, the Warehouse District was composed of, well, desolate warehouses. But thanks to Black’s work with a 10-year Great Streets Master Plan, the area developed into a vibrant destination with charming shops and luxurious accommodations. The retrospective will feature 74 projects, models, and sketches from his travels. Black himself will provide insight into his work during a lecture on April 24. This exhibit is a rare opportunity to delve into the mind of a master planner, and possibly see what the future holds for the city.

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CHALK PAINT 101 WORKSHOP April 1 Silk & Sage Design Studio

LISS LAFLEUR: GREENER PASTURES Through April 20 Women & Their Work

AUSTIN POETRY SLAM April 1 Stateside at the Paramount

WORLD OF WONDERS GALA April 22 Harry Ransom Center

ART CITY AUSTIN April 1 & 2 Palmer Events Center ANNE SIEMS: WEAVING April 1–April 29 Wally Workman Gallery GARTH WEISER: PAINTINGS, 2008–2017 April 2–August 27 The Contemporary Austin MARK LEWIS: GALVESTON April 2–August 27 The Contemporary Austin AUSTIN INTERNATIONAL POETRY FESTIVAL April 6–9 Various Locations SEBASTIÁN: THE GEOMETRY OF SPACE AND TIME April 8–June 25 Mexic-Arte Museum FUSEBOX FESTIVAL April 12–16 Various Locations MALOU FLATO: PAINTINGS April 15–May 20 Davis Gallery

RIMI YANG April 1–30 Russell Collection Fine Art THE NEW CUBAN COLOR: WORKS BY LIMONTA, MEDEROS AND VALDES Through May 6 Flatbed Press MENTORING A MUSE: CHARLES UMLAUF & FARRAH FAWCETT Through August 20 Umlauf Sculpture Garden & Museum


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E V E N T P I C K | A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T

Art SPACES THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: LAGUNA GLORIA 3809 W. 35th St. (512) 458 8191 Driscoll Villa hours: Tu–W 12-4, Th-Su 10–4 Grounds hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 10–5 thecontemporaryaustin.org THE CONTEMPORARY AUSTIN: JONES CENTER

EVENT PICK

LIGHTEN UP! MOONTOWER SPOTLIGHTS COMEDY LUMINARIES By Anna Rachel Rich

Moontower Comedy & Oddity Festival APRIL 19 – 22

On any given night, absurdity wafts out of local bars, clubs and theaters as comics sling self-satirizing bits and precisely honed jokes at dependably liberal audiences. It’s no secret that Austin’s anything-goes spirit creates fertile comedic ground year round. But if you haven’t heard, April is humor harvest time as the comedy world’s cream of the crop serves up a smorgasbord of stand-up, sketch, improv and musical entertainment. From April 19 to 22, Austin’s collective grin will widen while resounding guttural chuckles signal the presence of the Paramount Theatre’s sixth annual Moontower Comedy & Oddity Festival. There will be performances by more than 100 comics, including national headliners, such as Ali Wong, Patton Oswalt, Chris Hardwick and Colin Quinn, who will inevitably ignore taboos and toss out punchlines at eight downtown venues. Live podcast tapings such as My Favorite Murder and Guys We F@#ked, along with events featuring Ralphie May and Jim Gaffigan offer audiences a buffet of all things hilarious. Whether you have a penchant for the irreverent or a hankering for the hysterical, seasoned heavy-hitters, up-and-comers and Austinbased talent will be sure to keep you amused.

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700 Congress Ave. (512) 453 5312 Hours: W 12-11, Th-Sa 12-9, Su 12-5 thecontemporaryaustin.org BLANTON MUSEUM OF ART 200 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 471 7324 Hours: Tu– F 10–5, Sa 11–5, Su 1–5 blantonmuseum.org THE BULLOCK TEXAS STATE HISTORY MUSEUM 1800 Congress Ave. (512) 936 8746 Hours: M–Sa 9–5, Su 12–5 thestoryoftexas.com ELISABET NEY MUSEUM 304 E. 44th St. (512) 458 2255 Hours: W–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 ci.austin.tx.us/elisabetney FRENCH LEGATION MUSEUM 802 San Marcos St. (512) 472 8180 Hours: Tu–Su 1–5 frenchlegationmuseum.org

GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER MUSEUM 1165 Angelina St. (512) 974 4926 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–4 ci.austin.tx.us/carver HARRY RANSOM CENTER 300 E. 21st St. (512) 471 8944 Hours: Tu–W 10–5, Th 10–7, F 10–5, Sa–Su 12–5 hrc.utexas.edu LBJ LIBRARY AND MUSEUM 2313 Red River St. (512) 721 0200 Hours: M–Su 9–5 lbjlibrary.org MEXIC–ARTE MUSEUM 419 Congress Ave. (512) 480 9373 Hours: M–Th 10–6, F–Sa 10–5, Su 12–5 mexic–artemuseum.org O. HENRY MUSEUM 409 E. 5th St. (512) 472 1903 Hours: W–Su 12–5 THINKERY AUSTIN 1830 Simond Ave Hours: T-Fri 10-5, Sa-Su 10-6 thinkeryaustin.org UMLAUF SCULPTURE GARDEN & MUSEUM 605 Robert E. Lee Rd. (512) 445 5582 Hours: T-Fri 10-4, Sa-Su 12-4 umlaufsculpture.org

DAV I S C R O S S P H OTO G R A P H B Y M A N DY L E A P H OTO ; J A N E A N E G A R O FA LO P H OTO G R A P H B Y R U S T I N G U D I M

MUSEUMS


A RT S & E N T E RTA I N M E N T | M U S E U M S & G A L L E R I E S

GALLERIES 78704 GALLERY 1400 South Congress (512) 708 4678 Hours: M–F 8-5 78704.gallery ADAMS GALLERIES OF AUSTIN 900 RR 620 S. Unit B110 (512) 243 7429 Hours: T–Sa 10–6 adamsgalleriesaustin.com ART AT THE DEN 317 W. 3rd St. (512) 222 3364 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-6, Su 12-5 artattheden.com ART ON 5TH 3005 S. Lamar Blvd. (512) 481 1111 Hours: M–Sa 10–6 arton5th.com ARTWORKS GALLERY 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 472 1550 Hours: M–Sa 10–5 artworksaustin.com AUSTIN GALLERIES 5804 Lookout Mountain Dr. (512) 495 9363 By Appt. Only austingalleries.com AUSTIN ART GARAGE 2200 S. Lamar Blvd., Ste. J (512) 351-5934 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 austinartgarage.com AUSTIN ART SPACE GALLERY AND STUDIOS 7739 North Cross Dr., Ste. Q (512) 771 2868 Hours: F–Sa 11–6 austinartspace.com

BIG MEDIUM GALLERY AT BOLM 5305 Bolm Rd., #12 (512) 939 6665 Tu-Sa 12-6 bigmedium.org CAMIBAart 2832 E. MLK. Jr. Blvd. Ste. 111 (512) 937 5921 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 camibaart.com CAPITAL FINE ART 1214 W. 6th St. (512) 628 1214 Hours: M–Sa 10-5 capitalfineart.com CO-LAB PROJECTS: PROJECT SPACE 613 Allen St. (512) 300 8217 By event and appt only co-labprojects.org

FIRST ACCESS GALLERY 2324 S. Lamar Blvd (512) 428 4782 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-7, Su 12-5 firstaccess.co/gallery

LA PEÑA 227 Congress Ave., #300 (512) 477 6007 Hours: M–F 8-5, Sa 8-3 lapena–austin.org

ROI JAMES 3620 Bee Cave Rd., Ste. C (512) 970 3471 By appointment only roijames.com

FLATBED PRESS 2830 E. MLK Jr. Blvd. (512) 477 9328 Hours: M–F 10-5, Sa 10-3 flatbedpress.com

LINK & PIN 2235 E. 6th, Ste. 102 (512) 900 8952 Hours: Sa-Su, 11-4 linkpinart.com

FLUENT COLLABORATIVE 502 W. 33rd St. (512) 453 3199 By appointment only fluentcollab.org

LORA REYNOLDS GALLERY 360 Nueces St., #50 (512) 215 4965 Hours: W–Sa 11-6 lorareynolds.com

RUSSELL COLLECTION FINE ART 1137 W. 6th St. (512) 478 4440 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–6 russell–collection.com

GALLERY 702 702 San Antonio St. (737) 703 5632 Hours: Tu–Su 10-6 gallery702austin.com

DAVIS GALLERY 837 W. 12th St. (512) 477 4929 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 10–4 davisgalleryaustin.com

GALLERY BLACK LAGOON 4301-A Guadalupe St. (512) 371 8838 Hours: Sa 1-5 galleryblacklagoon.com

DIMENSION GALLERY SCULPTURE AND 3D ART 979 Springdale, Ste. 99 (512) 479 9941 dimensiongallery.org

GALLERY SHOAL CREEK 2832 MLK Jr. Blvd. #3 (512) 454 6671 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12–5 galleryshoalcreek.com

DOUGHERTY ARTS CENTER 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4000 Hours: M-Th 10-9, F 10-5:30, Sa 10-2 austintexas.gov/department/ dougherty-arts-center

GRAYDUCK GALLERY 2213 E. Cesar Chavez Austin, TX 78702 (512) 826 5334 Hours: Th -Sa 11-6, Su 12-5 grayduckgallery.com

EAST SIDE GLASS STUDIO 3401 E. 4th St. (512) 815 2569 Hours: Tu-Sa By appt. only eastsideglassstudio.com FAREWELL BOOKS 913 E. Cesar Chavez St. (512) 473 2665 Hours: M-Sa 12–8, Su 12–7 farewellbookstore.com

JULIA C. BUTRIDGE GALLERY 1110 Barton Springs Rd. (512) 974 4025 Hours: M–Th 10–9, F 10–5:30, Sa 10–2 austintexas.gov/department/ doughertygallery

LOTUS GALLERY 1009 W. 6th St., #101 (512) 474 1700 Hours: M–Sa 10-6 lotusasianart.com MASS GALLERY 507 Calles St. (512) 535 4946 Hours: F 5-8, Sa-Su 12-5 massgallery.org MODERN ROCKS GALLERY 916 Springdale Rd. #103 (512) 524 1488 Hours: Tu - Sa, 11- 6 modernrocksgallery.com MONDO GALLERY 4115 Guadalupe St. Hours: Tu - Sa, 12- 6 mondotees.com OLD BAKERY & EMPORIUM 1006 Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: T–Sa 9–4 austintexas.gov/obemporium PUMP PROJECT ART COMPLEX 702 Shady Ln. (512) 351 8571 pumpproject.org

SPACE 12 3121 E. 12th St. (512) 524 7128 T-F 10-5 space12.org STEPHEN L. CLARK GALLERY 1101 W. 6th St. (512) 477 0828 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–4 stephenlclarkgallery.com STUDIO 10 1011 West Lynn (512) 236 1333 Hours: Tu–Sa 11–5 studiotenarts.com VISUAL ARTS CENTER 2300 Trinity St. (512) 232 2348 Hours: Tu–F 10–5, Sa 12-5 utvac.org WALLY WORKMAN GALLERY 1202 W. 6th St. (512) 472 7428 Hours: Tu–Sa 10–5 wallyworkman.com WOMEN & THEIR WORK 1710 Lavaca St. (512) 477 1064 Hours: M–F 10–6, Sa 12–5 womenandtheirwork.org YARD DOG 1510 S. Congress Ave. (512) 912 1613 Hours: M–F 11–5, Sa 11–6, Su 12–5 yarddog.com

FREDERICKSBURG AGAVE GALLERY 208 E. San Antonio St. (830) 990 1727 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 agavegallery.com ARTISANS AT ROCKY HILL 234 W. Main St. (830) 990 8160 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 11-3 artisansatrockyhill.com FREDERICKSBURG ART GALLERY 314 E. Main St. (830) 990 2707 Hours: M-Sa 10-5:30, Su 12-5 fbartgallery.com INSIGHT GALLERY 214 W. Main St. (830) 997 9920 Hours: Tu-Sa 10-5:30 insightgallery.com LARRY JACKSON ANTIQUES & ART GALLERY 209 S. Llano (830) 997 0073 Hours: M-F 9:30-5, Sa 10-5 larryjacksonantiques.com THE GALLERY AT VAUDEVILLE 230 E. Main St. (830) 992 3234 Hours: M 8-6, W-F 8-6, Sa 8-9, Su 8-5 vaudeville-living.com WHISTLE PIK 425 E. Main St. (830) 990 8151 Hours: M-Sa 10-5 whistlepik.com

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Mr. Zilker Bark A Man About the Park BY ANNA ANDERSEN PHOTOGRAPHS BY NICOLE MLAKAR

WHEN ALEX HOPES MOVED TO AUSTIN IN 2012, IT WAS ON A WHIM.

He had never visited, he didn’t have a job lined up, he didn’t know anybody who lived here, and he spent the first couple weeks crashing on a couch that belonged to a friend of a friend. Five years later, as we walk around Zilker Park, it’s difficult to imagine that Hopes was ever an unfamiliar face. Everyone seems to know who he is or has at least heard of Zilker Bark, the wildly popular Instagram account that he manages. But the story behind Zilker Bark begins in Omaha, Nebraska, before Hopes moved to Austin, when he adopted a six-week-old beagle-mix he calls Sid. “I wouldn’t be where I am today if I hadn’t gotten Sid, and it was total happenstance,” Hopes says. “Somebody messaged me one day in Omaha and was like, ‘Hey, I know you’re looking for a dog. I have a dog at my work. Somebody can’t keep him because of a lease.’”

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Photographer Alex Hopes, AKA the Zilker Bark guy.


Alex Hopes spends 25–30 hours per week at Zilker Park taking photos of dogs for his Zilker Bark Instagram account, which has more than 82K followers.

Although Hopes says he wasn’t looking for a dog, he wound up taking him home that day for fifty bucks. As pet owners do, Hopes quickly began documenting everything Sid did and, in the process, discovered a love for photography. “I had a live model to practice on that wouldn’t say no and wouldn’t tell me I was taking bad pictures,” Hopes says, “and he’s really good at posing for a treat, which made it really easy for me.” All that practice came in handy when Hopes grew tired of waiting tables at Bess Bistro, the first job he took after making his move to Austin. “I felt like I wasn’t pushing myself, so I quit my job, bought a camera I couldn't afford, and put myself in a situation where I would either fail or I would figure it out,” Hopes says. “I wouldn’t have called myself a photographer at that point, but I was decent at it, and I was also good with social media, so I started a business where I could pair the two.” With his business doing well in 2014, Hopes made plans to move to Croatia, where he figured he could continue to do the same kind of work. “I thought, I’m going to move to the most beautiful place in the world and do this,” he says. “Croatia has a super low cost of living, and I found a

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two-bedroom place for like 200 dollars a month. There were a lot of reasons why it made sense.” But none of it panned out. The day Hopes sold nearly everything he owned and loaded his car up with his remaining belongings, Sid was hit by a car. “It was the most traumatic thing ever,” Hopes says. “I found him in the middle of the road. He had released his bowels. He was bleeding out of his mouth, and he couldn’t move.” A stranger pulled over and offered to drive them to an emergency hospital where Sid went on to have two major surgeries. He had four fractured ribs, a punctured lung, a herniated diaphragm, and his spleen was sliced in half. To raise money for the medical bills, Hopes started a GoFundMe campaign and Sid’s followers raised 10,000 dollars for him in two days. Remarkably, Sid recovered and was back to his old self in a couple of weeks. At that point, as they no longer had a place to live, Hopes decided to hit the road, and the two of them drove 15,000 miles around the country for eight months, living out of his car and camping when they could. “When we got back to Austin,” Hopes says, “I had burned through every


Engaging Dogs in Philanthropy Before Hopes shifted his focus to Zilker Bark, he says he always imagined using Sid’s fame to bring attention to good causes. “My thought was to have Sid be the face of dogs in Austin so that I could use his brand to bring attention to nonprofit efforts,” Hopes says, “and that’s pretty much what I’ve done with Zilker Bark.” For past two years, Hopes has raised money for Austin Pets Alive through his annual Valentine’s Day photo shoot in front of the I Love You So Much mural at Jo’s Coffee. This year, he photographed nine dogs every ten minutes, raising $9,000 in three hours. For the first time, this year, he also put on a benefit event at Zilker Park called 10k for APA, raising another $10,000 in 12 hours. Still, Hopes dreams of doing more. One day, for example, he would like Sid, as Dog Mayor, to shut down the streets of Austin and lead a dog march for charity. “It would be like the Gorilla Run, but with all these dogs in these cute little costumes,” he says, smiling at the thought of it. “So that’s the direction I’d like to go in, to one day be hosting an event in which dogs in costumes are marching through the city, raising money for charity.”

This page: Photographs by Zilker Bark

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That’s a dapper dog right there.

Austin, You Have a Dog Mayor…His Name is Sid

“He’s the dog I shouldn’t have gotten, but I don’t know where I’d be without him.” 56 APRIL 2017 |

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Sid, better known as Sid the Pizza Dog, held a slice of pizza in his mouth for the duration of a four-second video that broke the internet in 2015. His social media following grew exponentially, he starred in a Domino’s commercial, and Miley Cyrus even photoshopped a picture of herself riding the hotdog that he held in his mouth for another food-related stunt. Wanting to put his newfound celebrity status to good use, the basset-beagle-corgi-lab mix decided later that year to run for Dog Mayor of Austin. Although he ran unopposed and there was never an official election, he had an appropriate suit made for the occasion and someone from the (human) Mayor’s Office sent him a letter stating that Mayor Steve Adler wanted to recognize him. Sid hasn’t been in any more contact with his human counterpart, but in his new role he has since been asked to make a variety of mayoral appearances. He’s thrown out the first pitch for The Round Rock Express, he’s dropped the puck for the Texas Stars, and he’s going to do some work for the PGA tour in Austin later this month. But, of course, he still spends most afternoons at Zilker Park, being sure to stay connected to his local community, interacting with other dogs and sharing a picnic with anybody who is willing. In case you would like to reach Sid and request an appearance, his email address is myregalbeagle@gmail.com. As he’s more social media savvy than your average mayor, you might also follow him on Instagram (@myregalbeagle) and Facebook (facebook.com/myregalbeagle).


penny that I had saved for my trip. I was starting back up again, so I decided to put on an art show with the photos from my trip and I published a children’s book about Sid, called Sidventures. Well, three or four days before the show, Sid went viral for his pizza dog video. The book sold out immediately, and he got all sorts of publicity.” Coincidentally, that was about the time that Hopes started Zilker Bark. “I had built Sid’s Instagram following and I enjoyed doing it,” he says, “but I was starting to burn out of content. Creating concepts for one dog is a lot of work, especially when it’s only valued for six to ten hours. So I thought, ‘I love photography, and I love taking photos of dogs. I’ll take photos of dogs at Zilker Park.’” After eight months of coming out to Zilker Park, he asked his girlfriend, “Do you think anyone would pay for dog sessions?” Although he was skeptical, his girlfriend was confident that people would do it. And, she was right. Since Hopes did his first session in December 2015, he’s done 450 sessions, and he currently has 100 dogs on a waitlist, unable to keep up with the demand. After all, he also spends 25 to 30 hours at Zilker Park each week,

taking photos of dogs for his Zilker Bark Instagram account, which has more than 82K followers at this point. “It’s been amazing to be part of this community, getting to know all the people and their dogs. I don’t know all of the people’s names, but I can tell you most of the dogs’ names,” Hopes says. “Sometimes, I just sit back and I think, God, it’s so crazy how this came to be. You know, I was constantly living in Sid’s shadow because he was internet famous and I was known as the guy with the famous dog. But now Zilker Bark has become its own thing.” And, almost on cue, a group of star-struck fans make their way over to him and ask, “Is that your dog? Are you Zilker Bark? Do you get to do this for a living?” He nods his head, smiles, and says yes, yes he does. “You know, when I first moved to Austin, I came to Zilker and it blew my mind,” Hopes says, just before we part ways. “I had no idea that something this beautiful and open existed. There were people playing games and there were people with dogs. It was my personality in a nutshell—being outside, being active, playing with dogs. And, in a city that has eighty percent sunny days? It just validated my move to Austin.”


THE OCTOGENARIANS OF BARTON SPRINGS

Lifetime passes seem like the stuff of Willy Wonka Golden Tickets: too good to be true. But if you’re an octogenarian with a proven obsession with Barton Springs, Austin’s City Council wants to keep you doing you—for free. ¶ Lifetime passes to the Springs began in 1960, when Mayor Tom Miller gave Charles Morrison what might count as the best 85th birthday present ever, along with this super-sweet, adorably formal note: “NOW, THEREFORE, I, Tom Miller, Mayor, and we, members of the City Council of the City of Austin, do hereby honor Charles W. Morrison on this, the twenty-fifth day of August, 1960, being his eighty-fifth birthday, by awarding him the lifetime privilege of swimming in Barton Springs free of charge and urge that he continue his daily swims to maintain his youthful and zestful enjoyment of life.” ¶ Hey, we could all use a little help in maintaining a “youthful and zestful enjoyment of life.” Not to mention birthday presents from the mayor. Since Mr. Morrison, approximately 30 devotees have been awarded lifetime passes, including the following wonderful folks who agreed to share their love for the pool with us. BY ANNA ANDERSEN & ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY RANDAL FORD

NANCY M. RICHEY, AGE 84 EDITOR OF THE DAILY TEXAN, 1956–57

Moving to Stratford Drive in the summer of 1968 turned me into a swimmer. Barton Springs was just down the street, and soon I began taking our two young sons—Crispin, then four, and David, not yet a year, down there. I would sit on the rock ledge in the shallow end while they played in the water. Gradually over the summers as they got older I would swim just a little way away, then a little farther—and one day I surprised myself by swimming to the east dam. Then one evening at supper toward the end of Crispin’s first-grade year I said, “I think it would be nice to swim really early in the morning, but I’d have to have someone to go with me.” Seven-year-old Crispin gave me an “if that’s all it takes” look and said, “I’d do that.” So the next morning we took a bottle of hot tea with us, and he sat on the steps in his yellow-and-or-

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ange polka-dot robe, watching me. He did that for about ten days and then unceremoniously quit; he got me started. One of those early mornings I saw Sandra Yarne there, which led to our calling each other at five in the morning and meeting at the pool to swim for years. That was only the first of the great friendships formed over the years in that special place. Getting down here is a new act of will every day, but I always know I’ll be glad I did. To me, the water is magic. I come even when it’s cold, when there may only be about four people in the pool. Once in the late nineties I was the only person in the pool when a Statesman photographer took a picture on a 29-degree day. The cutline read: “... Elsewhere in Austin folks went sledding.”


FRANK C. COOKSEY, AGE 83

MAYOR OF AUSTIN, 1985–1988; FORMER PRESIDENT OF SAVE BARTON SPRINGS ASSOCIATION

I started swimming here at about the age of seven. In grade school I was very interested in the single-cell protozoa that live in the springs. I actually wrote a paper about it for school called “One Celled Animals in the Water at Barton Springs,” and I won a prize at the Junior Academy of Science state competition! That was pretty exciting and my family was proud, I believe. My routine here has varied over the years. When I was Special Assistant to the Texas Attorney General, I’d come down during my lunch hour and do laps. There were also many years when my regular Sunday routine after church was to go downtown to buy the New York Times at Watson’s on Congress—that was before they delivered it to you at home—and I’d take the paper to the springs and read and swim.

My wife and I have always been involved in efforts to protect the springs and the Edwards Aquifer, to keep the water clean for everyone. Before I was mayor, I was on three different task forces on water quality issues; then, when I was in office, we passed a comprehensive watershed ordinance. Later, when I was not mayor, I testified at the famous all-night city council meeting. It was really something. People have to speak up and do what they can. They sure did that night and I’m glad. I feel lucky to still be swimming here. It’s a special place, not just for me but for so many people. The water is a constant 68 degrees, so in winter, it’s not the water but the breeze that gets you. This is pretty much what I hope heaven looks like. tribeza.com

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LYNN C. COOKSEY, AGE 81

RETIRED EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE INTERNATIONAL HOSPITALITY COUNCIL OF AUSTIN (NOW GLOBAL AUSTIN); PAST PRESIDENT OF THE AUSTIN HISTORY CENTER ASSOCIATION BOARD

I probably came here for the first time when I was a freshman at UT, but I didn’t swim regularly till I retired about eight years ago. That’s when I got really serious about it. I swam daily for about an hour starting at 7 a.m. You could say that’s when I got addicted to swimming at Barton Springs Pool—I mean that in a good way! Whenever we have visitors come to Austin, we bring them here because, as we like to say, this is the “real Austin.” It’s the heart of our city. People tell us all the time that they’ve never seen anything like it. I’ve brought people from all over the world here. In lots of countries, you know, people don’t necessarily have access to clean water or get to see anything like this, so everyone understands about Barton Springs and they see

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why we care so much about protecting it. Years ago, we had a student staying with us from Saudi Arabia. Once we introduced him to this place, he came almost every day! I know many students from around the globe who say some of their best memories in the U.S. are from right here at Barton Springs. I still go with my friend Anne Wheat early in the morning. Sometimes in winter we may wait till midday, when the sun is out and it’s a little warmer. When we’re here early in the morning and that sun rises, you know, it’s really something. And hardly anyone is here, either. You just have to get in without missing a beat. Every year, this is where I come on birthday, which happens to be the longest day of the year. On June 21, this is where you’ll find me!


MOLLY BEAN, AGE 81 RETIRED ATTORNEY

After my husband retired as an army dentist, we moved to Austin and I went to law school. I graduated in 1982 and opened a practice in 1983, which is also when I started swimming at Barton Springs. I knew how to swim, but I really had to teach myself to swim in this cold water. Now, it’s addictive. In the summer, I come about five days a week, as early as possible. In the winter, I come when it’s warm, if it’s at least in the seventies. I always swim for 30 minutes. I used to be able to do a half-mile in 30 minutes, but several years ago I realized it was taking me longer to do a half-mile. So, I am not a half-mile swimmer, I’m a 30-minute swimmer. To me, it’s like a meditation every day I go. I do not float, so I have to stay active when I’m in the water. When I’m finished with my swim, I spend time outside of the pool chat-

ting with people. I’ve established some firm friendships down here. I love walking over to the shallow end and looking over the fence to the stream. There used to not be a fence there, so I could walk down to where a good friend of mine meditated every day for a long time. She was actually joined by big birds, like the great blue heron. They got so used to seeing her that they would just land near her and do their thing close by. She felt like they were visiting with her. After you’ve devoted yourself to the springs like I have, it’s like being on another planet or escaping into another reality. I guess that’s the best way to describe it, like I’m in another world. Sometimes I linger there even if I don’t have anybody to talk to. It’s hard to pull myself away. tribeza.com

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Austin’s

Huckleberry Finn Teen fishing phenom Grant Langmore’s love for L ady Bird Lake runs deep BY ANNE BRUNO PHOTOGRAPHS BY MATT CONANT

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The face of the water, in time, became a wonderful book—a book that was a dead language to the uneducated passenger, but which told its mind to me without reserve, delivering its most cherished secrets as clearly as if it uttered them with a voice. And it was not a book to be read once and thrown aside, for it had a new story to tell everyday. — MARK TWAIN

W

hile hardly Twain's mighty Mississippi, Lady Bird Lake has her own cher ished secrets. To those willing to commune with her, this lake born of a river also tells a different story each day. One record-setting Austin teenager has listened intently for years, and now has a few stories of his own. I meet Grant Langmore one week shy of his 15th birthday, after school at one of his regular spots on the lake. He's been fishing, he tells me, since he was about five. "My mom's dad got me started with a cane pole, like a lot of people start," he explains, his kind eyes somehow managing to focus on both the water and me while we talk. “I pretty much liked fishing from the beginning.” Lean and likely approaching a growth spurt, Langmore looks like a regular high school freshman with a side-swept haircut, but he sounds more like a seasoned guide, the kind you find on a firstclass, bucket-list type of fishing expedition. I tell Langmore that I love the water and that I’ve fished. Once. A long time ago. He nods his head; no judgment, and searches for words that will explain to a novice what feels as natural to him as breathing and as exciting as winning the lottery. "Basically, you're matching the hatch,” he says. “It's all about what and how you present the lure to the fish. You’re imitating whatever the fish you want to catch is eating, figuring out what the bait-

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fish look like and how they move." Acknowledging that both skill and luck are involved in fishing, Langmore says it’s critical to critique every line cast. "The thing is," he instructs, "these fish are super elusive, but they will tell you what you need to know: How aggressively are they biting? At what? What patterns are you noticing about their behavior at different times of the year? What temperature is the water? Are they more in sun or shade? What's the depth? There's just a lot of factors to take in but, like I said, the fish'll tell you every time." A familiar sight to regulars on Lady Bird Lake and its walking trail, Langmore exploded onto the record books on Monday, December 7, 2015. As the corroborated story goes —corroborated, because facts matter a lot with fishing stories — Langmore, an eighth-grader at the time, was fishing after school off the dock at the Texas Rowing Center with his friend, Augie Gabbay. Finishing up, Langmore made one long, last cast parallel to the dock. He felt something bite and guessed it was big. But until he'd gotten it to the dock, he didn't know the largemouth bass he'd reeled in was a whopping 27-inch long, 13-and-a-halfpounder. That weight beat the existing record for the lake by a remarkable half-pound. "The thing is, once you get anywhere past nine pounds, every ounce is actually a really big deal," Langmore explains. "So, yeah, 13.5 is a very, very big fish. My friends and I fish for largemouth bass and we're about quality, not quantity. And, of course, it's all catch and release because that's


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“I GUESS FISHING FOR ME AND MY FRIENDS IS LIKE WHAT VIDEO GAMES ARE FOR SOME PEOPLE. BUT THIS IS OUTSIDE, ON THE WATER, AND IT’S SO MUCH BETTER.”

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really important for conservation efforts, and respect for the sport and the fish." Langmore and his friends prefer to use lures called swimbaits, which can be as long as 10 inches and weigh no less than two ounces. According to Langmore, swimbaits have serious following power. "To the fish, swimbaits are like aliens in the water. These bass, you know, they're curious by nature and the older ones have seen a lot," he tells me with authority. "Fishing with swimbaits began on the west coast and it's starting to catch on here. If you want to learn more about it," he offers, "there's all kinds of stuff on YouTube." Indeed, there is. What Langmore doesn't mention is that he's frequently the featured guest fisherman on some of the most popular YouTube fishing channels with half a million followers. To find out just how big of a deal it is for a 13-year-old kid to catch a double-digit large-

mouth bass, I visit Jay McBride at the fishing department of McBride's Guns. I tell him that when asked about his go-to source for the best fishing advice, Langmore didn't skip a beat in naming McBride. Not exactly blushing but close, it's obvious Langmore's Obi-Wan Kenobi of fishing is genuinely flattered. As we chat over a glass counter filled with colorful reels, McBride pulls a dog-eared clipping from a stack of brochures on fishing gear. While the well-worn paper attests to the popularity of the story on Langmore, nothing can dull the unmistakable expression of shock on the kid’s face as he holds a humongous bass with both hands. "For most people—of any age, myself included—catching a five-pound largemouth bass is something you'll tell everybody about for years,” McBride says. “If I had to say one thing about Grant, it's his passion for just getting out there and learning by doing that's amazing. He and his friends, they're taking it to a new level. The focus and sportsmanship are very unusual, especially for that age." McBride, whose voice betrays more than a little pride, goes on to tell me what happened after Langmore’s buddy took that photo. To qualify for an official Catch and Release record, he explains, Langmore had to contain his excitement long enough to comply with two of three specific rules set forth by Texas Parks & Wildlife. He quickly flagged down a rower to act as witness for the weighing of the fish with the scale in Langmore's tackle box; then, a picture of the fish was taken next to a ruler to verify its length. After carefully getting his history-making catch from the dock back into the water where it belonged, one step remained. The next day, Langmore's longest-standing fishing partner, his father, John, drove the scale used to weigh the fish to a scale shop in Bastrop where it was certified. It was official. The catch broke multiple records and earned Langmore a Texas Parks & Wildlife Big Fish Award. Given how rare it is for fishermen to catch one double-digit fish in their lifetime, people were


When the Quirky Filmmaker Met the Fishing Phenom

Opposite: Fishing buddies Grant Langmore, Will Sunby, and Charlie Lewis are a regular sight on— and sometimes in —Lady Bird Lake.

naturally incredulous. “There were some people who had a hard time believing I caught it myself and some people on Facebook said maybe I'd doctored the picture," he says matter-of-factly. "It doesn't bother me. I think they realized later that wasn't true. Most people are really nice. I've met so many awesome people down here fishing." Records and double-digit catches notwithstanding, Langmore relishes the camaraderie in fishing and the chance to share his passion with anyone interested in learning. "One time my dad and I took some family friends fishing and I helped the boy, who was about eight, catch his first fish,” Langmore tells me. “Seeing someone do that is so fun. You just get really excited when they get all excited. That's a really good feeling inside." Standing around holding a fishing pole is the opposite of boring, says Langmore. "It's actually totally addicting," he maintains. "I guess fishing for me and my friends is like what video games are for some people. But this is outside, on the water, and it's so much better."

An easy kinship exists among those whose love of the outdoors borders on an obsession. Such is the case for Austin-based independent filmmaker Bradley Beesley and fisherkid Grant Langmore. Though separated in age by 30 years, the two quickly forged a bond over their common passion when Beesley was commissioned by outdoor lifestyle brand YETI to direct and shoot a short documentary about Langmore. “Grant is a skilled fisherman, especially for his age, and he and his fishing club buddies can geek out for hours on the most minute details,” Beesley says. “But, there’s much more to Grant than that. He loves just being out there, on the water. I love that we both share this over-romanticized ideal about being in nature, on a river.” In certain circles, Beesley, a self-described “river rat,” is something of a fishing legend himself. His 2001 documentary about fishermen who eschew rod and reel for their bare hands, “Okie Noodling,” (yes, he’s that guy) has been in continual rotation on PBS nationwide since its first appearance over 15 years ago. Subsequent projects depicting offbeat Americana have won Beesley acclaim at SXSW and Sundance, on HBO, A&E, the Discovery Channel and the History Channel. Turning 60 hours of footage into a compelling seven minutes about Langmore was no small task, but Beesley says he enjoyed every minute of it. “The Catch” screens this summer.

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Humansnboeflt: the Gree

A FIELED GUID

BY BRITTANI SONNENBERG ILLUSTRATIONS BY HEATHER SUNDQUIST

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Houston architect Carlos Jimenez designed this ranch house with big windows that frame the grand landscape.

Most Austinites know all about the Greenbelt’s rich wildlife offerings. You’ve got your Western ribbon snake, your golden-cheeked warbler, your Eastern tailed-blue butterfly, your jumping spider, your shy Barton Creek salamander. But until now, no naturalist has taxonomized the wide array of humans found along the trail. This handy guide, compiled from months of copious research (see “Spotted Slacker,” below) now offers the definitive taxonomy of Greenbelt Types, using helpful identifiers such as markings and mating calls to make spotting easy and fun for the whole family. While you’re at it, ask your partner what “type” they think you are! Or maybe wait until couple’s therapy to inquire! THE SPOTTED SLACKER Easily recognizable by their sloppy attire, sporting old jeans and threadbare T-shirts with numerous coffee and grease stains (hence the “spotted” moniker), this species once thrived throughout Austin (see Richard Linklater’s 1991 film Slacker), but have recently sought a new habitat in the Greenbelt. Coworking spaces, 9-5 cubicles, and “nail bars” have driven slackers of all stripes outdoors, blinking confusedly, probably hungover, in the bright sunlight. Astute naturalists, with some practice, will be able to identify sub-species of spotted slackers, detailed below.

THE TOPPLING SLACKER Here’s a fun pneumonic: On a slack line, it’s a slacker. Like the yellow garden spider, toppling slackers love balancing on thin threads hung between trees (slacklines), but unlike spiders, they fall off a lot. Toppling Slackers tend to travel in herds, making them easy to spot, and they enjoy a symbiotic relationship with

other slacker sub-species, such as the drum-circle slacker, the hula-hoop slacker, and the slow-moving Marley Slacker. Toppling Slackers are also adept at “playing dead,” but don’t be alarmed, they’re usually just asleep or stoned out of their minds, thanks to the Marley Slacker’s excellent product.

THE “HEY, I’M NOT A SLACKER, I’M AN ARTIST” SLACKER Like all Spotted Slackers, this sub-species first emerges in the Greenbelt mid-afternoon, and distinguishes themselves from other slackers by carrying notebooks, guitars, or crayons. They’re not “hiking,” or “hanging out,” they’re “working on a screenplay,” “finding inspiration,” or “getting in touch with their inner child.” Note: Many first-time Greenbelt Type naturalists will mistake a herd of well-dressed humans on slacklines for Spotted Slackers, when they are in fact Google or Indeed employees on a team-building exercise. The giveaways here are the nametags and the guy with a megaphone.

THE BOOMING HUMPBACK According to some evolutionary biologists, the Booming Humpback should have died out in the late eighties, with the rising popularity of the Walkman, when humans no longer needed to walk around with a boombox (see Spike Lee’s “Do the Right Thing”) to savor tunes. But much like the tailbone, the Booming Humpback mysteriously persists long past its function, blaring Top 40 Schlock along the trail, sometimes with a full speaker set. Largely viewed as pests, with a grating call that rivals the Grackle for auditory torture, biologists have speculated that the Humpback’s horrible music may serve as an (ineffective) mating call. Another school of biologists argue that Booming Humpbacks are simply out-of-work DJs, trying to cheer themselves up. Adele vs. Rihanna fights will occasionally break out among Booming Humpbacks competing for space at a waterfall, to the great distress of Aggrieved Treehuggers. tribeza.com

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Largely viewed as pests, with a grating call that rivals the Grackle for auditory torture, biologists have speculated that the Humpback’s horrible music may serve as an (ineffective) mating call. THE LINKED BOBO u The Linked Bobo is so named because the species, while not monogamous, is largely found in pairs, often “linking” hands or other body parts (the bobos often engage in dangerous mating rituals in the Greenbelt’s undergrowth, risking poison ivy outbreaks, and you can often identify an unlucky bobo by its itching and swearing). “Bobo” is derived from bobonae, the Latin word for “really annoying.” Even the toughest scientists studying the Linked Bobo often report fighting feelings of extreme nausea when observing the dumb, lovesick expressions on bobos’ faces as they skip down the trail, feed each other Clif bars, and pose for wedding pictures. Occasionally, a Linked Bobo will try to mate with another Greenbelt species, such as a Spotted Slacker, which is a tragic occurrence. The Linked Bobo will think it is a “date,” while the slacker assumes they’re just “hanging out.”

THE NEON HELMETHEAD AND THE KAMIKAZE TRAILRUNNER The Neon Helmethead and the Kamikaze Trailrunner are two of the most aggressive species to be found on the Greenbelt, alongside the Aggrieved Treehugger (see opposite). Luckily, much like poisonous snakes, the garish coloring and too-tight fit of the “gear” that adorn these largely male species make them easy to recognize. Sadly, unlike snakes, Helmetheads and Trailrunners are not more scared of you than you are of them. Their sharp cries of “ONYOURLEFT” may give you a chance to jump out of the way, but every year, countless other wildlife fall prey to their wheels and thudding heels. Since they do not eat their victims, scientists have speculated that the killing may be accidental, though why the species are in such a hurry remains unsolved. One paper, published in Science last year, advanced the controversial theory that these speedy hunters are, in fact, the hunted, and that they are merely trying to escape a sinister, invisible pursuer: middle age.

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THE BANDED EX-ROCKER q Much as the Spotted Slackers have lost their habitat, the Banded Ex-Rocker has been forced to migrate away from downtown since the nineties, and they now nest in the northwest suburbs, have tech jobs, and lots of cars. Their limbs are decorated with colorful tattoos and their torsos are generally covered in a black band t-shirt. While their offspring are largely unmarked, the little boys tend to have long, Iggy Pop hair, while the girls excel at riot grrrrl tantrums. Their parents, once known for chucking beer bottles, screaming “death to capitalism” and puking on each other in the nineties, are now one of the more peaceful Greenbelt types, who have traded in their Doc Martens for expensive hiking boots.


THE SCREECHING TALK SHOW HOST q The Screeching Talk Show Host’s habitat is not limited to the Greenbelt; the brightly colored species can be spotted throughout Austin, as they also roost in coffee shops, yoga studios, living room couches, and Neiman Marcus dressing rooms. You can attract Screechers to your own backyard by leaving out trays of cheese and crackers and large glasses of wine, although some wildlife lovers have complained that, like sparrows at birdfeeders, Screechers will drive away the rest of the animals. You can recognize a Screecher by its signature calls: “He just doesn’t communicate,” “So according to Brené Brown,” and “So then I texted—” Some naturalists have hypothesized that Screechers are, in fact, the female counterparts of Helmetheads and Trailrunners, which would explain why the males are prone to sweaty flight, and why the females describe the males as “cowardly” and “unavailable.”

THE AGGRIEVED TREEHUGGER p While Aggrieved Treehuggers look like mild-mannered librarians in REI attire, make no mistake: they will mess you up for mistreating the environment. Their list of felonies includes, but is not limited to: talking too loud (see Screeching Talk Show Host), playing music (see Booming Humpback), leaving trash around (see Spotted Slacker), and wearing disrespectful outfits (see Linked Bobo and Banded Ex-Rocker). Aggrieved Treehuggers have long fascinated naturalists as one of nature’s greatest contradictions: a species that purports to love nature, but does not seem to realize that fellow humans technically fall under this category. The park service has received numerous complaints from trees over the years about assaults and unwanted advances from Treehuggers, from “hugging” and even “kissing” to scrawled messages like “Environmental Justice 4-ever” in chalk on their tree trunks.

ENDANGERED AND MIGRATORY SPECIES A quick word will suffice on rarer finds, such as the Hatted Texan, now at risk of extinction in the Austin area, with their distinctive greeting calls of “Howdy,” or even “Hidy,” to fellow wildlife. Then there are the migratory species that pass through the Greenbelt, peaking in early March, though some specimens, such as the Wide-Eyed Swedish Indie Star, have been spotted in the Greenbelt well into September, sunburned, sporting platinum SXSW badges, and still looking for that club on Red River Street. tribeza.com

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2017

Featuring over 50 restaurants, food purveyors, and signature beverages, Taste of Mexico makes for an impeccable pairing of spirited vibes and dazzling edible creations.

MAY 3rd, 2017 6:00–9:00 pm BRAZOS HALL 204 E. 4 Street, Austin, TX 78701 th

TICKETS $45 Presale http://bit.ly/tastemexico for more information call (512) 200-7278

AUSTIN CURATED

The Official Mexican & Mexican American Fine Arts Museum of Texas


LIFE + STYLE HOW WE LIVE RIGHT NOW

YETI’s new flagship store boasts an outdoor bar, a live music stage, and a bear. PHOTOGRAPH BY HAYDEN SPEARS

ST YLE PROFILE

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

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IN CONVERSATION WITH:

Alex Martinez of the Martinez Brothers Taxidermy Shop By Anna Andersen Photographs by Hayden Spears

T

HE MARTINEZ BROTHERS TAXIDERMY SHOP IS SOMETHING

of an institution in Austin. For more than 50 years, it has occupied the corner of Oltof and South Lamar. Its hand-painted sign, adorned with the outline of a jaguar, looks the same as it did when Alex Martinez started the business in 1962. His son, Alex Martinez II, who took over day-to-day operations more than a decade ago, greets me at the door and introduces me to his son, Alex Martinez III, a gregarious grade-schooler who says he plans to follow in the footsteps of his father and grandfather. After Alex III gets me acquainted with the various animal mounts around the shop, Alex II sends his son into the back room to watch TV and we sit down to talk about life as a taxidermist, making mounts for hunters and, it turns out, for pet owners, too. Growing up, did you always want to be a taxidermist? No, I would say that I was 15 when I decided that I was going to become a taxidermist, that I was going to take the reins and continue the Martinez Brothers legacy. I grew up spending time in my father’s shop just like my son Alex hangs out here with me. I probably started working in the store when I was in grade school. I’d sweep the floors and shadow my dad, Alex senior. Then, when I was 15 or 16, I became my father’s apprentice. I started with the reptiles—the snakes, the lizards, anything with scales. Then I did the fish, which are larger, and from the fish, I moved on to the mammals, and from the mammals, I moved on to the birds. tribeza.com

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STYLE PROFILE | LIFE + STYLE

“SHE H A D T WO C ATS—T HESE SPECI A L , R A R E BR EEDS—A N D SHE WA N T ED TO M A K E H A N D WA R MER S .”

It’s been about 12 years now since I took over the day-to-day operation after my father started to become ill from Agent Orange contamination in the Vietnam War.

days. It’s taxidermy—they’re just putting an artistic spin on it. More people are interested in taxidermy, which is good. I think any taxidermy is good.

Austin has changed a lot since your father opened the store in 1962. Has taxidermy grown more popular or less popular over the years? Taxidermy has generally grown more popular. In the last six years, you see more taxidermy in Hollywood films—not necessarily the traditional head mounts, but the antlers or the skulls painted in some way. It’s cool to have taxidermy. We’re seeing more of this taxidermy art these

How many pieces do you do in a year? Hundreds—I couldn’t tell you exactly how many, but it’s hundreds. We basically get all our work in the fall, and it keeps us occupied until the following fall, with the spring and summer being production months. My family comes in to help and I hire seasonal staff, but at the end of the day it’s a one-man show. I’m the man in the front, I’m the man in the back, I’m the man building the pieces, and I’m the man finishing the pieces. That’s a lot of work. How long does it take to do the different pieces? The antler mounts and the elk skulls can take three to six weeks. I do those first. Then I work on the head mounts, and they can take months. I tell people that anybody can do taxidermy because it’s been turned into a kit, but it takes a true taxidermist to get that animal to look realistic again—to get the ears, the eyes, and the nose to look natural. Anybody can skin an animal, send it off to a fur dresser, and then get the piece back and say, “Okay, I’m going to put the animal back together.” If they have enough will power, they’ll get the animal over a manikin, suture it up, and it’ll be there [laughs]. Well, it’ll be there, but it might not look good. Oh yeah, I’ve seen some great photos of taxidermy gone wrong. So how do you get it right? You can study the live specimens and look at photos of them. There are natural poses that a deer holds its ears in. Rotating its ears, it can go from a relaxed pose to an I-think-I-heard-something pose to a what’s-over-there pose. You can open the eyelids a bit wider to make a I’m-nervous pose. [Opens his eyes wide and laughs]. It’s the ears, the eyes, and the nose—that’s what makes the mount. How do you decide on the pose? A lot of it comes down to how the taxidermist

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ing more common. It’s mostly the smaller kinds, like those Teacup Chihuahuas, but we’ve also done a full-grown German Shepherd. I had a house cat picked up last week. This woman just wanted the skull. Skulls are becoming more popular. I had someone else from way up north, somewhere near Maine, call me and ask to have her cats tanned. She had two cats—these special, rare breeds—and she wanted to make hand warmers.

Seriously, this guy will taxidermy anything.

feels at the time [laughs]. Also, it’s whatever the client is trying to achieve with the mount. When we work with the local film industry, for example, we get very specific requests. Which films have you made pieces for? My father made props for “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre” in late seventies. Basically, the production team came in and said, “Is there any way that we can just have the tools and everything off this desk and the walls to put it in Leatherface’s workroom?” [Laughs]. Then there was “Hope Floats” in the nineties. The grandmother—the woman who plays Sandra Bullock’s mom—she uses a purse that we made from an armadillo. And more recently, Robert Rodriguez has used us for several films—”Grindhouse,” for example.

decade. People want to have their dog immortalized, as a lot of people say. They don’t want to have it cremated, they don’t want to bury it, they want to go ahead and have it there with them, just like that black bear right there [points to the bear next to us]. Also, there is no Long-Haired Chihuahua manikin on the market, so it’s a custom job. We use the carcass to produce a mold, and from the mold, we order a manikin. I don’t freeze dry; I make traditional mounts. It’s old school. I skin the animals, I cure the skin, and then I send it to a fur dresser who turns that rawhide into a softer, more malleable leather. After that I rehydrate it so that I can put it on a manikin.

What are the most difficult pieces to make? For me, the most difficult pieces are the domesticated dogs. The difficulty comes from the mindset that you have to put yourself in, or that I personally put myself in because I’m a dog person.

Does that separate you from other taxidermists? I think that separates me from the rest. We’ve also made our own manikins until this year. Well, I still make them, but they cost double. Otherwise we order them from a company called McKenzie, which supplies taxidermists nationwide with all their needs.

Are a lot of people bringing in their pet dogs? I have four domesticated dogs in the shop right now. So, we get commissioned to do dogs—and cats—quite often. But it’s mostly dogs in the last

After being in this business for so many years, you must have some stories. What’s the most unusual request you’ve received? I’d say domesticated animals, but they’re becom-

She wanted to make hand warmers out of her cats? She said their fur was just so soft. You could hear that this was an old lady on the phone—somebody’s grandmother. She had had the cats for more than 10 years before they passed. She loved the cats, and she wanted the skins. I told her how to ship them to me, and I did what I had to do, and sent them back. The poor woman had been going state to state, calling people in the directories. She was so happy that I would do it. She said, “You don’t know how many people I’ve talked to. They’ve hung up on me, they’ve cursed at me, and you’re just so welcoming and nice.” And I said, “Sure, we do everything.” What do you like most about the job? Meeting people. Everybody has a story. They want to sit down and talk about the hunt that they went on. I do a lot of pieces for youth. People take their daughters or their son hunting, and they’ll come back with that first deer and want it taxidermied. But it’s not always the cut-and-dry deer. I showed you the fish, the snake, the coyote, the mountain lion, the steer named Buck. The neatest piece I have in the studio right now is actually a bald eagle. It’s the whole thing. A Native American put the paperwork in, and they’re pretty much the only ones who can do that. It came in this huge box—frozen. We’re going to do a standing mount with its wings up a bit, looking proud. Now how many taxidermists do you think can say they’re working on a bald eagle? tribeza.com

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STYLE PICK | LIFE + STYLE

YETI Moves In WITH ITS FIRST AND ONLY STORE, AUSTIN’S PREMIUM COOLER COMPANY DELIVERS A LOT MORE THAN ICE THAT L ASTS FOR DAYS. by Anne Bruno Photographs by Hayden Spears

I

F AUSTIN’S COOL FACTOR WERE KEPT IN A

cooler, it’d be a YETI. As it happens, our city’s unmistakable vibe is nowhere near melting and can hardly be contained, even inside an incredibly sturdy, bear-proof, explosion-proof, hyper-insulated box. On the contrary, the culture and way of life that keeps Austin living large (and in-charge, as a favored destination for visitors as well as those looking for a new home base) continue to spread across the country and even the globe. The recent opening of YETI’s flagship store—a retail space and three-dimensional celebration of the no-holds-barred-live-life-to-the-fullest attitude embraced by the YETI Nation, as its uber-loyal customers are known—is set to up Austin’s game even further. With an outdoor bar, a stage for live music, a screening area showing films depicting what adventurous outside living looks like around the world, as well as a full cal-

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endar of events, the place is far more of an experience than it is a store. So far, it’s drawing throngs of visitors (locals and tourists alike) to its South Congress and Barton Springs Road corner location like Parrotheads to a Jimmy Buffet concert. Talk to fishermen, hunters, campers, tailgaters and pretty much anyone who likes their socializing and sporting to take place in the great outdoors and you’ll see how this hometown sweetheart of a brand is well on its way to Austin-icon status. With actual treasures on-site from living legends such as barbeque pit-master Aaron Franklin and neon sign artist Evan Voyles, the YETI Flagship pays homage to its Texan roots while selling its goods—ranging from $4.99 decals to a $1,300 cooler—in an authentic way you have to see to believe. Even if you only need your ice to last until you get home again, it’s worth the stop. YETI.COM/FLAGSHIP 220 SOUTH CONGRESS AVE. (512) 640-7249

T HE N EW Y ET I FL AGSHIP IS DR AW ING T HRONGS OF V ISITOR S LIK E PA R ROT HE A DS TO A J IM M Y BU FFET CONCERT.


H A P P Y B I R T H DAY T E X A S P H OTO G R A P H B Y T I M FA D I N G

In addition to Tundra coolers, you’ll find bears and beer.

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“ you

can

have anything you want in life if you

dress for it.� ~E D IT H H E A D


FOOD + THOUGHT A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE ON OUR LOCAL DINING SCENE

In addition to fantastically fresh seafood, Clark’s serves up a mean hamburger. PHOTOGRAPH BY KNOXY KNOX

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K AREN'S PICK | FOOD + THOUGHT

Clark’s Oyster Bar THIS CL ARKSVILLE GEM LURES DINERS WITH ITS STELL AR SE AFOOD AND NAUTICAL CHIC. By Karen O. Spezia Photographs by Knoxy Knox

A sampling of Clark’s decadent indulgences.

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IF YOU ’ V E E V ER V ISIT ED NA N T UCK ET, OR T HE H A MP TONS , OR T HE COA ST OF M A IN E , CL A R K ’S IS K IN D OF LIK E T H AT.

S

OME REVIEWS ARE EASIER TO WRITE

than others. This one’s easy. Because Clark’s Oyster Bar is so easy to love. In a nutshell, it’s always good and it always makes me happy. But if you’ve never been to Clark’s, I’ll elaborate. If you’ve ever visited Nantucket, or the Hamptons, or the coast of Maine, Clark’s is kind of like that. Except it’s just down the street on West Sixth. It’s got that same well-honed, well-heeled casual air of privilege. An understated nautical vibe fills the snug cottage, which has preppy stripped awnings; a chic shotgun dining room with seafoam banquettes; a clubby marble and polished wood bar that lines the petite kitchen

and raw bar; and a breezy, tree-shaded deck that overlooks a parking lot—not the Atlantic Ocean—but you’ll soon forget that as you ease into your lovely meal. Although you can grab a quick bite at the bar, Clark’s really shines when you linger. Settle in with one of its on-point cocktails, such as a minty mojito or classic martini, while you ponder the menu. Your skillful server will bring you a complimentary plate of homemade sourdough, top-quality butter, flaky sea salt, and crisp radishes, transporting you to the coast of France. Now sip, nibble, and relax. When you’re ready, sample an assortment of Clark’s fantastically fresh East and West Coast

oysters. And order up a glass of crisp Muscadet wine or a flute of champagne, two natural partners of the oyster. With your appetite piqued, move on to one of Clark’s tasty starters, such as the outstanding red snapper ceviche or the traditional steak tartare (it ain’t all seafood here). Of course, there are also lovely salads and New England clam chowder. Hungry for an entrée? Mussels and clams steamed in an aromatic white wine broth is an overf lowing bowl of goodness. Be sure to get extra sourdough for sopping. There’s exotic Cioppino stew and a sophisticated riff on Shrimp Toast, plus the obligatory yet outstanding lobster rolls and crab cakes. I’m frequently lured by the daily catch, seasonal offerings such as the grouper, scallops, mahi, or branzino, which are simply prepared to allow the sweet flavors of the fresh fish to shine through. In the mood for meat? Clark’s juicy, pan-roasted Black Angus hamburger is one of the best in town, perfectly proportioned and served with shoestring fries or tangy cole slaw. To end your blissful meal, there’s key lime tart, vanilla bean cheesecake, and chocolate pot de crème, to name a few. Clark’s quality and success comes as no surprise; it’s owned and operated by chefs Larry McGuire and Tom Moorman, who also helm top Austin restaurants such as Perla’s, Jeffrey’s, Elizabeth Street Café, and Lamberts. After opening its doors five years ago, Clark’s was an instant hit with its Clarksville neighbors and other Austin locals, who quickly recognized a gem. It’s the kind of place where you always leave feeling better than when you arrived. And unfortunately, you do eventually have to leave. But didn’t you have a lovely time? CLARK’S OYSTER BAR 1200 W. 6TH STREET (512) 297.2525 | CLARKSOYSTERBAR.COM

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D I N N E R C O N V E R S AT I O N | F O O D + T H O U G H T

What’s For Dinner? THIS DINNER THE ATER HAS BEEN STAGED FOR SEVER AL YE ARS RUNNING AND RECENTLY ADDED A NEW CAST MEMBER. By Oscar Cásares Photographs by Casey Chapman Ross

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Scene opens with Dad (played by Oscar) in the kitchen preparing dinner. Mama (Becky) and the kids (Adrian, 9, and Elena, 7) are in the living room with the family’s new rescue dog, which the vet has identified as a Basenji mix. Adrian: What’s for dinner? Dad: Bacon & eggs. Elena: Breakfast for dinner! Wait, didn’t we have breakfast for dinner when the foster lady brought the dog? Remember how the whole place smelled like bacon? Adrian: That’s probably why she keeps wagging her tail. She thinks she came to live in the bacon house. Elena: I’d be wagging my tail, too, if I had one. Silly dog, did you think this was the doggy bacon house? (Dad brings plates to the dinner table.) Mama: Who needs to wash hands? Adrian: I did it when I got home from school. Elena: No he didn’t, and anyway, I just saw him touching the dog’s tail. Adrian: No I wasn’t, that was Elena. She was trying to dress her up in that ridiculous cheetah vest. You’re lucky the foster lady isn’t here to see you dress up her dog like that. Elena: She’s our dog now and the vest might be her Halloween costume. And no offense, but the word is pronounced ri-dog-u-lous. Mama: Both of you wash your hands. Elena: But I just washed mine. Mama: But then you came in here and petted the dog again. Next time just wave at her. Dad: Waving doesn’t mean anything to a dog. It’s not like she can wave back. (Adrian waves, which brings dog to the table.) Dad: Out! Out! Out! (Dog exits, tail tucked, back to its pillow.) Adrian: I thought you said to wave. Dad: Not when we’re at the table. No dogs at the table. Elena: You say it like there’s more than one dog in the house. Dad: So far yes, there’s only one dog. Mama: Don’t get any ideas. Whose turn is it? Elena: I always do it. Adrian: No you don’t, you never do it. You’re always complaining about not wanting to do it. Elena: Last time I did. Plus I already set the table. Dad: Check the list. (Both kids race to the china cabinet to find the Helping Hands Chart.) Elena: Wait, Daddy said I was the list checker, not you! You always think you’re the one, but it says it here on the last line, right under emptying the clothes hamper. See, “Elena, List Checker.”

Adrian: Mama: Dad: Mama: Elena: Adrian:

Adrian: Mama: Dad: Elena: Dad: Adrian: Dad: Adrian: Dad: Adrian:

Dad: Elena: Dad:

Mama: Dad: Adrian: Dad: Elena: Dad: Elena: Dad: Adrian: Elena: Mama: Dad: Elena:

He picked me to be the official list checker. You’re just jealous because all you get to do is empty out the stinky recycling boxes. That’s so not fair. She gets to check it every day, all week. Was this your idea? I didn’t think they’d fight about it. You made the chart. It says Adrian. Again? How many times a week do I have to do it? (Adrian snags another bite of his bacon, then puts down the strip so he can hold hands with the rest of the family.) Thank you, God, for this food and… for our new dog, Wilma! Amen. Who wants a tortilla? (Enter dog.) Out! Out! Out! And by the way, that’s not her name. What do we call her, then? I was thinking Luna might be a good name. Why Luna? Why not? I like the sound of it. Luna! Here, Luna Petuna! (No reaction from dog.) But she already has a name. Wilma! (Enter dog.) Out! Out! Out! And stop saying it, you’re confusing her. You mean stop saying WILMA! (Family watches as dog circles the table and returns to her pillow.) Yes, that one. Stop it already. But why can’t we just keep her original name? She needs a permanent name, not just her adoption name. Keeping the old one would be like buying a picture frame and not taking out the paper photo that came with it. Should we put her outside until we’re done eating? She needs to learn to not come to the table when we’re eating. Nobody look at her. How can we not look at her? She’s staring right at us, with her tongue hanging out. Only because we’re eating. We’re not just eating, we’re eating bacon. Everybody just ignore her. Pretend it’s last week and we still don’t have a dog. If we give her a real name will you stop saying Out! Out! Out! Every time she gets near the table? Her name’s Luna. Call her Luna. I know, let’s call her Boris! Boris, for a girl dog? Eat your eggs. I guess it’s better than a boy named Sue. Who’s that? tribeza.com

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D I N N E R C O N V E R S AT I O N | F O O D + T H O U G H T

Mama: It’s one of daddy’s dumb jokes. Eat your eggs. Elena: But isn’t it going to confuse her more, to get a new name? Adrian: I know, let’s call her different names until she responds and that’ll be her name. Elena: Yeah, I want to do that! Let’s call her Moo Moo. Adrian: She’s a dog, Elena, not a cow. Elena: I know, I know, let’s call her Little Missy. Dad: Yeah, and if she gets lost I’ll be the one running down the street yelling, “Little Missy! Come, Little Missy.” Adrian: Wilma! (Enter dog.) Dad: Her name’s Luna. Out, Luna, out! Mama: Why don’t we change the subject? Tell us something different that happened at school today?

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Adrian: Dad: Adrian: Elena: Mama:

_____ farted when we were at P.E. What’s new about that, doesn’t _____ always fart at P.E.? Everybody heard it this time. That’s different. Maybe we should talk about more dog names. THE END.

Oscar Cásares is a novelist and associate professor at UT Austin; Becky is an Assistant Attorney General in the Opinions Division for the State of Texas; Adrian is a gamer extraordinaire; Elena is perfecting her headstand; and Luna is adjusting to her new name.


WWG

Wally W orkm a n G allery

Anne Siem s

What do bronzed chicken feet have to do with Gone With The Wind ? View this story—and many more—at the Harry Ransom Center. THROUGH JULY 16 21st and Guadalupe Streets www.hrc.utexas.edu FREE ADMISSION

SOMETHING FOR

EVERYONE

Shop our cutting-edge apparel, unique accessories and gifts, as well as, our fabulous jewels!

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BANGER’S SAUSAGE HOUSE & BEER GARDEN 79 Rainey St. | (512) 386 1656 Banger’s brings the German biergarten tradition to Rainey Street with an array of artisan sausages and more than 100 beers on tap. To get the full Banger’s experience, go for their weekend brunch and indulge in the Banger’s Benny, the beer garden’s take on eggs Benedict.

BARLEY SWINE 6555 Burnet Road ,Suite 400 | (512) 394 8150 James Beard Award-nominated chef Bryce Gilmore encourages sharing with small plates made from locally-sourced ingredients, served at communal tables. Try the parsley croissants with bone marrow or Gilmore’s unique take on fried chicken.

GUSTO ITALIAN KITCHEN 4800 Burnet Rd. | (512) 458 1100

34TH STREET CATERING

Upscale-casual Italian in the heart of the Rosedale

1005 W. 34th St. | (512) 323 2000 | 34thstreetcafe.com

neighborhood. Fresh pastas, hand-tossed pizzas,

One of the best and most creative full service

incredible desserts (don’t miss the salted caramel

catering companies in Austin. Acclaimed Chef

budino) and locally-sourced, seasonally inspired

Paul Petersen brings his culinary experience

chalkboard specials. Full bar with craft cocktails,

and high standards to catering company

local beers on tap and boutique wines from around

and to your event. Call them to save the date

the world.

and they'll start planning any occasion. BAR CHI SUSHI

24 DINER

206 Colorado St. | (512) 382 5557

600 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 472 5400 Chef Andrew Curren’s casual eatery promises delicious plates 24/7 and a menu featuring nostalgic diner favorites. Order up the classics, including roasted chicken, burgers, all-day breakfast and decadent milkshakes.

ASTI TRATTORIA 408 E. 43rd St. | (512) 451 1218 The chic little Hyde Park trattoria offers essential Italian dishes along with a variety of wines to pair them with. Finish off your meal with the honey and goat cheese panna cotta.

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A great place to stop before or after a night on the town, this

FONDA SAN MIGUEL

2330 W. North Loop Blvd. | (512) 459 4121 | fondasanmiguel.com

Good looks and good taste? Count on it, when you order this stunning Piña Colada at Austin’s nationally-lauded Fonda San Miguel. Served in a gorgeous copper pineapple with two straws, it’s the perfect way to start an evening that will dazzle all of your senses- from the spectacular decor and artwork to exquisitely prepared interior Meican cuisine.

sushi and bar hotspot stays open until 2 a.m. on the weekends. Bar Chi’s happy hour menu features $2 sake bombs and a variety of sushi rolls under $10.

BRIBERY BAKERY 2013 Wells Branch Pkwy. #109 | (512) 531 9832 1900 Simond Ave. #300 | (512) 297 2720 Pastry Chef Jodi Elliott puts a fun spin on classic confections. The Mueller location is a Candy Land-esque space where diners can sip on cocktails, beer, wine and coffee.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

CENTRAL STANDARD

CHEZ NOUS

1603 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 942 0823

510 Neches St. | (512) 473 2413

Between their full dinner menu, impressive raw bar and craft

Now an iconic Austin staple, Chez Nous creates authentic

cocktail offerings, Central Standard at the South Congress

French cuisine just a few yards away from bustling 6th

Hotel is the perfect place to spend a night on the town.

Street. Genuine, simple and delectable, it is hard not to leave

CHINATOWN

this bistro feeling completely satisfied.

3407 Greystone Dr. (512) 343 9307

CLARK’S OYSTER BAR

107 W. 5th St. | (512) 343 9307

1200 W. 6th St. | (512) 297 2525

Some of the best traditional Chinese food in town. Fast

Small and always buzzing, Clark’s extensive caviar and oyster

service in the dining room and delivery is available.

menu, sharp aesthetics and excellent service make it a re-

This restaurant boasts an extensive and diverse dim sum

freshing indulgence on West Sixth Street. Chef Larry McGuire

menu for customers to munch on!

brings East Coast-inspired vibes to this seafood restaurant.

CONTIGO 2027 Anchor Ln. | (512) 614 2260

LAS PALOMAS

Chef Andrew Wiseheart serves ranch-to-table cuisine and an elegant take on bar fare at this east side gem. Take your

3201 Bee Caves Rd. #122 | (512) 327 9889 | laspalomasrestaurant.com

pick from the exquisite and bold cocktail menu and grab a

One of the hidden jewels in Westlake, this unique

spot on the expansive outdoor patio.

restaurant and bar offers authentic interior

COUNTER 3. FIVE. VII

Mexican cuisine in a sophisticated yet relaxed

315 Congress Ave, Ste. 100 | (512) 291 3327

setting. Enjoy family recipes made with fresh

Belly up to the counter at this 25-seat space for an intimate

ingredients. Don’t miss the margaritas! BULLFIGHT 4807 Airport Blvd. | (512) 474 2029 Chef Shawn Cirkiel transports diners to the south of Spain

dining experience that’s modern yet approachable.

MANUEL'S

310 Congress Ave. | (512) 472 7555 10201 Jollyville Road | (512) 345 1042

This unique eatery gives three, five and seven-course tasting menus in an immersive setting.

COUNTER CULTURE 2337 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 524 1540

for classic tapas, including croquettes and jamon serrano.

A local Austin favorite with a reputation for

An East Austin haven for vegans and vegetarians, Counter

The white-brick patio invites you to sip on some sangria and

high-quality regional Mexican food, fresh pressed

Culture provides internationally inspired vegan options with

enjoy the bites.

cocktails, margaritas and tequilas. Try the Chile

organic and local food. Daily specials are shared through

CANTINE

Relleno del Mar with Texas Gulf Shrimp, day boat

their constantly updated Twitter feed.

1100 S. Lamar Blvd. Suite 2115 | (512) 628 0348

scallops, and Jumbo Blue lump crab, or Manuel’s

DRINK.WELL.

Owned by restaurant veterans Lisa and Emmett Fox,

famous mole. Located downtown at the corner

207 E. 53rd St. | (512) 614 6683

Cantine produces new twists on Italian and Mediterranean

of 3rd and Congress Avenue and in the Arboretum

Located in the North Loop district, Michael and Jessica

classics. Along with the slew of culinary temptations,

on Jollyville Road. One of the best happy hour

Sanders bring craft cocktails and American pub fare to

the restaurant also has an impressive selection of imported

deals in town.

drink.well. with a seasonally changing menu. Snacks to try

liquor and a skilled bar staff.

include fried chickpeas and house-made Twinkies. tribeza.com

| APRIL 2017

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EAST SIDE KING

GERALDINE’S

L’ESTELLE HOUSE

1816 E. 6th St. | (512) 407 8166

605 Davis St. | (512) 476 4755

88 1/2 Rainey St. | (512) 571 4588

2310 S. Lamar, Suite 101 | (512) 383 8382

Located inside Rainey Street’s Hotel Van Zandt, Geraldine’s

This cute walk-up kitchen and patio fuses traditional

Winner of the James Beard Award and Top Chef, Paul Qui

creates a unique, fun experience by combining creative

French and Southern cuisine. Think late night Parisian-style

offers out-of-this-world pan-Asian food from across town

cocktails, shareable plates and scenic views of Lady Bird

burgers with frites or rosemary biscuits and gravy for

trailers with fellow chefs Moto Utsunomiya and Ek Timrek.

Lake. Enjoy live bands every night of the week as you enjoy

Sunday brunch.

Try their legendary fried brussels sprouts!

Executive Chef Stephen Bonin’s dishes and cocktails from bar manager Jen Keyser.

L’OCA D’ORO

EASY TIGER 709 E. 6th St. | (512) 614 4972

HILLSIDE FARMACY

Located in the Mueller development, Chef Fiore Tedesco

From the ELM Restaurant Group, Easy Tiger lures in both

1209 E. 11th St. | (512) 628 0168

delivers contemporary Italian cuisine with a strong nod to

drink and food enthusiasts with a delicious bakeshop up-

Hillside Farmacy is located in a beautifully restored

the classics. Alongside delicious plates, guests will enjoy

stairs and a casual beer garden downstairs. Sip on some local

1950s-style pharmacy with a lovely porch on the east side.

impressive cocktails, wine and a great craft beer selection.

brew and grab a hot, fresh pretzel. Complete your snack with

Oysters, cheese plates and nightly dinner specials are

beer cheese and an array of dipping sauces.

whipped up by chef Sonya Cote.

NAU’S ENFIELD DRUG

ELIZABETH STREET CAFÉ

HOME SLICE PIZZA

An Austin institution since 1951, this all-American soda

1501 S. 1st St. | (512) 291 2881

1415 S. Congress Ave. | (512) 444 7437

fountain within an antiquated drug store gives guests an

Chef Larry McGuire creates a charming French-Vietnamese

For pizza cravings south of the river, head to Home Slice

unmatched experience founded on tradition. The food is

eatery with a colorful menu of pho, banh mis and sweet

Pizza. Open until 3 a.m. on weekends for your post bar-hop-

simple and classic, rivaled only by the scrumptious shakes

treats. Both the indoor seating and outdoor patio bring comfort

ping convenience and stocked with classics like the

and hand mixed old-fashioned sodas.

and vibrancy to this South Austin neighborhood favorite.

Margherita as well as innovative pies like the White Clam,

Don’t forget to end your meal with the housemade macarons.

topped with chopped clams and Pecorino Romano.

OLAMAIE

FOREIGN & DOMESTIC

ITALIC

Food+Wine Magazine’s best new chef Michael Fojtasek

306 E. 53rd St. | (512) 459 101

123 W. 6th St. | (512) 660 5390

creates a menu that will leave any Southerner drooling with

Small, neighborhood restaurant in the North Loop area

Chef Andrew Curren of 24 Diner and Easy Tiger presents

delight over the restaurant’s contemporary culinary concepts.

serving unique dishes. Chef Ned Elliott serves thoughtful,

simple, rustic Italian plates. Don’t miss the sweet delicacies

The dessert menu offers a classic apple pie or a more trendy

locally-sourced food with an international twist at reason-

from Pastry Chef Mary Katherine Curren.

goat cheese caramel ice cream. Also, do yourself a favor and

able prices. Go early on Tuesdays for dollar oysters.

JEFFREY’S

FREEDMEN’S

1204 W. Lynn St. | (512) 477 5584

2402 San Gabriel St. | (512) 220 0953

Named one of Bon Appétit’s “10 Best New Restaurants in

7858 Shoal Creek Blvd. | (512) 457 5757

Housed in a historic Austin landmark, smoke imbues the

America,” this historic Clarksville favorite has maintained

Along with its unique street art interiors, Rebel Pizza Bar

f lavors of everything at Freedmen’s — from the barbecue, to

the execution, top-notch service and luxurious but welcoming

delivers updated takes on bar classics including hot wings

the desserts and even their cocktail offerings. Pitmaster

atmosphere that makes Jeffrey’s an old Austin staple.

and waff le fries. But the pizza is the real star of this cozy

and chef Evan LeRoy plates some of the city’s best barbecue

LA BARBECUE

on a charming outdoor patio.

1906 E. Cesar Chavez St. | (512) 605 9696 Though it may not be as famous as that other Austin barbecue joint, La Barbecue is arguably just as delicious. This trailer, which is owned by the legendary Mueller family, whips up classic barbecue with free beer and live music.

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1900 Simond Ave. | (737) 212 1876

1115 West Lynn St. | (512) 476 1221

1610 San Antonio St. | (512) 474 2796

order the biscuits (they’re worth every delectable bite).

REBEL PIZZA BAR

restaurant, like the Get Up Stand Up pie that packs a powerhouse of flavors that will leave you jostling for the last slice.


V I S I T T R I B E Z A .CO M TO VIEW THE ENTIRE ONLINE DINING GUIDE

SNOOZE

UCHIKO

WINEBELLY

3800 N. Lamar Blvd. | (512) 428 8444

4200 N. Lamar Blvd. Ste. 140 | (512) 916 4808

6705 Hwy 290 # 503 | (512) 584 808

This Denver originator serves up brunch classics with a

The sensational sister creation of Uchi, and former home

3016 Guadalupe St. Suite 100 | (512) 358 6193

creative twist seven days a week, with two locations on

of Top Chef Paul Qui and renowned chefs Page Presley

Named as one of the top 20 wine bars in America by Wine

either end of Lamar. With friendly service in an updated

and Nicholas Yanes. Uchiko is an Austin icon that everyone

Enthusiast, Winebelly boasts an international wine list

diner atmosphere, Snooze is sure to start your day off right.

should visit at least once. Try the bacon tataki!

and Spanish-Mediterranean small plates. The bistro main-

THE PEACHED TORTILLA

VINAIGRETTE

tains a local feel with it’s comfortable, laid back interiors.

5520 Burnet Rd. #100 | (512) 330 4439

2201 College Ave. | (512) 852 8791

WU CHOW

This cheerful spot is sure to clear your weekly blues with

This salad-centric restaurant off South Congress has

500 W. 5th St. #168 | (512) 476 2469

friendly staff, fun food and a playful atmosphere.

one of the prettiest patios in town. Along with an inviting

From the curators of Swift’s Attic, Wu Chow is expanding

Affordably priced, you’ll find culinary inf luences from

ambiance, the salads are fresh, creative, bold and most

Austin’s cuisine offerings with traditional Chinese dishes

around the world with a healthy dose of Asian and

importantly delicious, with nearly two dozen options to

sourced from local purveyors and farmers. Don’t miss their

Southern options.

choose from.

weekend dim sum menu.


A L O O K B E H I N D 7…7

Photographer Randal Ford and swimmer Nancy M. Richey come out of the pool, wrapping up our afternoon shoot at Barton Springs.

Brrr... Photographing four octogenarians in Barton Springs was an experience. There’s something I love about photographing older, and more importantly, wiser people. All of the subjects radiated a sense of optimism and hope that I tried to capture. Most shoots have some sort of challenge and for this one it was the temperature of Barton Springs. The frigid 68-degree spring water feels amazing when it’s 100 degrees out, but on this early spring day, it was chilly and windy outside. And after getting in and out of the water four times, I was chilled to the bone. But despite my shivering, it was still refreshing. The combination of spending time with wise 80+ year olds and dipping in and out of frigid spring water might just have been some sort of a revival for this photographer. —Photographer Randal Ford

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T R I B E Z A .C O M OUTDOORS | APRIL 2017

TRIBEZA April 2017  

The Outdoors Issue No. 188

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